Powered by Outside

Biceps!

Author Message
Posted: Aug 27, 2010 at 4:36 Quote
is it true that drinking ice cold water in the mornining helps loose weight,burn calories and increase you matabolisuum?

Posted: Aug 28, 2010 at 0:57 Quote
i swear by it
when i started downing a glass of ice water at 8.00am after riding 15mile to work in 40min the pounds just melted off

Posted: Aug 28, 2010 at 1:27 Quote
WasabiJim wrote:
i swear by it
when i started downing a glass of ice water at 8.00am after riding 15mile to work in 40min the pounds just melted off

how much do you drink in the morning then?

Posted: Aug 28, 2010 at 2:21 Quote
laurencethorpe wrote:
is it true that drinking ice cold water in the mornining helps loose weight,burn calories and increase you matabolisuum?

Your body burns some calories warming up the water, but not many. You would need to drink a lot of cold water each day for it to have even a minimum impact.

Drinking 2 litres of very cold water (over the space of day) could burn about the same calories as jogging for 1km. I would take the short run.

To lose weight you must be burning more calories than you consume, and this is best acheived through regular hard exercise (weight training is a very good option) - and being very careful about what/when you eat.

Posted: Nov 11, 2010 at 12:16 Quote
Would pushups workout the triceps? I have heard that the farther apart your arms the more your triceps are worked out and the closer your arms are, the biceps are targeted more. Is this true?
Also I'm trying to beef up generally since im kind of a small/skinny guy, would pushups and Leg lifts (the exercise where you lie on your back and lift your legs to hover right above the floor) be ok to get the abs and arms growing? I do these exercise every other day.

Posted: Nov 11, 2010 at 15:35 Quote
pushups will target the triceps, delts and chest. not the biceps. pushups are a completely opposite motion to a curl which targets the biceps. leg lifts will hit your lower abs but you will need other ab exercises aswell

Posted: Nov 12, 2010 at 1:19 Quote
dmanj wrote:
pushups will target the triceps, delts and chest. not the biceps. pushups are a completely opposite motion to a curl which targets the biceps. leg lifts will hit your lower abs but you will need other ab exercises aswell
Thanks for that dude, i knew it sounded fishy to say that your bicep was worked out in the pushup since the motion isn't the same as a bicep curl.

Posted: Nov 12, 2010 at 2:10 Quote
hazdxb wrote:
Would pushups workout the triceps? I have heard that the farther apart your arms the more your triceps are worked out and the closer your arms are, the biceps are targeted more. Is this true?
Also I'm trying to beef up generally since im kind of a small/skinny guy, would pushups and Leg lifts (the exercise where you lie on your back and lift your legs to hover right above the floor) be ok to get the abs and arms growing? I do these exercise every other day.

'Getting the abs and arms growing' is just a bad thing to aim for from the outset. The body likes to grow in proportion. You have to drop this gym-rat, men's health, beach body philosophy if you want to actually get bigger.

Look at sports which simply MAKE you bigger (olympic lifting, powerlifting, strength sports). Following these training systems/lifestyles will ENSURE growth.

The 10 steps to bigger biceps article in men's health will almost definitely NOT WORK FOR SHIT. Go back to basics. Lift heavy weights. Do big lifts (deadlifts, squats, overhead presses, etc). Take care of yourself, eat properly and as much as you can, rest and sleep well. What's the catch? You need to put in a shit load of effort and experience a fair amount of pain. This is why men's-health reading, jonnie the gymrat has wicked biceps but is actually a pussy when it comes to real strength.

Olympic lifting is a great sport which improves strength, speed, and will undoubtedly make you bigger overall. It just takes a while to learn the correct movements, but that's what I love about performing these lifts

Posted: Nov 12, 2010 at 3:29 Quote
raak wrote:
'Getting the abs and arms growing'*snip*
Thanks for that dude and i know what you mean, but i probably should have mentioned that my body is actually out of proportion right now, my legs looks beastly and as soon as you look above the waist im very scrawny which is why getting the abs and arms growing is kind of a priority for me right now. Smile

Posted: Nov 13, 2010 at 1:40 Quote
hazdxb wrote:
raak wrote:
'Getting the abs and arms growing'*snip*
Thanks for that dude and i know what you mean, but i probably should have mentioned that my body is actually out of proportion right now, my legs looks beastly and as soon as you look above the waist im very scrawny which is why getting the abs and arms growing is kind of a priority for me right now. Smile

Well when talking about abs, it's probably best to use the word 'core', and think of the entire midsection (the abs, obliques, and lower back). Generally speaking, these muscles should be used to stabilise (form a trunk around) the spine while performing either upper-body, or lower-body movements.

