Old Riders....But not "Old School"

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Old Riders....But not "Old School"
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Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 12:59 Quote
onemanarmy wrote:
Yeah, you think he ever gets to combine these skills?

I'm considering doing the same. At some point I'll have to pivot my career and won't be able to do that without a degree.

I'm getting old for the design game. Time for me to tell people what to do.[/Quote]

This is the thing with me actually. The only way for advancement (now anyways....) is to have a degree. I lost a prime role....thee role I was actually hired to eventually fill (....and the reason behind these guys are paying for me to get my degree..."come in, learn the ways, work on completing your degree....boom...!" ).....to someone that had ZERO team building or team management experience vs my 20+ years.

Why...? Because they changed the rules from "working on your degree and you can apply for positions that require one" to "must have your degree completed for positions that require one.." , and they had their degree.....in engineering..... Facepalm

personally I really want a snowboard, but shit....I can barely find time to ride let alone add a hobby. Plus I'd have to start from zero with gear, etc... Frown

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 13:26 Quote
I loved snowboarding... but my knees don't.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 13:31 Quote
If you've never done either, start with skiing. The fun comes on much quicker and with less pain. Learning to snowboard sucks, granted once you get "it" progressing with snowboarding might be easier. Becoming a really good skier is hard, but becoming an "ok" skier can be done in about a day, meanwhile the person that opted to learn to snowboard might have a broken wrist, collarbone, knee cap, or tailbone.

Also if you don't go much at all or aren't nit picky about the gear then just rent. You can run the gear over rocks without worry.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 13:35 Quote
skip to about the 23:30 mark lol


Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 13:37 Quote
chacou wrote:
if you don't go much at all or aren't nit picky about the gear then just rent.

That kind of dating advise is how folks end up with itchy bits and bobs lol

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 13:40 Quote
mysticmountainadventures wrote:
chacou wrote:
if you don't go much at all or aren't nit picky about the gear then just rent.

That kind of dating advise is how folks end up with itchy bits and bobs lol

Nothing a little 'tussin and ointment can't handle Wink

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 13:57 Quote
mysticmountainadventures wrote:
chacou wrote:
if you don't go much at all or aren't nit picky about the gear then just rent.

That kind of dating advise is how folks end up with itchy bits and bobs lol

lol lol

well played my man...well played

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 14:03 Quote
chacou wrote:
If you've never done either, start with skiing. The fun comes on much quicker and with less pain. Learning to snowboard sucks, granted once you get "it" progressing with snowboarding might be easier. Becoming a really good skier is hard, but becoming an "ok" skier can be done in about a day, meanwhile the person that opted to learn to snowboard might have a broken wrist, collarbone, knee cap, or tailbone.

Also if you don't go much at all or aren't nit picky about the gear then just rent. You can run the gear over rocks without worry.
I would say the exact opposite... I learned the basics of how to snowboard on one run, Mammoth Mountain, started at the top and spent an hour eating my shit all the way down and by about half way I'd kind of sorted it out, by the bottom I was ready to roll and took it from there. I've spent weeks skiing in my younger years and never developed the level of proficiency I got in a single day on a board.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 14:20 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
chacou wrote:
If you've never done either, start with skiing. The fun comes on much quicker and with less pain. Learning to snowboard sucks, granted once you get "it" progressing with snowboarding might be easier. Becoming a really good skier is hard, but becoming an "ok" skier can be done in about a day, meanwhile the person that opted to learn to snowboard might have a broken wrist, collarbone, knee cap, or tailbone.

Also if you don't go much at all or aren't nit picky about the gear then just rent. You can run the gear over rocks without worry.
I would say the exact opposite... I learned the basics of how to snowboard on one run, Mammoth Mountain, started at the top and spent an hour eating my shit all the way down and by about half way I'd kind of sorted it out, by the bottom I was ready to roll and took it from there. I've spent weeks skiing in my younger years and never developed the level of proficiency I got in a single day on a board.

Chair 23? (the garage/over hanging off-load ramp)
I bumped chairs on Chair 5 during the ~03/04 season, shoveled a shit ton of snow that winter. We had like 300" in about 10 days in January, buried everything in insane amounts of snow. I haven't been back to Mammoth since, such a fun mountain.

I learned the same way you did, spent an entire day falling down the ice at Canaan Valley, WV on an old Kemper ironing board that was probably way too big for me. But I'm a stubborn one, and the next run fell a little bit less, but I still maybe only got in 2 or 3 runs that day and left completely bruised. The next winter on a trip to CO to visit family I borrowed a friend's Barfoot and was cruising the back bowls at Vail and all over the mountain. When it clicks you can progress fairly quickly, but I still believe strongly that for a "never ever" for either, skiing is much easier and painless to learn the basics. Obviously everyone has different athletic abilities and physical traits that help in one way or another.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 14:38 Quote
chacou wrote:
Chair 23? (the garage/over hanging off-load ramp)
I bumped chairs on Chair 5 during the ~03/04 season, shoveled a shit ton of snow that winter. We had like 300" in about 10 days in January, buried everything in insane amounts of snow. I haven't been back to Mammoth since, such a fun mountain.

