What brakes are people running?

PB Forum :: Downhill
What brakes are people running?
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Posted: May 13, 2019 at 21:28 Quote
m1dg3t wrote:

If you're braking in the turn you've already f*cked it up LoL

yep lesson learned, I had no Idea it would make such a difference,

Posted: May 15, 2019 at 10:24 Quote
if anyone has any old hope mono6, mono 6ti or mono 4's laying around, id like to buy them for a restoration build. also looking for the limited edition black/green, or team green brakes!
thanks!

Posted: May 28, 2019 at 23:53 Quote
Wondering if anyone tried to pair shimano xt m8020 calipers with new xtr m9120 levers? I've seen this in pinkbike's hotlap vid with ALN that she's running this setup. Is there a gain in power or modulation? I smashed my xt lever last weekend so I'm thinking if I should upgrade or buy the same xt lever.

Posted: May 29, 2019 at 3:43 Quote
shwinn8 wrote:
Saint in front, XT in the back

brakes are bedded in and they are awesome!!!

Posted: Jun 12, 2019 at 18:54 Quote
Hello
i know avid had a lot of problems, what are the thoughts? i´m thinking buy one set to my downhill bike


Posted: Jun 21, 2019 at 14:48 Quote
jonasdh wrote:
Hello
i know avid had a lot of problems, what are the thoughts? i´m thinking buy one set to my downhill bike


Man, save your money and don't buy that shit!
The market has several other better options for less money and way better durability, quality and performance.

Posted: Jun 22, 2019 at 4:45 Quote
jonasdh wrote:
Hello
i know avid had a lot of problems, what are the thoughts? i´m thinking buy one set to my downhill bike


Save up money and buy a set of Zee brakes.

Posted: Jun 23, 2019 at 21:35 Quote
is there much of a difference between running a 200mm rotor in the REAR than a 180mm? i have always had 203/180 since thats what came on my bike but have always been curious if it's worth a try to do 200/200. i am a very light rider at 140lbs but i do like instant power which is why i got shimano zee's and centerline rotors which i have been happy with but idk

Posted: Jun 23, 2019 at 22:11 Quote
203mm look cooler front and rear; that's all i know!

Posted: Jun 23, 2019 at 22:59 Quote
VPentagon wrote:
is there much of a difference between running a 200mm rotor in the REAR than a 180mm? i have always had 203/180 since thats what came on my bike but have always been curious if it's worth a try to do 200/200. i am a very light rider at 140lbs but i do like instant power which is why i got shimano zee's and centerline rotors which i have been happy with but idk

I just recently made this change. In my mind it made sense because of heat management, I use my rear brake more which means it’s always hotter. A larger rotor helps dissipate heat better, and have a bit more power.
I found that the larger rotor does help keep temps cooler, which keeps fade at bay.
The increase in power was a mixed bag. Not a good thing on my Saints, which had less modulation, which means more locking of the back wheel/less control. Good thing on the Hayes Dominion, which have less initial bite and more modulation, which gave more power and no issue with lock/control.
I would think it also depends on the frame kinematics and tires. If you have a frame design which keeps the rear wheel active under braking (like the split pivot or abp), and/or are running super grippy rear tire, then the increas3 rotor size won’t have any modulation/control issues. But if your frame is less active under braking or are running a semi-slick in the back, I’d think twice.

Posted: Jun 24, 2019 at 9:09 Quote
I'm still rocking 04/05 hope M4s and minis. Can't fault them other than seals wearing finally in the levers.

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 8:16 Quote
Abacall wrote:
VPentagon wrote:
is there much of a difference between running a 200mm rotor in the REAR than a 180mm? i have always had 203/180 since thats what came on my bike but have always been curious if it's worth a try to do 200/200. i am a very light rider at 140lbs but i do like instant power which is why i got shimano zee's and centerline rotors which i have been happy with but idk

I just recently made this change. In my mind it made sense because of heat management, I use my rear brake more which means it’s always hotter. A larger rotor helps dissipate heat better, and have a bit more power.
I found that the larger rotor does help keep temps cooler, which keeps fade at bay.
The increase in power was a mixed bag. Not a good thing on my Saints, which had less modulation, which means more locking of the back wheel/less control. Good thing on the Hayes Dominion, which have less initial bite and more modulation, which gave more power and no issue with lock/control.
I would think it also depends on the frame kinematics and tires. If you have a frame design which keeps the rear wheel active under braking (like the split pivot or abp), and/or are running super grippy rear tire, then the increas3 rotor size won’t have any modulation/control issues. But if your frame is less active under braking or are running a semi-slick in the back, I’d think twice.

