1 Question: What's the Next Step For Mountain Bike Suspension Technology?

Apr 29, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  
PB One Question
There was a time when suspension was derided as being unnecessary, a complicated and heavy encumbrance that somehow sullied the 'purity' of mountain biking. Luckily, those sentiments soon disappeared as riders began to realize how much of a difference a few inches of travel could make. More control, less fatigue, the ability to travel through rough terrain at higher speeds – the advantages far outweighed the downsides, and before long some form of suspension was present on nearly every style of bike, from XC race rigs to DH machines.

Today's top of the line suspension offerings are miles ahead of those rudimentary elastomer and coil spring forks and shocks, featuring sophisticated valving, independent compression and rebound adjustments, and a blend of stiffness and light weight that was unimaginable during mountain biking's formative years. But what does the future hold? When there are single crown forks with 6” of travel that weigh only 4 pounds and are robust enough to handle any type of terrain, what will the next generation of suspension look like? We rounded up a selection of suspension gurus and industry insiders to try and get a hint of what's coming down the line. Understandably, many companies are cautious about divulging too much information about their current projects, but there are still strong hints as to where the suspension world is headed.








Jon Cancellier - Product Manager, RockShox


bigquotesThe next step for mountain bike suspension will be the versatility to adapt to a wide range of riding experiences with a single setup. Suspension that has the ability to transform itself from performance that would rival current DH bikes but at the flip of a lever or remote can go to XC firm. Forks that are DH stiff at XC weight. Rear shocks that are DH plush but XC efficient. In addition, we will see products that are easier to set up and interact with for the end user. Less time dealing with settings and more time spent riding on the trail.

Lapierre's E:I system was a great step forward in re-thinking the way that we interact with our suspension and the way that our suspension interprets the terrain around us. We feel there are great benefits to not just replacing a mechanical switch with an electronic one but as to where this will take us we'll have to wait and see.





Bryson Martin - Owner/Founder, DVO Suspension


bigquotes I'm not sure we will see big "steps" in MTB suspension technology but rather small steps in refinement. I do like the fact that we are seeing more companies going inverted with single crown designs. Inverted chassis do offer a great feel that conventional designs aren't able to deliver so expect to see more innovations in that direction, especially from DVO. I've been a big fan of inverted designs and first developed an inverted carbon XC fork 15 years ago.

I also think electronic tuning or a simplified version of data acquisition may make its way into suspension. It would be great to see how your settings are actually performing on the trail via an iPhone or Android app. For example, electronics in the suspension can indicate if your rebound or compression damping and air or coil spring settings are in the ballpark according to your weight and riding conditions. We are currently working on a app that can answer technical questions or trouble shoot set-up based off what the rider describes he or she is having issues concerns with. It would be like having the knowledge of a DVO technician on hand via an app. But of course, adding a few simplified electronic sensors shouldn't add complexity to the overall suspension system since I feel mountain bikers don't want the hassles of electronic gadgets that are finicky and delicate. Rather, they just want to ride and set it and forget it for the most part with the exception of an XC racer who may not mind hassling with the electronics.





Darren Murphy - Founder, Push Industries


bigquotesWhat's the next step in MTB suspension technology? To quote the Samsung commercials, "The next big thing is already here" with our patent-pending Dual Overhead Valve System found in ELEVENSIX. For us this type of user driven technology is most important. While our compression valve assembly is relatively consistent with what's found in high end racing dampers, the execution of providing two independent on-the-fly ride characteristics is unique.

As for the next step in suspension technology, our focus isn't always on making something new necessarily but rather making the ride better. A lot of times this result comes from something that isn't sexy and doesn't have an acronym associated with it. For example, in the case of our shaft assembly we spend a lot of time on manufacturing tolerances, what type of coatings are used on what parts, seal and seal gland design, as well as fluid testing. The results from these efforts add up to significant gains on the way the bike responds to small bumps and the level of off-camber traction you get, but don't make for the greatest marketing story when one of the big guys comes out with an electronic-diffibulating-bluetooth-actuated-damping-dingho.

So without continuing to babble, what is the next step? I think it's going to be spring technology. Incredibly light, performance spring systems that don't require a suspension pump...





Dan Dacko - Marketing, SR Suntour


bigquotesSimpler systems. Sure there are electronics out there pushing to be the next thing and stating to be able to think and react faster than you, but none of them seem to have created a large enough benefit for the greater good (and they are still expensive). But simpler high performance systems seems to be the next step that everyone is moving towards. Simpler usually means less parts, which usually means lighter weight. Simpler usually means that tuning a fork for a certain riding style, weight or conditions is faster and easier to obtain for those that might not be suspension experts. Simpler usually means a system can be made more durable and reliable as tolerances are easier to meet and less moving parts to break or wear out. A simpler system just makes more sense to match with do it all go anywhere trail bikes, the above reasons explain why.






Jim Morrison - Senior Design Engineer, Cane Creek


bigquotesIn the immediate future I think we will see increasing numbers of twin-tube dampers like the Double Barrel as the "average" consumer becomes more sophisticated with regard to their suspension setup and performance. We're already seeing the beginnings of this trend with the recent introductions of new products from Ohlins and Fox and it stands to reason that this trend will continue in both front and rear applications. Furthermore, as twin-tube technology becomes more prevalent I suspect we will see some trickle-down into more accessible price-points so even entry-level riders can reap the benefits of this technology.

If we look a little further into the future I think we will see a vast expansion of the features "landscape" of bicycle shocks. These additional features will range from improved climbing modes that optimize the damper's performance for low speeds to more refined and adaptable air-springs and beyond. As with all technological advancements, some of these features will be mere gimmicks but some will be truly game-changing. Of course, the packaging of bicycle shocks is always a big challenge so I expect we will see the emergence of some new shock sizes to allow designers a little more room to "play" so to speak.

In short, my crystal ball says that the top-end technologies of today will be in the hands of every-man (or woman) tomorrow and the top-end suspensions of tomorrow will further reduce the inherent bicycle suspension performance compromise between climbing and descending.




Noah Sears - Product and Marketing Manager, MRP


bigquotesI think the next step in mountain bike suspension is a re-imagining of rear suspension - what it's there to do and how best to accomplish that. Whereas with front suspension you can only skin the cat so many ways - traditional, inverted, one legged, etc... rear suspension is more integral to frame designs and not necessarily restricted one type of structure or layout. There have certainly been some pretty awesome new technologies introduced in the last few years, but for the most part modern air shocks look a lot like the original Fox ALPS first introduced almost a quarter century ago. That basic packaging and structure is almost universal across all brands.

What direction(s) rear suspension goes is anyone's guess, but my prediction is that there are some pretty wild concepts on drawing boards now, and most likely even in the prototyping phase. You have to think that with this industry's never ending arms race to produce the lightest, most-capable bikes, that there are damper designs out there that defy suspension orthodoxy. I'm not talking about the incorporation of electronics that simply take the place manual adjustments or do the suspension tuning for you, that stuff is here and has yet to really prove revolutionary. I'm talking about suspension technologies so different from the current norm you'll not only be scratching your head when you see them, you'll wonder how you ever rode what you've got now!






Clarke Dolton - Marketing Manager, X-Fusion


bigquotesI would say that in the X-Fusion office we are under the suspicion that electronics are the next big thing for MTB suspension, and seat posts as well. We know the technology exists from Moto GP and other motorsports based suspension, we know battery technology is there, so it's really just the compartmentalizing or packaging of those technologies into MTB suspension. Is that direction X-Fusion is heading? Probably not, at least not right now, but we do think this will be the next step. We think we may soon see real time computer controlled damping and it's not hard to imagine Di2 supported suspension as well.

As for seat posts, we think a motor driven and electronically controlled post will also come as part of the "electronic movement" and there are many patents out there supporting that idea. The suspension segment of the industry has gotten really tough in the last few years with many manufactures making truly high performance products so X-Fusion is concentrating on keeping our quality, performance and value high to stay competitive. That said, we do have some pretty cool projects in the works that will certainly turn some heads, but I can't talk about that.





Jeremiah Boobar - Director of Suspension Technology, Cannondale


bigquotesWe will see more electronic suspension solutions that will offer mountain bikers benefits in terms of performance and ease of use that can't exist without a powered system. We've all seen the potential presented by Accell group's E:I system and Magura's Elect. They offer benefits that could not be realized directly through pure mechanical solutions, which is a great step forward, but not enough of an improvement for the majority of users to accept the additional "hassle" of living with a battery. These new benefits will be so compelling that the issue of managing charging a battery for your mountain bike will become less of an issue for a broader base of mountain bikers.

I say all of that knowing that I myself still struggle with the concept of having a power supply to manage my mountain bike. There is something about dealing with a battery that suddenly makes you feel less self-sufficient, which in turn detracts from that experience of being outside and being one with nature. However, knowing the potential benefits, I think I will find a way to deal with my own emotional hang-ups and have a bike that rides faster.

If this question was intended to be interpreted more broadly then I would add a few more things. Suspension quality will continue to improve allowing for riders to reduce the amount of travel they use. As the quality of the suspension improves the system can more efficiently dissipate the same amount of energy input by the rider. This means that you can use less travel to maintain the same control. We can see a glimpse of this with the recent introductions of very capable 120mm trail bikes. With the right wheels, tires and bars these little bikes make you wonder how many areas of the world would make you want more travel.





Mark Fitzsimmons - Race Manager, FOX Racing Shox


bigquotesIn the future, the mountain bike rider will benefit from two developing directions. The first is bringing high-end suspension performance to more affordable bikes. We want our customers to enjoy the benefits of our RAD suspension efforts on bikes that the working man can afford. The second is further developing electronics into suspension.

The sky is the limit on electronic controls. There will be a lot of mountain bike riders that will say, "Why do I need this on my mountain bike?" For starters, every one of our World Cup cross country athletes are racing on electronically controlled suspension. They won the World Championships on it last year. And they are using it by their own choice.

We have to remember cycling is a human-powered sport. On a good day, some of us might put out a single horsepower. In order to enjoy endless hours of mountain biking we are battling a power to weight balance. A mountain bike's suspension needs to offer efficiency along with comfort.

Electronic advancements will require less maintenance. Before our XC teams were racing on iRD, they were using cable-activated remote levers to control their suspension. Typically, we would have to replace cables once a race as the elements would cause cable drag as water gets into the system. With iRD, we go an entire season without servicing these controls.

Another benefit is reduced fatigue. It takes about eight to twelve pounds of lever force to activate mechanical lever controls. This effort over the course of a two-hour ride is very fatiguing. The iRD switch requires less than two pounds of force to activate. Julien Absalon went from controlling his suspension twenty times a race to one hundred times a race because of this advantage.






