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Suspension SETUP, a 'how to' guide...

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Suspension SETUP, a 'how to' guide...
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Posted: Jan 1, 2009 at 12:27 Quote
Thank you very much!

Posted: Jan 1, 2009 at 12:40 Quote
You didnt go very in depth into how to set the preload for sag. Could you elaborate for me?

Posted: Jan 1, 2009 at 16:53 Quote
BigRidah wrote:
You didnt go very in depth into how to set the preload for sag. Could you elaborate for me?
Determine your desired sag [approximate percentages are listed in original post], assuming you have the correct spring for your weight range, then simply adjusting the pre-load (def: a pre-emptive load exerted upon the spring by compressing it a small amount in its static position) dial will either exert more compressive force upon the spring or less (factory defaults are generally just above minimum preload) which will in turn decrease or increase the amount the fork will compress under your static weight [with riding gear on] in the 'ready' position [standing up].

Basically, adjust the preload in order to get the fork to compress the desired percentage of travel under just your static [non-moving/still] weight - the amount required will depend on product specification and riding style - see your owners manual for more incite.

Posted: Jan 4, 2009 at 11:42 Quote
here is how to lower rock shox tora's solo air.
Views: 3,414    Faves: 19    Comments: 31

Posted: Jan 8, 2009 at 12:37 Quote
Hey,

I'm adjusting my fox talas rc2 and i'm a bit confused about the compression system, even after reading this thread. I need more detailed information how the fork will react if I increase or decrease the Low and High Compression (not in theory)

A special «Thank You» for the person who can explain this to me tup

Posted: Jan 10, 2009 at 16:18 Quote
joaovidal12 wrote:
Hey,

I'm adjusting my fox talas rc2 and i'm a bit confused about the compression system, even after reading this thread. I need more detailed information how the fork will react if I increase or decrease the Low and High Compression (not in theory)

A special «Thank You» for the person who can explain this to me tup
its all explained not 'in theory' in the first post- I explained how to make adjustments that will have a useful effect when you are actually riding and not when you are just fiddling with the forks, and how to come to the right setting for your personal requirement, if you need additional help, then you will have to be more specific as to exactly what you want to know and what it is that you don't understand

- loz

Posted: Jan 18, 2009 at 17:17 Quote
I have a question I just bought a new bike and I want to set the rider sag on the front and rear shocks, but I don't know how to do this. Can some one tell me a step by step on this?

I don't get how you figure out how much to adjust the shock for my weight.

Thanks

Posted: Jan 18, 2009 at 17:46 Quote
For the fork, take all the air out (if it has an air option), and turn out the preload adjusters. You should have 20 to 30% sag, so figure out what that is, and bust out the measuring tape. Turn the preload adjusters/adjust the air pressure as needed.

For the rear shock, make sure you have at least the minimum air pressure, and back the preload collar off until there is almost no pressure on the spring. I'm not really sure how to explain the best way to measure it out exactly, I just sort of go by feel. You should know pretty quick if you have too much or too little sag. Perhaps someone can step in here and explain it a little better. Anyways, adjust the preload collar in, and adjust the air pressure as well. Most shock companies tell you not to turn the preload collar more than 5 times or something like that.

Posted: Jan 19, 2009 at 3:42 Quote
ctd07 wrote:
joaovidal12 wrote:
Hey,

I'm adjusting my fox talas rc2 and i'm a bit confused about the compression system, even after reading this thread. I need more detailed information how the fork will react if I increase or decrease the Low and High Compression (not in theory)

A special «Thank You» for the person who can explain this to me tup
its all explained not 'in theory' in the first post- I explained how to make adjustments that will have a useful effect when you are actually riding and not when you are just fiddling with the forks, and how to come to the right setting for your personal requirement, if you need additional help, then you will have to be more specific as to exactly what you want to know and what it is that you don't understand

- loz

Man, you are right. The post was done really quick becase I was in a hurry.

So, I ride mostly street, and I would like:
- the fork wount not bottom out in hard impacts (High Speed compression),
- doesnt sink too much in nose manuals in wich I use the fronk brake (Low Speed Compression),
- doesnt have to be very sensitivy (againg Low Speed Compression).

So far, I have manage to match the fork almost with my personal test, including the Rebound and SAG and the Compressions are nearly finished (the High Speed just need a little adjust, but I think the Low Speed is incorrectly adjusted)

Any one have any ideas?

Posted: Jan 19, 2009 at 4:37 Quote
jonbikes wrote:
For the fork, take all the air out (if it has an air option), and turn out the preload adjusters. You should have 20 to 30% sag, so figure out what that is, and bust out the measuring tape. Turn the preload adjusters/adjust the air pressure as needed.