Learn to use your front brake!

Posted: Jun 25, 2019 at 8:18 Quote
jonasdh wrote:
Hello
i know avid had a lot of problems, what are the thoughts? i´m thinking buy one set to my downhill bike


codes are fantastic! I still have a pair of those silver ones, bleed once a season lots of power, and great modulation. The new codes are even better.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 0:25 Quote
y9pema wrote:
Abacall wrote:
VPentagon wrote:
is there much of a difference between running a 200mm rotor in the REAR than a 180mm? i have always had 203/180 since thats what came on my bike but have always been curious if it's worth a try to do 200/200. i am a very light rider at 140lbs but i do like instant power which is why i got shimano zee's and centerline rotors which i have been happy with but idk

I just recently made this change. In my mind it made sense because of heat management, I use my rear brake more which means it’s always hotter. A larger rotor helps dissipate heat better, and have a bit more power.
I found that the larger rotor does help keep temps cooler, which keeps fade at bay.
The increase in power was a mixed bag. Not a good thing on my Saints, which had less modulation, which means more locking of the back wheel/less control. Good thing on the Hayes Dominion, which have less initial bite and more modulation, which gave more power and no issue with lock/control.
I would think it also depends on the frame kinematics and tires. If you have a frame design which keeps the rear wheel active under braking (like the split pivot or abp), and/or are running super grippy rear tire, then the increas3 rotor size won’t have any modulation/control issues. But if your frame is less active under braking or are running a semi-slick in the back, I’d think twice.

Learn to use your front brake!

Really? Thanks, hadn’t thought of that...

Everyone uses their back brake more. It helps with weight transfer and keeping some braking traction in loose conditions, while maintaining grip on the front.
Go ahead and watch every video of wc , ews, or xc racers. On steep and loose sections where traction on the front is dicey you use the rear.
Braking is a dynamic action, it changes with body position and conditions. If there was an optimal split, they would be tied together to one lever (like a car).
If you’re not using your rear brake, you’re missing out in max traction and steering control on the front tire and being able to steer the back of the bike on really loose and steep chutes/trails.

Posted: Jun 26, 2019 at 9:14 Quote
Abacall wrote:
y9pema wrote:
Abacall wrote:


I just recently made this change. In my mind it made sense because of heat management, I use my rear brake more which means it’s always hotter. A larger rotor helps dissipate heat better, and have a bit more power.
I found that the larger rotor does help keep temps cooler, which keeps fade at bay.
The increase in power was a mixed bag. Not a good thing on my Saints, which had less modulation, which means more locking of the back wheel/less control. Good thing on the Hayes Dominion, which have less initial bite and more modulation, which gave more power and no issue with lock/control.
I would think it also depends on the frame kinematics and tires. If you have a frame design which keeps the rear wheel active under braking (like the split pivot or abp), and/or are running super grippy rear tire, then the increas3 rotor size won’t have any modulation/control issues. But if your frame is less active under braking or are running a semi-slick in the back, I’d think twice.

Learn to use your front brake!

Really? Thanks, hadn’t thought of that...

Everyone uses their back brake more. It helps with weight transfer and keeping some braking traction in loose conditions, while maintaining grip on the front.
Go ahead and watch every video of wc , ews, or xc racers. On steep and loose sections where traction on the front is dicey you use the rear.
Braking is a dynamic action, it changes with body position and conditions. If there was an optimal split, they would be tied together to one lever (like a car).
If you’re not using your rear brake, you’re missing out in max traction and steering control on the front tire and being able to steer the back of the bike on really loose and steep chutes/trails.

lol you don't know everyone uses their back brake more. If that's your thing cool, but it's definitely not ideal. there is a reason damn near every wheeled thing has larger front brakes.


 
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