339 Comments

  • + 248
 next step should be forgetting about all the sizes and remembering to just have fun on any bike
  • + 50
 That's a nice thought but this is the bike industry. One of these talking heads above will come up with some new proprietary "standard" and try to sell it as the next best thing to sliced bread. You can bet on that.
  • + 66
 if you don't want it, don't buy it.
  • + 40
 Helium up the entire air system in the bike. so we can float all the way.
  • + 19
 I think we should start incorporating trophy truck/prerunner technology. Have a shock that is longer than what we have now but once you sit on the bike it sags out to the length of the avg shock of today. A lot of sag to fill holes means more traction. That's just my 2¢
  • + 122
 The next big thing is having more day offs so I could ride my damn bike.
  • + 49
 I was thinking if companies could find a way to make profit by arranging skill clinics, at least in major cities, you know, where most of buyers come from, to then take the bike for a couple of weekends in a year to some remote location or major MTB venue like a bike park or trail center. I mean, if let's say FOX, sponsors building a pumptrack in my town, at least in some part, then that is a fun and performance booster, making riders faster than any new suspension product could ever make. I this way I'd totaly buy their products out of gratitude.

I also love the fact that dudes at MTBStore in Gothenburg, selling Kona, have several rental bikes, which they rent out at a relatively small price, and this is not real trail center (yet?) here or a bike park. Several other stores are starting to offer such services. In this way anyone can ride a bloody great bike from time to time if he can't afford one, and if someone comes to me for a visit and none of my bikes fits him/her, they can rent it and I can make sure they can enjoy local spots to the fullest. I personally value such things above anything else, even above a company sticking to 26", because these are tangible, advancement improving the way people ride in terrain and experience MTB in all forms.
  • + 2
 people without skills buy more shit ( iknow you knew already )
  • - 2
 @Chyu: the mistake that many people are making is that Helium doesn't have negative weight. It just weighs less than air, that's why it floats (just like a balloon filled with air will float on the water because it is lighter, while a rock is heavier than water so it will sink).
Helium still has weight; if you'd drop a balloon filled with Helium on a place where there is no air, for example on the moon, it will fall down on the ground, just likle a rock.

This being said, replacing Helium by air, would save less weight, than the total weight of the air in the forks. Which I guess even in an air fork with compressed air, would only be about 5 grams maximum.
Then Helium has its weight aswell, so imagine the weight of the air would be 5 grams, the savings would be even less; probably less than 3 grams.
Then Helium excists out of much smaller particles, meaning it will leak through materials, where air would not be able to leak through. This means you'd have to use more dense materials to keep the Helium inside, probably adding 100-200g total to the forks.

This is why Helium is never being used in the cycling industry. Not in tyres, not in forks, not inside frames.
  • + 21
 I thought Chyu was joking Frown
  • + 32
 @Mattin A helium filled balloon on the moon would expand until it popped due to the non existent atmosphere on the moon. But I understood your point.
  • + 4
 Haha good point SintraFreeride Smile
  • + 20
 are you telling us santa claus is not real?
  • + 5
 seal glands, hahahahahahahahahahaha
  • + 20
 If electronic suspension is the future of mountainbiking, then the future is not something to look forward to. The prices for suspension products have become extremely expensive. Why not rather try to make supension more affordable?
  • + 33
 @jaha222, "if you don't want it don't by it" does not work anymore. We are extremely short of 26" bikes and we are strongly dependent on frames and forks to get the axle standard we want. How many single crown forks does have 20mm axle? Hopefully my Lyrik will live forever. I think that's the biggest problem today. Industry is not giving you options. They even didn't provide you the best option. They always want you to change at least half of your bike when you are in a need for replacement.
  • - 6
flag FlowMasterO (Apr 30, 2015 at 6:21) (Below Threshold)
 @leelau boost is the best thing since sliced bread
  • + 11
 +1 for Mentalhead. If my current fork in my Stinky will die, I don't even think I have any options to buy new 26" forks with 20mm drop outs and 1 1/8" steerertubes? And IF there are options, it will be very minimal compared to 27.5" forks with 15mm drop outs and tapered steerertubes.

This means that the industry is FORCING me to both buy a new frame that fits tapered steerertubes and where the geometry (/bb height) is based on 27.5" wheels, which I'd need to buy aswell.

But then again, screw that, luckely there is still plenty of choice on the second hand market. I think that will last another 5 to 10 years before we run out of fork options for these sizes in the second hand market.
  • + 3
 @Mattin i did the math with hydrogen and yeah, you save barely half a pound. it sounds awesome, but it is not feasible at all.
  • + 3
 Foes had a bike a few years back that did that. Offered up I think about 2 or 3in of travel the other way. Really neat design.
  • + 20
 Let's say some companies like Shimano, Fox, Race Face, some hub manufacturers and various bike companies made a decisions to stick to the current standards...SRAM and Trek could be put on their heals and large profits for the companies willing to take a stand. Boost isn't even logical and nobody cares about ATV tires on their mountain bikes
  • + 19
 Get the fack outta here with your e suspension the only thing that gets batteries on my bike is a flashlight
  • + 28
 my thought is to just leave us alone for a couple of years, let the sport grow, figure out how to get the costs down and when you have something that is truly better and new, then release that. Until then please just let me ride and f off.
  • + 24
 Battery powered flashlight? What is wrong with you? I use a whale oil powered lamp
  • - 4
flag vernonjeff (Apr 30, 2015 at 7:31) (Below Threshold)
 honestly dude.. whale's are endangered. its not funny..
  • + 0
 electronic controlled damping. and moar wider!
  • + 6
 some kids are happy or "lucky" by just having shocks

www.youtube.com/watch?v=I2iUQqp-zU8
  • + 20
 +2 for Metalhead. Completely true.

I do not want more electronic gizmos. Fewer parts fewer problems. And what kind of sissy needs to replace the cable on a fork lockout EVERY RACE because it gets a little XC dust gets in it? Maybe the athletes should be thumb-wrestling a little more so their digits can bulk up.

The SR Suntour response best. Simplicity.

Strava will soon be the proving grounds that these geeked out bikes are not faster for the average Joe. They are just more expensive for the average schmuck.
  • + 13
 +1 for silvbullit for SR Suntour having the best response Smile
  • + 2
 forget all that, tell me more about the damping dingho on the shaft from push.
  • + 2
 Build more fun trails here in Raleigh NC so I can ride more and wear out all the components and will buy more of your products.
  • + 5
 The next big thing: patent wars on designs that shouldn't necessarily have been issued patents in the first place.
  • + 1
 yeah that Aheadset patent is bullocks!
  • + 8
 Disappointed that none of the insiders mentioned lowering the price of products we buy. I don't need the latest and greatest, just a decent fork that doesn't cost near a grand.
  • + 9
 i think the next big thing should be to ditch the internet.
  • + 2
 How about a conversation about where we're going to ride after a generation of snot nosed 15-year olds gets turned loose on multiple use trails with their 650B+-moto wide tires and Moto GP suspension technology? Bikes are amazing and getting more so every year, but every improvement makes them faster and makes that speed more accessible to less experienced riders. I'm not a luddite advocating for rigid single speeds, but for other trail users, our bikes look more and more like silent assassin motos every year. The multi use trail accessible for after work rides is now like driving a Ferrari on a US Interstate, less exciting because you can't begin to tap into the capability of the machine for fear of scaring the shit out of a mom with a stroller.

The advent of long travel on dirt bikes changed the nature of the terrain, creating whoops and braking bumps in lots of places that are deep enough to hide a pack of cub scouts in. Thus was created a never ending loop of suspension technology fighting to keep up with deteriorating terrain. The point is that advances in technology change the entire experience, not just the bike itself, and perhaps not always in a good way.
  • + 2
 Pull shocks ? Bring back the Lobo and Yeti/Scwhinn I want a modern day Lobo with Idrive and RS Pull shock.
  • + 4
 I didn't get the point of this article, until I saw the latest PB post about Motos. I think PB trying to introduce us to the idea of motorized mountain bikes. Don't like the fumes and noize of moto? How about 1/2 moto... a DH bike with an electric assist to help you carry all your body armor and 29+ wheels. No sweating on the up so you can be fresh on the downs. No pain all gain.
  • - 6
flag cuban-b (Apr 30, 2015 at 16:42) (Below Threshold)
 i'd buy an e bike just to piss off pinkbikers. it's worth it.
  • + 4
 What you need sir, is a Marzocchi 55cr! Not exactly a bad option, despite your limited choices Smile
  • + 2
 the 55 is a terrible fork dont buy the 26" leftovers, i want them all.
  • + 1
 Better buy them all to keep the production up. In the it is all about money, and if that one 26" fork sells well, they might actually keep it in the game
  • + 1
 Good advice there jaha222. What's your answer if I can't get what I do wanna buy? :s
  • + 113
 Today a young man on a mountain bike realized that all suspension is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration, that his front and rear shocks are one consciousness experiencing the terrain subjectively, there is no such thing as damping, rebound is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves.
  • + 10
 Awesome B.H. reference!!!!!!!
  • + 3
 The king! Smile
  • + 36
 Here's Tom with a new axle standard.
  • + 4
 well done. now if they would stop making wine and make another album.
  • + 8
 lol que? Unfortunately the artist behind this quote certainly won't make any more albums. He also had this advice for the bike industry:

If you are in advertising or marketing... kill yourself.
  • + 2
 Not the original of course but www.youtube.com/watch?v=0NL6wOFGg3E Smile (i doubt this is whoever phoenixsun meant)
  • + 1
 @SiSandro my job in advertising pays for all my biking.
  • + 2
 @JesseE so does my marketing job, but i have no illusions about being Satan's little helper and filling the world with bile and garbage.

@phoenixsun ah thanks, i was pretty sure Radiohead didn't get into viniculture
  • + 1
 @SiSandro I polish a lot of turds, but I'm not out to get anyone, and I know my clients are typically to incompetent to pull off anything truly damning.
  • + 1
 I just watched "Relentless" on monday at a special showing in my local movie theater. This thread should be closed to comments, it can't get better than a Bill Hicks quote.
  • + 1
 would rep OP again if i could. Made my day!
  • + 3
 and todays winner of the whole internet is... @ajayflex
  • + 62
 The next thing in suspension is the same as it has been since 5 years: make something that looks kind of new, mainly with graphics, then add a story to it so it sounds as something totaly new, all in order to - no1 appear innovative and at the pinnacle of technology, no2 keep sales going no3 convince people that change matters a lot. That is completely understandable since this is how we roll since a long, long time, and while some things do next to nothing (Lyrik>Pike, 2010 36>2015 36 - yea yea oh my, take a deep breath) some do more (DebonAir). Electronics? For XC - hell yea! For anything else, keep on throwing your money out of the window.

