Your Spray Painted Stuff?

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Your Spray Painted Stuff?
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Posted: Apr 14, 2019 at 20:59 Quote
Those cranks on the Iron Horse.

Posted: Apr 15, 2019 at 10:17 Quote
slaker wrote:
Those cranks on the Iron Horse.


they are or were painted and hydrodipped with the carbon graphics

Posted: Jul 10, 2019 at 20:48 Quote


My first attempt at painting a bike and I'm happy with how it turned out.

My wife's cousin passed away a few years ago and we had jerseys made in his honor, which this bike was painted to match. It'll be auctioned off at a silent auction in a few weeks for the foundation we have setup in his name. It'll be hard to see it go!

Posted: Jul 11, 2019 at 3:52 Quote
Painting a frame, sprayed it a metallic gloss-ish colour and ready to lacquer it. On the lacquer it says to go over the frame with 1200 grit wet and dry before lacquering, how necessary is that?

Posted: Jul 11, 2019 at 14:18 Quote
dingus wrote:
Painting a frame, sprayed it a metallic gloss-ish colour and ready to lacquer it. On the lacquer it says to go over the frame with 1200 grit wet and dry before lacquering, how necessary is that?

It gives the lacquer something to adhere to.

Posted: Jul 11, 2019 at 14:27 Quote
I've painted lots of frames and have never done that. As long as the paint job is reasonably fresh it should be fine.

Posted: Jul 11, 2019 at 17:14 Quote
DJ-24 wrote:
I've painted lots of frames and have never done that. As long as the paint job is reasonably fresh it should be fine.

The object is, to let the color coat cure, then spray the clear. You get a tougher finish that way. Waaaay back when I use to custom paint motos and autos, that was SOP. Leaving the color uncured means your covering is up, and takes way more time to cure,unless you use accelerators..

Posted: Jul 12, 2019 at 15:42 Quote
DJ-24 wrote:
I've painted lots of frames and have never done that. As long as the paint job is reasonably fresh it should be fine.

I'm with you. My cred can be found be found in my photo collections.

Hey fenning, congrats on a nice paint job for a really good cause. Your cred appears self evident. Nice.

Posted: Jul 12, 2019 at 16:48 Quote
Guess I'm just Old school...What ever works for you, maybe the chems in today's paints have changed..?

I do agree, the bike looks great.

Posted: Jul 12, 2019 at 17:07 Quote
Hammer48 wrote:
Guess I'm just Old school...What ever works for you, maybe the chems in today's paints have changed..?

I do agree, the bike looks great.

Dunno if it's the contemporary chemicals or, like you said, standard operating guidelines, but it's easy to agree that there's different ways to skin a cat. The processes that I've been a part of never included any kind of a sanding coat on the initial paint finish regardless of the grit count. Especially the work I did as the usual time put in or the materials involved couldn't afford a mulligan. But upon finishing the paint job a clear coat was applied ASAP, and a high grit passing was then applied. Which of course was followed with another coat of clear, and the process then repeated itself.

Luckily I got far enough in the paint and design parts of the jobs that I didn't have to do anymore clears after a while though. It's hard work, rarely rewarded and mostly identified when done poorly as opposed to done well. when it's done well most observers just admire the paint job, not knowing how critical the clear is in highlighting the details.

Good points hammer. Got my brain running.

Posted: Jul 12, 2019 at 17:26 Quote
obee1 wrote:
Hammer48 wrote:
Guess I'm just Old school...What ever works for you, maybe the chems in today's paints have changed..?

I do agree, the bike looks great.

Dunno if it's the contemporary chemicals or, like you said, standard operating guidelines, but it's easy to agree that there's different ways to skin a cat. The processes that I've been a part of never included any kind of a sanding coat on the initial paint finish regardless of the grit count. Especially the work I did as the usual time put in or the materials involved couldn't afford a mulligan. But upon finishing the paint job a clear coat was applied ASAP, and a high grit passing was then applied. Which of course was followed with another coat of clear, and the process then repeated itself.

Luckily I got far enough in the paint and design parts of the jobs that I didn't have to do anymore clears after a while though. It's hard work, rarely rewarded and mostly identified when done poorly as opposed to done well. when it's done well most observers just admire the paint job, not knowing how critical the clear is in highlighting the details.

Good points hammer. Got my brain running.

I should have added that when I was painting for a living, it was in the mid 80's to early 90's, I'm sure a lot has changed since then. I do agree that the clear is an Important part of highlighting the color. Also, rarely if ever do the prep guys get any cred for doing a good job, color sanding in a pain in the a$$. Keep rocking the good paint stuff..Beer

Posted: Jul 12, 2019 at 20:50 Quote
Thanks everyone! It's not perfect, but I'm happy with how it turned out. I used a steel putty to fill over the ugly welds (it was a low end frame to start with) and sanded and sanded and sanded some more. Then, I primed and sanded and primed and sanded...

I'm not sure how the paint will hold up long term since I used rattle cans, but I did put several coats of clear (minimum 48 hours between coats, per the directions on the can) like many people in this forum recommended. I just hope it sells for more than I put into it!

These are the jerseys I tried to match, I hope one of these guys end up with the bike.


https://www.gforcefoundation.com/

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