Home Made Bikes

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Posted: Nov 22, 2020 at 6:36 Quote
smalltownboycustoms wrote:
Anyone got any examples of homemade aluminium frames? I've done steel and carbon fibre and now fancy trying aluminium. Was wondering if there was a grade of aluminium that wouldn't require heat treatment for a one-off build.

In Europe you can get straight gauge 7020 relatively easily Just stick it in your local powder coasters oven for a while

Posted: Nov 22, 2020 at 7:43 Quote
MTBLegend92 wrote:

7005, its not the easiest to source but can be done without heat treating, just let it age about a month before riding.

I built one a couple years back with tubing from Nova, its not the prettiest frame but its held up so far.

Thanks will have a look into it. Got any pics of your build?

Posted: Nov 22, 2020 at 7:44 Quote
Compositepro wrote:

In Europe you can get straight gauge 7020 relatively easily Just stick it in your local powder coasters oven for a while

Cheers!

Posted: Nov 22, 2020 at 21:02 Quote
If you do end up heat-treating a frame - aluminum or steel - don't forget to cold-set it back into alignment. It will warp.

This is not to scare anyone off of heat treating. As Compositepro suggests, it's probably easier and cheaper to find an appropriate oven than you think. Cold-setting can be done to very high accuracy with just lumber, string and the cheap-but-accurate digital micrometers you can get online for ~$30USD.*

*(I strongly recommend the ones that allow you to switch between Metric, Decimal Inches, and Fractional Inches. It'll save you a lot of time when dealing with anything that some {probably American} dipshit specified in fractional inch measurements. ...likely because he {it was definitely a he} hadn't been informed that math had been invented, and that it was actually pretty handy.)

A proper alignment table is also probably a lot less expensive and easier to build than you'd think. It makes frame alignment a lot easier and faster, but takes up a ton of space. So unless you are aiming to make frames for money, it's probably not worth it.

Posted: Nov 23, 2020 at 5:22 Quote
anoplura wrote:
If you do end up heat-treating a frame - aluminum or steel - don't forget to cold-set it back into alignment. It will warp.

This is not to scare anyone off of heat treating. As Compositepro suggests, it's probably easier and cheaper to find an appropriate oven than you think. Cold-setting can be done to very high accuracy with just lumber, string and the cheap-but-accurate digital micrometers you can get online for ~$30USD.*

*(I strongly recommend the ones that allow you to switch between Metric, Decimal Inches, and Fractional Inches. It'll save you a lot of time when dealing with anything that some {probably American} dipshit specified in fractional inch measurements. ...likely because he {it was definitely a he} hadn't been informed that math had been invented, and that it was actually pretty handy.)

A proper alignment table is also probably a lot less expensive and easier to build than you'd think. It makes frame alignment a lot easier and faster, but takes up a ton of space. So unless you are aiming to make frames for money, it's probably not worth it.

I'm intrigued. How do you check a frame's alignment with lumber, string, and a micrometer?

Posted: Nov 23, 2020 at 18:41 Quote


I have made two aluminum frames, I used DEDACCIAI 7005 Aluminum. I purchased the tubes and associated frame parts from bike fab supply. This is my track bike that I built a few months ago.

Posted: Nov 23, 2020 at 18:43 Quote
Well, that's rather nice.

What were your most important learnings - your "I wish I'd known that when I started" items?

Posted: Nov 23, 2020 at 19:20 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Well, that's rather nice.

What were your most important learnings - your "I wish I'd known that when I started" items?

Thanks, It's amazing to ride.

The most import thing I learned is to clean everything really well, I cant stress cleaning enough. Remove the Oxide layer with some emery cloth or sand paper, both inside and out. I wipe everything down with acetone to remove any oils/ dirt from the tubes and filler rods. I also wished I did a few more practice welds to figure out my setting for 7005. I used 6061 to figure out my weld settings, specifically the cleaning action when welding in AC. I found that 6061 and 7005 weld a bit differently, but that could be just me. I would not call myself of expert welder, lol.

Posted: Nov 23, 2020 at 20:11 Quote
Glad you're enjoying the fruits of your labour and thank you for sharing your learnings!

Posted: Nov 23, 2020 at 23:55 Quote
cholack wrote:


I have made two aluminum frames, I used DEDACCIAI 7005 Aluminum. I purchased the tubes and associated frame parts from bike fab supply. This is my track bike that I built a few months ago.
This is really nice! I was never as nervous on a bike as the on the one evening I spent in the Velodrome of the UCI. Man those tracks are steep!

Posted: Nov 24, 2020 at 6:25 Quote
@cholack, the bike looks great. Congrats!

How did you handle heat treating?

Posted: Nov 24, 2020 at 10:29 Quote
dump wrote:
@cholack, the bike looks great. Congrats!

How did you handle heat treating?

I used a local powdercoater, there is also a local welding shop with a heat treat oven. If I start building more Aluminum frames I might try and build an oven.

Posted: Nov 29, 2020 at 19:21 Quote
cedrico wrote:
anoplura wrote:
If you do end up heat-treating a frame - aluminum or steel - don't forget to cold-set it back into alignment. It will warp.

This is not to scare anyone off of heat treating. As Compositepro suggests, it's probably easier and cheaper to find an appropriate oven than you think. Cold-setting can be done to very high accuracy with just lumber, string and the cheap-but-accurate digital micrometers you can get online for ~$30USD.*

*(I strongly recommend the ones that allow you to switch between Metric, Decimal Inches, and Fractional Inches. It'll save you a lot of time when dealing with anything that some {probably American} dipshit specified in fractional inch measurements. ...likely because he {it was definitely a he} hadn't been informed that math had been invented, and that it was actually pretty handy.)

A proper alignment table is also probably a lot less expensive and easier to build than you'd think. It makes frame alignment a lot easier and faster, but takes up a ton of space. So unless you are aiming to make frames for money, it's probably not worth it.

I'm intrigued. How do you check a frame's alignment with lumber, string, and a micrometer?

I've meant to reply to this a bunch of times, but 1. I'm lazy 2. It's hard to give a (useful) description without images, which I don't have handy. I finally decided to punt and just link to an old blog post by Dave Moulton (Masi, Fuso, etc.) which has most of the relevant info and pictures: http://davesbikeblog.squarespace.com/blog/2007/11/16/straightening-bent-seatstays.html

Basically, you pull the string tight across the head tube and dropouts and measure the distance from taut string to seat tube on each side to check gross alignment. Once that's set, you can repeat with the BB and head tube, seat tube and head tube, etc.

Lumber is used both for leverage when bending, and to provide support to specific areas you want to bend - without creating a sharp fulcrum.

For heat-treated steel or aluminum, I suggest cold-setting the frame into alignment, letting it rest at least 24 hours, and then repeating. It tends to have more memory than you'd expect.

Posted: Nov 30, 2020 at 14:25 Quote
Hi guys,

I was wondering if anyone new whether or not Titanium frames must be heat treated after welding like Aluminum frames? Thanks!

Posted: Dec 1, 2020 at 1:16 Quote
rosemarywheel wrote:
Hi guys,

I was wondering if anyone new whether or not Titanium frames must be heat treated after welding like Aluminum frames? Thanks!

No. Unless you are working with some weird scrap Titanium from 20+ years ago, any Ti tubing you'll find these days is easy to weld (...assuming good anti-oxidation practices) and won't require any heat treating.

This is also true of much (...if not most) of the aluminum tubing you can buy today, as well. Most of what's labelled "7000 series" in the US doesn't require, or benefit from post-weld heat treating.


 
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