The question is what is so scary in the idea that we already reached pretty much everything possible in MTB suspension technology? That 2025 forks will not be any better than current Pike or floatX? Why is development and growth sold as something mandatory? To me, all this resizing of hubs, wheels, tyres are a sign of overgrowth, of uncrontrolled surplus. Nobody really needs that, it's like trying to improve marital sex life by renting latest porn, when everyone silently knows that everything's been already done, that you have to get it up and get the other wet, get on top of each other and get on with it. If you don't like it this way then there are only three options: closing your eyes, getting permission to go on a shag week with someone else or simply masturbation. External stimuli are weak, as opposed to intrinisc motivation, you do it, or forget it.
  • + 11
 Waki I just put a brown paper bag over my own head.... problem solved !!
  • - 7
flag torero (Apr 30, 2015 at 4:34) (Below Threshold)
 All this creates the overproduction capitalist crisis, you have said Waki. Current suspensions are not more capable than five years ago.
  • + 25
 I get uncomfortable when Waki knows too much about my marital sex life.
  • + 3
 Best comment under this article.
  • + 4
 I'm sure people were saying similar things 10 years ago about other aspects of bike technology. Hell, 30 years ago suspension was barely even on anyone's radar with regard to MTB, now we can't live without it. There's always room for improvement, and no way in 10 years anyone on this forum will be as satisfied with a 2015 Pike as they will be with whatever is out in 2025. NO. WAY. There is lots of bullshit in the industry and false advnaces, but suspension isn't one of them, and it is by no means perfected. If it was, DH guys wouldn't have to twiddle knobs for days to dial-in their bike. In my mind, the future of suspension is set and forget with maximum performance and minimal maintenance at a cost that doesn't hurt the average guy. Whatever happens in those tubes to get me there I don't give one crap about about.
  • + 0
 JessE - no, it doesn't work this way and let me explain it on a set of products that I used myself:
2000 AD Shift from Rockshox Jet (something something) to Rockshox Psylo - dramatic improvement in stiffness and composure of chassis, damper improved incredibly (elastomer to hydracoil).
2004 Psylo to Pike - much better hassis, much better damper, at minimal weight increase. You could huck lots of stuff with that thing, compared to Psylo, not mentoning speeds a which you could ride, average "edible obstacle" size doubled.
2007 Psylo to Lyrik - huge difference both in chassis and damper, you can easily ride DH trails with Lyrik, real LSC damper, very good balance between diving and plushness, with good bottom out control, better rebound - all that with no weight penalty to previous PIKe.
2014 Lyrik to Pike - no improvement in chassis, slightly plusher thanks to new seals, slightly better LSC - less divey than Lyrik while remaining plush, no improvement in bottom out control, same rebound, slight improvement in air spring thanks to tokens, only tangible difference: 300 grams lighter.
  • + 4
 I think some of the biggest enhancements in the future might come from advancements in new materials. We've seen this recently with a new steel spring from fox that is lighter and cheaper than Titanium. I imagine new manufacturing techniques and stronger, lighter, cheaper materials will continue to improve suspension even if the rest is already as good as it gets.

@WAKIdesigns, do you know if there is a decent model year Lyrik that came in a straight 1-1/8" steerer?
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns I tend to agree. Riding pretty much any modern bike I don't really see suspension getting radically better; the modern stuff just performs SO well. To me the future (as a consumer) is simplicity and reduced cost. I've ridden (modern) Deore level bikes with Recons or Raidons or whatever and come away really impressed, like I would be totally happy riding that gear on a daily basis. I don't give a shit about dials, electronics, clicks, etc, I want a fork that doesn't f*ck up my nice ride in the woods, is easy on my wallet, and is simple to set up and maintain. I'll openly admit to being a Suntour fanboy ever since I got one of their forks, but IMO they're the only ones that have really focused on delivering low(er) cost gear that's super user-friendly and performs more than well enough for my skills.
  • + 1
 davemays - I may have been lucky but I rode 2007 version of U Turn for almost 5 years with no problems at all. I removed the floodgate though as riding with floodgate/lockout was terrible.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns when you were rollin' on that 2004 Psylo did you think suspension could get way better than it was then? Did you feel like you were on something that would be obsolete in a few years? 10 years is a lot of time in an industry that is already trying to one-up it's gear a few months after it's released. New materials etc. could have a profound effect on suspension, and you can also never predict new ideas and what they'll bring. Your experience may be plateauing, but I'm not sure that means the future of suspension performance has to follow the same curve. That said, my ego would be happy if my new Pike was still hot shit in 10 years. Sick of buying new forks, haha.
  • - 1
 My AM bike has a carbon fiber frame (Aluminum rear), 1x11 drivetrain, strong and light cranks with narrow/wide..., 160mm of awesome suspension, stealth dropper post, carbon bars, strong and light wheels (27.5" too!) Climbs and descends like a dream. 10 years ago, a similar style bike cost me $5000 and it weighed 37 lbs. My bike now performs even better (up and down) at 29 lbs. (size XL) To me that is fairly significant. I think we will be surprised again at what we can pull off in the next 10 years. I see Flax Fiber bikes with NanoTech oil suspension. Maybe an Infra-Red Powered paint job to power the computer controlled suspension too?
  • + 0
 I'm seeing more and more rigid single speeds. If you ride a lot maintenance of the suspension is ridiculous even at cost. According to Fox a rebuild is every month and a half. Lame.
  • + 3
 The fact is that everything has changed in major company MTB suspension technology between 1990 and 2004, then quite a lot between 2004 and 2010, nearly nothing afterwards. Öhlins, Push, AVA, Stendec, eventually BOS is the best you can get For a gravitish bike as those are companies that inplemented top MX stuff into MTB, one could argue in some cases it is F1 tech. And you think that Rockshox is going to reinvent fluid dynamics? For a freaking bicycle? This is no jump from cantilevers to Shimano Saints 820. It's almost over, it's fantastic what we have, se are more than privileged to ride those bikes even at 3k level - it's our turn, last call, to get our arses together and learn to ride. get on with it,
  • + 1
 carbon, carbon and carbon.... dont you think in 2025 we'll be able to 3D print pretty much anything from carbon springs to carbon chassis to carbonwhatever?
  • + 3
 I want to 3d print some sections of Val Di Sole, Lourdes and Champery and put them on a nearby mountain to create ultimate DH track for Sam Hill
  • + 1
 Haha you could 3D print a tabletop course for these: www.planetmountainbike.com/planet-mtb-tv/art-attack-mini-specialized-demo-8
  • + 38
 Most of these read like, "The next big thing is what we're working on! Buy it!" The next big thing for me would be adjustments beyond basic compression and rebound that I can actually tell make a difference. I've been ridden a lot of bikes over the years, I can hold my own, and I'm serious about reading manuals and proper setup. But for all the different forks and shocks I've used, I've always struggled to get an idea of what high and low speed compression and rebound are doing. Sometimes I wonder if it's just a case of the Emperor's New Clothes, and everyone just goes along with it: "Yeah, five clicks of LSC is perfect!" Or if I'm just a hack. In any case, my suspension feels good, but I often wonder if it could feel better. If a few electronics could give me the data and instructions to feel more confident in my setup, I'd be all for it. Meanwhile, any advice? I'm all ears.
  • + 26
 Wish I could help. I buy the gear with the most colors and most knobs because it all looks cool. And that's 90% of riding, looking like you know your shit.
  • + 6
 That's harsh criticism, these guys would be failing in their job if they were not working on what they think is the way forward for the industry and as a consequence their best business interests...
  • + 1
 It would be cool to see an internal data acquisition thing that you could plug into a computer to see what your suspension was doing throughout a run (think Remi Thirion Andorra 2013). That'd obviously be mega bucks and the average joe might not be interested but it'd be a nifty thing to have on the market.
  • + 1
 @hermichut you're right that it's their job, and I don't blame them for that. You can't really expect any of them to say much about what they really think, either. I just appreciate the ones who's shared their thoughts without referencing their current offerings.
  • + 1
 @hermichut...it's not that harsh. Take, for example, the Suntour guy, who says basically "simpler systems...not electronics...is the next step everyone is moving towards." Everyone else basically says "electronics." So, it's seems pretty clear that he's just pushing what Suntour is working on (note the pervasive Suntour ads of late). He's also pretty out of touch with the industry if he thinks everyone else is moving toward simple...
  • + 6
 He may be out of touch with what other people are doing, but I think they're really on to something. Suntour is delivering solid performance with minimal fiddling for less money than their competitors. Of course he's gonna advertise what Suntour is working on, but the companies wouldn't be working on those things if they didn't think that was "the next big thing". It's possible to say the company line but also be passionate about what you're working on.
  • + 6
 @hermichut: The thing is, they're mostly interviewing marketing guys. One thing I've learned is to never trust marketing guys. They can be good dudes but their job is to hype and sell product. Always keep that in mind.
  • + 0
 I was thinking the exact same thing when I read how the suntour guy commented. It was like he was talking about fox's CTD and we all saw how that turned out. His comments seemed dated to the rest of the industry.
  • + 8
 Out of touch with what other companies are doing doesn't matter, being in touch with what riders want does. I have an Epicon and absolutely love it, it's simple, cheap, reliable, and easy to work on. I got better performance out of it, with less fiddling around, and for fewer dollars, that's where suspension should be headed IMHO. I want to ride my bike, not dick with the suspension.
  • + 1
 I agree with you all, and I like the move toward simplicity Suntour is taking and no doubt a large number of riders will gravitate toward that. I think it's great that not all companies are moving in the same direction, because that will spur innovation and provide options for everyone. I just though his statement was ironic.

I'm really curious to see what Noah Sears is talking about: "I'm talking about suspension technologies so different from the current norm you'll not only be scratching your head when you see them, you'll wonder how you ever rode what you've got now!"
  • + 31
 Ι like Dan Dacko's (Suntour) approach. Simple suspension that works. I also agree with Jeremiah Boobar (Cannondale) that better suspension means you can get away with less mm of travel for a given application.

