1 Question - Is Social Media Having a Positive or Negative Impact on our Sport?

Mar 1, 2018
by Mike Levy  
1 Question



Like many people, I have a love/loathe relationship with social media for the obvious, sometimes self-righteous reasons that we all can recite. Sure, we know that it's probably not good for us in the grand scheme of things, but what about when it comes to our beloved two-wheeled hobby... Is social media having a positive or negative impact on our sport?

It's a question that, admittedly, hadn't come to my mind before stumbling across (on Facebook no less) an article written by Outside's Marc Peruzzi titled 'Stop the Progression Already.' In it, Peruzzi opines that social media is at least partly responsible for an ever-increasing number of injuries and deaths in alternative sports. Kodak courage is the culprit, supposedly, and he even goes so far as to say, ''And so it went that once healthy outdoor pursuits devolved into suicide clubs.'' Strange, I sure as hell don't remember signing up for any Heaven's Gate-esque mountain bike club, and I haven't seen any Jim Jones-types in our circles yet. To be fair, Peruzzi talks about losing friends in outdoor accidents, so the subject is understandably close to his heart, and he does back up his thoughts with stats that show an ever-increasing number of rescues and hospital visits between 2007 to 2013. Now, I'm not sure how he figured out the percentage of those that were GoPro and Kodak-related, or if the numbers went up simply because the number of participants went up, but I'm assuming that he might also be assuming.

Anyway, while I wholeheartedly disagree with Peruzzi's sentiments on social media being at least somewhat responsible for more injuries and deaths, the topic left me wondering what everyone else thinks. Below, I bounce the question off a handful of industry vets, both professional and lifestyle athletes, and also weigh-in with my own thoughts. But I also want to hear from you: is social media having a positive or negative impact on our sport?








Craig Glaspell – Global Category Director - Bicycle, Troy Lee Designs

Craig ''Stikman'' Glaspell's career has seen him go from working as a shop mechanic in Redondo Beach, California, to wrenching on the National and World Cup circuits for some of the quickest racers in the around. He's keeping things a bit more local these days, although he's still working with some of the fastest racers out there as the Global Bicycle Category Director at Troy Lee Designs.


bigquotesWell, it hasn’t made my life or yours ‘better’ and in some ways has made things worse, mainly in the way of narcissism, selfies, or bragging about your awesome (but probably shitty) life. But that is a societal issue that's not so much specific to ‘social in mountain biking.’

It has made the sports marketing side worse in the way that bikini shots get more ‘likes’ than an impressive racing accolade or sweet new section made by a trail crew. Made worse by outsiders and bean counters coming into brands only to measure the success of athletes (products as well) solely by the social reach, which bothers me to lean on that ROI from social solely, and not relying on real-world experiences. Having an athlete engage with a real person at an event, race, or ride will always be more powerful, yet less ‘measureable’ than some stupid Instagram post.

On the subject of people pushing their limits and stunt for ‘likes,' well, people have always been risk-takers and always will be. On the upside for brands and consumers, it has given brands more reach for less cost and given consumers the ability to learn about products, events, etc. without having to go far, and they can get that info/image very quickly. We get to see new trails we never would have seen, get to see trail builders doing their magic and applaud them, so there has been some good. As many have said; less social media and more riding is the best recipe for true happiness.






Matt Hunter – Professional Mountain Biker, Specialized

Since turning pro back in 2003, Hunter has been a major force in pushing the limits of freeriding back when no one was all that sure of how far the sport could go. Countless mind-bending movie segments (who remembers that insane gap to wallride in Kamloops?) stacked up over the years, but these days see the Specialized rider shifting his focus more towards big adventures rather than big senders.

bigquotesWell, this is a hammer of a question that I'm probably not certified to answer, but I can share my opinion and experience. First, I need to define "our sport" for this context. Let's talk about the sport as it relates to a rider. Our church, the pillar of it all, the reason for all the wheels, carbon, dirt, metal, rubber, shovels and blood: The Ride.

Instantly, the benefits of social media and The Ride are apparent: The ability to connect with other riders, inspiration, and accessibility. Social media has simplified connecting with people who share the same interests. You can find a riding partner from your couch, just by swiping and typing. Social media also provides inspiration to ride. Photos of stunning places, gorgeous bikes, and mind-blowing action create a powerful urge to ride your bike. You can spend hours dreaming of what it would be like to shred there or jump that. Accessibility is simple with social media. Apps provide the perfect trail, with descriptions of the terrain and photos of the scenery. You can even be sure you aren't going to get lost as long as you turn on your GPS and keep checking the screen throughout your ride. Convenience and safety! What a glorious time we live in!

Seriously, though, that's all bullshit.

Having a tough time finding someone to ride with? Go ride. Chances are you will meet someone on the trail. Or, you'll break something on your bike, and then get to go to a real bike shop, with real people and then you'll definitely meet a person who rides. Lacking inspiration? Keep a magazine near your toilet. Flip through it while you poop. It's not going to send you any notifications and distract you from completing a thought process. Thoughts that may go something like this: Wow, look at that awesome photo. Bikes are so cool. Mountains are the best. I should go mountain biking.

Trail-challenged? Go ride. Anybody who rides their bike regularly knows where the trails are. When you ride your bike, you'll meet riders, and riders talk about trails. It can be directions or just a rumor. Go look! You might get lost, tired and hungry. Then, just before you die, you will find the sickest trail ever just hiding in the forest. Or you'll bushwhack your way back home and be inspired to build a ribbon through all that brush that just removed your shin skin. The Ride is a chance for mental clarity. We travel quietly through beautiful places. We are alone with our thoughts or we have time to chat with a friend. We feel the exhilaration of doing dangerous things and a higher sensation of being alive. We improve our skills and solve problems. Nothing is more valuable and powerful than this.

Overall, I feel the inclusion of social media in The Ride detracts from it. If I think to stop and photograph something for social media, whether or not I do it, that thought has interrupted my flow. If you're thinking of how many likes your selfie at the top is going to get, you're not in the moment.

Social media has a way of looking better than reality. Carefully selected imagery creates an impression to make a peer's riding look sick AF. Extended exposure to this filter can make a person feel less than sick AF. You know what is really sick AF? Getting out for a damn bike ride and breathing some fresh air, and carving a corner even if you fall on your face. That's livin'. And it's something to be proud of.

It's 2018 and social media is definitely here to stay. I'm not saying all mountain bikers need to abandon it. Just keep in mind that it's really a bunch of bullshit and don't let it spoil your ride.






Wade Simmons – Professional Mountain Biker, Rocky Mountain

Does this guy really need an introduction? Along with Richie Schley and Brett Tippie, Wade is one of the original pioneers of freeriding who were launching off cliffs into gravel pits and balancing across ungodly skinnies while most riders were still rocking 100mm stems and Lycra. The Godfather is still charging hard, and, luckily for us, he's also just as opinionated as ever when it comes to social media.


bigquotesAhh, man, you know that I really don't care, but if I had to answer, I'd say it's somewhere in between.

On the positive side, social media is great for product launches in terms of the reach of audience. In the pre-social media days, a launch involved a magazine ad and then a media event or similar where people get together to try the product, which still happens today. But now the technology ensures a demographic targeted reach = better ROI. What I don't like is the fodder. All the re-iterated bullshit by athletes...of course, the cream will always rise to the top and the good quality stands out, but the mediocrity is too present. Who really cares about (enter social media athlete here) doing another 1-3 minute shitty shred in (enter trendy location here like Bali, Iceland, Peru... you name it)?

I'm too cynical to take it at face value, and maybe I take a too philosophical view thinking that is this it?... Is Instagram and Facebook the route we are taking for the next ten years? Christ, I hope not; at least with old magazines you can pick one up and have a laugh on the shitter, but who's gonna swipe through old shitty Instagram posts? Nobody.






Lauren Gregg – MTB Marketing Manager, Fuji Bikes

While Gregg is now the MTB Marketing Manager at Fuji Bikes, it was only last season that she was chasing the Enduro World Series around the globe and calling her custom-built Ford Transit van home. And, having harnassed social media to allow fans to follow her adventures, she's also uniquely qualified to comment on the pluses and minuses of that approach.


bigquotesSocial media is just a tool, and it’s how users choose to use it that determines whether it has a positive or negative impact on our sport. If it’s used solely for self-promotion, or if the focus on social media takes away from the actual experience of riding, then it is harmful. But when it’s used to connect with people, introduce new riders to our sport, and spread the love of riding, I’ve seen it have a positive impact as well.

In my own career, I’ve had a major love/hate relationship with social media. I can’t deny that my early success on Instagram was a major catalyst for my success in my riding career as companies has just realized the value of social media marketing. This shift allowed the industry to focus more on the experience and adventures of mountain biking, which I think is definitely a positive. But sometimes the focus on social media puts lots of pressure on turning rides into photo shoots instead of just enjoying the experience itself. It cheapens a moment when you have to remember to pull your camera out and capture it or try to recreate it in a certain way to “get the shot.” The solution is just to be more casual and authentic. The first priority should be actually having a good time, not getting a photo or video of it. Sharing an authentic experience is much more valuable than just getting a good shot for your own self-promotion.

At times, I wasn’t sure if all my work on social media was having any positive impacts, but over time I’ve had many women and new riders come up to me and tell me they tried mountain biking for the first time because of my Instagram. I meet these people at MTB festivals or trailheads, and they now have the love of riding in their lives. Those interactions were more gratifying than any race result I’ve ever posted. Inspiring and connecting with new riders is a great positive that’s come from my experience with social media.





Mike Levy – Tech Editor, Pinkbike

Levy doesn't seem to mind alternating between making friends and ticking people off with his words, but hey, you're probably doing it wrong if everyone's a fan, right? He's also bounced on and off of social media since it became a thing, mostly using it these days to upload too many photos of his dog or waste multiple hours each day looking at cars that he'll never be able to afford. He may talk a big game, but he loves social media deep down.


bigquotesDon't mind me; just coming up with a hypocritical answer to my own question. I admit to enjoying a lot of what social media has to offer, despite feeling a bit conflicted about it all. I mean, it's usually just a narcissistic highlight reel of our own lives, isn't it? But there I am, uploading dog photos faster than a mom shares pics of her newborn baby that bears more resemblance to a potato than a fresh human. No one actually cares about my dog or that potato baby, but we'll still do it even though we know it's just a result of conditioning. In fact, it's a lot like how I know that the tube of Pringles in my cupboard has literally been engineered to trick my brain into wanting them even though I'm kinda meh about Pringles in general. Yeah, I'm mad at myself because I just inhaled the whole tube even though I didn't actually want them. Now I feel gross, bloated, sad, and I still feel empty to boot.

And that's social media in a nutshell as well, at least for me.

Doom and gloom aside, I'd argue that social media is mostly harmless, and it's a good thing to be exposed to more [insert whatever you're into here] than you ever would be able to see IRL. But is it good for our sport? If you believe that more riders, more sales, and more popularity is a good thing, then sure. I don't think any of those are positive points, however, and yes, I do fully realize the irony of my opinion given that I make words for Pinkbike. But I miss the days when mountain biking was a kooky, strange thing to be doing, when I was made fun of relentlessly for being a teenager who was more interested in bikes than normal teenager stuff, and when sponsored riders didn't have social media to pollute with their bought-off posts and asinine hashtags. And don't even get me started on self-absorbed Twitter morons who believe their whiny feed makes one iota of difference.