What I am getting at is that it is much better to train the core by not trying to isolate it; it is better to perform big, full body movements which force the core to act as a brace.

For instance, take the standing overhead barbell press, this is an upper-body movement (shoulders/triceps), yet it puts a huge demand on the core; and also the barbell front squat, this is primarily a leg (quad/hamstring) movement, yet the front squat is brutal on the core muscles (with STRICT FORM).

The important factor here is that these exercises allow you to lift heavy loads. This is why they are so good for adding muscle to the core area. I'm not ruling out isolation exercises, but they should be done at the end of the workout, after some sets (5 x 6 reps for instance) of a big lift.

A solution to your arms and abs problem could be based on two alternating workouts:

day 1

standing overhead press (hitting arms and shoulders + core)
isolation movement for tricep (pull down, french press, skull crushers, etc)
isolation movement for core (crunches, leg raises, etc)

day 2

deadlift (hitting arms shoulders, upper back + core)
isolation movement for bicep (curl, gorilla curl, chin ups, etc)
isolation movement for core

Aiming for heavier loads and therefore lower reps on the first big 'money' movement (5-7 reps at most), and more while doing the isolation exercises (8/10 reps). But ultimately I cannot prescribe anything to you, and this is just a general outline of what has worked for me.

Posted: Nov 13, 2010 at 10:38 Quote
raak wrote:
hazdxb wrote:
raak wrote:
'Getting the abs and arms growing'*snip*
Thanks for that dude and i know what you mean, but i probably should have mentioned that my body is actually out of proportion right now, my legs looks beastly and as soon as you look above the waist im very scrawny which is why getting the abs and arms growing is kind of a priority for me right now. Smile

Well when talking about abs, it's probably best to use the word 'core', and think of the entire midsection (the abs, obliques, and lower back). Generally speaking, these muscles should be used to stabilise (form a trunk around) the spine while performing either upper-body, or lower-body movements.

What I am getting at is that it is much better to train the core by not trying to isolate it; it is better to perform big, full body movements which force the core to act as a brace.

For instance, take the standing overhead barbell press, this is an upper-body movement (shoulders/triceps), yet it puts a huge demand on the core; and also the barbell front squat, this is primarily a leg (quad/hamstring) movement, yet the front squat is brutal on the core muscles (with STRICT FORM).

The important factor here is that these exercises allow you to lift heavy loads. This is why they are so good for adding muscle to the core area. I'm not ruling out isolation exercises, but they should be done at the end of the workout, after some sets (5 x 6 reps for instance) of a big lift.

A solution to your arms and abs problem could be based on two alternating workouts:

day 1

standing overhead press (hitting arms and shoulders + core)
isolation movement for tricep (pull down, french press, skull crushers, etc)
isolation movement for core (crunches, leg raises, etc)

day 2

deadlift (hitting arms shoulders, upper back + core)
isolation movement for bicep (curl, gorilla curl, chin ups, etc)
isolation movement for core

Aiming for heavier loads and therefore lower reps on the first big 'money' movement (5-7 reps at most), and more while doing the isolation exercises (8/10 reps). But ultimately I cannot prescribe anything to you, and this is just a general outline of what has worked for me.

Thanks for letting me know about this stuff, weightlifting can get pretty complicated sometimes....anywayz thanks to you alternating plan, i've formed a plan according to the equipment available to me.
day 1

standing overhead press (hitting arms and shoulders + core)
Pulldowns (isolation movement for tricep)
Crunches (isolation movement for core)
day 2

deadlift (hitting arms shoulders, upper back + core)
Bicep Curl (isolation movement for bicep)
Crunches (isolation movement for core)

I will be slowly cranking it up and adding more exercise as i progress but am wondering if this will be ok for now?
One last question, is it possible to substitute the deadlift with something else? I don't really have a spotter right now and that exercise would certainly require one. But if the deadlift is important i can always find a partner.
Thanks a lot for your help!

Posted: Nov 13, 2010 at 12:44 Quote
hazdxb wrote:
I will be slowly cranking it up and adding more exercise as i progress but am wondering if this will be ok for now?
One last question, is it possible to substitute the deadlift with something else? I don't really have a spotter right now and that exercise would certainly require one. But if the deadlift is important i can always find a partner.
Thanks a lot for your help!

You do not need a spotter for deadlifting (in fact it's impossible to spot a deadlift). If you cannot make the lift, you simply let go of the bar. The deadlift is one of the easier compound lifts, and that's why I suggested it (although the technique needs to be learnt). If you have access to a squat stand you could try squats, or front squats.

