Photographers of Pinkbike-READ THE OP

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Photographers of Pinkbike-READ THE OP
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Posted: Feb 20, 2020 at 17:58 Quote
alreadyupsidedown wrote:

Don't do this. That's $1200 CAD for a bigger, heavier lens that's worse in the dark.

F2.8 vs 3.5 is only a HALF stop of light, and 2.8 vs 5.6 is 2 stops. The image stabilization on the Sony kit lens should make up for 3-5 stops in low light. In terms of portraits and subject isolation, you will see nothing on the short end, and only a bit on the long end. Realistically, F2.8 isn't anything special for bokeh on APS-C, and I doubt the casual viewer would notice the difference without a side to side comparison. Pass.

A lens that lets in 4x as much light on the long end is a huge difference. His photo albums show he predominately shoots candids of moving people - which renders image stabilization useless. The only way to get sharp photos of moving subjects is to keep the shutter speed up with fast glass.

I personally prefer primes, but he was asking about a zoom, which is why I recommended an alternative zoom instead of a bag of primes.

That said, I really like the Sigma 1.4 lenses-

Danny Hart in the rock garden at the 2019 Mont Sainte Anne World Championship Final

Posted: Feb 20, 2020 at 18:42 Quote
Thanks for the input. I think the main reason I'm not happy with my current setup is the quality of the kit lens. I find it's harder to get super sharp photos out of it when compared to my long lens or friends cameras I have played with. I like the idea of a nice prime because like you said, most of my photos are around 20mm or less. My only hesitation with that would be with ski photos since unlike with biking shots if I'm too far away I can't just walk closer and changing lenses in deep powder while it's snowing is risky business. I guess I can just crop in too.

Posted: Feb 20, 2020 at 19:09 Quote
The only downside to the Sigma primes route is that you would be hampered from going to a full frame camera down the road, if that’s your eventual desire. Also, some people just don’t like shooting primes, but that’s strictly personal preference.

Posted: Feb 20, 2020 at 19:37 Quote
I feel like looking back at my photos I pretty much use my kit lens as a prime. I'm probably a long way away from upgrading from this camera too. From my quick tire-kicking of cameras online I didn't really see anything I wanted more than the a6000. I really like the 11 fps and small size.

Posted: Feb 20, 2020 at 20:07 Quote
Yeah man, nothing wrong with the A6000. it's easy to fall for the marketing that APSC is just a 'stepping stone' to 35mm, but that's BS. Sony's crop bodies outperform their FF bodies in a lot of ways.

I also think it's good to dedicate to a platform... I used to try and only buy FX primes for my DX Nikon DSLR in case I ever bought a FX body... That never happened, so why did I lug around the extra weight and waste the money? You can always sell lenses down the road, for very little loss.

Since you mention the deep snow scenario, I'd take a long hard look at the Sony 18-135... It seems to get great reviews in terms of sharpness and quick focusing, and it's the smallest and lightest of the decent Sony APS-C zooms. Great range too- lots of people seem to use it as a walk around lens, and leave their 55-200's at home.

There's always the new 16-55 f/2.8 G... It's surprisingly compact, and supposedly worthy of the hype. Weather sealed for shooting out in the elements... This would be certainly be the pro move, if money were no object.

https://www.henrys.com/105152-SONY-SEL-16-55MM-F2-8-G-LENS.aspx

$1350 is a lot of money though... You could get an 18-135 for general use, and a Sigma 1.4 prime for low light, and have money left over...

Posted: Feb 21, 2020 at 2:04 Quote
If you're worried about limiting yourself to full frame in future, the Sony 50mm f/1.8 is an excellent lens for a surprisingly affordable price. If you can stretch a little more to the Zeiss 55mm f/1.8 then you'll get a little more sharpness and nicer build quality, but there's nothing wrong with the cheaper 50mm at all - it's incredibly sharp for the price range.

That being said, 50mm on a crop sensor can be a little close. If you're mostly taking shots of single subjects I wouldn't expect this to be an issue, but a lot of it is down to personal shooting style.