Then again, maybe I'm just getting old. I'd argue that social media is a tool largely used by both the media (including PB, of course), professional riders, and brands to get the best possible return on investment. The issue is that I'm not sure we remember that often enough.

So no, I don't believe that social media is good for our sport, but that's just an extension of me believing that social media isn't good for us period. Now to upload a new photo of my dog and wait for those 'likes' to roll in. I might feel empty, but at least I got them double taps, right?





Guys like Wade and myself can be as grumpy and backward about social media as we want, but no amount of moaning is going to make Instagram and Facebook disappear anytime soon. There's a simple-ish solution, however: just be aware. Be aware that those photos are just the highlight reel of what is probably a relatively normal life full of ups and downs, that what you're looking at might actually be a thinly disguised ad, and that you don't need to post a photo of your adventure for it to have happened.

So, what do you think... Has social media brought our sport more positives than negatives? Do you reckon that mountain biking would be better off without it, or has it helped us in some way?



313 Comments

  • + 231
 It's been Pinkbike's week for tackling hot-topic issues. Transgender rights, gun control, social media influence... Next week we'll probably see housing prices and pipeline talk!
  • + 29
 Its the middle of winter for crying out loud. Not much going on in the bike world and nothing is related in this world of random individualized events.
  • + 84
 Really hoping this isnt sarcastic at all. I mean, I gotta say, im impressed with the new content coming out of this platform. Especially because I feel like most pinkbike users are oblivious, hella privileged, and rather close minded.
  • + 26
 @Boardlife69: Its always summer somewhere
  • + 19
 @doe222: which reminds me, it's 17:00 somewhere. Cheers! We need PB to do an IPA shootout. I volunteer.
  • + 34
 @POWsLAYER: Thankfully there are self-rightrous enlightened, deserving, open minded people like you to balance out all the neanderthals.
  • + 12
 @POWsLAYER: and judgmental.
  • - 5
flag POWsLAYER (Mar 1, 2018 at 9:58) (Below Threshold)
 @smithcreek: wow, really took it personally didnt we.
  • + 20
 @POWsLAYER: well you did attack the entire community as "hella privileged" whatever the f*ck that means..
  • + 11
 @dkidd: Trans rights? I think I missed that, can you point me to what you're talking about?
  • + 4
 @laxguy: did i? did i "attack" the entire community not-so-laxguy? are the users of this website not predominately white CISHET men with expendable income or did i miss something?

the fact that you don't even know what "privileged'' mean furthers my point.

also, its not my job to educate you, so google it.
  • - 2
 @delusional: yeah im real curious about that one too.
  • + 1
 @delusional: Aussie dh race a few weeks ago... Trans men racing the women class. I think?
  • + 10
 @POWsLAYER: "Hella", must be a fellow Bay rider?
  • + 24
 LET'S JUST GET THE GRAVITY SEASON STARTED AND PEACE WILL RETURN TO THE VALLEY!
  • + 0
 @Mtb4joe: Link ?? i dug around but didnt find it on this site (shrug)

I lived in the bay for a spell, some things stick with yaWink
  • + 8
 @POWsLAYER: I did a bit of searching and turns out there was a (generally, and predictably, awful) discussion in the comments discussing the winner of an NZ DH race being trans. www.pinkbike.com/news/new-zealand-national-dh-series-round-3-report-and-results.html
  • - 6
flag POWsLAYER (Mar 1, 2018 at 10:30) (Below Threshold)
 @delusional: Ah, so pinkbike.com didnt actually report on it, but yeah thats par for the downhill course sadly.
  • + 4
 @Boardlife69: It's stout and porter season but I like where your head's at.
  • + 1
 @POWsLAYER: you did... but clearly explaining that to you would be pointless. I'll take my CISHET (again what the f*ck does that mean?) and expendable income with me and go ride my bike. have a good day getting angry on the internet Smile
  • + 3
 @delusional: Thanks for sorting that out. And yes it was ugly and awful!
  • + 3
 @POWsLAYER: i know i am. Where’s my mechanic - I got a flat - pics on istagram. Hey - do you really slay pow - sounds gnar AF. Bro, do you even Lawyer up. Enve everything. ETap eagle. Yes Bro!

And im not closed minded. You are. You could choose to be more like me. But Nooo. Proabably dont even run a coil.
  • + 1
 @laxguy: you know its funny you mention getting angry on the internet. I had a look at your profile and over there where it list all of your comment activity, it would seem its YOU that has a bit of an anger on the internet issue. Couple of screen grabs since i know youll probably be embarrassed about it nowWink
  • - 13
flag laxguy (Mar 1, 2018 at 10:59) (Below Threshold)
 @POWsLAYER: OOOOHHHH NOOO MY GOD IM SO EMBARAASSAASSSEDDD!!! PLEASE DONT SHOW THE WORLD!!!! OMGGGG!!!!!! IM SOOOO EMBARAAASSSDEDDERDSDSS..!!!!!
  • + 5
 @POWsLAYER: You sound like a real ass. Surely you can find something in the Portland area to help chill you the heck out.
  • + 2
 @laxguy: Assuming you're honestly asking, "cishet" refers to those who are both cisgendered and heterosexual. Cisgendered meaning that your gender identity matches your birth assigned sex, and heterosexual generally meaning that you largely engage in romantic relationships with people of a different gender to yourself.
  • + 1
 @doe222: not where i live, right now Big Grin
  • + 13
 @delusional: interesting... i tend to call that a straight man, but to each their own. Smile
  • + 6
 @smithcreek:

Neanderthals were the first artists - didn't you read the news last week. I happen to have more Neanderthal markers in my DNA than 86% of 23&ME customers, so don't be hurling around that speciesist speciesism, ite?
  • + 4
 @Grosey: I don't think she's a Bro, breh.
  • + 4
 @laxguy: Well "man" there is an odd choice, I mean women can also be cis, and men can also be trans. So these labels are useful to be clear about what we mean when that clarity is important to the discussion. Obviously in most cases where we use woman/man the trans/cis prefixes are not necessary.
  • + 2
 @delusional: you know what, you're right. i read that as being directed towards me and responded based on that.. this is all very new to me. but unlike some people, i'm not here trolling or getting angry
  • - 11
flag POWsLAYER (Mar 1, 2018 at 11:20) (Below Threshold)
 @Grosey: Certified Master Wrench here, bummmer about your flat. I need to borrow a tool though, anyone got a Grosey?
  • + 2
 @laxguy: Ah the fun and confusion of the general or specific "you" in English. I guess I could have written "one", but that feels a little too formal for PB comments!
  • - 6
flag POWsLAYER (Mar 1, 2018 at 11:39) (Below Threshold)
 @NCByron: i sound like a fart? how can you even hear me? SBD!
  • + 21
 God I wish Joe Rogan was riding bikes and had a Pinkbike Account
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: would make things even more entertaining.. POWERFUL JOE ROGAN!
  • + 3
 @map-guy:

Why do porters and stouts even have a season? Why can’t we just get all major varieties all year? Mmmm.... beer...
  • + 12
 Can we all just take our hats off to Matt Hunter for being the man.
  • + 1
 @POWsLAYER: Why don't you head on back there
  • + 7
 They're trying to distract people from the real issue: FLATS OR CLIPS?!?!?!?!?!
  • + 0
 @POWsLAYER:
TRUTH
( re your original comment)
  • + 2
 Everybody is downvoting powslayer and I can see why, but he's actually right about us being privileged. The fact that we're writing here and that we own our bikes proves this. I'd consider it a bit ungrateful not to recognise it.
  • + 1
 @Slabrung: his comments are rather cryptic to folks who feel the need to put themselves on one side of some argument. Right now we don't know what his argument is and on which side of it he stands. And I guess that may well be the point. My kind of guy... or girl, or zee, or navy cis.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: haha Big Grin Yeah I think you summed it up well! (It's been a long time by the way! Good to 'see' you!)
  • + 2
 @Boardlife69: sorry mate, its summer in the southern hemisphere and there's a LOT going on here, cheers im going for a ride!!
  • + 2
 @dkidd next week is tariffs and the impact on the price of bikes.
  • + 1
 @Mtb4joe: If you want some interesting reality checks regarding trans "rights" that's not ugly check out Dr. Jordan B Peterson. Definitely challenges the not always well thought out, but well intended, sjw message out there.
  • - 4
flag TrevDHmaster (Mar 2, 2018 at 9:07) (Below Threshold)
 I saw your mom on Instagram, sent her a dm now I am your daddy.
  • - 4
flag TrevDHmaster (Mar 2, 2018 at 9:08) (Below Threshold)
 @POWsLAYER:
Hillary Clinton is a criminal. LOCK HER UP
  • - 3
 @POWsLAYER:
Tell your mum I said "hey"
  • + 1
 @rrolly: JP is definitely not someone to listen to on this. He genuinely has no idea what he's talking about, and sounds completely ridiculous to anyone who has actually studied any of the topics he tries to hold forth on. His whole act of invoking some post-modern neo-marxist boogie man is completely ridiculous and based on a complete misunderstanding of what post-modernism actually is. It's fairly telling that basically every sociologist, anthropologist, or other academic who actually studies these ideas finds him utterly laughable.
  • + 1
 @delusional: +1. JP may be a conceited blowhard, but he markets himself well, and comes across as educated enough for conservatives (without time to research) to latch on to, unfortunately.
  • + 3
 @delusional: no he doesn’t but if you like to picture him this way, it’s your problem. As with all these sorts of dicussions, as with all opinion makers like him, if you are looking for someone to lead you and follow his every single word, please, grow yourself some own personality. I fon’t like everything about him, he is too pushy, but if I had an opportunity to tell him what I think and what he could change, I wouldn’t. If you want to talk about anyone whether he is religious, postmodernist, marxist and expect absolute coherence, if you look for someone who says everything you could consider as viable, you’re in for a painmaze journey. He’s not my prophet, but he has hell of a lot of good things to say. As a Pole who had family fkd up bith by Nazis and Soviets, being an ex catholic, I just find lots of modern ideas to be refries bullshit or at least symmetrical to bigotry I have experienced myself first hand. I can listen to JP, Raj Patel, Noam Chomsky, Milton Friedman, Slavoj Zizek, Pinker, Harris, Pope Francis and plenty more, and get something out of it. You can call me a moral relativist, it’s on you. But to me Social Justice Movement is a bunch of ideologically charged, power greedy fks, with hormonal imbalance who are not much different from Hiter Jugend, they are just limited by what they can do, by modern law system. If they could, if juridical consequences were not an issue, go to Wallstreet , grab these dudes out and lynch them, they would. Blinded by ideology, they are perfect useful idiots. Check that term “useful idiot” in relation to folks like George Bernard Shaw. I am super happy they exist, because thanks to such extremes we can adjust ourselves and see what ideology is leading to. Do you think teenagers and 20 year olds joining ISIS work on different behavioral mechanisms? No they don’t. They all want to serve a bigger cause. And maybe such state of mind, such thought mechanism was useful in the past, after all, this is what brought end to comunism in Poland, East Grrmany, Czechoslovakia, but in the current environment it’s just something that brings damage. So I don’t agree with JP that SJW is going to turn the world into another Stalinism, it just can’t. But it blindly strives for it, and it is the reason why wave of nationalism is tumbling through the first world, waking up all the demons. Because certain group of people may be racist fka, but another big part of people are tired of this PC bullsht.
  • + 3
 Sorry, I meant it is one of the reasons why nationalims is so popular. Not the main reason. Anyhoo, I think it is important for someone like Pinker or JP to picture what those “civil rights” movements of today are heading at, more or less consciously . Most of all these dudes are saying that this is who we developed monkeys are, these are some of mechanisms that drive us, these are the demons that influence us. Don’t let them grab you by your soul. Keep them at bay. The moment you get really angry, at something that doesn’t exactly influence you, is a clue they are in your room, messing with your synapses. Brew them a cup of coffee and then ask them out
  • + 2
 @delusional: astounded by your comment. The point is to engage in dialogue and look at studies. Some academics disagree with him, "every?" um, no. This is the rhetoric that is exactly regressive, not progressive.
  • + 1
 @rrolly: Sure, and JP tries to throw all of that away. He's so out of sync with the contemporary humanities and social sciences that the only way he can validate the ridiculous arguments he makes is to claim that the humanities and social sciences are all entirely flawed and need to be thrown away - that's because the sort of things he's arguing haven't been taken seriously by the field since the early 20th Century. It's not just some academics that disagree with him, he's a laughing stock in the academy.
  • + 2
 I think what Waki is trying to say is there are some very fine people on both sides. Wink
  • + 2
 @delusional: JP actually invites the dialogue from the research I've done, and am continuing to do, on him. This is precisely what is not often allowed to happen in the humanities and social sciences on university campuses. I have yet to come across anything where he states that the social sciences are entirely flawed and need to be thrown away, which would be ridiculous anyway since he is a professor in the field currently at UofT and formerly at Harvard.
I'm not trying to change your mind regarding JP. I just think there is validity to some of the things he says and it is helpful for us to get other perspectives of a given topic.

