Freecoaster Thread *Everything you need to know* Questions Welcome

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Freecoaster Thread *Everything you need to know* Questions Welcome
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Posted: Jul 3, 2008 at 5:19 Quote
Freecoaster-


How they function


The typical free-coaster works off of a screw mechanism.

The driver will have a screw shape coming off of it into the hub. And the clutch will have it on the inside, so that when the driver is turned, the clutch will move in toward the diver.

But what if the clutch just moves forward with the driver(you might ask)? Well, that is the work of the resistance. In most coasters this resistance is created by a spring running along the axle. The spring will prevent the clutch from moving forward easily with the driver, so the threads on the driver will pull the clutch in toward itself.

As it moves toward the driver, ridges on the clutch will come into contact with the hub shell and turn it with the whole mechanism. The harder you crank down the more the clutch will push into the shell and pull it forward.

When you stop pedalling, the forward movement of the hub shell will push the clutch slightly back off of the driver threads and disengage the hub. In this way, the clutch never moves unless the driver moves, so the hub shell is free to move in either direction with out binding.


Slack


Slack is the rotational gap between the clutch being fully disengaged and fully engaged, measured in fractions of a turn either at the crank or rear sprocket. For example, a typical cassette might take up to a 1/20th of a revolution to engage, while a typical coaster might take 1/8th of a revolution.


Maintenance


Freecoasters NEED to be taken care of and taken care of properly if you fail to do this you will be out money and you have no one to blame but yourself.

Good Run Throughs Of How To Take Apart A Freecoaster


http://www.bmxdirect.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1692


http://www.khebikes.com/cms/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=208&Itemid=48


Anymore questions? Post them below...


This is a video basically explaining everything from above.

[YT=https://youtube.com/watch?v=12I8iK12oqA]


Thanks to norcoman-1314 for writing this up.

Posted: Jul 3, 2008 at 5:21 Quote
Angular Contact

Angular contact bearings are ideally suited for high speed applications where both axial and radial loads are to be supported, and where system rigidity requires preloading. The design inherently limits thrust loads to one direction, and are generally used in pairs or sets. Radial load support is limited and occurs only when thrust loads are present or preload is used.

Angular contact ball bearings have raceways in the inner and outer rings that are displaced with respect to each other in the direction of the bearing axis. This means that they are designed to accommodate combined loads, i.e. simultaneously acting radial and axial loads.

The axial load carrying capacity of angular contact ball bearings increases with increasing contact angle. The contact angle α is defined as the angle between the line joining the points of contact of the ball and the raceways in the radial plane, along which the load is transmitted from one raceway to another, and a line perpendicular to the bearing axis.

Posted: Jul 3, 2008 at 13:43 Quote
looks familiar:P...

Posted: Jul 3, 2008 at 13:55 Quote
norcoman-1314 wrote:
looks familiar:P...

I know you too probably talked about this... but your whole thread is now gone... You don't have a sticky anymore and Fufa didn't give you any credit in this one... Confused

Posted: Jul 3, 2008 at 13:56 Quote
416rider wrote:
norcoman-1314 wrote:
looks familiar:P...

I know you too probably talked about this... but your whole thread is now gone... You don't have a sticky anymore and Fufa didn't give you any credit in this one... Confused


yes he did...lets keep it clean...and no we never talked about it...

Posted: Jul 3, 2008 at 15:31 Quote
Credit is at the bottom of the post.

The last thread was honestly full of crap and arguing. Now we have a clean thread rather then me just deleting about 50 comments.

Posted: Jul 5, 2008 at 4:24 Quote
i cant see any downsides so why doesent every one have them

Posted: Jul 5, 2008 at 4:28 Quote
jazmx82 wrote:
i cant see any downsides so why doesent every one have them


sometimes the bearnings blow out and the slack in the cranks, also people might just perfer cassettes...

Posted: Jul 5, 2008 at 4:32 Quote
norcoman-1314 wrote:
jazmx82 wrote:
i cant see any downsides so why doesent every one have them


sometimes the bearnings blow out and the slack in the cranks, also people might just perfer cassettes...
thanks

Posted: Jul 10, 2008 at 7:41 Quote
norcoman-1314 wrote:
jazmx82 wrote:
i cant see any downsides so why doesent every one have them


sometimes the bearnings blow out and the slack in the cranks, also people might just perfer cassettes...

some people are really particular about the weight of their bikes and cassettes are always lighter...but I run an nankai

Posted: Jul 11, 2008 at 22:03 Quote
Best sticky ever!

Posted: Jul 11, 2008 at 22:21 Quote
Well coming from mountain biking, I just learned a lot. I sort of get the main differences but don't fully understand yet.

Can someone setup a simple comparison? I'm not looking for an in depth essay here, but just an idea of the differences and advantages of both. I'm considering getting a BMX and I like to know everything about my bikes... It would be appreciated.

Posted: Jul 12, 2008 at 3:24 Quote
watch the video it pretty much spells it out for you...


bigquotesBest sticky ever!


thanks...

Posted: Jul 12, 2008 at 8:36 Quote
Okay that made things a little clearer... I turned it on last night and didn't feel like watching all 8 minutes of it lol

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