I'd like to see coils return in shorer travel. Smoothness and less things to go wrong compare to air.
  • + 5
 right there with you. I don't want to think about my suspension.
  • + 3
 Yeah this one resonate the most with me as well. If it is simple, affordable, durable, low maintenance and the damping works well to keep the bike properly balanced in its travel, I am willing to sacrifice some weight and all out performance and sensitivity.
Most "gains" in the suspension world are always done in the name of performance, where the gains that would matter most to the average user is in practicality.
The highest performing most light weight shocks and forks are more money and more maintenance than they're worth if shit blows up inside them and they need to be rebuilt constantly. My pockets don't refill quickly enough to keep up with a fork that needs more money and attention than some blonde bimbo trophy wife.
  • + 0
 To each his own I guess, I love the coil feeling but I don't really see the point anymore. Air is much easier to adjust and more precise, lighter and the progressive nature gives you both good small bumps absorption and bottom out control. It's hard not to like.
  • + 6
 Suntour is really delivering on that philosophy too. I'm absolutely in love with my Epicon. Performance is SO smooth, service is fast and easy (not that it ever really needs it), and every little detail is geared towards a hassle-free user experience (Qloc is far and away the best thru axle design, IMO). And at the end of the day it saved me a ton of money too. They're going to make really big waves in the future.
  • + 3
 Rockshox dude was hitting a similar tone, talking about "Less time dealing with settings and more time spent riding on the trail." It's when the high performance stuff trickles down not only in price, but more importantly in ease of use (set and forget - and make it easy to set in the first place) that there's a real difference to a large portion of the cycling population. The high end guys will always tinker and tune; the masses will always expect their stuff to just work. Getting mid-range suspension to deliver much (even if far from all) of what high end suspension does, at a decent price, and without the need to tune a lot (and without the currently pretty high probability that people run seriously out-of-tune bikes) will make a huge difference to a huge number of people. The company that can reliably deliver that will get gobs of OEM business - as the bike brand to harness that will have more satisfied customers.
  • + 3
 Yeah I would hope so. They have their work cut out for them though. Flashy marketing, grandiose promises in performance gains and of course "It's even lighter lighter lighter!!" seem to go a long way in this business. So the rest of the industry has to fall in line in order to remain competitive and attractive, even if they don't agree with the direction.
Then it reaches a point of diminishing returns, and the suspension becomes ultra expensive and super high maintenance and the people cry...WTF!! I cant keep up with this!! I just Bought the damn thing and now I need to spend How much time and money to rebuild it every Month!! And I cant even do it all at home!!? I need to dismantle my $(insert many zero's) dollar bike and send my fork away for How long!!?? Again!!!!?? Can't I just ride my bike dammit!?
At which point we hopefully see a return to something sensible with a product that is reliable over the course of years, not weeks, and can happily be serviced at home.
  • + 2
 I don't know, I would like to remind you that the last time someone tried to simplify settings, we ended up with CTD and people went apeshit. It was a good idea but I don't see it working because too few presets will always fail to work for a large portion of riders as skill levels, trail type and preferences vary wayyyyy too much to just make 3 universal settings and call it a day.

I understand that adjustability can be a pain in the ass, especially for newer riders but then if you don't like the stock tune, you're either stuck with something that leaves you longing for more or you have to pay (again) to get a proper revalving which I kind of see as a lose/lose situation. And I don't want to have to pay and maintain stuff like autosag that nobody except rental places really need either. Yes, maybe the higher end products could use some dumbing down but you can't sacrifice performance on a high end product so it is a tough balance.

In the current state of things, I don't want adjustability to go away and I don't think it will unless someone comes with a revolutionary concept where the shock can figure out the right LSR, HSR, LSC, HSC tunes for anybody by itself and EVEN if it did, you'd get people like me who would be curious to see if the bike would handle better with a little more of something and a little less of something else.
  • + 1
 @PLC07 it's not that adjustability is a pain in the ass, it's that high cost and frequent user input (ir. service, adjustments, and other off-bike time inputs) are a pain in the ass. My Suntour fork has a good range of compression and rebound adjustments, and I mess with them every once in a while. But the differences between it and my revelation (for example) are: (a) thru axle takes literally 1 second in and out (b) service, travel adjustment, or changing a damper assembly is FAST.... like, 5 minutes (c) lowers are greased so there's no oil to change (d) it costs less. Performance difference on the bike is barely noticeable 99% of the time. And on top of that, they deal directly with customers and sell all replacement parts through their website. Overall, a better user experience (in my opinion), and for less money. Now I'm not knocking RS or the revelation at all; it's a solid product. But if I could swap out the maxle for qloc, or if I virtually never had to change the oil, that would improve my user experience.

There will always be premium customers who want infinite adjustability (racers, for one), but they're definitely not the majority of the market. With the amount of bitching about product cost and maintenance intervals we see here on PB, I expect to see more and more people on Suntour suspension in the future.
  • + 2
 @PLC07 I think the whole miss with CTD came from the dampening tune in it just plain sucking, and you had no real way to remedy it with such few presets. If Fox had really nailed the dampening then we may have seen a very different reaction to that platform. I don't think I interpreted Dacko's reply the same way you did. Simple does not necessarily mean dumb or less adjustable. Simple to me means it simply works. Having an appropriate range of adjustability so you can really have a system that performs as you want it to, setting it, and forgetting it, is a lot more simple than a three position lever or lockout or gizmo you need to constantly be pushing or turning while careening through the woods trying not to break pace. Push and Avalanche come to mind in this regard. Great adjustability to find the right settings, and no need to be flipping levers and pushing buttons while riding. IMO Suspension should be set up off trail and left alone while on trail, not the other way around.
  • + 28
 I want data, want a graph over time of what my suspension is doing. Make telemetry cheap and accessible. If I had a graph of what the thing is doing, could look at it at the end of a run I think I could dial things in faster and better and adjust to different riding conditions. This would also enable dialing in multiple setups for different types of trails, rather than a set and forget that works best for most.
  • + 8
 This.
(and basically what @BiNARYBiKE said).

also, it would be neat-o if the telemetry was A) easy to read and understand and B) telemetry collection was removable, so I didn't have to think about it all the time, and lug it up every hill.

But yeah, along with the telemetry could come custom settings. Imagine hitting the 'Fromme' setting, or 'Sunshine Coast' or 'Whistler Bike Park' settings, and have your compression, rebound, etc all tuned to where you left it the last time you were in that location. I'm agnostic to negative on most bike electronics at the moment. Di2? Eh, whatever. Something like that? Oh yes, sign me up.
  • + 1
 Yeah totally, telemetry. Anything that helps me understand what I'm doing setting up my suspension. Also some sort of crowd sourced platform to help me see what others with the same bike, weight, and riding style are doing, without having to trawl though forums. Or even better, a custom setup that works off the bat, rather than having to spend time fining out what works. Longer term, looking at whats happening in the super bike world is really interesting. Even adaptive damping has been in cars for years. Still, totally psyched with the quality and performance of what is available right now!
  • - 1
 How about suspensions that performs so well consistently that you wouldn't need to spend hoirs on all that telemetry crap? Something simple, reliable, that does the job and does it well
  • + 5
 @dhmachine86 Sure, but it would totally suck having to switch to a new floppy disk halfway through a rock garden...
  • + 1
 not only would you be able to dial in settings perfectly, it would be loads of fun If priced reasonably. People could upload and download setups and you could instantaneously feel what its like to ride others and how crazy pros would have their suspension setup.
  • + 1
 The thing I struggle with is relying on my body's sensations to know if I am going faster over the length of a run. Sure, I can tell if it feels better/smoother. But faster is a harder thing to perceive. Let's say I change the suspension settings and ride a run that I know well. Maybe it feels the same or more harsh, but then I look at my time and I am a lot faster. Is the suspension actually working better to let me go faster, and my perception of harshness actually me carrying more speed over the run? Maybe telemetry would help me sort this out? I don't know.
  • + 1
 @jasdo and @BiNARYBiKE. Get a GoPro. Put some wildly colored tape (purely red, or green, for example) in the lowers, in a place near the top that is always seen by the camera. Calculate the spatial resolution of the image (pix/mm) the best you can (with like, stanchion diameter or something). Make an algorithm in MATLAB that can automatically detect the location of this colored tape in every image. Boom, easy easy, you got your travel vs time signal, and a cool video too.
  • + 1
 Yeah I had though about that idea. Don't own one currently, but an interesting idea. Looks like it goes to 240 frames per second which probably would be fast enough. I think major issue that would be time consuming and probably make actually number crunching not feasible would be cleaning out the camera vibration from impacts from the data. Maybe with the right type of mount that wouldn't be an issue.

Second idea I had is to attach a pressure sensor to the schrader valve of the fork/shock and record the pressure change over time. This would be not as ideal as a travel measurement but I wonder if it measuring that pressure over time would at all be helpful. Anyone think this would be at all helpful to know? I have no idea.
  • + 1
 @dhmachine86 koenigsegg have done something similar to their new cars. they go to a track and tune the cars suspension and then they upload the data to a cloud when you go to that track you can get those settings right away
  • + 3
 This is a very good idea - and something that with blue tooth and wireless sensors we can easily do these days by transferring the data back to either our cell phones or some other small data acquisition device. Yea - that's all words on my end haha - but I do seriously think we should be close to that capability with a little more vested interest involved.

However what do we actually do with this data? 99.9% of riders wouldn't have the slightest clue as to what the data really means, as they also don't have a System ID of the actual damper assembly to draw reference from for more in depth analyzation, and thereafter - optimization.

We need a front end that will display this data and do all the frequency response analysis and other calculations based on suspension parameters necessary to give the end user of this telemetry equipment a meaningful display of what's going on, and highlight areas that are 'good' 'bad' and 'optimum' perhaps.

Just thinking out loud, but it's a problem I face at work a lot - WTF are we actually going do do with all this 'COOL' data? how do we make it mean something to our clients? The same applies to this idea - and I think it would be a great collaborative effort of all these dudes in the suspension industry - as I'd be surprised if you interviewed them all separately and they even came close to a uniform explanation of how to analyze and use the telemetry data. This would all be in an effort to try to bring a standardized method for tuning.
  • + 3
 I think telemetry would be an amazing resource. I don't really like the idea of stuffing electronics into my bike and my suspension, but I think the information that could be gained through widely accessible telemetry that is removable from the fork/shock would be a true Giant Step for the suspension industry.
I also think there are a couple ways to go about it.
It could be a removable external sensor that could detect the movement of a small component in the fork/shock. Like a tiny magnet. Data from this could possibly be interpreted by an app on your phone and translated into something understandable like "Increase LSC Damping", "Reduce Rebound Damping", "Increase sag", etc.
Maybe the telemetry equipment belongs to your local shop, so your not paying for the expensive equipment. It could be part of a purchase agreement, like many shops do with promising free bike tuneups for a year. This should keep the cost down and keep the suspension unencumbered.
This information could also be shared with the suspension manufacturers to get real data about how their products are performing under their target markets.
Such a challenge they face right now is having to make an educated guess about what tune will work best for the greatest number of people. Access to solid data on how their intended markets are using their products would be extremely valuable information, and would go a long ways towards producing true set-and-forget suspension for any style of bike, terrain, and rider. Suspension that behaves predictably and reliably with an appropriate range of usable adjustments.

