Old Riders....But not "Old School"

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Old Riders....But not "Old School"
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Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 18:03 Quote
True, DH brakes for DH bikes, but there are enough crossover applications where something like an Elixir gets OEM specced on an XC race bike with 4/6" rotors, then a DH bike with two 8" rotors.

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 18:59 Quote
hustler wrote:
In a nutshell: The black things aren't because the fluid got boiled once, its because of repetitive heat cycling. Water is in there, but it's not an emulsion, so you see what look like floatey things.



This information (above) was collected from years of Shimano and Avid tech seminars.

Makes sense. Thanks! Salute Would a Goodridge kit minimize this effect?

Not complaining, I was just curious if that is what happened. I don't really mind bleeding brakes. And I think flushing the black shit out from time to time is just a part of regular maintenance. It really isn't that big a deal, now that I know how to do it properly. It was just my front brake that boiled, and I don't even have those brakes anymore.

My new (to me) Demo has Juicy 7's (though the old bike had Juicy 5's, so I know I'll have the same issue). I'll probably do a full bleed as soon as I get the bike anyway, even though I know the previous owner (Kurt/Kaoscreator) took great care of it while it was his!

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:04 Quote
christophish wrote:
hustler wrote:
In a nutshell: The black things aren't because the fluid got boiled once, its because of repetitive heat cycling. Water is in there, but it's not an emulsion, so you see what look like floatey things.



This information (above) was collected from years of Shimano and Avid tech seminars.

Makes sense. Thanks! Salute Would a Goodridge kit minimize this effect?

Not complaining, I was just curious if that is what happened. I don't really mind bleeding brakes. And I think flushing the black shit out from time to time is just a part of regular maintenance. It really isn't that big a deal, now that I know how to do it properly. It was just my front brake that boiled, and I don't even have those brakes anymore.

My new (to me) Demo has Juicy 7's (though the old bike had Juicy 5's, so I know I'll have the same issue). I'll probably do a full bleed as soon as I get the bike anyway, even though I know the previous owner (Kurt/Kaoscreator) took great care of it while it was his!

i heard kurt has ridden it in the snow and beat the fuk outta it and it's got a rusty chain and the breaks don't come with the bike

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:07 Quote
christophish wrote:
Madder lol
BWAHAHAHA!!!

just havein fun..thought that might get you attention..lol

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:13 Quote
christophish wrote:
Makes sense. Thanks! Salute Would a Goodridge kit minimize this effect?

Christophish,
I really don't know to what degree a Goodridge kit will improve that state of affairs, but I will evangelically tell you that a properly installed Goodridge system can transform your bike handling/brake response. It may be the best results per $$ spent upgrade in MTBing.
Confidence, control, minimal fading, great feel at the lever.....do it now!!!!Smile

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:18 Quote
I agree - Goodridge means less expansion of the lines.

I even have them on my Jeep.

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:21 Quote
Thanks for the info.

I run Saints but do not have an issue with overheating. Instead, in their second season they began to feel mushy so I bled them.This helped for a bit but then the problem rematerialized. A change of the fluid was the ultimate fix. So now I know why changing the fluid made such a difference.



hustler wrote:
For the following post to follow deductive logic, you need to accept the anecdotal knowledge that brakes that get hotter more often, need to be bled more often.

The boiling issue thing is as simple as this: brake fluid is hyygroscopic, which means it absorbs moisture from the air. Basic chemistry tells us the hotter it is, the more water it can absorb. Only tiny amounts of moisture make their way in through a relatively sealed brake line. Heating the brake line causes more moisture ingress doubly - by expanding the fibers or other material of the line, and by allowing more water to be absorbed when it gets a chance to.

What you will find is that if you took equivalently bled brakes and ran one set on an XC bike, and one on a DH bike, the XC guy might go three years without a bleed, and the DH guy might do it three times a season.



In a nutshell: The black things aren't because the fluid got boiled once, its because of repetitive heat cycling. Water is in there, but it's not an emulsion, so you see what look like floatey things.



This information (above) was collected from years of Shimano and Avid tech seminars.

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:40 Quote
what is the cost approx for the goodridge lines?

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:41 Quote
If you have to ask....


























Just kidding hit me up on Thur and I will let you know.

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:49 Quote
dion5000 wrote:
what is the cost approx for the goodridge lines?

In Canada, by the time you do the fittings and the lines it's about $150 for a pair (too much), from CRC I think it's about £25-35/brake depending on application, and there are cool anodizing colours available if you like stuff like that (I do).

Edit: I get parts at cost at a Canadian bike shop, and some stuff is just still cheaper on the internet.

If any of you guys are in my hood, and get new lines I would be happy to bleed them for you. I realize that's really an idle threat, but you never know.

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 19:52 Quote
hustler wrote:
dion5000 wrote:
what is the cost approx for the goodridge lines?

In Canada, by the time you do the fittings and the lines it's about $150 for a pair (too much), from CRC I think it's about £25-35/brake, and there are cool anodizing colours available if you like stuff like that (I do).

have you seen the shit ive been buyin? course i love flashy bling..thanks for the info!

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 20:09 Quote
I run Formula R1 on the Mojo trail bike with 200mm rotor up front and 180mm rear= no problems with fade or warped rotors so far and only one bleed in the last six months.

On the Canfield, I run Codes and have had to bleed them a few times but no fade issues, but I don't ride shuttle runs here as we just don't have'em, and I don't think I ride anywhere nearly as much as some of you guys. Big Grin

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 21:06 Quote
jayburn wrote:
criscokid25 wrote:
Just watching "Deeper" a teton gravity film with Jeremy Jones. Do yourself a solid and watch this vid.

I watched it 3 times, I am pretty stoked for that movie.

have heard lots of good about it anyone know where i could get it?

Posted: Feb 13, 2011 at 22:04 Quote
When you boil the brakes, they lock up and the line bursts at the wheel caliper. You get burned the same as you would if you splashed deep fry oil on your legs. After that you must replace all the seals in the caliper and the line - they're cooked. I don't care about weight, which is why I would consider throwing some CR levers onto my XX calipers. I think that the one piece lever body would sort me out. I also have the black floaties in my fluid. Even after one ride. It does in fact look like seal chunks or paint chips as was earlier mentioned by someone, but what Hustler said is also true, though I'm not sure my fluid is in there long enough to do that.

I will probably end up with saints. That's buying up one class - DH brakes for AM riding. Should do the trick - we'll see.

If anyone's wondering, I got into the industry through wrenching, and I still occasionally put in a shift at one of the shops in the village. So I bleed lot's o brakes to WBP standard. I have had wicked bad luck with SRAM stuff - I don't see the problems that I'm having on many customer bikes.


 
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