Anyway, time to get ready to ride bikes.
  • + 1
 Well... that escalated quickly. I’m not even gonna weigh in on this comment sequence. I just wanted to comment on the fact of how impressed I was that Matt Hunter really “gets it.” He speaks from the heart and soul on this one. Good on ya man.
  • + 3
 @Slabrung: Powslayer is a woman people. Check the profile. Adds credence to her comments that everyone automatically assumed she was a he.
  • - 2
 @POWsLAYER: Triggered much? Hard to hit the wall huh?
  • + 3
 @POWsLAYER: ??????
When you have an audience from all parts of the globe, from all walks of life and you come up with this.
pretty sure 95% of the PB audience aren't hella privileged, don't ride top of the range full carbon racing machines. Which is why you see more often than not the call for PB to do more 'affordable' bike reviews or bikes under 2k which is the price tag for the majority of the readers.
  • + 2
 @Hooch73: Let's ask all the starving African kids who usually post on here their opinions, shall we?

Just becuase you aren't taking home 100k plus per year doesn't mean you aren't incredibly privileged in a global perspective. You have the time, energy, and technology to join this debate- a debate around social media's effect on the hobby that you spend your disposable time/income on. Doesn't get much more privileged than that.

In the words of every 'woke' person on instagram: "check your privilege".
  • + 1
 @dkidd: you don't need to go to starving African kids. I see kids in the skate park looking at my DJ bike thinking wooooow, can I try it? They don't hate me. Then a friend comes by with 160 bike and they almost piss their pants. They don't hate him. You need a certain portion of hormonal imbalance and minority complex to go after people who have more than you. And the key factor here is that you almost have it, you get impatient, why, fkng why this dude has such bike and I don't, I ride better than him! And then you get a job, stable income, buy some version of this dream thing and this stupid anxiety all goes away... as if we all didn't know deep inside that a 3k bike is pretty much as capable as it's 10k version... come on... and I also think it comes down to limited peer group and limited amount of people you see around. If you went to a proper bike park or a Enduro competition, or to a good skatepark, saw people doing all sorts of stuff on all sorts of bikes, you'd calm down, because you would know it always comes down to work put in, both in terms of skills/fitness and what you earn. It is all earned in majority of cases. Finally, if you ride really well, why would you care... honestly. XTR, Charger damper, inifinity link, carbon frames and components - it's all silly, yes it is. Go out and meet people, meet those poor shredders and meet those dentists, get to know them, and you'll see your "bikes are supposed to be cheap" is just as silly. Why do you want to know how low end Trek Remedy rides? pretty much as well as the 9.9. You do the job mate! So I understand where that anxiety comes from, but it's just a delusion.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Not totally sure what that had to do with my point that we are all privileged, but you clearly needed to get that off your chest, so well done!
  • + 1
 @dkidd: I meant that people call other privileged because they feel underprivileged, and due to hormonal ibalance, closer they are to "privilege" the more they want it and more impatient they get. If you are a kid who has nothing, you are quite unlikely to call privilege on a dude with an exclusive bike. But if you have some sort of a bike and the exclusive one is within your reach, and you have issues, you will call him names. Same goes for super cars. You just don't go around throwing wankers at owners of Porsche GT3, but if you have slightly older BMW M3... ooooh...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Cool. I get what you're saying.

In this case do you agree that we're all very privileged (in a global perspective), having the luxury of participating in this sport in any capacity? I think that's what @POWsLAYER was getting at- that we're finally being exposed to arguments that might make us uncomfortable becuase a lot of the time we're not exposed to the issues (thanks to our privilege).

Most of us don't have to battle through gender reassignment, more than half of us don't feel our sex is underrepresented, most of us don't face gun violence daily, most of us have enough time, energy and money to participate in the sport at some level, where these are issues faced by a huge number of people around the world.

We should be grateful for our privilege, and wary that it may blind us to opportunities to help others who are less fortunate.
  • + 1
 @dkidd: yes, we are fukhing privileged. My problem with privileged people telling me that I am privileged is that they accuse me of not recognizing certain issues due to my privilege, while they themselves cannot recognize their privilege to blow situation of other privileged people out of proportion calling them unprivileged. This sounds stupid because it is stupid. They latch on to the tiniest notion of underprivileged-ness, which in extreme cases leads to calling someone sceptical of their over-protectionist stance a nazi, whereas an actual, real, true nazi would tie their hands, make them kneel next to a hole in the ground and shoot them in the back of their head. Because they said something awoke as fk against the establishment. The same would happen to them in a marxist state, with equality of outcome that they so eagerly would love to see working in real life
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: so you don't want to hear that you're privileged from a privileged person...and any everyone on here is privileged. That sounds a bit too much like burying your head in the same for me, but you do you.

Also, there's a beautiful irony in berating someone for taking things to extremes while simtaneously invoking Nazis to make your point. Wink

Just to remind all our popcorn-holding readers... the argument here is that we all benefit from learning something about how others live, and that articles like this might help all of us see past our sheltered perceptions of the world. Privilege is a good thing. Willful ignorance is not. Don't confuse the two. To call someone privileged is only an attack if they are aware that they have more than they need and aren't helping those less fortunate.
  • + 0
 @dkidd: I’m sorry but this is where this is getting these days, I flirted with a girl last thursday without warning here about it. And since #metoo I’m a rapist. And if you don’t want to recognize it’s because you are privileged. And North Americans are super touchy about Nazi references because they are privileged by not having anything to do with the real ones. I am privileged to be a Pole, born and living 1h drive from Auschwitz, having famy members who got killed, almost escaped concentration and at the aame time serving in Wehrmacht on Eastern front, so I can actually say call you a snowflake for having issues with invoking them. We in Europe, having actually been through it, don’t run around like headless chickens when we hear the N word. Sometimes we make fun of it. It’s a privilege you don’t have. Even southpark didn’t blow through it. I’m so fkng privileged that when I heard Jordan Peterson bring up Solzhenitsyn and results of Marxism I went: ndaaaaa?!
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Woah. Lots to unpack there. Most of that was stuff that should probably stay between you and your therapist, so I'll leave it be. Don't worry though, despite the existence of people standing up for women's rights, you still aren't a rapist if you haven't tried to rape someone. So you're (probably?) in the clear.
  • + 115
 Social media has a good chance of ruining the world.
  • + 8
 Agreed. +1
  • + 15
 @chasejj: Seems to be more powerful than any missile, gun or aircraft at the moment....
  • + 42
 Yep. I've never had any social media, ever - not myspace, friendster, FB, Insta, Twit, etc.. its always been a window into your habits. From creepers to corporations. Its metadata to be sold to the highest bidder cloaked in a marketing buzzword "social media".. Its nothing more than a tool to sell you something and track your habits and your location. Most don't even understand that photo "tagging" was just a way for FB to use facial recognition on most of the population. "Checking in" just tracks your location.

Fact is, anyone using it is sheep. Cattle, fodder, simply a body to sell something to or to sell all of your most personal information to someone else. Bullying, lying, keeping up with the jones, etc.. everything that is wrong in the world today is a mirror into society through social media. Oversharing and lying on platforms that most view as a source of truth. "Look at ME ME ME" its disgusting. Now get off my lawn.
  • + 6
 a good chance to make the world better, which is not happening
  • + 3
 @NYShred: yup what it is becoming
  • + 2
 @NYShred: Well stated. Pulling the veil off it.
  • + 5
 @foxxyman: Becoming? Always was that by design.
  • + 7
 @NYShred: I thought it was only me who thought like this.
  • - 5
flag gnarnaimo (Mar 1, 2018 at 12:34) (Below Threshold)
 Especially since it's likely social media is mostly responsible for Trump being the president of the United States.
  • + 7
 @cdmbmw: and it allows people like you to immediately jump into international politics for no reason. Social media causes people to take every chance given to them to start drama or confrontation. Politics are instantly divisive. Thank you for proving my point.
  • + 4
 Sigh...
  • + 2
 Social media is great for the content creators who can market their brands and build their following, but for the consumers that might never get off the couch to ride, they might just be lulled into contentment of living vicariously and never reach their potential.
  • + 2
 @NYShred: Suuuure... guess what dude, you're using social media right now!!
  • + 2
 I'm 21 and in an unfortunate catch 22 where I am aware of how awful social media is, yet all of my generation has social media and I'd be crippled in terms of making friends/networking/chasing tail without it. I'm waiting until I'm 25-30, in a long term relationship, and settled down in terms of who my friends are then just delete everything. Apart from Pinkbike. Pinkbike is allowed to know where I poop.
  • + 2
 @Timroo1: Honestly just felt it directly related with your original comment
  • + 4
 Pinkbike is social media. Just saying...
  • - 2
 For you millenials - PB is not social media, its a blog, it has social media feeds (FB, Insta, Twitter, etc..)

Calling PB social media is like saying FB is the internet. Youre too young to know the difference.
  • + 6
 @NYShred: "social media: websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking."