Maybe a pipe dream... Maybe not. But I think this would spawn a lot of advancements and really benefit the end user.
  • - 3
 Pleeaase stop writing books keep it simple
  • + 2
 @Metacomet yes! i love this idea.
  • + 1
 I want a fork and shock thats epic for DH, i want a fork and shock thats epic for going down and going up. thats it. i don't need some wizz bang shiny button filled madness, just some simple shit thats good at the job it needs to do. FUCK!
  • + 32
 how about lower the cost of suspension?....
  • + 14
 Yep, that would be a big one. Also, ffs, make service more easy (=cheaper). Servicing the suspension in my bicycle costs about as much as servicing my car.
  • + 7
 @maxram7 @Kainerm both of said exactly what I wanted to post - this would be big news :-)
  • + 3
 Yea - Pretty much. We've only seen growing prices - we need to see manufacturing technologies or designs that are just cheaper to utilize in general. The SR Suntour rep pretty much stated how to do this exactly.
  • + 2
 Try a Suntour fork, I probably sound like a brain washed fan-boy as I recommend them to everybody, but seriously, try one. Super easy to maintain, and reliable so you aren't working on them very often.
  • + 1
 Also a Suntour fanboi. Seriously, if you're looking to save some money on suspension you NEED to try out their shit. It performs great, is super reliable, and is really easy to work on if you ever do need to fiddle with anything. My Epicon TR kicks ass. Vital reviewed the Auron really well too.
  • + 2
 i have a friend who has an epicon on his ride and for the money they are amazing forks, truly unbeatable quality for money, it has all the things (and more) the nearest RS delivers but cheaper.
  • + 18
 I crossread all of these statements and I understand they do not know what they are doing and why and they never did.
All of them are just making experiments in the light&cheap department on the consumers cost, driven by the marketing guys.
  • + 7
 BRAVO!!!! Smile
  • + 3
 100 points, we have a winner!
  • + 3
 "We already know what we'll be releasing in 2019 but we don't really know what the future holds in store".

I'm speechless.
  • + 20
 Just give me something simple that performs
  • + 23
 That would be a BMX.
  • + 5
 I wish simple was everywhere. My nomad has the rct3... i really don't want it. Too much. I just want the pike rc.
  • + 6
 Without being a troll, the RC is actually the smoothest model of Pike, Plus you don't need the RCT3 and Dual Position has lots of stiction compared to the RC Solo Air.
  • + 2
 I totally agree. And In that case, who wants to buy my rct3!?
  • + 4
 @tranthony123 do you realize how big of a first world problem thing you sound like haha i don't want this super expensive thing i just bought
  • + 15
 As I was progressing with my mtb riding and knowledge skills I started learning more and paying more attention to bike, fork, shock setup etc. I bought expensive forks and shocks with great tunability and I spent hours fine tuning them.

At the end I got bored and tired and switched back to coils!

Personally I believe that most of us amateur mtb riders the important thing is to ride and enjoy it. Unfortunately during the last years we pay so much attention to all these "innovations" (wheel sizes, new standards etc) and instead of just enjoying our rides we get obsessed about all these "next best things" and instead of enjoying our current equipment we just feel bad because now they are "obsolete" by the new bike industry evolutions.

Anyway I suppose that's life. But honestly by the time I will realize that my riding is depending on a battery I will choose another sport.
  • + 16
 Next step in mtb suspension is actually PRICE REDUCTION.
  • + 4
 Ha! You (and I, and everyone else) wish!
  • - 1
 ha ha ha ha. You're funny...
  • + 4
 Yes we could seeit with DVO. Before release: yea, finaly someone keeping it real, yea upside down, right! show those greedy comapnies like Fox and Rockshox hwo it's done! go DVO! Hell yea DVO! - pricing announced - Booooo! aaa that's a joke, you can buy a moto for the price of that for, booooo, I ride 15 year old shiver and it's all I need. Mountain bike products are bloody expensive, and mountain bikers who write comments are very hard to please
  • + 16
 Return to 26-inch
  • + 4
 Best comment ever! And also the most technically correct. Once dampers have been optimized the only way to improve traction is by reducing unsprung weight.
  • + 4
 You know 27er specific suspension is coming. Everyone with a fancy new big wheeler will have outdated suspension by the end of the month.
  • + 11
 I wish suspension of future would still allow me change oil and seals at home. Manufacturers should provide affortable rebuild kits as well as free manual with individual steps. Be able to do your forks (and shocks) at home is important, as long as the service intervals are getting shorter and shorter.
  • - 1
 id like to see maintenance go away all together. then they can have my money. oil changes should be left to motorsports.
  • + 2
 I'll give Rockshox full credit for this. An entire Pike rebuild kit is quite cheap and you can do it at home if you have reasonable hands-on skills. Fox is terrible for this.
  • + 3
 Suspension that can be serviced by your average home mechanic would get my buy. Hell, I can't even find a local shop mechanic to service my Fox suspension.
  • + 1
 I like my Marzocchi forks for its simple maintenance and fact that oil levels are super easy to find on their web even for older models. Only issue are costs of rebuild kits in my country, even Fox has cheaper.
  • + 11
 This is why you should ask engineers and not marketing wonks...

I'd like to see the next improvements in the manufacturing of forks rather than the forks themselves, I find it depressing that in 2015 two tubes, a spring, and a couple of valves seemingly can't be made for less than £500.

"More control, less fatigue, the ability to travel through rough terrain at higher speeds – the advantages far outweighed the downsides"
You do realise the same arguments could made for putting engines in mountain bikes? Maybe we should be asking ourselves what mountain biking should be, instead of what the technology for it should be - one should drive the other but we have it backwards at moment.
  • + 3
 Unfortunately hype like articles like this sells product and makes profit. e.g. Boost 148 axles. Poor engineering, but the porschewagen crowd will spend $$ to buy it. (Meanwhile performance race teams like specialized move back to 135 axles because they actually have desirable performance characteristics)
  • + 3
 @cambamber - Mountain bikes are human powered, and engines or motors don't belong on them. End of story. As far as who should have been questioned for this article, you'll notice that there are a mix of job titles represented, from engineers and company founders to product managers and marketers. Everyone that participated has extensive industry experience, and certainly have an idea of what products are coming down the pipeline.
  • - 1
 But what if a lil' old granny wants to rail the trail, perm the berm, slap the gap? But she can't cause she needs a little pedal assist to get to the top of the double black DH track? Isn't the whole idea of lift access bike parks basically a ski corporation "owning" the motor that gets you to the top of A Line?
  • - 1
 I find electric moutnain bikes 99% harmless to anyone being conscious of them as long as he doesn't get on hating them, which can be unhealthy. Idea itself is kind of redundant, because putting a weak engine with heavy battery on a relatively flimsy contraption that even a DH bike can be , is just trying to hard to ride a moto but with a good feeling of exercise and less of some undefinied, ridiculous guilt of sitting on your arse, making noise in nature. What I would love to see instead would be a trials type, electric engine powered motorbike that rides downhill relatively well. I'd love to try that!
  • + 3
 if granny needs pedal assist to get to the top, she also lacks the strength to "rail, perm, and slap," and otherwise properly handle a bike to make it back down. maybe you're playing devil's advocate, but I'd say "yes" to the last question you pose, except that lift accessed riding is designed for just that. Your average mountain bike trail isn't designed for motorized vehicles.
  • + 1
 I tried to earn my turns on A line once. But all these gates and fences got in my way. Tried building skinnies to get over the obstacles but then all these guys on motorized 4 wheelers came around all pissed and stuff... I guess A - line is motorized access only.
  • + 13
 Most of these read like an ad. Don't care about battery powered shocks or apps. How about something that performs really well for less money and less maintenance intervals.
  • + 6
 I've said it before and I'll say it again. I think you are refering to Marzocchi till 2007. Bomb proof components and work like a dream. Most of my friends still ride 03-06 forks for FR on their hardtails. Changed oil maybe 3 times, yet they work like an AK-47. Really, what more can a girl want?
  • + 2
 Agree. I've had a few Z1FR's back in the day, bombproof. My only complaints were the weight and that I preferred the damping of Avalanche.
  • + 1
 Damping and technology is one, but I am actually quite furious about the prices they want for inferior products to their predecessors. I remember the DJ3 fork as something amazing, today the DJ1 is basically half a 2006 DJ3 for a bit more money. So you move production to Taiwan to make everything cheaper=cheaper plastics, higher prices, lose a fair bit of the market, close Moto division. If that is not a formula for success, I don't know what is?
  • + 0
 z1fr is a tank, but my rc3 evo v2 ti 55 is like riding on butter.
  • + 10
 Serious? electrics here, electrics there.... Are you kidding: I would say that 70% of the bike community don't even know how to set-up their Shocks and forks. And 90% of all Bikers don't know how to rebuild their stuff so why do you want more komplex parts? oh yes I got it: profit, not riders interest...
i would say the future should be easier systems but this won't be in managers interest..... unfortunately...
  • + 1
 That's kind of the point. Electronics will supposedly make it easier for the 70% to set up their suspension, and since only 10% service their own stuff the other 90% don't care how complex it is.
  • + 14
 Marzocchi......Marzocchi.......Marzocchi......???
  • - 4
flag torero (Apr 30, 2015 at 4:36) (Below Threshold)
 Bankruptcy.
  • + 4
 As has been stated 100X, its the moto division that seems to be going away. By all accounts, the mtb division is still going to be up and running.
  • + 0
 Get your facts straight before spreading lies and misinformation
  • + 1
 Sounds like a Drake song.
  • + 11
 on their forks and shocks they will make more stupid sockets and heads to avoid user service it by himself. oh, wait, fox already does it. the future is now then
  • + 11
 Magnetic suspension? no air, no coils, no anything. Just pure magnets (I'm going out on a limb here)
  • + 4
 Magnets? How do they work?
  • + 0
 Yes and magnetic bearings for hubs - less resistance... I know these technologies have been tried and tested in the automotive industry, but they do intregue me!
  • + 1
 MagneRide. I like the sounds of that. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MagneRide
  • + 3
 'magneto-rheological' can be done.. That's effectively using magnets to change how viscous the damper fluid is, so you control damping force anywhere between full 'soft' and 'firm' settings. This is available on a lot of cars, but yep it's expensive and no you don't see it on many (if any!?) Motorsport cars. It's expensive and difficult to engineer properly..

