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Posted: May 17, 2021 at 18:58 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
Yeah, but if he's remaking it from scratch, I pity him. Even Marzocchi didn't make the original Super Monster from scratch!

Yeah, I have a picture of the cast Marzocchi Moto lowers on my profile somewhere. I want mine to be machined as much as possible, and in my situation it's easier for me that way. I have no idea how to make casts.

Posted: May 17, 2021 at 19:04 Quote
its-chris wrote:
To be honest I would question myself on what it is going to do better than any of the current offerings....

Pretty weird project

With an Avalanche damper, Yes! Heavy AF, but it will be soooo bad@$$! custom paint, too...

https://www.pinkbike.com/news/montster-t-russia-vintage-freeride.html

https://www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=140520

There is a passion for certain things I can't explain^. Back when MTB was just messing around in the woods with your freinds for the joy of riding. I have weird feelings of nostalgia for things I am not old enough to be nostalgic for.

I am pretty sure I was from the 1950's in another life...

Posted: May 17, 2021 at 19:23 Quote
rosemarywheel,

My proposal for you:

1. Buy Formula / Tech trials or pitbike fork legs. There are other vendors, of course, but I don't know much about moto trials, so that's the first one that came to mind and Formula may be more willing to do something custom than Showa, for example.
2. Get much softer springs or alter the internals to use only one spring.
3. Pay Formula or an aftermarket tuner to tune them for half or less the damping force.
4. Make some gratuitously machined custom crowns with excessive and elaborate webbing, pockets, maybe some semi-structural logos, and whatever your freehuckin' heart desires. Maybe anodize it purple.

Alternatively, how would you feel about an off-the-shelf Avalanche fork, maybe with custom crowns, custom finishing for the uppers, and/or custom coatings for the lowers?

Posted: May 18, 2021 at 9:33 Quote
rosemarywheel wrote:
I have weird feelings of nostalgia for things I am not old enough to be nostalgic for.

I feel the same way.

Posted: May 18, 2021 at 11:52 Quote
rosemarywheel Check out this guys instagram. He's pretty much doing what you want to do but with a 1998 Z1 fork.

https://www.instagram.com/marzocchi.z1/

Posted: May 18, 2021 at 20:56 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
rosemarywheel,

My proposal for you:

1. Buy Formula / Tech trials or pitbike fork legs. There are other vendors, of course, but I don't know much about moto trials, so that's the first one that came to mind and Formula may be more willing to do something custom than Showa, for example.
2. Get much softer springs or alter the internals to use only one spring.
3. Pay Formula or an aftermarket tuner to tune them for half or less the damping force.
4. Make some gratuitously machined custom crowns with excessive and elaborate webbing, pockets, maybe some semi-structural logs, and whatever your freehuckin' heart desired. Maybe anodize it purple.

Alternatively, how would you feel about an off-the-shelf Avalanche fork, maybe with custom crowns, custom finishing for the uppers, and/or custom coatings for the lowers?

Fabulous! I didn't know about Formula. Would you guys say one spring is better? Lighter weight, but I like things to be equal...

I wouldn't mind buying stanchions from someone, but I want to make my own chassis. Maybe buying a couple forks just for me to decorate would be cool, but thats isn't very authentic if I just let someone else make almost all of "my" product. The whole point is I kind of have the skills to make this happen, and machined everything is just so much more desiable.


"Make some gratuitously machined custom crowns with excessive and elaborate webbing, pockets, maybe some semi-structural logs, and whatever your freehuckin' heart desired"

This ^ is more like it Beer I may also make a coupe and decide it's too much and won't be profitable enough to keep going.

Buying Avalanche forks also violates the "authentically mine" policy, but I would like to buy their cartridges if they only would answer my email. At least I know they make the good stuff. Thanks for the Formula tip, I will work on that tup

Posted: May 18, 2021 at 21:01 Quote
mediocrityontwowheels wrote:
rosemarywheel wrote:
I have weird feelings of nostalgia for things I am not old enough to be nostalgic for.

I feel the same way.

tup Fab Beer Salute

Posted: May 18, 2021 at 21:56 Quote
rosemarywheel,

I respect your principles. Please be aware there is no way this will make money. You'll be lucky to sell more than you can count on one hand. They're going to cost you a fortune, the lack of demand is the reason no such thing is currently on the market, and even the ones that were on the market have all been discontinued.

If you want to make this as a personal project and maybe sell a couple, please do, and I have no doubt they're going to look amazing. I'm just trying to keep a nice guy from going into bankruptcy!