Posted: Nov 13, 2010 at 21:48 Quote
raak wrote:
hazdxb wrote:
I will be slowly cranking it up and adding more exercise as i progress but am wondering if this will be ok for now?
One last question, is it possible to substitute the deadlift with something else? I don't really have a spotter right now and that exercise would certainly require one. But if the deadlift is important i can always find a partner.
Thanks a lot for your help!

You do not need a spotter for deadlifting (in fact it's impossible to spot a deadlift). If you cannot make the lift, you simply let go of the bar. The deadlift is one of the easier compound lifts, and that's why I suggested it (although the technique needs to be learnt). If you have access to a squat stand you could try squats, or front squats.
arite, i just thought that i would need someone there to make sure i was lifting properly, as i've heard the risk of injury is quite high if you do it wrong. I guess i'll just carry on with the plan i have right now.
thanks

Posted: Nov 13, 2010 at 23:42 Quote
hazdxb wrote:
raak wrote:
hazdxb wrote:
I will be slowly cranking it up and adding more exercise as i progress but am wondering if this will be ok for now?
One last question, is it possible to substitute the deadlift with something else? I don't really have a spotter right now and that exercise would certainly require one. But if the deadlift is important i can always find a partner.
Thanks a lot for your help!

You do not need a spotter for deadlifting (in fact it's impossible to spot a deadlift). If you cannot make the lift, you simply let go of the bar. The deadlift is one of the easier compound lifts, and that's why I suggested it (although the technique needs to be learnt). If you have access to a squat stand you could try squats, or front squats.
arite, i just thought that i would need someone there to make sure i was lifting properly, as i've heard the risk of injury is quite high if you do it wrong. I guess i'll just carry on with the plan i have right now.
thanks

It's definitely a GOOD idea to have someone teach you how to deadlift. I've been trying them for about 3 years now, so my technique is okay, but I'm always trying to improve it. Basically:

approach the bar, bend down somewhat, keep thighs above parallel (keeping your hips tight, and trying to maintain a neutral position in your spine by squeezing your core muscles) - take hold of the bar (gripping just outside your shoulder width) - pull the bar towards you so it is touching you shins and then adjust your footing so that the outside of your calves are pressed against the inside of your forearms - spread your knees out slightly pushing them against your arms a little ------ setting up in this way provides you with a very firm base, you've started by getting a firm grip, worked your footing into a good position, and from there, you must keep everything tight - squeeze the upper back, head in a comfortable position - and begin to stand up in a controlled manner, leaning back slightly (YOUR WEIGHT SHOULD BE ON YOUR HEELS). This movement is difficult to master because of the amount of different things you have to do to perform the lift. It's not just taxing on the muscles, it's taxing on the central nervous system also.

Mikhail Koklyaev has great technique. Notice how he sets up, and the strong/tight position he is in just before he pulls the weight.


Posted: Nov 14, 2010 at 0:50 Quote
raak wrote:
hazdxb wrote:
raak wrote:


You do not need a spotter for deadlifting (in fact it's impossible to spot a deadlift). If you cannot make the lift, you simply let go of the bar. The deadlift is one of the easier compound lifts, and that's why I suggested it (although the technique needs to be learnt). If you have access to a squat stand you could try squats, or front squats.
arite, i just thought that i would need someone there to make sure i was lifting properly, as i've heard the risk of injury is quite high if you do it wrong. I guess i'll just carry on with the plan i have right now.
thanks

It's definitely a GOOD idea to have someone teach you how to deadlift. I've been trying them for about 3 years now, so my technique is okay, but I'm always trying to improve it. Basically:

approach the bar, bend down somewhat, keep thighs above parallel (keeping your hips tight, and trying to maintain a neutral position in your spine by squeezing your core muscles) - take hold of the bar (gripping just outside your shoulder width) - pull the bar towards you so it is touching you shins and then adjust your footing so that the outside of your calves are pressed against the inside of your forearms - spread your knees out slightly pushing them against your arms a little ------ setting up in this way provides you with a very firm base, you've started by getting a firm grip, worked your footing into a good position, and from there, you must keep everything tight - squeeze the upper back, head in a comfortable position - and begin to stand up in a controlled manner, leaning back slightly (YOUR WEIGHT SHOULD BE ON YOUR HEELS). This movement is difficult to master because of the amount of different things you have to do to perform the lift. It's not just taxing on the muscles, it's taxing on the central nervous system also.

Mikhail Koklyaev has great technique. Notice how he sets up, and the strong/tight position he is in just before he pulls the weight.

I'll take that advice to the point on how to deadlift to the point since you seem to know what you're talking about. Also that guy in the vid is INSANE, 405 KILOS? Holy crap! i'll be happy if i can even lift a 100 kilos in my lifetime hehehe


 


Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.022899
Mobile Version of Website