It's also worth remembering that resale value on a well looked after lens is still good. If I remember correctly, I bought my Sigma 30mm f/1.4 for £330, and sold it for £200.

Posted: Feb 21, 2020 at 2:58 Quote
Tbh I find 50mm on crop to be too close 50% of the time and too far for the other 50%.

Posted: Feb 21, 2020 at 6:44 Quote
I spent a lot of time shooting through a 50mm on crop, and while it was good for full or half body portraits, and taking photos of things, I would agree it was far from ideal.

As a sole fast prime for crop, 24mm or 30/35mm are hands down more practical, and could be considered do-it-all lenses. As a normal angle, 35mm will take all the same portraits as 50, with a bit of cropping, or a slightly different view angle, and it’s just wide enough that you could leave it on the camera for a trip and not feel limited. I have a 35mm 1.8 on my Nikon now, that never comes off.

It definitely made sense to buy full frame lenses back in the 2000s and early 2010s, when crop and full frame DSLR lenses were basically the same size, and there were very few good APS-C primes anyway.

Old style AF-D (screw drive) primes for Nikon were cheap and tiny, and got you those fast apertures, with the only caveat that you had to stop them down to be pin-sharp in the daytime.

Now a days with higher resolution cameras, and mirrorless, the difference in cost and size has widened considerably, to the point that I don’t think it makes sense to mix them anymore. Only exception would be 50mm, which are always sharp and affordable, and about the same size.

Posted: Feb 21, 2020 at 11:00 Quote
If a dude wanted a mirrorless camera what would you recommend?

Posted: Feb 21, 2020 at 14:26 Quote
ajax-ripper wrote:
If a dude wanted a mirrorless camera what would you recommend?

Now is a really bad time to be getting into any system, IMHO. There is basically a battle of standards going on, and they are not all going to survive, nor are any of them perfect. Safe bets would be Fuji & Sony, and probably Canon. Sony & Fuji by far have the largest selection of glass; Canon can too, but it requires an adapter.

My recommendation would be to get into a budget system like Micro 4/3 or Sony APSC while the market sorts itself out. Olympus & Panasonic have tons of bodies and glass, and it’s all very affordable. Check out the EM5, or the EM1 & G9 if you want a premium body.

Another intriguing option could be the Canon EOS RP & 24-240 lens. Full frame setup with a wide range at one hell of a price. The EOS bodies have some of the best ergos & controls I've felt on a full frame mirrorless body.

Posted: Feb 23, 2020 at 10:21 Quote
ajax-ripper wrote:
If a dude wanted a mirrorless camera what would you recommend?

I’m on a Fuji x-t1 and it’s been pretty awesome! I do wish there was less noise in the darks but not willing to fork out the cash required for improvement.

Posted: Feb 23, 2020 at 12:42 Quote
ninjatarian wrote:
ajax-ripper wrote:
If a dude wanted a mirrorless camera what would you recommend?

Now is a really bad time to be getting into any system, IMHO. There is basically a battle of standards going on, and they are not all going to survive, nor are any of them perfect. Safe bets would be Fuji & Sony, and probably Canon. Sony & Fuji by far have the largest selection of glass; Canon can too, but it requires an adapter.

My recommendation would be to get into a budget system like Micro 4/3 or Sony APSC while the market sorts itself out. Olympus & Panasonic have tons of bodies and glass, and it’s all very affordable. Check out the EM5, or the EM1 & G9 if you want a premium body.

Another intriguing option could be the Canon EOS RP & 24-240 lens. Full frame setup with a wide range at one hell of a price. The EOS bodies have some of the best ergos & controls I've felt on a full frame mirrorless body.

I suppose it ultimately depends on what the budget is and if you're willing to wait. I think 2020 has the potential to be a turning point in the mirrorless world.

Canon has put out some amazing glass for their mirrorless system, but the bodies have been lacking a bit, but it sounds like they've got some unbelievable bodies coming in the next year or so.