For the rear shock, make sure you have at least the minimum air pressure, and back the preload collar off until there is almost no pressure on the spring. I'm not really sure how to explain the best way to measure it out exactly, I just sort of go by feel. You should know pretty quick if you have too much or too little sag. Perhaps someone can step in here and explain it a little better. Anyways, adjust the preload collar in, and adjust the air pressure as well. Most shock companies tell you not to turn the preload collar more than 5 times or something like that.

yeh, first also check you have the correct springs for your weight, for your forks, get in touch with the manufacturer or a supplier, for the rear spring, there are links to 'which spring calculators' on page 1

If you can get your desired sag with the springs you currently have, then you already have ones that are ok.

The minimum preload on you rear spring should be apprx 1 turn in from when the preload collar touches the spring, alternatively, when there is sufficient contact pressure so that the preload collar turns with the spring when you turn the spring - if you add too many turns with the preload collar, you run the risk of coil binding (where the spring reaches full compression [goes solid] before the damper reaches full compression) - this is bad!

Rear shock sag is measured at the shock shaft, not by rear wheel movement. To measure rear shock sag, first obtain your shocks stroke (written on spring [note: round down the given stroke written on Fox branded springs to the nearest common stroke length]), get 25% of it [e.g. (57mm/100)x25 = shock sag] and then sit on your bike with your feet on the pedals, then gently dismount to avoid further extra compression - to obtain a measurement simply slide your bump stop elastomer up to the damper end before you sit on your bike, then measure apprx how far it has moved with a tape measure; alternatively, if your bump stop won't move/stay - spraying some PTFE spray on the shaft, then splashing some talcum powder onto it will give an indication as to how far the shock has compressed when you sat on it.

Adjust front and back preload in increments and eventually you'll get to your desired setting.

EDIT: If you are running Monster T's - be sure to bleed the air build up from the top regularly as instructed to do so in the manual otherwise your forks will gradually get stiffer (Monster T's use a Moto style sealing system which causes air to get trapped inside the fork and pressure will gradually build up), they have an air bleed valve at the top of each leg [at least I think there is one on each leg].

Posted: Jan 19, 2009 at 4:42 Quote
joaovidal12 wrote:
Man, you are right. The post was done really quick becase I was in a hurry.

So, I ride mostly street, and I would like:
- the fork wount not bottom out in hard impacts (High Speed compression),
- doesnt sink too much in nose manuals in wich I use the fronk brake (Low Speed Compression),
- doesnt have to be very sensitivy (againg Low Speed Compression).

So far, I have manage to match the fork almost with my personal test, including the Rebound and SAG and the Compressions are nearly finished (the High Speed just need a little adjust, but I think the Low Speed is incorrectly adjusted)

Any one have any ideas?

As far as I am aware, Fox's FIT dampers in their 36 series forks don't have too extreme adjustments, only functional improvements - For street riding, there aren't going to be any stutter bumps (unless you have cobbled streets), so I would just crank the low-speed damping all the way on [maximum]; if you find it is a problem, then lessen it a few clicks.... and so on, until the fork starts to do its job without you being aware of its presence.

Posted: Jan 19, 2009 at 4:51 Quote
Today I changed the spring in my Damain to a softer one, what a quick job! I had the bike lying down so the oil doesn't come out.
I noticed it had two thin plastic spacers on top of the coil, are these the preload spacers? My fork doesn't have a preload knob on that leg obviously. And since I'm guessing they are preload spacers is it necessary to leave at least one in there or is it ok to remove both?

Posted: Jan 19, 2009 at 4:59 Quote
Frumpy-Housewife wrote:
Today I changed the spring in my Damain to a softer one, what a quick job! I had the bike lying down so the oil doesn't come out.
I noticed it had two thin plastic spacers on top of the coil, are these the preload spacers? My fork doesn't have a preload knob on that leg obviously. And since I'm guessing they are preload spacers is it necessary to leave at least one in there or is it ok to remove both?
As long as the spring is under at least some preload when the top cap it tightened it would be ok, otherwise you will have a 'loose' part of travel at full extension where there is no spring effect and the fork will freely move up and down with no resistance. The spacers may well be there so that the preload can be 'adjusted' in this way.

Try removing 1 or 2 of them and see - and feel free to post up on this thread what difference it makes!

Posted: Jan 19, 2009 at 14:36 Quote
Good point CTD07, I was mainly concerned that if they are both removed then the spring would be sitting directly under the top cap, which I wasn't sure if it's meant to or not.

I remember when I purchased my STP, the Argyle 318 came with a couple of similar ones that were in with the booklet. I didn't keep the fork so never got to experiment with them. Lol being used to seeing travel spacers for a tora I was kind of puzzled how they could do much. It does make a bit of sense now though - you only do a few turns of preload at the most for a coil shock so I guess the small spacers would equate to that for a coil fork, well particularly for one that doesn't have any sort of preload adjustment knob.

The sag is better with the softer spring. I'll have to get a few rides in before I think about taking the spacers out. I guess it will depend on how much travel I'm using.

Posted: Jan 19, 2009 at 14:48 Quote
i like your threads very informative.Salute


 


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