What brakes are people running?

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What brakes are people running?
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Posted: Aug 6, 2019 at 15:29 Quote
jeremy3220 wrote:
yzedf wrote:
jeremy3220 wrote:
Any good aftermarket options (better than OE) for Code brake pads?

Trickstuff makes pads for sram brakes

They're organic though. Have you used them? I'm not sure if that would be an upgrade.
I don't think they are that great. Really short life. They do have a good initial bite when cold but for longer descents the power is the same as sram metalics.

Posted: Aug 8, 2019 at 5:50 Quote
Just installed a set of Formula Cura 4 brakes with rotors. Tomorrow will be first day riding them. Based on the garage squeeze test and bedding in the pads going up and down the street, they feel good.

I’ll post a review after the weekend, tomorrow it should still be wet and Sunday it should be dry. Will make for a good test of noise, power and bite as well as pad durability in the wet.

Posted: Aug 8, 2019 at 6:40 Quote
new setup in progress.

these calipers
this is gonna be fun

on these levers

on these 240mm rotors
trying out this 240mm rotor

Posted: Aug 8, 2019 at 6:47 Quote
ktm87 wrote:
new setup in progress.

these calipers
this is gonna be fun

on these levers

on these 240mm rotors
trying out this 240mm rotor
diretissima are mineral oil, no? Going to use mineral or dot?

Posted: Aug 8, 2019 at 6:51 Quote
mineral. got all new seals to convert the hopes

Posted: Aug 9, 2019 at 5:36 Quote
Exotic! Good luck, keep us posted.

Posted: Aug 9, 2019 at 15:49 Quote
Abacall wrote:
y9pema wrote:
Abacall wrote:


I just recently made this change. In my mind it made sense because of heat management, I use my rear brake more which means it’s always hotter. A larger rotor helps dissipate heat better, and have a bit more power.
I found that the larger rotor does help keep temps cooler, which keeps fade at bay.
The increase in power was a mixed bag. Not a good thing on my Saints, which had less modulation, which means more locking of the back wheel/less control. Good thing on the Hayes Dominion, which have less initial bite and more modulation, which gave more power and no issue with lock/control.
I would think it also depends on the frame kinematics and tires. If you have a frame design which keeps the rear wheel active under braking (like the split pivot or abp), and/or are running super grippy rear tire, then the increas3 rotor size won’t have any modulation/control issues. But if your frame is less active under braking or are running a semi-slick in the back, I’d think twice.

Learn to use your front brake!

Really? Thanks, hadn’t thought of that...

Everyone uses their back brake more. It helps with weight transfer and keeping some braking traction in loose conditions, while maintaining grip on the front.
Go ahead and watch every video of wc , ews, or xc racers. On steep and loose sections where traction on the front is dicey you use the rear.
Braking is a dynamic action, it changes with body position and conditions. If there was an optimal split, they would be tied together to one lever (like a car).
If you’re not using your rear brake, you’re missing out in max traction and steering control on the front tire and being able to steer the back of the bike on really loose and steep chutes/trails.

You do realize that on motor vehicles they employ a device called a proportioning valve which controls braking forces F/R. Generally they are biased something like 70/30 F-R and the ABS does the rest. You don't have a 50/50 brake bias unless it is setup like that for a specific reason.

Posted: Aug 10, 2019 at 8:15 Quote
m1dg3t wrote:
Abacall wrote:
y9pema wrote:


Learn to use your front brake!

Really? Thanks, hadn’t thought of that...

Everyone uses their back brake more. It helps with weight transfer and keeping some braking traction in loose conditions, while maintaining grip on the front.
Go ahead and watch every video of wc , ews, or xc racers. On steep and loose sections where traction on the front is dicey you use the rear.
Braking is a dynamic action, it changes with body position and conditions. If there was an optimal split, they would be tied together to one lever (like a car).
If you’re not using your rear brake, you’re missing out in max traction and steering control on the front tire and being able to steer the back of the bike on really loose and steep chutes/trails.

You do realize that on motor vehicles they employ a device called a proportioning valve which controls braking forces F/R. Generally they are biased something like 70/30 F-R and the ABS does the rest. You don't have a 50/50 brake bias unless it is setup like that for a specific reason.

Yep, and that was my point. Braking is a dynamic action, requiring changing f/r input based on conditions and circumstance. We as the rider can prepare for those changing conditions before they arise and decide how to use our f/r split. Cars proportioning valves start braking at 70/30, adjusting only after slip or weight shift, making braking a reactionary action instead.
Simply stating "learn to use your front brake" is a regurgitated knee-jerk blanket statement. There are plenty of circumstances in steep and loose sections of trail that using your front brake more will result in loss of traction, especially when speed builds.
Coming into a turn too hot and slamming on your front brake will drop that front wheel and your face to the ground asap as well. Sure, that's "not how you're supposed to turn," but how many times does that happen to us?
In perfect conditions, sure, 85% of your braking should be done with the front. But mountain biking isn't done in perfect conditions, and it would be boring if it did.
But, if you feel that works for you, cool. Have fun with that.

Posted: Aug 12, 2019 at 7:53 Quote
Formula Cura 4 short review

Awesome brakes that were easy to install, bled with a syringe at the master was all it took for a great feel at the lever. Used the stock pads with the nicer 2 piece rotors.

2 days of park riding so far (21,000 vertical feet roughly) in damp to hero dirt conditions the first day and dried out dusty blown out conditions on the second day.

Day one I was blown away. My previous brakes on this bike, 2017 Operator 27.5, were Guide R and obviously underpowered. The Cura 4’s definitely aren’t! I had to relearn my braking points, bring the levers closer to the bar and quick speed checks on jump lines is now rear brake only.

Day two was the eye opener, dry loose double black loam chutes were a slow controlled affair if you wanted to creep in, or a hard stab at the bottom to rein it back in. By the end of the day my wrists and shoulders were beat, it’s time to get stronger and take full advantage of the new capabilities.

TL;DR - awesome brakes that I’d buy again

Posted: Aug 12, 2019 at 14:48 Quote
SLX M7100 Lever / Zee calliper, the new mid mounted levers have a lot less flex than older generations, feels good.

Posted: Aug 15, 2019 at 11:29 Quote
I have a set of Hope tech team edition v2’s with rotors and braided lines for sale if anyone is interested just message me your number and I’ll shoot you photos
Thanks

hope tech team

Posted: Nov 6, 2019 at 5:18 Quote
Anyone hear anything about the TRP DHR? Looks like a new caliper?
https://trpcycling.com/product/g-spec-dhr/

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