Posted: May 19, 2021 at 0:06 Quote
I would also be surprised if your school allowed you to make anything on their equipment to sell like you are suggesting. I know it varies from school to school, but I think in general that's a big nono that can land you in a lot of trouble. Doing one or two as "personal projects" you can probably get away with, but even a run of 5 I would expect to draw attention and questions for the amount of machine time you would take up from others who are trying to use the same equipment. When I was in school we had several large and very capable machine shops on campus for student use, but unless you wanted to just use a manual mill or lathe, every other machine tended to have a long list of people waiting to use it and would be supervised by professors or student instructors.

Posted: May 19, 2021 at 5:56 Quote
R-M-R wrote:
rosemarywheel,

I respect your principles. Please be aware there is no way this will make money. You'll be lucky to sell more than you can count on one hand. They're going to cost you a fortune, the lack of demand is the reason no such thing is currently on the market, and even the ones that were on the market have all been discontinued.

If you want to make this as a personal project and maybe sell a couple, please do, and I have no doubt they're going to look amazing. I'm just trying to keep a nice guy from going into bankruptcy!

Thanks for the honesty. I am willing to agree that there is almost no chance of this being a successful business.

Thet absolutely will cost a fortune, In time and money (AKA Life Energy Points) As for lack of demand, I know that they are no longer making DH bike sin 26" for some years now, but There areplenty of older bikes out there and someone is going to need a new dual crown eventually... Or maybe not.

Anyway, I agree it probably won't go over too well but not for lack of demand, more like the manufacturers stopped making a lot of bikes 26" and everyone now has bigger wheelsizes Cry

I also can either work on cool projects like this or spend money on bike parts and more bikes for my little collection. TA least this will be a learning experience. Bankruptsy is just around thew corner actually, but only because after I pay my parents rent, I go by things for whatever older frame I have hanging around. I really don't have much to pay for as of yet...

Posted: May 19, 2021 at 6:00 Quote
MTBLegend92 wrote:
I would also be surprised if your school allowed you to make anything on their equipment to sell like you are suggesting. I know it varies from school to school, but I think in general that's a big nono that can land you in a lot of trouble. Doing one or two as "personal projects" you can probably get away with, but even a run of 5 I would expect to draw attention and questions for the amount of machine time you would take up from others who are trying to use the same equipment. When I was in school we had several large and very capable machine shops on campus for student use, but unless you wanted to just use a manual mill or lathe, every other machine tended to have a long list of people waiting to use it and would be supervised by professors or student instructors.

Oh, Yes. I meant a prototype or two which they would love. with the way the classes were set up at BTC (Bellingham Technical College) there was a whole quarter in which alll the CNC's were not being used, if I remember correctly. Either way I wouldn't be taking up too much time.

Posted: May 19, 2021 at 17:39 Quote
Dude your project sounds sick and I like how you are sticking to your personal ideals, much respect to you!

Couple things to remember with working on projects at school is your tooling and the tolerances that can change, I know as a student machinist you probably are already aware of that part. Just thought it would be a quick reminder. Plus don’t break the carbine tooling, to expensive.

Secondly be careful not to get to aggressive on the machines, treat them with care (not a cupcake and roses, but a good reminder ).

Posted: May 19, 2021 at 20:24 Quote
joose wrote:
Dude your project sounds sick and I like how you are sticking to your personal ideals, much respect to you!

Couple things to remember with working on projects at school is your tooling and the tolerances that can change, I know as a student machinist you probably are already aware of that part. Just thought it would be a quick reminder. Plus don’t break the carbine tooling, to expensive.

Secondly be careful not to get to aggressive on the machines, treat them with care (not a cupcake and roses, but a good reminder ).

Definitely! However, I am sad to say that the tooling at school is in better condition/availability than at my work. ...Although that's probably because LKQ is an engine remanufacturer first and the only Machinist things are in the two repair areas...

I would most likely buy a few tools for myself for the finishing work, and just go slowly with cutting out the internal diameters of the lowers and all that.

I am not sure whether it would be better to drill/ream the lowers or use a smaller drill/use a boring bar/then ream. Any suggestions? McMaster-Carr does have Morse -Taper drill bits up to 50mm wide Eek (I would of course go undersize and ream out the last .010 or so)

Beer

Attention Danger! Men at work Attention

Posted: May 19, 2021 at 20:58 Quote
As promised, chassis fixture plans.

This should help a lot of folks, especially those looking to build FS bikes.

http://www.peterverdone.com/the-skynet-master-plan/


Posted: May 19, 2021 at 21:33 Quote
Damn! your website is amazing. When I start making frames and things I want your parts as part of the build kit options. Those seatpost collars, dropouts, bashgaurds, rotor adaptors, Headsets and frames are to die for tup

What's your story? are you an engineer? where did you go to school? what industries have you been in?


 
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