It's easy to say active/electronic suspension is the future, Automotive engineers have been talking about it for many decades and doing it for a few less decades. But even after all these years and all the financial firepower of the automotive industry, it's still an expensive additional option that gives a good gain but for a lot of money. And that's without the fact that they often give an un-natural feel so aren't unanimously loved!
  • + 6
 Magnets are heavy.
  • + 2
 I mean "no air, no coils, no anything. Just pure magnets" as the comment starter said.
It would need not a small magnet.
But even small magnet is hevier than air.
And also they are brittle.

Well, who knows...this idea needs a development and experimentation and tests.
  • + 13
 Magnets are magnetic, i dont like them because . .. they 're magnetic and stick to the fridge or an anvil. Can you imagine ridding with a fridge stuck to your bike...haaaa, refreshements....
  • + 2
 I think you mean rather something like ferrofluid.
  • + 0
 Then i suppose you're talking MagLev like the train that exists...
  • + 3
 I think loloTHUNDAH is talking about adaptive suspension en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_suspension#Adaptive.2FSemi-active. It's been used in F1 before, is being tested in tanks (www.racecar-engineering.com/news/industry/f1-active-suspension-to-be-used-on-tanks). It would make sense in mtb -- as it would be possible to selectively modify suspension response based on acceleration, speed, etc.
  • + 1
 Just thought of it at 1am and did a few research on books and whatnot. I'm no engineer, but the idea came out when i played around two magnets. The same poles (remember that they attract each other if opposite poles faced each other?) face the each other and it causes them to repel each other. I did a makeshift tube and played around the idea more. But since it was 1am (or nearly 3, I'm not so sure) I thought it was kinda possible with stronger magnet and some proper engineering R&D. Surely an Illustrator playing around magnets at 1am isn't really credible for this kind of idea, but hey a man can dream. I'll read up on the links you guys put up and see where this thought goes.
  • + 2
 @loloTHUNDAH thats what I mean by MagLev. They've managed to apply those principles and make it work, for trains. Basically they use magnets to suspend the train off the rails, so then there's no friction between the two. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maglev

the other thing I (and five5shot, Pauiko and wbftw) mentioned is using magnets to control dampers, by putting ferrous (such as iron) particles in the fluid and surrounding it all with wire coils that produce a magnetic force when they have a current flowing through them. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetorheological_damper

Both things are pretty cool technology!
  • + 1
 Wow @powermutant ! Cool article! Thanks for the link. Whats it gonna take to focus his attention back to making bikes? His bike from 2008 still looks about 208 years ahead of its time.
@Pinkbike ! Time for a follow up interview to tug on this guys arm a little!!
  • + 7
 The best suspension has been out there for a long time. It can read the trail ahead and can set itsself up for it. If you're about to ride bumpy parts it will be set softly with a fast rebound, but if you're in the air, the suspension will harden itsself because it knows there's a big impact on it's way. It can change the settings automatically withing just tenth of seconds.
This technology is a collaboration of your eyes, brain and body. Doesn't matter how good suspension gets, it will never be as good as the suspension in your arms and legs, and it will never be able to fully replace that.

The less suspension I ride on my bike, the more my arms and legs will compensate Smile
  • + 6
 Just make prices a bit more normal. How is it that thequality of Marzocchi DJ forks deteriorated tenfold, whereas the price went up? The Suntour Duro used to be a 120 Euro fork that kills everything, now, 8 years later, I can't find one under 250Euro. How is it that I could buy a Super T brand new with waranty for 400 and now I can just buy a hyped XC fork for that amount. Since I have started rifing on a more serious level, I have seen so much bull come out of these companies. So much in fact, that today most beginners want all the knobs and the skilled riders and those who win at most races actually prefer the simple components.
  • + 5
 Well, it looks like we're getting e-tech suspension shoved down our throats next. Look for it on EVERY bike 2017. Because something that has the potential to break more and not be dyi repairable seems to follow the current industry "standards". But it'll make you 2% faster for sure. We need more Dan Dackos out there please.
  • + 9
 Nothing from Avalanche? ?
  • + 4
 Nope NO Avalanche ,,,,,
everyone just LOVES Craig's work and everything he does to make the guys suspension they did talk to work BETTER !!!!!!

plus his stuff is bombproof and there's no money in that Smile
  • + 1
 Hes already miles ahead of the stock suspension so just look at his upgrade products on sale atm lol.. theres 2 things on a bike I don't change avalanche suspension and hope brakes.... any new bike will still have these..
  • + 5
 For me, biking is: use my own power
be safe
have a fun
have a bike as simple as it can be (that can fix everything or make a service on my own)
For me, there is a limit how much ellectronic parts, and very high end parts the bike should have.
That's just my opinion and it works with me very well.
  • + 4
 Dear suspension manufacturers, I understand that there is a place for electronics, especially in racing and product development. However, if you are talking about adding electronics to my trail bike's suspension, then you have already lost me as a customer.
  • + 4
 Electronics is suspension... isn't it expensive enough as it is?! Adding an electronic element will only force prices to climb even higher.

MTB needs to become accessible to the masses. It never will with the way the prices are trending.
  • + 8
 Batteries are for dildos and TV remote controllers. Not for forks!
  • + 5
 How about parts that are thoroughly tested? not just given to pro riders who'll spend a month or two before moving to the next prototype.

The average rider isn't going to service a set of forks after every other ride
  • + 8
 RIP BOOBAR @ SRAM
  • + 2
 Yeah, am I the only one that didn't know he had moved on from SRAM?
  • + 1
 I remember the video he did promoting the new Boxxer last year. That was painfully awkard (comin fron someone who is painfully awkward)
  • + 0
 Stoked to see what he does for Cannondale. Lefty future is bright.
  • + 3
 All interesting to read and I'm sure there are great technological strides to be made in a variety of ways however, I can't help but think that comprehensive set-up guides for existing products or parts featured on full bikes might be a useful starting point or handy feature for many consumers... Some companies do try (Cane Creek Lounge or the Trek shock guides spring to mind) but lets make sure everyone is getting the best possible performance from whatever level of suspension components they're running. In real terms, this wouldn't really cost much to the industry (a small sheet of paper with the product or a simple website page, after all, the companies involved clearly know their onions so why not improve the flow of information and advice to customers?) and would provide a huge, free, practical benefit to many riders out there. Just my two cents from a retailer perspective.
  • + 3
 Keep it simple, give me descent suspension and a killer wheelset and leave the rest up to me. Electronic this electronic that, make the parts that are available affordable. I don't want my bike to ride like a limo on the trails and I don't hear people saying "I wish I had electronic suspension" I'm hearing more people say "I wish they wouldn't get rid of 26"! If these parts were just for racers I get it but we all know The drill. I can't wait to see what the next big thing is next year.
  • + 5
 Electronics, no thanks. I ride my bike to get away from that stuff. Lighter coil shocks on all mountain bikes is what I think we will be seeing more of.
  • + 2
 Amen, and I hope so!
  • + 2
 thank you. totally agree.
  • + 4
 No BOS.... Yeah it's not like they are making shitty suspension...Talking about innovation in suspension and not asking BOS is like talking about space traveling and not asking the NASA...pfffff
  • + 12
 Maybe the problem is that usually they do not reply emails..?? Razz
  • + 1
 Maybe a secret production in course...
  • + 0
 What's that thing with not responding to mails... i feel like i live on the moon ^^
  • + 6
 Single crown upside down 160mm fork with twin tube please Cane Creek!
Need it to match / perform as good as my CCDBcs!
  • + 5
 Did I just read the fox thing right, about fatigue... It's early here, but I swear I just read that
  • + 2
 F1 standard coil springs for front forks (Boxxers), same material and manufacturing as F1, dual spring rate with a 2% rate accuracy and performance characteristics far beyond any coil available now.. Maybe prototypes will be in a few forks at the world cups this year? Available to public by September? Am I making this all up? Maybe I am maybe I'm not...
  • + 3
 SR Suntour gets it. I want shit that's SIMPLE and hassle free, but performs well. They're delivering on that 100%; I've been unbelievably happy with my Epicon. I'd love to pick up an Auron or Aion at some point.
  • + 5
 I have an Auron and love it. Look how One-By drivetrains are simple and have really taken off. I think that says a lot for what the MTB world wants.
  • + 6
 get away from me, electronic MTB. Get away you disgusting pig.
  • + 2
 Sort of pissed that no one has a true coil-like air shock in the works.. wasn't that the holy grail just a few years ago? To make an air shock that felt exactly like a coil with tons of small bump sensitivity and linear rate?

Like how tough is it to design a tube that has variable (decreasing) displacement through the travel and a slightly stronger negative (air) spring for zero breakaway at initial? Making a completely linear air shock isn't too hard with a bit of creativity.. Just imagine how many people would go nuts over that if so many are still crazy about today's shocks! PLEASE someone from one of these companies read this and don't quit the air shock dream
  • + 2
 I'm working on a customers Di2 road bike and the damn thing doesn't work because of a broken electrical wire. Any other bike would be back on the road in 10 minutes with a new shift cable install. electronics=more headaches. in my opinion
  • + 1
 The next step for suspension is magnetic levitation. It'll be the game changer that lets us rip thru the forest like Luke Skywalker. I can't wait! Just like the trains we'll be going 300 kph! We're going to need some longer trails.
  • + 1
 It's this...this is the next iteration of rear linkage design. Sliding link much like the newest Yeti has, but taken a step further with a longer sliding element to generate a sine-wave axle path that allows optimized behavior in the ideal sag setting (i.e. in the middle of travel, more or less). www.youtube.com/watch?v=83a8rsXonIU
  • + 4
 1hp = 746watts. On a good day for sure, but only for a few moments of that good day...
  • + 1
 The only possible thing I can think of is quicker shock reactions to fast, small impacts. Such as coming into a small rock at high speeds which will sometimes "rim strike" your wheel. This is very tough with low tire pressure on the tubeless set ups used by most people today.
  • + 1
 Makes me happy to hear the majority say that electronic suspension is not looking to be the future. Light weight and simple data acquisition would be cool for racers running practice laps though. That could bridge the gap between factory supported teams and independent teams. Making racing more exciting. I like that most the guys had a different idea of what the future was. There's still hope for variety.
  • + 1
 Funny how everyone is yelling "ELECTRONIC SUSPENSION" while it's never happened... I have seen prototype electronic shocks years ago (and by electronic I mean electronic - not just some fancy electric remote lock-out), yet no one has found a real reason to use such a thing. The theory sounds intriguing, but the reality just doesn't match up.
I guess it is kind of the same story as with electric power steer in cars: Manufacturers have tried to perfect them for decades by now, but still... a hydraulic system is the better performer. Electric may be more efficient, but when it comes to performance, it is no match.
  • + 3
 2 stage springs similar to what utvs are running? can we keep electronics out? i dont want to have to buy a $100 sensor every time i clip a tree
  • + 1
 These days the concept of "cloud" is so hot. Suspensions should also catch up with this cloud fever. Cloud suspension - which allows you to upload your setups to a cloud server and download them to any bikes you ride.