Pinkbike is the definition of social media.
  • + 3
 @NYShred: Are we arguing? Then it's social media. You're too old. I'm done. :-)
  • + 1
 @NYShred: What is the definition of social media?
  • + 52
 The irony here is that Pinkbike is in and of itself, a social media website.
  • + 7
 Boom. In addition, the overwhelming negativity in these comment sections is pathetic. People just love to bag on others to make themselves feel good. There was a time when "talk shit, get hit" was a rule of life. Not so much any more.
  • + 3
 The difference is, here we are communicating with strangers who share our interests, rather than "friends" who, more often than not, bug the shit out of us with things we don't care about. Or maybe that's just me.
  • - 3
 PB is not social media, their instagram, twitter and facebook feeds are. This website is a blog, forum, and digital community. Calling it social media means youre probably too young to know the difference.
  • - 1
 @metaam: it just you because im pretty sure no one is forcing me to see stuff im not interested in on social media
  • + 8
 @NYShred: "digital community" sounds social to me. This website provides news, photos, videos, and journalistic content. Sounds like media.

Sounds like social media to me...
  • + 4
 @NYShred: "Digital community" aka social media, lol
  • - 8
flag NYShred (Mar 1, 2018 at 15:39) (Below Threshold)
 It's cute that you kids think a blog is social media. $20 says youre both under 30
  • + 5
 @NYShred: by definition it is
  • + 7
 @NYShred: the commments section of a blog is in every way, shape, and form social media.
  • + 5
 @somethingwith69or13init: I would argue that pink bike is a news site before social media. Yes we interact in the comments but I’m not sharing personal details or sharing pics here for external validation. It’s really a news site and forum with some social media aspects that most people ignore.
  • + 0
 @poozank: You and I have been users on this website for over a decade, I remember seeing your name in comments and forums ages ago. Just because you only use photos for buy/sell, doesn't mean that's the only or primary reason those features are in place.

There are millions of photos and videos uploaded on here, Pinkbike is one of the original places people shared "edits", it was always about users sharing their own content with each other. Some of those users got really good at it, so their content looks (and is!) professional. Other bike websites provide news, but the level of activity and amount of user generated content is what distinguishes pinkbike from the rest.
  • + 1
 [dual post]
  • + 30
 Totally agree with Hunter and others: Social Media is just a lot of Bull@hit. As long as we acknowledge that, we and "our sport" will be fine.
  • + 2
 Agree, for sure it has a major negative influence on how people live and behave nowadays, when not filtered appropiately to some audiences/ demographics..
  • + 2
 I agree with him and Wade. When on the shitter (ana(l)og) > digital. I still have the mag with Gwins first win still next to the toilet. And it is fun to go back for a laugh about this new upcomer representing the winless void known as U.S DH. Thats not the case anymore.
  • + 1
 Yeah it's a constant societal issue, not specific to our sports If you're conscious of it I think you can get by just fine
  • + 16
 I think people are missing the greatest benefit of social media. Its given power to the athletes to self-brand. Before riders were beholden to the few outlets to gain exposure (movies and magazines) and in some cases, the sponsors would have to pay the film or magazine company to have their athlete featured so their exposure was based on how much the sponsor was willing to shell out. Also the athletes had very little input as to how they were represented. Oh you didn't like how your part was edited or you had to share a segment? Too bad.

I think its no coincidence the rise of social media has lead to a massive influx of banger self films like Revel, Ashes and Deathgrip, online series from the Athertons and I'd even say the FEST series wouldn't exist without a ton of free advertising and building a following on social media.

There are the obvious downsides as already mentioned but the benefits seem to greatly outweigh the drawbacks.
  • + 5
 @scott-townes: Agreed! Social media allows those that aren't racers or contest riders to share their content with the world, something that rarely happened 20 years ago.
  • + 0
 @scott-townes: To some extend yes, I agree (as I wrote in my other post here) but I don't agree that the option wasn't quite there before social media became big. Athletes used to have their own websites where they published race reports and pictures, write about their training or whatever they felt like, highlight their sponsors. It was all there. I used to read both websites from Jill Kintner and Anneke Beerten back when they were competing in UCI WC 4X racing and I loved to read about their different views on the same races. The only thing social media has added is the interaction with whoever has a social media account. And the proper race reports are replaced by a short tweet and a (motion) picture.

As for the Athertons, they always seemed to have taken their media exposure in their own hands. They didn't need social media for that. Also, I don't see how social media contributed to the rise of self films. Yes they both increased and improved, but what's the relation? There simply is more film and photo material available because there is more equipment available and it is cheaper to operate. That is, you don't need to develop film anymore. You don't need a helicopter anymore for an areal shot. Photo and video editing software has become cheaper and easier to work with (and more people have become capable of working with such software) and the size and weight of body-/helmet mounted cameras has become more acceptable. Sure, marketing now also works through social media. But you're still going to read and see about it on your regular mountainbike website and in paper magazines, just like back in the day.

Now of course the question is, does social media reach a wider audience than the "traditional" media like paper magazines and websites like this? I think it is fair to say that a good number of PB readers don't use social media and we can agree that they still have a good chance of being exposed to these movies mentioned. The other way around though, are there really people out there who interact on social media mountainbike platforms (not sure how to call these) but don't visit these websites?
  • + 2
 @vinay: True athletes had their own websites but it never reached an audience close to what social media provides and also it costs a lot more money and effort to run a single website than multiple social media accounts.

The independent films don't use cheap gear and its well-known and established filmers who are now working directly with the athletes.

"I think it is fair to say that a good number of PB readers don't use social media" That's blatantly false. Social media platforms are the number 1 way to reach audiences which is why literally every athlete, filmer and photographer in every action sport have multiple social media accounts.

It sounds like you're about 7-8 years behind the curve on this one....
  • + 0
 @scott-townes: Taking this point by point.

Yes you're probably right on this one. I don't know what running a website costs and I don't know what running a social media account costs. The website probably depends on who builds and monitors it for you, how much traffic you have and of course security. That said, the aforementioned ex-4x athletes still have their websites though Anneke Beerten indeed doesn't quite update it anymore. It usually takes a while for her to get her new sponsors on there (she still appears to be supported by GT, SRAM etc) and she doesn't publish new race reports, just links to her social media accounts. But Jill Kintner still seems to have a fairly up to date website. So if you still have a website, monitoring social media accounts doesn't really save you money does it?

The other thing (and again I may just don't know about this kind of stuff) is the audience bit. Of course there are more people with an internet connection nowadays so comparing absolute numbers of people who view a particular internet source now to those who did it ten years ago is always going to be a bit false. But really, anyone who was interested in their achievements ten years ago (sticking to those two successful 4X athletes for now) and did have access to the internet, could just visit those websites, right? So what makes it different to subscribing to their social media channels? Social media (afaik) requires an internet connection so if you can read their articles on social media, you could just as well visit their website.

As for the filming gear, no I wasn't saying film makers nowadays use cheap gear. I said that "affordable" portable camera gear (like helmet/body/bike mounted gear) allows riders to record and edit their own material and publish it on social media. Compare that with what Romaniuk got strapped to his helmet when recording The Collective ("wow, that's like a hardcore song"). Of course Clay Porter is going to film Deathgrip he's pulling out the stops. Sven Martin did that too when following The Athertons back in the days (when on Animal/Commencal). The other way around though, compact consumer grade camera gear is being used for pro stuff. Danny MacAskill does use GoPro for some of his edits (like Cascadia). Caldwell does use the "dadcam" for some of his stuff too.

The next one is a difficult one as I haven't defined a "fair number" but yeah I was thinking about at least a tenth or so (which makes for quite some visitors). I don't use it so I thought I can never be that unique Wink . The other thing I noticed in the comment section here is that there is also some discussion about what social media actually is. Some say it includes the forum and comment section of PB too so then by default I should be wrong! And some say video platforms like youtube and vimeo are social media too so again, I am sometimes being linked to such a website so yeah if so I may also be using social media. But if forums, comment sections and video platforms are not considered social media I don't think I'm using it and I think there are enough who aren't using it too.

As for being 7-8 years behind the curve, yeah I think it is usually something like that. A bit more even, probably. I think it was in 2001 when I had to replace my 286 computer with MS-DOS5.0, a 5.25" and 3.5" (DD) floppy drive for my study because it turned out to be inconvenient because I had to format every 3.5" floppy to DD in order to save MS-Word documents in WP5.1 format to be able to edit them at home. And maybe get internet access too. I did get a cellphone with a touchscreen late 2014 (because I thought it was convenient to synchronize agendas) but I never got along with the touchscreen so I'm back on a regular phone again. I do have a robot vacuumcleaner though. Because it is convenient to just enter home dirty after a good ride and know that the robot look after it. See, if technology really brings something that matters I'm going to use it. But I just haven't seen why I would need social media. But back to that curve. I guess I like to see where it is heading before I jump on the bandwagon. That usually takes about ten years.
  • + 23
 I agree with Matt Hunter on the interrupting flow statement, not just riding, but fun stuff in general. I have had friends literally stop us having the fun we were having, just to get a picture of the fun we were having.
  • + 8
 I get wanting to document the day, but enjoying the day is far more important than posting to instagram..... And whats the benefit of being internet famous? Is it all just bragging rights and vanity? All that glitters isn't gold. Just 'cuz it looks sick on instagram doesn't mean much in the real world.
  • + 3
 My buddy has his phone out checking strava before the helmet and gloves even come off or the car is unlocked. But its pulling teeth to get him to enter a race, go figure.
  • + 2
 I guess he meant that Sterling Lorence can be irritating...
  • + 2
 @preston67: I know a guy just like that. He deletes Strava runs if he didn't get a trophy yet he won't enter a race as he knows he will hate getting beaten. Sad thing is that he would do really well and racing would make him better.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: If Sterling Lorence was taking pictures of my fun, my fun would look like a lot more fun.
  • + 16
 I used to have fun riding bikes. Now with social media, I've realized that I'm not good at it and that my life is a bore...
  • + 18
 I can't stop checking back here to see how many likes I've gotten...
  • + 4
 @stflood: Bwahahahahah! Well done, sir.
  • + 1
 @stflood: Do I have any or are you asking me to be yours? Big Grin
  • + 1
 @Poulsbojohnny: lol, will you be my friend?
  • + 1
 @stflood: If you buy me beer and let me ride your bike, sure. But you have to come out West. I ain't going to the East Coast.
  • + 1
 MEAN OLD FRIEND^^^
  • + 12
 I think the answer is certainly somewhere in-between. I'm also maybe in between, as a child of the 80's I remember pre-social media riding very well and certainly a lot of what Wade and Hunter say is true. But I also see the fun in following my friends and seeing what they see, what they like, what they do. Especially as I age, and seeing friends all the time is harder and harder to do. I like photos of nice looking bikes and landscapes, and fill some of boring bits of the day with that stuff. Likewise I enjoy sharing photos of these things with my friends and those who wish to see them as well. I do actually sometimes look back at my own posts and reminisce to Wade's statement about nobody looking at old posts. Ultimately, when I have the time, I go out and ride and I don't care about any of it. I don't think living in 2018 prevents me from enjoying that to the fullest, though I certainly connect with the feelings of nostalgia for simpler times.
  • + 0
 Off course the answer is in between. Ever wanted a donut? Ever wanted 40 donuts a day? Well if you eat one every few minutes... it will creep up on you. Every substance abuse has negative consequences.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Of course I understand that - it was the point I was making. Although I'm not sure this is as simple as the healthy number of donuts to consume. I think they posed the question simply, "is this good or bad" and I was pointing out it's not a yes/no question.
  • + 3
 @DARKSTAR63: Yes. I just have a brief vision of this skype meeting that Vernon Felton wrote about, where Pinkbike staff sit and talk what's on agenda this week. I think they sit there with a bag of weed, their policy of psylocybin microdosing inspired by Silicon valley went way out of hand, Mike Levy eats CBD donuts, and Carl Burkat goes... gun control... this can generate lots of hits maaaaaan, cuz guns are bad. Two days later head of operations at Giro calls: I saw your article relating us to company selling guns use at mass shooting... weeell sir, nobody knows what gun was it... no! no! no! It was... amazing! We just had to increase the bandwidth for our webshop!!! And corporate orders are flowing in like nuts!
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: The content is getting VERY traffic driven. I don;t care for that but I can't necessarily fault them either. I really prefer product reviews to this sort of click-baity editorial.
  • + 10
 One could argue its having a negative impact on our lives as a whole. Remember when the News was the News and you could trust it? No more. When the leader of a certain nation gets his facts from twitter then God have mercy on us all. And its not just him. How many times have I seen the News use tweets as facts? Too many times. Welcome to the age of misinformation. But bike social media? HELL YES, and keep it coming too.
  • - 28
flag chasejj (Mar 1, 2018 at 9:22) (Below Threshold)
 You have it 1/2 wrong. Trump uses Twitter to counter fake news stories and propaganda, something that is long overdue and actually genius given what he faces daily. The mainstream media has been aligned politically for 40-50 years but it has gotten out of hand over the last 20. Social media has been around for close to 20. So you can figure that out. When the news quotes random tweets as if they are valid sources of info then you have a problem. Controls/liabilities on media will need to eventually happen, but nobody has the balls to go there yet.
  • + 1
 @chasejj: True. I was witness to an "event" in the late 90's. Two whole weeks later was BBC an CNN reportin "LIVE" and sold the world a story that never happened and was completly opposite of the truth. I was calling "fake news" waaay before Trump.
  • + 2
 Ohhh, does my eye witnessed fact upset some people? Sorry but yes its true, BBC, CNN, Faux and others dont always tell the truth even when they know it. Sorry if that hurts anyones preceptions. Go cry it out in a safe room.
  • + 5
 youre so right! Every time i watch a former well reputated news magazin and they start reading the reaction of the twitter crowd it drives me nuts. Seriously what the hell?? I dont care what XY average Joe has to say about it. Give me the uncommented facts.
  • - 5
flag chasejj (Mar 1, 2018 at 10:13) (Below Threshold)
 @Boardlife69: @Boardlife69: I am racking up the negatives by the dozens. Lot's of Fake News lovers on PB. Happens everytime you stray from the narrative being fed to them.
  • + 0
 good comment!
  • + 12
 @chasejj: Nah mate, you are getting negged because there is a difference between someone yelling (or tweeting) 'Fake News' everytime a story doesn't fit HIS narrative. You can criticise the media for a lot, but if you think there is a major conspiracy going on the answer might just be that it's not 'mainstream' media but whatever you consume that is conspiring. Read 'The Emperor's New Clothes' and you might understand what I am getting at.
  • + 6
 @chasejj:
The fact that you have so many downvotes for stating the obvious is an indicator of the problem. All news outlets are biased and it is up to the citizen to sift through all the BS and formulate their own opinion based on the given data - notice I didn't say facts...

