Sexiest Slopestyle Bike Out There

PB Forum :: Freeride & Slopestyle
Sexiest Slopestyle Bike Out There
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Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 12:02 Quote
Schism wrote:
Tom-Ryde wrote:
moleman wrote:
I don't care if these bikes have been posted before, but this thread is way of topic.

All nice bikes, but has this one been posted before?
Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://i579.photobucket.com/albums/ss237/Danbury_MTB/SLOPESTYLE%20Bikes/MDE-Player.jpg

Also, i cant decide whether its a short travel (slopestyle) freeride bike, or more of a long travel freeride/trail bike..?


http://s579.photobucket.com/albums/ss237/Danbury_MTB/SLOPESTYLE%20Bikes/

wow cove anyone?
not really...
Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://www.covebike.com/bikes/gspot/gspot-computerized-image.jpg

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:06 Quote
Dalmando wrote:
dkidd wrote:
crs-one wrote:


Who you facepalming? He's right, there's no pivot by the axle.
context is everything dude. Read the comment above. Just b/c there's no pivot there doesn't mean it has to flex. He just doesn't understand how the linkage works, but decided to post anyway.
As I said... context... there's a reason the quote feature works like it does.
Hi friend Smile I think you'll find that it is you that does not understand. Look at every other bike with that suspension design and you will find a pivot near the rear axel. This is because the top link and the positioning of the shock, means that the rear triangle can not fallow the arc that it would fallow if it remained in a constant shape. So to allow the seat-stays to move separately to actuate the shock, there is usually a pivot near the rear axel. Since the frame we are talking about does not have this pivot, the frame must flex. Smile
Facepalm (again)
sorry man, you are mistaken, but I'm far to lazy to explain the difference between the linkage you are thinking about and this one.
Just think about all the places the macmahone linkage could pivot, and all the places it would need to to avoid flexing a weld in the frame.

Basically, no, the welds of the frame do not flex. Nor does the tubing. Unless one is working in ti, it is generally considered uncouth to design flex into a frame to compensate for pivots.

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:21 Quote
Yes, the tubes do flex. It's impossible for two pivots in different locations to continue on the same arc. It's physically impossible.

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:25 Quote
sherbet wrote:
Yes, the tubes do flex. It's impossible for two pivots in different locations to continue on the same arc. It's physically impossible.
you do understand that this frames functionality does not rely on the chain and seat stays flexing away from each other through the shock stroke, right?

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:27 Quote
Yes it does. Again, two pivots in different locations cannot remain on the same arc. Think about it.

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:29 Quote
why do they need to? The frame linkage pivots
1. at the bb
2. at the bottom "rocker" linkage plate
3. at teh top of said link plate
4. at the shocks top eyelet
5. the shock changes length.


no frame flex needed.

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:34 Quote
There's two pivots that infulence the rear end. One at the BB, one at the top tube. Again, two pivots cannot follow the same arc. It's a physical impossibility.

Here's a picture. If you still don't get it then that's kinda sad. Razz

Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/2016/flexp.png

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:37 Quote
haha, nice drawing Razz and thanks for backing me up Big Grin

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:41 Quote
This was covered months ago. A drawing was made back then, too. I think it eventually came to the point where we contacted MacMahone, and even they said it used some flex. The rear triangle flexes down during the stroke, making the very short travel frame (68mm) also very stiff.

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 13:42 Quote
well, I'm not gonna concede defeat here, but if you have actually contacted the company and they said FOR SURE that frame flex is necessary for the linkage to work, then fine. Weird design though.
so the issue here becomes... why do people consider this a good design?

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 14:00 Quote
Are you one of those people who wont believe what the other person says just because you don't want to, even though it's clear you're wrong D:

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 14:10 Quote
EmteeHayze wrote:
Are you one of those people who wont believe what the other person says just because you don't want to, even though it's clear you're wrong D:
no, but I consider myself reasonably competent with most suspension designs, having worked in the industry for a few years now. When someone tells me that a dj frame relies on flex (of the main tubes) to actuate the suspension... I get curious (and incredulous). Especially when it's someone who 2 pages earlier claimed the frame was not a BB pivot (though he has talked to the frame manufacturers about the linkage issue before, and is thus presumably familiar with the design).

As far as I could tell, the frame did not rely on flex to make the suspension work. I will concede that I was wrong if I hear that the company specifically designed it thus.

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 14:17 Quote
OK I am bored with this argument for the topic's sake here is my whip. It now has a RS turn coat and I modded the shifter for the hammerscmidt on the seat post clamp so that I can do barspins. No tailwhips yet. I just haven't taken any good pics yet. I love this beast but I have been riding my session a bunch lately.

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 14:28 Quote
dkidd wrote:
well, I'm not gonna concede defeat here, but if you have actually contacted the company and they said FOR SURE that frame flex is necessary for the linkage to work, then fine. Weird design though.
so the issue here becomes... why do people consider this a good design?
It is considered a good design, because nomatter how precisely you machine pivots, or bearings, there always exists sideplay. there is no sideplay in a solid piece of metal flexing. This makes for a much stiffer(side to side) frame.

Also used in the cannondale scalpel(no pivot neer the BB)
Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://cdn.media.cyclingnews.com/2009/08/07/1/tinker_scalpel_rear_triangle_600.jpg
And early Trek Fuels
Unsecure image, only https images allowed: http://www.btt.com.ar/foto/o/10/98/1098097420_2004-Trek-Fuel-90-Disc.jpg

Posted: Aug 30, 2010 at 14:34 Quote
so, just so we all are clear, if you took all the air out of the shock on that macmahone, the linkage wouldn't move without flexing the tubing. If I'm readin' y'all correctly.


 
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