Besides, I think @WAKIdesigns can do something about this topic!
  • + 1
 After a quick google to see if it is suitable (as it seems to have a use in every field) graphine is a brilliant shock absorber, perhaps this will be incorporated somehow?. I can pretty much guarantee that it will replace the kashima coating bollocks (and actually work!).
  • + 1
 John Cancellier, first paragraph. Bryson Martin, definitely first paragraph. Finishing out the extent of sensibility among all that bullshit is Dan Dacko. There is nowhere left for suspension to go except more inverted but as per usual the neverending search for the next sellable & failure prone gimmick will continue & as per expectation the guy from C-Dale is slingin' it harder than anyone. :s Please just take that electronic fvcking garbage & shove it. Or at least don't try to force it so we actually can cast our own vote (which will be against it of course).

LMFAO @ Fitz. "Typically, we would have to replace cables once a race as the elements would cause cable drag as water gets into the system" yeah cuz you know currently we don't possess technology to isolate a sliding cable from the elements but guess what, we do happen to have the ability to isolate a wire. :s f*ck some of you a*sholes are so stupid. The thing IDK is are you stupid for believing that load yourself, or just stupid enough to think we're stupid enough? Maybe some of us are. :s
  • + 1
 All I'd like to see besides more inverts is an easy to flip toggle on the fork & the shock that locks each down to half travel. Marz used to have something like this years ago that locked the fork down as far as it got pushed. I'd like that but instead just take things down halfway. Keeping the spring loaded the same as it'd be under normal operation at that part of the stroke, so you can lower travel to half & increase firmness accordingly. You'd have great firmness for climbs, street, trials etc. with enough give to take the edges off & then flip the switch to open things back up to full squish for the stutters & senders. To me it's the best/simplest way to do the most with one bike, like Cancellier was saying. Maybe it's already been done & I'm too ignorant to know about it? Other than that there's nowhere left to go. The drivetrain is the only thing that needs a great deal of attention & oddly enough, it's the only thing where manufacturers refuse to apply the necessary innovations. Money money money. :/
  • + 5
 Funny how you can easily tell Cannondale isn't quite into gravity Smile
  • + 5
 Next big thing: $20,000 mountain bikes
  • + 1
 The first company that uses ferrofluid successfully is going to be interesting, there's no doubt that electronic will be a big step and tec that controls settings so we just turn on system and ride... For one I'm going to embrace the first system that doesn't require setup past setting sag
  • + 1
 The next step the industry should take is to fuck right off and let people bike. Or maybe make shit more affordable to the common bike bum. If companies want to charge moto prices, and slowly turn mtb into lite moto, they should just become a moto company and get out of our industry.
  • + 1
 Dawnchairy -Online Bullshitter The future lies in suspension so responsive and supple that riders will finally stop complaining about performance they can't even feel and knobs that they don't understand. Suspension so reliable and smooth that riders will stop complaining, put down their keyboards and just ride the snot it of their bikes.
  • + 3
 Are you talking about Marzocchi till 2007? I think you are talking about Marzocchi till 2007 Big Grin
  • + 0
 lol nice one
  • + 1
 The future of suspension is lighter weight and stronger materials. These will come about as other industries develop techniques to cheaply produce things such as graphene. The lighter weight materials will then allow suspension manufacturers to make more reliable suspension with less maintenance. Coils are far superior to air for a consistent spring rate, but to keep a competitive weight, manufacturers are moving away from them. Adding more oil also makes for more consistent performance, but once again the weight penalty and need to be lighter than the other guy means less oil in the fork. This means more fade as the oil heats up, more friction due to less lubrication and much more maintenance. Marzocchi has understood this and always had more oil, less stiction and much longer time between maintenance. But hey have lost sales due to the weight of their forks being heavier.
  • + 1
 Better material, tighter tolerance and the ability to service and make adjustment without sending fork away. No electronics!

Pretty wild how bikes have gotten so much better, but the trails being built lately are so smooth and easy. What's the deal?
  • + 1
 The future in suspension will be magnetics. No coils. No cans. No air. Just 2 opposing magnets. Need a stiffer feel? Just swap out the magnet with a stronger one!!
I'm no engineer, but it has always been an idea of mine. Who knows.
  • + 5
 There's too many words. My attention has shifted to the comments.
  • + 1
 Dan Dacko (SR Suntour) has one major part right. The big name brands keep coming up with wacky features that end up doing nothing but taking away from the performance of the suspension. Funny how the simplest designs (Avalanche) have the best damping characteristics.
Focus on damping performance to make suspension work better. Not more features that are a compromise in all settings as well as price and weight.

Noah Sears (MRP) almost had what I would say. I do think he has a great point on rear suspension designs (let's hope for more systems like the new Commencal).
But I'd like to expand on a small statement of his; we need to re-evaluate what suspension does and how to improve that. What is our current damping technology not able to do? In the same way shim damped suspension replaced damper rods, shims will be replaced as well. Shims have been pushed in motocross (way more than in MTB) and they are at their limit. Without a new design that better controls the flow, we cannot advance. One minor advancement is the Dynamic Suspension Spool Valve (DSSV). Very popular in F1 due to more consistency than shims, but at a high cost. No big performance gain though, just consistency.
Above that, there is a patent pending damper valve being designed and tested in motocross from a small shop with extremely promising results. Once it is dialed in there, expect to see it make it's way to bikes. What I can say about it is that while electronic suspension can only react, it has to wait until you hit the bump to know what to do (if it is even that advanced), this technology knows beforehand.
  • + 2
 While damping is the main concern, a lot needs to happen in air springs. The MTB industry is so backwards on how they control air springs. Volume for progression and pressure for spring rate is all wrong. Make an air spring that can be correctly tuned for sag, spring wright and progression (or lack thereof) to finally move ahead.

Rebound; so often thought of as a minor thing. Check out WP's Trax shock. That is technology worth developing.

Carbon, and other fabric, stanchion and slider material uses.

Lastly, we need to minimize the amount of shock sizes. There are far too many eye-to-eye and stroke lengths. It's way more ridiculous than 2 axle sizes and 3 wheel sizes.
  • + 1
 @kc358 " Volume for progression and pressure for spring rate is all wrong."

what other ways are there to control progression and spring rate for an air spring?
  • + 1
 Air volume is what determines spring rate.

Air pressure is what determines preload (sag).

Progression should be dealt with separately. The only current technology is using a second air chamber separated by a piston and pumped up much higher pressure. Set so when the main chamber starts to progress, the chambers equalize and create a larger effective chamber. Reduces progression. Or 3 chambers.
  • + 1
 Isn't that just a dual air spring? Everyone seems to have abandoned those because they're such a fiddly PITA to set up. If you weren't careful/precise you'd mess up your sag or screw up your available travel, or slow down your rebound. Probably the most fiddly piece of bike equipment I've ever owned. Dual air is the only way to make sag and spring rate independently adjustable, but not worth it IMO. Idk how you'd do 3 chambers, you'd need 3 valves and as it is you can really only have them at the top and bottom of the fork leg. Maybe a concentric doohickey like Schwalbe uses on procore? Sounds like a setup/tuning nightmare.

Manipulating air volume is the only way to control ramp up in an air spring. Pressure scales to the inverse of volume (PV = nRT), there's no way around that. Unless you want to use the damper to ramp up resistance, like Manitou is doing on the Mattoc. But then that's not an air spring issue anymore, it's a damper issue.

Agree with you 100% on shock sizes though. Prices would probably drop like a rock if they could standardize those more.
  • + 1
 Dual air chambers like RockShox uses is for travel adjust, not for progression adjust. DRCV is the closest thing to what I am talking about, though the mechanical actuation removed the ability to tune it.

When you have dual chambers, it would be far easier to set up a for right. First, pick the volume that correlates to the correct spring rate for your weight. Second, set the air pressure to give you the desired sag. Third set secondary air chamber to adjust amount of linearity in the fork. By making your fork more linear, you make more of the travel available without having to resort to extreme sag or low damping. And rebound doesn't have to work with such drastic spring force changes. Hence why coil sprung forks still work better.
Right now, if you are a light rider, you'd have to run extra volume spacers and have tons of ramp up meaning it will be harsher in te end travel and you may not be able to use the last 30% of travel. Not a good compromise. Rather, people use volume to adjust ramp and have to use pressure to juggle sag, dive and spring force. Not good. There's a reason coil springs are sold in different weights.

3 air chambers would be possible I the same way x-Fusion is doing their new shock chamber. Though I would stick to 2 as 3 would be more confusing than necessary.
  • + 1
 Also to clarify, yes, volume, or more accurately compression ratio, affects the ramp up. The point of a 2 chamber system is that the volume is able to change. When the pressure starts to ramp and the main and secondary chambers have the same pressure, they act as one larger chamber. The volume increases which thus reduces the ramp up and keeps your spring at a more linear rate.
  • + 1
 The next big thing is suspension design is a chassis with:

-Marzocchi pre 2009 reliability
-lefty stiffness and zero stiction

the next big thing in suspension designed dampers;

-easy set up with better trained staff when purchasing to assist
-tuning for bike size/discipline on all forks
-more reliability on design and higher quality control in china assembly lines
-spare parts more readily available

And my final say...why do manufactures make so many different dampers in their range? Rockshox for instance. Why not put the top end charger in ALL forks? Manufacturing costs? i don't think so. It takes some money to design the cheaper dampers not to mention the parts and time spent. Surely if they ran with a lone damper which was their best design then the costs for the manufacturer would reduce and sales go up.....Plus each and every rider would be happy knowing they have the best technology in their fork/shock.