As for social media, no thanks. PB is my vice for blabing about biking. I don't even know you people, but we have a common connection in bikes that is enough to get along and chat. The rest of the world doesn't need to know when I go to the dentist or stubb my toe, go on vacation, whatever. The people that care about me and that I care about connect in other ways. SM is just too impersonal for any meaningful relation.

And Matt Hunter. Hell yeah. I'd love to buy you a beer - after a ride, of course.
  • + 1
 @Sp4xXx: Lese mal "The Emperor Wears No Clothes " von Jack Herer, you'll love it!
  • + 8
 Turkeys gobbling. I am expected to listen now because every low life dregs of society feels they are entitled to speak. Most have nothing to say other than why they need to justify guns because they have a small penis.. have fun jerkoffs.
  • + 5
 Search engines and social media have algorithms that display results that reinforce what people already believe and feel. You are much more likely to click on something if you agree with it, so not only is every idiot free to spout nonsense but that nonsense is easily reinforced.
  • + 2
 @MrFogg: These algorithms certainly provide a very unrealistic and biased view of the world. Scary stuff for sure.
  • + 3
 @MrFogg: echo chambers, that's what it is. big electronic echo chambers.
www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles
  • + 3
 @oneplanka
No one is forcing you to read any of this. And in the United States, you aren't entitled to speak, you are given the right to do so without persecution (backed up by that pesky 2nd amendment). Double edged sword, I'm afraid.
  • + 2
 I have to sell all my guns now!!! I had no idea they were linked to having a small penis. I need to call my wife!

She was wrong Smile
  • + 8
 The insanity of this article i beyond anything on this site so far... like little boys talking about their first erection. Am, I am doing this, but I'm not sure if it's right or wrong... for fks sake waaaait, waaaait and see where it goes. It goes somewhere and you cannot stop it. Abandon your ego, stop intellectualizing it. This is what molecules do when given enough time. Sorry, I claim utter bullshit at your poetic, just go out and ride, stay in the woods, look at the stars at night. f*ck you! honestly. All you are doing is you are convincing yourself that your ability to romanticize something, somehow makes you better than those who don't appreciate what you appreciate. You say it to feel edgy to yourself. You let your ego to come at you through your arsehole.

To me the only person who made some sense here was Wade. And I guess "I don't care" was the best answer this subject can get.
  • + 9
 @wakidesigns: you’re all right for a foreigner.
  • + 2
 I actually agree here with you. I think the "cool" response is "ride your bike, get outside, media isn't real life" when in actuality nobody said it was. I think you can do both. At least most level headed people can, if they want, or not. Who cares is right.
  • + 8
 Adolescent suicides
Russian Bots
Far-right extremist cesspool chat rooms
Kids eating f*cking Tide Pods
Fake news
Beheading videos
Live streamed murders and rapes
Oh, and people stopping group rides to take too many goddamned pics for their stupid instaface whatevers

The list of negatives FAR outweighs any positive social benefit of anti-social media.

I don’t have a Facebook account. Or twitter, or Instagram, or anything else. The only place I post is here on Pinkbike. Even then, I try to limit my interaction here in the comments because it always devolves into ugliness. This sh*t is all poison and is eroding the fabric of society in front of our eyes.

I predict that Social Media will go down in history as the worst social health crisis history has ever seen.

But hey bro, that Strava time you posted was sick! And that rock roll was way gnarly brah! And wow that sandwich looks tasty! And that pic of your feet in the sand on that beach really has improved my life!
  • + 3
 Nail on the head
  • + 4
 except its not bad social media but rather bad people

why you hate the tool instead of hating dumb people doing dumb stuff?

Facebook is pretty cool and has many uses beyond "fake news" so is Instagram and twitter etc
  • + 1
 You forgot Far-left extremist cesspool chat rooms
  • + 3
 @preston67:

You’re absolutely correct. I don’t disagree.

Those too exist. While those weirdos definitely exist, they don’t often espouse lynching people, or shooting up schools, or creating conspiracies about child sex rings in pizza parlors, etc.
  • - 1
 @MasterSlater:
you have pretty wrong picture of how social media looks like
  • + 3
 @Asmodai: His social media might look like that, the whole cycle of casually looking in to a subject for whatever reason and then getting notifications, updates and deeper into a place that started out as a mere curiosity.

When I scroll on FB, over half the posts has a picture of a bike, for some people it might some very negative things, over and over

There is some awful stuff out there, I try to avoid and block it
  • + 1
 absolutely nailed it.
  • + 3
 "I predict that Social Media will go down in history as the worst social health crisis history has ever seen."

^^this
  • + 1
 dude, bullseye.
  • + 7
 I use my bike to distance myself as far as I can from the distraction of social media. No selfies, no “rad” action shots and no check ins at perceived cool locations. Simply my hands on the bars and enjoying the sounds of rubber on dirt. Social media is here and won’t go away. We all are exposed to its influence in some way but I feel like each of us has the ability to somewhat control what that influence is. Just remember, your life may not be as interesting as you might think it is.
  • + 6
 I think both Matt Hunter and Wade Simmons said it best.

Although there is at very least one or two poeple i follow on social media who post the occasional selfie or short Rad looking edits, and i always think "Damn look at that place.. Look at That Trail. I gotta go there." even though i know half the time im also thinking "i dont know if can even ride that same line. Or send it off that kicker"
And yes I personally make/post quite alot of 'shitty video' of local trails for Likes and Attention to distract me from my 'Shitty Life' but to me MTB social media posts also inspire me to go ride my bike. Ride harder, go faster, climb higher. If people like the Local Legend can do it. why can't I. Yeah its gonna take some work but thats called progression. And if it things like this inspire me. Than maybe I can inspire other people to push themselves as well.

On the flip side of the same coin. Just because the Local Legend makes it look easy, doesn't mean it is. Sending 50 footers can have major consequences. The GoPro effect can also get you into some pretty hairy situations.
If your out on the trails strictly for attention; then your out for the wrong reasons. This is the darkside of MTB social media posts. The jackass effect or Monkey See - Monkey Do.
Through the filter of Social Media everything looks awesome and totally Do-able.
Ride within your Limits. Don't be a Hero. And just because the Local Legend makes it look easy doesn't mean it is.
  • + 1
 I too agree with matt hunter it is all about the ride.
  • + 6
 I'm all about taking pictures of cool trails and love seeing videos of myself clearing tough obstacles. That being said, some people turn a 5 mile ride into a 3 hour photoshoot more often than they should. They post the rad pictures to Instagram, and try to sell themselves. They only want to ride lines to earn credentials, and a XC ride either has to be 50 miles suffer fest, or the hardest DH line on the mountain. Why can't we just ride bikes for ya know, the social factor? Having fun. Meeting people. Laughing at eachother.
  • + 6
 It's bs for sure. I will take it over the edge and say smart phones are bs as well. Remember the good ole days when people you were physically around were actually present and not constantly looking at their phones?
  • + 2
 Social media, widespread and reliable internet, and portable pocket computers have done more to globalize and shrink and the world than any trade agreement or political policy. The Matrix is kinda starting too seem more real than just a sci fi flick...
  • + 1
 Yeah I remember to go ole days of getting lost all the time and not really knowing where there are hundreds - if not thousands or other places to ride were ...... lol
  • + 2
 @SirWonky: Learn to read a map, talk to real people and use a desktop computer. The trails are not on your phone, they are in the woods. Trust life's more fun when you turn off that thing and live in the moment.
  • - 1
 @Mtb4joe: or you can find trail online then ride them and hopefully you won't have to speak to other people while doing that

different spokes for different folks
  • + 4
 @Mtb4joe: Or... treat your phone as a tool, not a self aggrandizing mechanism. GPS, maps, and a photo during a rest break are all I use mine for on the trail. I still don't get why people play music when they ride...
  • + 1
 @Mtb4joe: Maps unfortunately can't be updated. So you might have to buy many maps per year to keep up with ever-changing trail networks, and still likely wouldn't keep up with what's new. A trail was just completed in my area and was instantly added to trail forks, it's a super fun trail that many wouldn't know about for who knows how long without trail forks.
  • + 5
 I was in my local chemist the other day, when I was approached by a member of staff who said she was conducting a survey and asked me what my favourite grooming product was. She looked a bit surprised when I answered "Facebook".
  • + 8
 Social media sucks. Ride more, scroll less.
  • + 26
 *scrolls down to see more comments.
  • + 2
 right because somehow you can't do both
  • + 4
 As a 24 year old.... sometimes I sit back and realize how addicted I am to social media. I see it all around me. It's pretty sad w/ people my age and does retract from real life.