I learned the same way you did, spent an entire day falling down the ice at Canaan Valley, WV on an old Kemper ironing board that was probably way too big for me. But I'm a stubborn one, and the next run fell a little bit less, but I still maybe only got in 2 or 3 runs that day and left completely bruised. The next winter on a trip to CO to visit family I borrowed a friend's Barfoot and was cruising the back bowls at Vail and all over the mountain. When it clicks you can progress fairly quickly, but I still believe strongly that for a "never ever" for either, skiing is much easier and painless to learn the basics. Obviously everyone has different athletic abilities and physical traits that help in one way or another.
Panorama Gondola down to chair 23 then down Scotty's... Second run was chair 23 back up and then Cornice bowl down.

This was 1997, we had an el nino and to this day it was the most epic winter I've ever experienced. A buddy of mine, Aaron, worked up there around the same time as you though, wouldn't be surprised if you guys knew one another.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 14:40 Quote
billbek wrote:
What are you old guys skiing on these days?
Still on a pair of Rossignols from around 2005 or 6. Z-5.
I was at one time a decent skier and fairly aggressive in the bumps and I still like to run the occasional line when the body lets me. I am much more conservative on the boards than I was but still would like a ski that will do tight turns and also cruise well. Typically not a lot of deep snow around here.
Any suggestions?

Atomic Vantage 97 daily driver. Older Vantage 100 as rock skis.
Kastle FX86HP on hard and spring snow
Kastle TX93 touring, with ATK bindings and Dynafit Hoji's
Atomic Atlas 115, old but works fine on a rare powder day. With Tyrolia floppy "touring" binding and skins for some side country.

Tested a bunch last March at Jackson Hole. Dynastar M-PRO 99 was by far my favorite, Maybe 90mm version for firm snow. That is probably what I will replace Vantage Ti's with.

Recently I prefer Tyrolia Attack 16 bindings for everything, except for Pivots on hard snow skis.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 14:43 Quote
badbadleroybrown wrote:
chacou wrote:
Chair 23? (the garage/over hanging off-load ramp)
I bumped chairs on Chair 5 during the ~03/04 season, shoveled a shit ton of snow that winter. We had like 300" in about 10 days in January, buried everything in insane amounts of snow. I haven't been back to Mammoth since, such a fun mountain.

I learned the same way you did, spent an entire day falling down the ice at Canaan Valley, WV on an old Kemper ironing board that was probably way too big for me. But I'm a stubborn one, and the next run fell a little bit less, but I still maybe only got in 2 or 3 runs that day and left completely bruised. The next winter on a trip to CO to visit family I borrowed a friend's Barfoot and was cruising the back bowls at Vail and all over the mountain. When it clicks you can progress fairly quickly, but I still believe strongly that for a "never ever" for either, skiing is much easier and painless to learn the basics. Obviously everyone has different athletic abilities and physical traits that help in one way or another.
Panorama Gondola down to chair 23 then down Scotty's... Second run was chair 23 back up and then Cornice bowl down.

This was 1997, we had an el nino and to this day it was the most epic winter I've ever experienced. A buddy of mine, Aaron, worked up there around the same time as you though, wouldn't be surprised if you guys knew one another.

Maybe, smoked a ton of weed with lots of people. Liftie life! lol ...looking back it was 04/05 season, 570" on the season, 120" in January, a bit fabricated the prior 300" claim Wink

Janitor job at Breck was still the best ski bum job I've ever had, shit pay but got shift meals and could ride all day everyday, shift was 4pm - ?? (usually about 11pm, enough time to go out to the bar or get to bed early for the pow the next day), no dress or grooming requirements and the only shit you had to deal with from tourists was the actual shit, which is easier to deal with than the shit spewing from people's brains at a ski resort.

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 15:23 Quote
I loved snowboarding for decades... but it took its toll on my lower bits... ankles, knees, hips...likely broke my back at one point as well but never got in to a doctor. Sent a 40’ cliff and landed on a snow covered downed log... fully unconscious, snapped board and broken binding... not sure how I made it down...couldn’t walk right for months lol loved it but damnit I got served so many times... Facepalm

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 15:30 Quote
sterlingmagnum wrote:
I loved snowboarding for decades... but it took its toll on my lower bits... ankles, knees, hips...likely broke my back at one point as well but never got in to a doctor. Sent a 40’ cliff and landed on a snow covered downed log... fully unconscious, snapped board and broken binding... not sure how I made it down...couldn’t walk right for months lol loved it but damnit I got served so many times... Facepalm
We can confirm what kind of mess you get in when you skateboard, so can imaging what kind of ruckus you put down on snow!! Lol

Posted: Dec 6, 2021 at 16:30 Quote
Carnage. Blue and black and lumpy.

I have one pair of skis and I ski a lot. Mostly in the ski area, but also some touring. I always look for soft stuff. And I have Head Kore 105's. 105 under foot. They work for me. Not to nice on icy groomers, but not horrible.


 
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