Nikon's sort of done the opposite and put out some pretty darn good bodies and some okay glass. As a Nikon guy, I hope they are going to step up their game this year.

I haven't shot with Sony (and really don't want to change systems), but from a technology standpoint, I think they're in the lead, but generally doesn't sound like they are as great from an ergonomic or durability standpoint. I have a number of friends who've had to send their Sony bodies in for service numerous times. I'm also a big guy and don't want the smaller body that Sony provides. Still the best AF in the game, although Canon seems to be catching up fast with their new 1DX (obviously not mirrorless, but the trickle down potential is huge).

Posted: Feb 23, 2020 at 18:05 Quote
What do you think about Fuji? The XT-30 looks pretty cool to me. A friend of mine uses the XT-20 I think and I messed around with it a little and it felt and looked pretty good. Off topic, anybody know hoe I can get a black sky like in this photo?


I edited this on a different computer and looking back at it want to get this effect again with bikes but have no idea how I did it the first time.

Posted: Feb 23, 2020 at 18:46 Quote
On one hand- we’re at a turning point in the market, and there is some uncertainty about which mirrorless mounts will ‘win’ and ‘lose’, but we’ve also never been so blessed with choice. Cameras are f*cking amazing now. Honestly I feel like cameras were good enough to get the job done 7-8 years ago, and everything since has been gravy. It’s easy to get caught up looking for the perfect camera, and never be satisfied, but I really don’t think you can go wrong in 2020. The perfect camera doesn’t exist, so pick the brand with your favourite colour science, and get on with it.

Recently, my girlfriend purchased a camera to use in her wood studio. She wants to produce documentary video, and take better pictures for Instagram. She appreciates good imagery, but gives zero f*cks about gear, and has a very low tolerance for tinkering with settings.

Essentials were: ~$1000cad price point, compact form-factor, articulating screen, a microphone port for a lavalier, and good stabilized 1080p video. The goal was a camera that didn’t need to be baby-sat to produce clean footage with good exposure, white balance and colour. Throw it in Movie or P mode, and build stuff. Turns out there aren’t many affordable (sub $1k cad) small cameras with mic ports, so that narrowed the field to pretty much the Canon M50, G7x MkIII, or a used Sony a6xxx or Panasonic GH.

Anyways, she settled on the G7x, and I’m very impressed.. It’s not a perfect camera by any means- It doesn’t have the dual pixel AF, so it’s not great for action pics.. But damn, I haven’t used another point and shoot camera that produces such reliable, usable imagery. Beautiful JPGs right out of the box, and super smooth video. It has a built in ND filter that you can set to automatic, which the camera uses to keep its 1.8-2.8 zoom wide open as much as possible. I think the thing that struck me the most is how much slicker the software has gotten. Canon’s touch screen settings menus are a revelation.

Anyways, I thought it was really neat to have to buy a camera within such a narrow set of requirements, and just live with it. I’m also very pleased with how favourably that turned out- It’s great that there is an ideal camera for every niche, and you can get something so usable even under such limitations.

Edit: @GravityCandy

Find your colour HSL sliders, and pull the blue Luminance down to desired effect.

One thing to be aware of with Fuji- Apparently you really need to shoot JPEGs to take advantage of the Xtrans sensor. Sure, you can edit the raw files, but Fuji’s in-camera image processing does it better. Ideally, you nail the exposure and white balance in-camera. I’ve heard good things about this approach, but I’ve yet to try it myself outside a camera store.

Posted: Feb 24, 2020 at 15:52 Quote
I shoot a lot of in camera JPEGs these days (all the photos I posted in the past couple pages are OOC JPEGs), so the Fuji system is a big draw for me. The XT4 should be out soon, so I am waiting to see what that offers.


Really just wish Sigma / Tamron / etc would make X mount lenses. This is where Sony wins big- an open lens mount. Lot of quality affordable FE mount glass.


 
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