I liked reading this article. Good reminder to step back and instead of checking social media after quitting time at work I should just put my phone in my bag & talk to my bike first.
  • + 4
 Who doesn't like watching some kid you don't know brake sliding and skidding through a corner on your favorite trail on instagram. Especially love seeing the secret trails getting torn up as well as exposed. Next questions is Pinkbike and all bike videos good for mtn biking?
  • + 2
 to answer you last question: yes.
Trolling here for a year before buying a new bike gave me all kinds of information and knowledge so I was able to make a solid choice when parting with my hard earned cash.
  • + 4
 About a year and a half ago I stumbled across the “battery usage” setting on my iPhone. Out of curiosity I decided to see how much screen time was devoted to each app over the course of the last 7 days. I considered myself a lower than average user/peruser so was astonished to see over 6 hours of combined screen time on social channels over the course of a week. Extrapolate that number and you’re looking at over 300 hours for the year. A few minutes here, another half hour there… it really adds up. I decided to delete the apps and replace it with something meaningful, like riding my bike with friends and family. I’ll admit, there was a bit of separation anxiety, but I worked through it. Last year I got out on over 200 rides, which is no small feat in my opinion, while logging 360 hours of riding in the process. Pretty much a no brainer for me, I’d highly recommend doing the same.
  • + 4
 So, here's how I see it as an average family man, amateur racer and a local cycling community kindof guy. Pros... don't like it (not saying all, but some) as it puts more aspect on social reach VS actual results. To where someone without top results can still be more popular via social media. AMATEURS, here's where it gets interesting, AM's like myself, love it. I may not be a "PRO" racer even though my handling skills and tech riding skills are on par or better than alot of Pro XC racers I know I am still just a family man who doesn't have time to "Live the van life" but, I am a PRO at being a weekend warrior mountain biking every chance I get and having a good time, and social media has helped actually give me a platform to say, "hey world look what I do on a weekly basis" which is still above the norm I would say. And brands actually see that value and I have picked up multiple Ambassadorships through brands to showcase their products on my social media. They support me, and I support them, which helps with this bicycle addiction that costs as much as my kids college fund these days. So, long story short I enjoy how it's evolved for the average Joe, and if your PRO and anti-social, well, sorry... it takes more than that nowadays, adapt... overcome because that's the real world.
  • + 1
 Sounds like you're playing the game well, but I wish it wasn't a game we had to play....
  • + 2
 @TerrapinBen: hate the game not the player.
  • + 3
 Why is being a family man and having a job that affords you the ability to ride nice bikes on the weekends not enough? Why need a platform to say "hey world look what I do on a weekly basis"? Used to be we all just felt good about finding the right work/life/play balance and didn't need the outside reinforcement from strangers on the internet.
  • + 2
 @leefrance: the only reason we didn't need it, was that Internet didn't exist

people crave for applause since forever, nothing has changed
  • + 2
 @Asmodai: I suppose if the upside is inspiring others to get off the couch and on the trails then it's a positive, even if the original intent was slightly more self fulfilling
  • + 1
 @leefrance: 1, who doesn't like making cool vids with friends? 2. my job doesn't afford me all the bikes stuff I would like. I race multiple disciplines as well. Being a Family man, doesn't mean I'm not competitive, I still took 2 sport masters championships last year racing and will be racing cat 1/pro xc this year. But without the social aspect it would be very hard for me to find supporters other than the local bike shop race team...
  • + 1
 @leefrance: who doesn't take a pic of their bike while out for a ride, or record their friend hitting that 6' drop in the woods etc? Instagram started for me as just for friends to see my adventures as I get tired of the BS of facebook and non-stop argueing and political advertising...
  • + 2
 @manchvegas: Fair point and I understand the drive to be a top competitor while also being a family man. Mtn biking is expensive as it is without attempting the race scene in multiple disciplines. If playing the social media game is what it takes to pursue your dream then good for you and good luck out there!
  • + 3
 "Well, it hasn’t made my life or yours ‘better’ and in some ways has made things worse, mainly in the way of narcissism, selfies, or bragging about your awesome (but probably shitty) life."

I've read some version of this quote many times -- that people are just posting the good times to make their sh@##y life look good -- and I don't necessarily agree. I'd say my life is mostly good, with ups and downs like anyone else. I only post the good times, not because I want you to think my life is this constant awesome party, but because I'm particularly stoked when I'm doing something cool, and I think it might be interesting to my friends and family. I want to share it with them for any number of reasons -- maybe they can't be there when my kid takes his first steps, or maybe they want to see what Moab looks like because they haven't had a chance to ride there, or whatever.

The everyday humdrum stuff -- who cares? The real bad, crappy things that happen in life? There's a time and place for it among your closest friends and families, if you need support. Social media is not the place for it. You learn to scroll past those who constantly live in a gray cloud quite quickly. So that's why everything seems to be awesome on social media. In a way it's not that different from real life. You don't bounce around your casual acquaintances at work, for example, being Mr. Doom and Gloom -- you'll be ostracized quickly. Maybe the problem is, we tend to gather too many "friends" on social media. Maybe we should pare down the list, and we could be more honest, but it is what it is.

I'll also say this -- I belong to a group on Facebook that talks about training and technique for riding, among other things. I look forward to updates from this group probably more than any others. Certainly more interesting than reading the latest pro/anti-gun argument. So in that respect, it's proving useful.
  • + 3
 I've met a bunch of rad people on various types of social media who shred. Often times I will end up riding with them at some point later and either make a new friend, ride a new trail, learn some shit about new bikes and places or all of the above. Social media is a tool and you can use it many different ways. There is a lot of toxic stuff out there and scrolling for hours is addicting and accomplishes almost nothing, but if you want to learn more about the world it can connect you with places and people quickly and effectively.
  • + 3
 It is not for me. I don' t use it. I don't need it.

I can understand it is great for athletes to get exposure and expose their sponsors. But I think there is a flip side to that as well. A decade or so ago it seemed like if you were a pro rider what you were supposed to attend races/competitions and do well. Or go on cool trips and see them documented in magazines and videos. And go for shoots. It seems nowadays you can't really get away being a pro and not use social media so I definitely think your sponsors expect you to do that. Great if you like to but kind of annoying if it is not your thing. So yeah, my impression is that it has become mandatory for athletes to be involved with social media and I don't think that is good.

Matt Hunter is correct.
  • + 3
 The entertainment value of social media is what I enjoy most. It is inspirational to see people from all over the world doing crazy stuff - in remote areas like Tasmania, Russia or Chile - it’s just basically people having fun. It inspires me to go out and have more fun too.
  • + 1
 Yes, and we can learn a lot of things from those motivated and nice people.
  • + 3
 I think social media has helped progress the sport because kids these days can easily see what other kids and doing and try to copy and get better. Looking back to before social media, you had to wait for movies/edits which took way longer to make to see the type of progression you can today with one scroll through instagram.
  • + 3
 The thing with Simmons and Hunter is: they are being paid to promote product. If you aren't promoting product or inspiring on a very effective self-run platform then are you really doing your job effectively? It used to be magazines, now it's social media. For a handsomely paid pro, its more and should be more than just "getting out and riding". Kids don't know who these dudes are for the most part. You have to perpetuate your longevity. Certainly now that big yearly productions like NWDs etc aren't being produced. They are in danger of eventually working in sales.
  • + 2
 Interesting question. We just had an interview with a well known female EWS rider (to be published on here soon) who said people often don't see how much time athletes (are expected to) put in to this. Social media presence has overtaken results in the process of selecting an athlete, she said. In that way you can definitely argue it's not good for the sport. I.e. it absorbs a lot of an athlete's energy which could otherwise be put into more training. On the other hand, social media is an excellent tool for upcoming riders to put themselves out there and chase a career in their beloved sport. Plus, as a spectator it also becomes a lot easier and personal to follow your favorite athletes, which seems like a positive development for the sport.

We agree with how she put it. 'If athletes try to also use it in a valuable way, ie to help promote upcoming talent, and not just post selfies, it can have a positive influence.'
  • + 2
 social media is a horrible waste of time. I just do my upmost to stay clear of any time wasting people. I have been on holiday with keen facebook users and its like having a reporter with you telling everyone else what your up to. My dream is that one day we will all eventually realize what a detrimental affect this has on us and people will stop using it so much. But most people are such attention whores that crave any feedback they can get and keenly write tons of pointless comments as if they are writing their biography and all the other sycophant's just further there intent to continue doing so. I am prone to the same thoughts but I exercise some restraint by staying the hell away from social media. Live your life......stop reporting it!!!
  • + 2
 Interesting question for sure.....the online community that social media presents can often lead to real world connections and amazing opportunities. The power of trailforks is incredible, but i'm not sure I would categorize TF as social media-Strava fits, and bears all the markings and pitfalls of social media. It's undeniable that all these tools get people out to ride more! As stated everyone must us the social media BS filter carefully when delving into that world. Nobody wants to admit that that they crap with their phones. Let's make a Instagram feed for people who crap with their phones and look at mtb porn at the same time
  • + 2
 "20 years from now we will look back and say what did we do?"