I am happy with current damping technologies as we already have a vast range but the chassis do need a re think.
  • + 1
 This may sound weird, but I would like softer spring rate for climbing. I find that when my trail/enduro bike's suspension is setup properly for getting rowdy on the way down, it ends up being way too stiff for climbing technical single track slowly. When the suspension is setup to operate correctly at 15-25 mph, it barely moves at 5mph. This is especially true of the fork, which has very little weight applied during steep climbs on a modern trail bike with a slack HA and long front center. Most brands "climbing modes" seem to be optimized for XC riders hammering up smooth single track or riders who climb fireroads to get to the top, but I climb a lot of steep technical trails. I would like the suspension to be more responsive at low speeds so it maintains traction over rocks and roots instead of bouncing over. If I setup my suspension the way I like for climbing, it blows through the travel and bottoms out on the way down.

I would also like to see more geometry adjustment in suspension. I have a 160-140 DPA Pike, and the dropped handlebar height is great for steep climbs, but I would love a shock adjustment that raises the BB for a steeper seat-tube angle more pedal clearance. What I would really love for climbing is a lever that drops the handlebars, raises the BB, and softens both ends with a single adjustment.
  • + 2
 You're absolutely correct, it does sound weird.
  • + 2
 I don't understand why all of the high-end single crown forks seem to be air rather than spring? I realise air is lighter but spring just seems to work better and is easier to set up.
  • + 1
 Next step in suspension should be the implementation of electromagnetism. No Springs, no Damping, just a bettery, microchip, controller, and some magnets. You pop in a USB to record your ride, and make adjustments at home on your PC.
  • + 1
 Several of them mentioned the problems of battery charging putting people off electronic systems but I can think of at least six ways to generate the small amount of power from the bike itself. A system similar to those watches which generate their power from kinetic energy would be ideal and non intrusiv.
  • + 0
 I think there is lots of potential for carbon fiber all mountain and larger forks. Carbon is lighter and stronger, and often cheaper. I think in the next five years cf bike prices will come way down, and in my mind a single crown 8" travel fork would be easy to produce with a carbon crown, stanchions and lowers. May need to switch to mineral oil for fluid, but i see big potential. with a carbon crown and uppers you could make dynamic shapes that are lighter and stronger where they need to be, instead of just round.
  • + 2
 Thank Suntour and Xfusion for keeping it real. and not joining the group of companies force feeding us electronic suspension and how much it will change our lives.
  • + 0
 I'm riding a 140mm travel more than efficient enough suspension works great, but I'm still waiting for somebody to design a bike that is flat out better than the bike I've owned since 2009. I'm ready to pull the trigger on a new ride. I love 26, 29, 27.7 in no particular order. But I won't be joining the e-bike crowd. Not for drive, not for shift, not for suss. Never. Its a bike dammit.
  • + 3
 whats the next step in suspension technology? here speak to our marketing managers and let them sell it to you...
  • + 0
 Magnetorheological, electronically controlled suspension. it's already a reality in automotive market. that's the next big step. active control through magnetic and electric fields. faster and more precise response than classical suspension could ever have. if we talk about technology. if we talk about prices, well the trend is always cheaper and better performing, right?
  • + 3
 Sr Suntour had the best response, all the other company's are making bikes feel even more unreachable then they already are.
  • + 0
 Next step will be to add bluetooth tech so you can connect to your suspension and get all kinds of data from the electronics inside the shocks.... After that you will see an I-Shock released in the perfect blend of stupid options, bigger, yet smaller with a integrated battery pack no one can replace...
  • + 1
 i want to be a mtb sr product mgr when I grow up! Meet with top racers and engineers to improve tech. No worries, the masses will follow. May take 6 months or 10 years, but oh yeah, they will follow.
  • + 1
 Ironic timing for me on this article. Something related might come out of this weekends hardware hackathon regarding suspension + electronics. Wink
hackaday.io/event/5213-hackaday-prize-worldwide-new-york-city
  • + 3
 Wow, working at Cane Creek and singing for the Doors? Busy dude! Haha.

That's kinda funny that he has the same name.
  • + 5
 no marzocchi?
  • - 7
flag Nicolai-ion-rider (Apr 30, 2015 at 0:27) (Below Threshold)
 Marzocchi will be down... once again... tenecco will be closing some segments and Marzo is one of these....
  • - 4
flag shuwukong (Apr 30, 2015 at 0:32) (Below Threshold)
 somebody must buy marzocchi
  • + 7
 They're NOT closing, the moto department in Italy will, but the MTB departmnet is as strong as ever!
  • + 2
 as a die hard marzocchi fan, I say thanks for telling me that
  • + 3
 No interview with Dave Weagle? I bet he'd have some pretty great insight on this topic!
  • + 3
 I second that. I started reading this article because I wanted to read what Weagle had to say, but I guess the focus is on shock/fork 'technology', not suspension design?? @mikekazimer, is that correct?
  • + 4
 Artificial Intelligence Suspension System that will blow your mind !
  • + 2
 Screw telescopic suspension, Corvette leaf springs are the future of mtb suspension.
  • + 2
 Nothing shocking above. More reason to just get out on the trails and have a helluva good time!
  • + 3
 Lightweight versatile air
  • + 2
 Dan Dacko at SR Suntour gets it. Keep things simple. No electronics on the mtb please.
  • + 2
 Something 1/3 better than what we have today at 1/2 the price should do nicely ...
  • + 3
 hem...... "Jim Morrison"
  • + 1
 I feel the future of suspension will be in the changing of other components because of the suspension. Frame rigidity, weight, strength, even braking components.
  • + 3
 Where the f*ck is Olivier Bossard?
  • + 1
 One bike that can race DH, Enduro and XC equally competitively....then as the last poll suggested, I could have a moto too : )
  • + 0
 A fork that suits multiple wheel sizes. Yesterday I suggested dropouts with multiple holes for through axles, but Beardless Marin Rider suggested a flippable chip, which is even better.
  • + 2
 stick to modeling
  • + 1
 good idea actually, and I'm guessing the relative offsets could be designed into the position of the flip chip too.
  • + 0
 Yep. I envision xc racers swapping between 29 and 275 depending on the course, or even DH riders using 26 for tight courses, and bigger wheels for faster courses. Or simply someone who wants a more versatile fork with higher resale value.
  • + 0
 There will be better economies of scale for manufacturers and therefore lower prices for bike companies (ordering 1000 forks instead of 500 of each size) and finally consumers. I'd expect this would only be applied to the lower end of the market.
  • + 2
 Why don't you ask Öhlins design engineer. I'm really interested when will be their DH fork premiere
  • + 2
 probably something electronic and pointless that can be controlled from your mobile phone.
  • + 1
 make something better at a better price point and it will fly off the shelf,mmmkay thanks
  • + 0
 "The next big thing is already here". That dude from Push with their (nicely machined and built) clown shock is hilarious. Fanboys, bring on the negs.
  • + 1
 Electromagnetic suspension with a directional air restriction based damper! :-D
  • + 3
 Magnets man, magnets.
  • + 1
 f*cking magnets, how do they work?
  • + 1
 suspension that doesn't cost more then stiffer, tougher, motorcycle suspension
  • + 1
 the next step:FOX/CCDB/Marzzochi or what fking ever

MAKE SOMETHING FOR MY S-L-A-S-H!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Contact Push. They might have an option for you.
  • + 1
 More bikes with DELTA link suspension. Evil has that shit DIALED. FSR feels like an ancient relic (it kind of is).
  • + 2
 You contact sr suntour... but not manitou, marzocchi or bos? Rolleyes
  • + 2
 next step ? => Less price..
  • + 1
 I'd love to hear what James from SuspensionWerx thoughts are on this? What would make the current suspension better?
  • + 1
 Same they did'nt ask somebody from Marzocchi on this, they're really up there with all the other top suspension companies.
  • + 2
 Millyard.
  • + 1
 That's a very Flemish thing to say :-) we say miljaar or miljaard as a swear word...
  • + 1
 fugettabouit & ride a SS!
  • + 1
 magnetic sprung. no stiction with that computerized dampening
  • + 1
 Coil sprung 26"wheeled enduro bikes
  • + 1
 Let's get over Boost first
  • + 1
 Where is BO's point of view ? would have been interesting !
  • + 1
 Same advantages, less weight...
  • + 0
 I think that the rock shocks bluto fork should be built more like the pike,and have more travel!
  • + 1
 Electronic thermostatically controlled Dampening for when it gets hot?
  • + 1
 Too much heat is never a problem in the UK
  • + 1
 I think you and it seems everyone else may have missed the joke! Never mind...
  • + 1
 Dan Dacko for President of Earth, 2016.
  • - 3
 I think that suspension on any bike should be able to adapt to any situation you may find yourself in. Meaning that you shouldn't have to adjust you rebound and compression settings or air/spring weights for different tracks. A small,easily replaceable electronic gizmo on the top cap of your fork or on the piggy back of your shock shouldn't be hard to do. These little Gizmo's would have a learn mode, for example, that you would activate and it would determine what suspension settings are ideal for your weight, ridding style, bike and terrain. It could self diagnose and indicate that your "fox dhx 6 E" ( Fox's new shock that I made up that has this technology) needs a 525lbs spring instead of a 550lbs. Sure some riders may say that they want less rebound and such, but in the computers tuning process, it would ask you questions about the settings it has chosen for you. Just thought I have. Doesn't seems unreasonable to me though.
  • + 2
 where are ohlins boys?
  • + 2
 The developers of the cane creek double barrel
  • + 1
 Where is BOS ??
  • - 1
 Who?
  • + 25
 Theyre probably still trying to work out how to answer an email...
  • - 21
flag Aksel31 (Apr 30, 2015 at 1:02) (Below Threshold)
 you dumbf*ck @ajayflex
  • + 16
 Thanks bro, I hope you didn't break your keyboard typing that.
  • + 1
 keep it simple
  • + 0
 Eye to eye length adjustable rear shox
  • + 0
 I wish my name was Jim Morrison....
  • + 1
 Active suuspension??
  • - 1
 I don't care. Just shut up and take my money! (Throws arms up in exasperation)
  • + 1
 Magnetics
  • + 0
 is it just me... or is this possibly the dullest week on PB ever...
  • + 0
 Electronically controlled shock based on power meter
  • - 1
 Magnetics..like dem caddy's
  • + 0
 only shipment payment
  • - 1
 Magnetic suspension fluid being tested by rockshox, best believe it
  • + 0
 i dont now
  • + 0
 magnets
  • - 1
 Carbon stanchions for full carbon forks and same for shocks.
  • - 3
 Penny Farthing Redux
  • + 2
 Thats a penny farthing with a suspension wheel right? I'd love to see an animation of that.
  • - 2
 Someone should make air sprung suspension, that would be cool
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