Trails in progress, show us your building skill.

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Trails in progress, show us your building skill.
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Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 15:22 Quote
snoray1 wrote:
Its public! Part of the new 66 Trail system, but this is on the north side of the highway behind the facebook data centers. Access is from Ochoco Viewpoint State Park. This is an intermediate level skills park, and Im about to start construction on an advanced level park in the next few weeks in the same spot.

sounds sick! if you need some hands let me know! just one town over

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 17:12 Quote
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Marble flats, Arkansas. This blue downhill line is going to be awesome. Got to shape the berms and flag the blue line which was fun.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 17:42 Quote
ibishreddin wrote:
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Marble flats, Arkansas. This blue downhill line is going to be awesome. Got to shape the berms and flag the blue line which was fun.
Looks like really well built fun tracks. Nice work.

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 17:43 Quote
snoray1 wrote:
Looking off the start ramp of my new trail in Prineville, Oregon!


That looks so fun!

Posted: Nov 19, 2019 at 18:55 Quote
ibishreddin wrote:
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Marble flats, Arkansas. This blue downhill line is going to be awesome. Got to shape the berms and flag the blue line which was fun.

That's killer stuff. Might be worth a drive to Arkansas this winter.

Posted: Nov 23, 2019 at 6:46 Quote
That first shot is dirt porn. Can’t wait to start building again.

Posted: Nov 25, 2019 at 20:11 Quote
ibishreddin wrote:
Loads of stuff going down in Arkansas USA. will get some pov stuff soon. That's asteal for $30 Holy mole

Just out of curiosity, does anyone here build trail for their job?
I build trail for Parks Canada for a living and then private contracts and illegal stuff on the side

Posted: Nov 27, 2019 at 14:53 Quote
I got my first jump and landing built and it runs pretty smooth, it'll definitely be better once I build a roll in and get rid of the grass in-run (may be wishing the landing was a few feet further out though:
Jump building at home
Jump building at home

One problem I ran into though was the support failed: I mashed the brakes on a practice in-run when my foot slipped off the pedal it ended up ripping the 3" screws out of the 2x4 supports. Am thinking that maybe a pt 4x4 would be better then add some lag bolts to the 2x8 (ramp radius/side board) and perhaps some horizontal bracing? Does anyone have thoughts or experience with this?

A buddy built a calculator on Desmos that was pretty great for figuring out what the jump would look like:
https://www.desmos.com/calculator/mvclxiz6od

also used this bike jump calculator from Trailism (new to me!)
https://trailism.com/trail-science/jump-design/#jumpangle

and this from Omni calculator (awesome calculators by the way)
https://www.omnicalculator.com/physics/inclined-plane

to think about how high to build in-run ramp. Am currently thinking 6'/2m with a 30 degree ramp off of it because it would be easier to carry speed down the shallower slope (vs 45) and onto the ground..

Anyhow - new to this and any constructive feedback would be most appreciated!

Cheers!

Posted: Nov 27, 2019 at 16:10 Quote
Looks like you're doing it all right man. Little details like gravel in the hole below the wood. Your skill and preparation is way beyond mine so i cant help. I just drink beers and do what feels right. Im sure someone here can give you good feedback on the engineering. Keep up that good work

Posted: Nov 27, 2019 at 16:30 Quote
nice work on that wood sender!

Posted: Nov 28, 2019 at 4:09 Quote
Definitely beef the ramp up if it broke once, you don’t want it to break while you hit it at a faster speed.
Deck screws should hold, you can get thicker deck screws also. The common ones are an 8

If you bumped up to #10 or #12 screws they will have a greater shear strength.

You need to attach the legs to the ramp. a 2x4 that will screw to the leg then lay flat on the ground and get screwed as close to the shallow part of the ramp. On both sides
It will then triangulate the legs and the will be way stronger.

Currently nothing is tying the legs in horizontally where they meet the ground and they can easily break. I imagine they have a bit of wobble to them as is

Every thing else looks good on the ramp

As far as the roller angle I cant help I did mine to what looked right... then had to re do it.

You want the bottom curve of the downramp to have large radius, that makes it an easier transition to the ground and makes it more pump able for speed.

Nice work by the way- that is how my setup started way back when I was like 18

Posted: Nov 28, 2019 at 12:56 Quote
Thepureface wrote:
Definitely beef the ramp up if it broke once, you don’t want it to break while you hit it at a faster speed.
Deck screws should hold, you can get thicker deck screws also. The common ones are an 8

If you bumped up to #10 or #12 screws they will have a greater shear strength.

You need to attach the legs to the ramp. a 2x4 that will screw to the leg then lay flat on the ground and get screwed as close to the shallow part of the ramp. On both sides
It will then triangulate the legs and the will be way stronger.

Currently nothing is tying the legs in horizontally where they meet the ground and they can easily break. I imagine they have a bit of wobble to them as is

Every thing else looks good on the ramp

As far as the roller angle I cant help I did mine to what looked right... then had to re do it.

You want the bottom curve of the downramp to have large radius, that makes it an easier transition to the ground and makes it more pump able for speed.

Nice work by the way- that is how my setup started way back when I was like 18

Thanks! To the hardware store once the Black Friday madness passes...

@mrgonzo - once I get some experience I'll get to the drink beers and do what feels right but for now it's all protractors and tape measures

Posted: 14 hours ago Quote
I mostly work with dirt so it's easy to make adjustments after a test ride. I made a ladder drop at my old house and just had a picture in my head what it would look like based on what I like to ride, scribbled out a plan, and had it up and riding in a weekend.

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