Social media is very damaging, it is all just a way to mass market crap. It is an industry of eyeballs. If your up for a good read, this article by The Globe and Mail says a lot.

www.theglobeandmail.com/technology/your-smartphone-is-making-you-stupid/article37511900
  • + 2
 What's up with pinkbike these days....first there was a comparison between skiing and MTB...then social media is bad for the sport....YO...people...it's called progression the more engagement you get with the audience the more people will get in to it...the more people get in to MTB...the more the sport progresses...and NO the earth is not flat....and YES vaccines can save your life...
  • + 2
 id say it did better for the bike world then most other community for example in the car world it ruined it. it attracted the wrong kind of person to it and also started the trend of "cheeping out" on things. the quality of builds dropped so hard when Instagram hit, and the ever so cringe worthy car girl... for bikes it did good things i find out about cool new companies and people all the time from it and am able to see what my friends are doing who dont live near me anymore. also since bikes are still relatively expensive it keeps out some lesser quality folk
  • + 2
 When I am in the real world I witness bikers in general as a very nice and cohesive community. Whether it be people I ride with all the time, the guy/gal I talked to in the parking lot because I thought their bike was sick, or all the bikers who ask if I need help when I am stopped by the trail. I get very confused when I come online and see the majority of conversations riddled with trolls, useless spats, and arguments over wheelsize/tire size/ whatever the next newest bike change is. I thought this article was interesting and seeing some of the comments immediately after the post wants me to get back outside where bikers act as normally caring people vs the aggressive/abusive individuals that some turn into when behind a keyboard.
  • + 2
 I think looking at pictures of people's adventures is awesome and it gets me pumped on planning more of my own. Pro's dont care to share their (often co. paid for) rides? That's a shame, as its something a lot of fans and avid mtbers are inspired by, and really aren't they paid to showcase their riding, the locations, the bikes etc? All the stuff we wanna see. I don't get the hate on social media. like always, everything in moderation. Times have changed, i think if they don't embrace it, stamp it in a way that suits them, they're going to be left behind. From a company perspective, why would I keep a 40 year old on board, even if he was rad back in the day, if he refused to engage in promoting the brand on the platforms that everyone uses with very little effort involved to new generations, new to the sport and with new technology? These guys made their $$ promoting themselves and their imagery, why shut it down now when you have even more control over the content of promoting yourself and your brands?
  • + 3
 next week on Pinkbike...Is an IPA the only acceptable post ride beverage? Should you be banned from shop rides if its not craft? and is it still frowned upon to break the 2 finger jean cuff rule in 2018?
  • + 2
 What about wine, is that an acceptable post ride drink? Anyone for pinot grigio in a red solo cut?
  • + 2
 On the one hand, yes. Exposure to other people sending ridiculous features/tricks enables kids to take a look and think "oh yeah I can definitely do that". But on the other hand, my instinct for self preservation is a pretty good deterrent....I realize that saying "Darwinism" here would be harsh as I love to watch and see it but if you don't want to risk anything I hear that curling can be pretty fun.
  • + 2
 It has ups and downs. Seeing stuff from past riding buddies who have moved on is great! It keeps us in touch in a way, because we would have no contact otherwise, but the majority of it seems to be negative. It seems empty, all the passion seems to be eliminated when it is all for the superficial face of how "rad" you are. The biggest gripe I have though is the social media requirements for sponsorships. It seems that up and coming riders are being used as marketing tools, instead of being bred into the rippers they should be. All of my friends who have some kind of legit contract have monthly requirements that have to be met, such as a certain amount of posts or likes you need to have on your social media accounts. If these requirements are not met they could be dropped, no matter how good they are. If you aren't gaining enough of a following then you're not seen as a valuable asset. Why has the industry come to this? How did we lose our roots? It should be about getting out and riding as said above. It bums me out, I became a mountain biker because of how awesome and fun it is, but now it seems to be falling out and blending in with all the other activities. The comradery that makes our community is fading.
  • + 3
 I became a mountain biker because of how awesome and fun it is, but now it seems to be falling out and blending in with all the other activities. The comradery that makes our community is fading. Not sure how old you are, but I remember when I first started riding and used to laugh at roadies and their snobbery. MTB was a hooligan sport not fit for the masses. Us mtbikers got on because we were of the same mindset and there weren't very many of us comparatively. Now days a lot of it is fashion show like road biking, skiing, etc. Oh well. I'll stick to my roots and keep on getting dirty.
  • + 3
 Can we please just leave this site a mountain bike website?????

Just stick with bikes and gear, maybe some head to head comparisons that are not bought out would be great!!
  • + 2
 Yes social media will ruin mountain biking just like print media, the internet, and marketing campaigns did. Also racing is bad for our sport as is competitive slopestyle and lift access resorts. If social media ruins biking for you then turning off is a good place to start. You don't have to be be a hater or a creator. There is a healthy margin in the middle. Everything in moderation friends.
  • + 5
 Sicial media isn’t the issue, it’s the condescending and marketing pricks that use it that are the issue
  • + 1
 internet killed out attention span as far as edits go, they have to start with a huge banger to keep peoples attention, ad then dies down from there, perfect example is the x games real ski this year, everyone started with a huge banger, and then it tapered off into alright skiing, accept phil cassabons vid
  • + 1
 I believe it can do great things, spread positivity in the sport, allow us to make connections, friends. Yet for certain groups, and in many ways, I believe it can be toxic. For example, look at Emily Batty's latest Instagram post (March 1), I'm sure some people love that but what does it say about female riders? She is 1000% in the spotlight and when young girls see that what do they think? What about adult men? I'm sure there are some who will see beyond, but it perceives female riders in an overly sexual way. Don't get me wrong, Emily is an amazing rider and a huge inspiration to many but it's hard when she's half naked in a magazine... That's just my rant, but I think social media is capable of a lot of great things like inspiration, product development and I believe companies have a lot to owe to it.
  • + 1
 Unless you're marketing to pay bills, i side with thinking social media is just the new magazine rack next to the toilet. The difference... It can go everywhere, prompting some to get confused and virtually defecate all over the superinfohwy. The real question; who's gonna clean it all up? Will our posts be left like cave drawings for future civilizations to decifer? May the Almighty algorithm help them.
  • + 1
 I sort of find that photos generally get in the way of being in the moment for me and thats fine,I just don't really take photos when I'm riding.I have very few images or videos because I'm generally into the ride.Today I scared myself and rode some things that are for me quite challenging.It is part of the very slow progression that is happening in my riding.My friend spent the day with another friend working on an edit. Thats their thing.Good on her as she probably pushed herself to ride as well as she could.So it probably works for some and not for others.I use it all the time to know when shuttles are,group rides etc etc
  • + 1
 Social media is bad for society, and the individual. That doesn't mean its going away, that doesn't mean that no one should use it. It is crucial for everyone to be aware of, in order to keep social media (and phone/internet addiction in general) in check. Use it in moderation. Remember that the content presented on social media IS NOT REAL LIFE. I think its like fast food. Its bad for you. It just is. If you use it once in a while, its okay though.

(before im dismissed as a grumpy old man, my high school graduating class, 2005, was the second class to be allowed to access facebook. We were all so excited that once our college registrations went through we could sign up for facebook, since at that time only a current .edu student email could be used to register for facebook. I participated in the beginning of the social media boom, and have subsequently seen that it does nothing to improve my life.)
  • + 1
 From the American Physiological Association:
www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2017/technology-social-media.PDF

"Survey findings suggest that more than eight in 10 Americans are attached
to their gadgets on a typical day (86 percent say they constantly or often
check their emails, texts and social media accounts). "

"For constant checkers, stress runs higher than for those who do not
engage with technology as frequently. On a 10-point scale, where 1 is
“little or no stress” and 10 is “a great deal of stress,” the average reported
overall stress level of constant checkers is 5.3. For non-constant checkers,
the average reported stress level is 4.4."
  • + 4
 Take a step back ffs, put the phone down,turn off the computer & go ride.
  • + 3
 Well, there is at least one big positive of social media: Companies can FEEL the instant backlash when they come up with something as dumb as the dub.
  • + 1
 Social Media has enabled mountain biking to be fetishized, but the industry loves that. It goes like this; the average joe becomes fascinated by the latest and greatest trail bike he sees on Instagram; he buys it, takes pictures of it, then posts the pictures to instagram, proclaiming that he is now a 'rider'. That process is cyclical. Perhaps I'm being irrational, but I still believe in earning your decoration. I like to watch the pros on youtube and instagram thrashing their bikes, but like Wade said, there's all this other junk on there. And no I'm not bitter because I 'can't afford a bike'. Nevertheless the current spec of trail bikes is f'ing unreal, these machines ride like a dream.
  • + 1
 I find social media to be a good thing for this sport. one of my favourite tracks is controlled by the local council and is closed if wet due to soil type. They use Facebook as the media of choice to get the word out so that ppl know straight away not to bother going, for me that means saving me a 45 min trip each way. There is also a Facebook page for only mountain bikes and related gear and a Facebook page for MTBrs across Sydney that do group rides etc. with these mediums information can be quickly spread and meetups organised in advance. Its not the social media but how you use it. showing pics of your breasts and your pet dog doesn't really do it for me, but that great pic of two riders in a field of sunflowers, pure awesome
  • + 1
 If brands could have tracked ROI on magazine ads, and any other marketing spends 'back in the day' , they would have jumped at the opportunity. They were used to pissing LOTS of money down the drain to just look, act, be cool. Now that the data is out there to 'prove' marketing managers are doing their job correctly, we get the haters coming out saying it's ALL not worth it. Social media has made lots of what used to be 'fake', REAL! Do your job good, and get real engagement, then sell your product. Just happens digitally now, instead of thumbing through paper. Just my opinion.
  • + 4
 Oh Matt HUnter talking trash about gps devices, but driving ebikes is cool... what an ignorant man you are ...
  • + 1
 At this point, whether social media is good or bad for mountainbiking is somewhat of a moot point. Either way, it's here. I hate having to be involved in social media at all, but a few years ago I realized how many opportunities of all kinds I was missing by refusing to engage. Now I have a PB profile, a FB profile, and a couple others and I use them not because it's what I want personally, but because if I don't the world will happily move on without me and I won't hear about a lot of jobs, romantic opportunities, and a million other things. Without a social media backtrail to look at... some people (prospective employers, lovers, etc.) won't have anything to do with you. You can lock yourself up in your ivory tower of moral superiority, but you're gonna be lonely and hungry eventually...
  • + 3
 Enduro is not that exciting and everyone is getting antsy for DH WC to get started!! The only thing keeping everyone sane on PB is yoga with Abi!
  • + 3
 Does Strava count? I hate that some fun trail rides become constant race runs for certain folk.
I personally don't use Instaface or Twitter. Doesn't bother me one bit
  • + 1
 Do know what this is a good point. I have come off all main social media platforms 2 months ago and i feel liberated. My point is that it has not lost me any interest in any sport i enjoy! Oh and i now talk to my family a lot more!
  • + 2
 It's just communication between people. Can too much of that be a bad thing?
As with pretty much everything in life,social media is what we want it to be. Use it like salt.
  • + 1
 Social Media has made content more readily available and I dig that! I almost feel like the guys I subscribe to on YouTube or Facebook are buddies since I see watch them so much.
  • + 11
 That is sort of a "problem" actually. This is one of the reasons why social media is evil. They are not your friends/buddies.
  • + 3
 @chasejj: I’m fully aware of that, I was making a joke. But on a serious note if it wasn’t for social media a guy like Scotty Cranmer wouldn’t have the support and backing that he does to continue healing and getting the word out about spinal and brain injuries. With over 1 million followers he can make a serious change in the way people view those types of injuries.
  • + 4
 @chasejj: social media isn't evil lol and how feeling like a person you enjoy watching is your friend is bad? it makes no sense
  • + 1
 The only people pb interviewed use social media and therefore I find there discussion one sided filled with industry insiders who are tying to sell both themselves and the products of the companies They represent. Ftw
  • + 0
 Social M Usage is Shifting to bully control vs voyerism, normal people with interesting trail related info tend to not post it for fear of trolling,until there is some control ( like your down arrow on pinkbike ) its only going to get worse and/or useless until that pivot point where the unlike button will be created
  • + 1
 I think whether you see it as positive or negative, that's a reflection of how you see the world in general. Nothing is either positive or negative, but we make it so in our minds.
  • + 0
 I skipped all the commentary after @stikmanglaspell and ran over to Instagram to see if Bernard Kerr, Wyn Masters or Nick Pescetto had uploaded anything. Their videos are like Christmas on a Tuesday!

That being said, I argue like a MoFo on social media, so I lose money and sanity (I think I actually gain a little when people agree with me) every time I post up.

Love me some Instagram since it's simple and quick. Wife asked me why the heck I post to it and I tell her it's almost like a personal journal I can look back on or modern day photo album. No arguments or debates for the most part. Pop a pic, share it to FB and keep charging my day.
  • + 1
 "...at least with old magazines you can pick one up and have a laugh on the shitter, but who's gonna swipe through old shitty Instagram posts? Nobody."

Unnecessarily...or necessarily...harsh? Maybe. Epic? Yeah.
  • + 0
 I have a few things to say here. First of all, what Mike said, "If you believe that more riders, more sales, and more popularity is a good thing, then sure. I don't think any of those are positive points," is really condescending, elitist garbage; I usually like his opinions other than that though. It reminds me of all those hipster kids talking about how their favorite band went to garbage when they got popular. I also think that what he pointed out about the emptiness of social media is his fault, not the fault of social media itself.

Secondly, I'd like to say that I actually find social media to be really beneficial to riding. Teenagers nowadays are actually less attached to their phones than before, and actually know how to healthily connect on social media without becoming addicted. Social media has influenced me extremely positively, I don't even know if I ever would have started riding bikes without it, and frankly, I don't think I can comprehend how different I would be without social media. In my opinion, I feel like the people who complain about the vapidity and lack of personality that social media causes are just finding a scapegoat for human nature as they do not know how it actually affects anything.

Thirdly, it seems like every one asked gave themselves the ability to pick and choose which social medias were bad and which were good. All things can be abused, and social media is just one of those things. Just imagine back in 1817 when the bike was invented, and all of the old farts were saying, "Oh, these bikes are making people lazy, I think bikes negatively impact our lives?" Social media is too big of a beast for any one person to understand, not even the CEOs of major companies.
  • + 2
 " Teenagers nowadays are actually less attached to their phones than before, and actually know how to healthily connect on social media without becoming addicted."

Your opinions are certainly valid, and well thought out. I agree very much with the hipster mentality sentiment. However, the idea that people are less attached to their phones and their online personalities is incorrect.

From the American Physiological Association:
www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2017/technology-social-media.PDF

"Survey findings suggest that more than eight in 10 Americans are attached
to their gadgets on a typical day (86 percent say they constantly or often
check their emails, texts and social media accounts). "

"For constant checkers, stress runs higher than for those who do not
engage with technology as frequently. On a 10-point scale, where 1 is
“little or no stress” and 10 is “a great deal of stress,” the average reported
overall stress level of constant checkers is 5.3. For non-constant checkers,
the average reported stress level is 4.4."
  • + 1
 Cool.
  • + 1
 Keeping to bike specific Social media. Maybe it’s a geographical thing but I don’t get the more riders bad for trails thing. Without people riding trails the trails die. I’m in my 40’s now and ride as much as I can but I have to do so around my work, friends and family, on rides if trails are getting over grown or lost I stop and try to get them redefined but I can’t spend days in the woods cutting new trails. Back 20 years ago I spent all my time in the woods cutting trails with my riding friends, life changes, people move on. If you keep the trails secret, when you move on and and it’s very likely you will even if at 17 you think you won’t those trails will die, isn’t it better to share them so new people can keep them going? Maybe this is where USA / Europe differs, too many people in cities hitting the same areas v’s not enough people to keep trails clear. Social media such as Strava is good for this & when moving locations great for finding trails. Last 2 years I’ve started spending more time in a completely new place, I’ve found where the trails are via Strava but it’s obvious the people that put the work in originally are long gone, I don’t yet know any riders in the area and can ride all day and not see anyone else, I think I’m one of only a hand full of people who don’t know each other who keep the trails alive there.

Very few of my long term friends now ride anything more than gentle XC to a pub, yet 20 years ago some were national and even WC riders.

Social media has made it easier to keep in touch with new people I’ve met out riding and form friendships that would have been no more than a 5 minute chat as our paths crossed once randomly in the woods. It’s also lets me get a feel for guides and riding holidays that so that I can turn up on my own and know i’ll fit in or not and to avoid. All good things.

Bad things Marketing - social media has been hijacked by marketing it wasn’t originally created for marketing, but now it’s almost dominated by it which is tiresome. Of course now many forums only exist as marketing tools. Trolls / Trolling - sad sad people sometimes it’s hard not to react. Grass is always greener thoughts when you see people riding in places you want to be but can’t be, that can get depressing. Progression - yes I know it’s great but it’s also a bit depressing when you see some of the crazy lines new young riders hit that even the best riders 20 years ago wouldn’t dream of attempting. This stuff gets shoved down your throat a good bit on social media due to the wow factor, more clicks and shares but I think it can make people who are good riders feel they are not as they compare them selves often to the slightly daft loon who has no regard or understanding of their own safety.

There are pros and cons. It’s not all good but it’s also not all bad.
  • + 2
 if it has negative impact on you that's only your fault social media isn't bad or evil its a tool that you choose how to use it
  • + 3
 For me personally it has zero affect on my taking part or enjoyment of the sport.
  • + 2
 f*ck up social media¡¡¡¡ theres nothing positive on it, our planet still sick and get worst at every moment, likes are just killing it faster
  • + 2
 Am I the only one who spends half my ride thinking about what to name the ride's Strava title? #ashamed
  • + 3
 Social media is making us all dumb and dumber.
  • + 3
 Let's just focus on riding our bikes like the old days. Happy Trails!
  • + 2
 MFRacin
  • + 1
 @flyr: F-Yeah!
  • + 1
 *Quickly scrolls to comments section to see what other people on this mountain bike specific social media think and to roast them on their wheel size*
  • + 1
 Powerful Matt Hunter. This guys passion is always contagious. The @mattyhunter ig is full of evocative trailporn, keep posting!
  • + 2
 Negative, causes too many people to ride the trails that you want to keep as a hidden slice of heaven.
  • + 3
 Another 1-3 minute shitty shred lol
  • + 3
 Matt Hunter having regrets about shilling eBikes on social media?
  • + 1
 he basically didn't have a choice.
  • + 2
 Is the ultimate irony that we're answering this question on Pinkbike, a renowned bicycle social media site?
  • + 0
 Its positive. Firstly its a platform to inspire and share. Secondly, this is social media so without it, I would not know whats going on, see new products etc. Im not paying nearly £6 for a magazine
  • + 1
 It is only what you make it out to be. Nothing more, nothing less. It is positive if you want it to be.
  • - 2
 Social media sucks!! Bunch of armchair a-holes attacking you for whatever reason. Social media itself has brought stellar riding to light, Danny's epic street riding, etc., but as a whole, social media sucks. I hate commenting on this website because of all the trolls. Bashed for my history, opinions, likes and dislikes. Years ago, Pinkbike was once a site where you found others riders that love to ride, no judgements, we just rode. But the amount of wimps behind the handle, for me at least, have made it nothing more than a print magazine in online form. I don't even go down to the comments most days..
  • + 7
 Your first sentence: you create what you want to fight. Then you go on to devaluate every person interacting with others on social media. You sound like a preacher talking about people who leave the church. Are you that helpless in the face fear of novelty that you see just the dark side of it? Yet you are here, fricking here writing this? You’re one of us, we are no other, we share the same biology, regardless of ideology. Give up and hug me
  • + 2
 Pretty sure it has a negative effect on everything.
  • + 1
 I can't say I'm a fan of social media but it sure was nice to get that early footage at Rampage this year.
  • + 2
 We should start by turning off the comment section.
  • + 2
 10 out of 10 worst things are your local Cycling Facebook group
  • + 1
 por que no los dos???

it has a good and bad effect, depending on the content.
  • - 1
 Mike, Wade, and Matt hit it. Though my own actions are probably hypocritical, I think they're close to correct. The Ride is the goal. When media overshadows it, then it's a problem.
  • + 3
 if you're a regular joe then yes, but aren't wade and matt paid to promote product?
  • + 1
 Um yeah... we're gonna need the pro's, manu's, and media to stop blowing up sensitive area. That'd be great.

Umkay?
  • + 1
 Racing results mean less now then before, instagram pays the bills so why risk all racing
  • + 2
 Classic Wade Simmons "Ahh, man, you know that I really don't care" hahaha
  • + 2
 Matt Hunters gap to wall-ride with Sorge indeed is the shit Wink
  • + 2
 You can get rid of all that crap, just don't take away my Trailforks app!
  • + 2
 Who else has been on Facebook for 15 years now?
  • + 1
 Stravasshole is a biking-specific word for social media abuse. Plenty of that. At the same time, Strava is kind of awesome.
  • + 2
 People love to show off Smile
  • + 0
 I respect Matt Hunter for being upfront with his thoughts especially because he is on social media. Also liked what Wade Simmons had to say.
  • + 2
 Preach, Matt Hunter, preach!
  • + 2
 It seems clear Pinkbike is a Canadian thing.
  • + 2
 Matt Hunter is the man, 100%
  • - 2
 @POWsLAYER @laxguy
Both of you be quiet or I will have to pound your significant other in the bum with my average size penis. If your significant other is male or female, I do it give a damn. However, I have a strong feeling I’m going to be beating some man cheeks. AKA you blokes are flaming gay.
  • + 1
 thanks for coming in 2 days later with that stunning witticism.. you're contribution is truly appreciated.
  • + 1
 Narcissistic highlight reel..AMEN Smile
  • + 2
 What's social media
  • + 1
 Instatwitsnapface
  • + 2
 Yes.
  • + 1
 If you consider Strava as social media then NEGATIVE!
  • + 1
 Ditto
  • + 1
 Love Matt hunter' s answer. Then, just before you die...
  • + 1
 I think social can both hurt and help mountain biking as a sport
  • + 1
 @Matt Hunter, you nailed it.
  • + 2
 couldn't care less TBH.
  • + 1
 Agree with Matt but it's good for trail condition updates...
  • + 1
 Wade nailed it.
  • + 1
 Both
  • + 0
 I feel like PB recently is turning into "The View". Coffee and bitching.
  • + 1
 I came for a poll :-)
  • + 1
 Hi Park Baker
  • + 0
 Matt Hunter's opinion is on point.
  • + 0
 It's all just a bunch of bullshit and I'm too busy riding my bike
  • + 1
 Mike Levy Spot on !!
  • - 2
 Social media like FB, instagram etc are killing all good websites and forums like pinkbike, VitalMTB, MTBR, DH-Zone I dont like that.
  • + 7
 I am losing faith in PB. Vital seems to be doing it pretty well. MTBR is an SJW disaster, being based in Norcal that would be expected.
  • + 2
 @chasejj: MTBR? I thought they died in 2001 according to what the website looks like. But yeah, way too Norcal bro-brah to be considered as anything other than a local chatroom. Remember chat rooms? Me niether.
  • + 0
 Fuck yes Matt Hunter. You NAILED IT!!!
  • + 1
 Both
  • + 0
 Positive.
  • - 3
 We can hate social media but its the reason biking blew up and I see that as a good thing.
  • + 5
 What planet the f@ck are you from? Biking blew up because it is awesome, social media had nothing to do with it. As an old t-shirt I got from Fanatyk, Whistler back in 2005 said. "Mountain biking, as addictive as crack, but twice as expensive. Visit your local dealer". People try it and they're hooked.

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