10 MTB Goggles Ridden & Rated

Apr 21, 2020
by Nikki Rohan  
About This Review

Another of the age-old MTB debates is whether to use riding glasses or goggles. In the glasses camp, people claim better ventilation and more freedom, while wearers of goggles boast of better protection and more comfort in colder conditions.

This spring while Nikki has been testing MTB specific riding glasses, I have been testing ten different MTB specific riding goggles. For me, the most important aspect of a goggle is the size and shape and how it fits with my face and helmet. For choosing a goggle, it's best to head to your local shop so you can make sure it fits with your face shape and helmet shape. Other than being chased down the trail by a rabid dog, there's nothing worse than riding down the trail while your nose is pinched off and you have a splitting headache from a poor fitting goggle. Other aspects to consider for that "just right" goggle for you are lens optics, anti-fog coatings, ventilation, and how easy it is to change lenses.

I typically only wear goggles in the late summer when you inevitably end up riding through a murky dust storm churned up by other riders due to the fine talcum powder coating my local trails. This spring, however, I found they also worked quite well during wild and windy rides where lots of blowing moisture and dust can often get around the edges of riding glasses. Goggles helped to keep my eyes and face more protected, which allowed me to better focus on changing trail features and conditions.

Read on for details on some of the best goggle options out there right now. Blast shields down!




Tear-Offs / Roll-Offs

A lot of people may be wondering what those little tabs on all these mountain bike goggles are for. They are made to mount either tear-offs or a roll-off cartridge for use in wet or muddy conditions when clear vision is critical. Typically this is only used for racing.

But which one to use? Greg Minnaar typically uses tear-offs: "I’ll use 2 to 3 tear-offs for a run. If conditions are super sloppy, I’d use roll-offs." Aaron Gwin, on the other hand, prefers roll-offs: "To me, it’s just easier to pull the roll-off knob when you’re riding wide open as opposed to a thin tear-off. I also feel like the roll-offs keep the water out from between the film and the lens better when it’s really raining. If it’s super muddy I can probably get five runs from a cartridge depending on if I’m able to clean the rest of the goggles decently between runs."

Cost is usually $10-15 for a pack of 12-14 tear-offs, and around $20-30 for a single roll-off cartridge, depending on the manufacturer. If you're just a regular Joe out on a regular ride, probably not necessary. But if you have an occasional race or two, it may be handy to keep a few sets around just in case things take a turn for the soggy out on the course.



POC Ora


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 145g
• Frame Colors: Lead Blue, Uranium Black, Prismane Red
• Lens Colors: Transparent, Grey, Light Brown (Clarity)
• MSRP: $70.00
pocsports.com


The Ora goggles from POC are a modern MTB specific goggle designed specifically for Enduro racing when eye protection and clear visibility are key. Ventilation is improved by eliminating foam in the vents to allow for maximum airflow. POC claims a flexible frame help keeps the goggle locked in place and lenses can be changed fairly easily, but it takes a bit of muscling to get things removed and reinstalled. POC also offers the Ora in a "DH" version that has the plastic posts for mounting roll-offs or tear-offs. Of course, you can get these babies in POC's standard "Uranium Black" color, but I think the "Lead Blue" looks quite sharp!

One of the highlights of these goggles is the high-quality Zeiss lenses. Putting these on compared to other brands it was immediately clear that the lenses offered a much crisper and defined view of the world. With some other goggles, I would notice things would lose sharpness and details could look somewhat muddy and distorted. With the Ora, I never had this problem. Especially when using the Light Brown "Clarity" lenses; it was always hard to come back to plain old dull reality when taking my goggles off after an epic downhill.

The Ora are on the larger end of the spectrum but have a wide, unobstructed field of view without any distracting corners or blind spots. The fit on POC's own Tectal helmet was sublime and I didn't have any interference issues with helmets from other brands either. Note the picture of the goggles on the POC's Tectal helmet really isn't even worth posting here: with the visor up there is a minuscule ledge to park the goggles on before they come crashing down into your forehead.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
POC Ora

Pros
+ Class leading Zeiss Lenses
+ Wide field view
Cons
- Difficult to change lenses



Giro Tazz MTB


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 105g
• Frame Colors: Red-Black, Black-Grey, Lava
• Lens Colors: Amber Scarlet, Smoke Trail, Vivid Trail
• MSRP: $65.00
giro.com


Giro's Tazz MTB is a MTB specific goggle with a minimal footprint and a feathery light weight (at only 105g it was the lightest of this test). The Tazz feature Giro's Expansion View Technology which it claims improves the field of view by shaving down the frame rim or removing it altogether in unnecessary places. There are posts on all the MTB lenses for mounting tear-offs or roll-offs if you are so inclined.

The Tazz MTB goggles are smaller than some of the other current phaser blocking blast shields out there, and I found they fit well on my medium-sized face. Additionally, they fit perfectly with Giro's Tyrant helmet (which happens to be an excellent helmet if you wear goggles a lot while riding). The field of view wasn't spectacular though (probably due to the smaller size), and I didn't find the standard lenses to be that noteworthy. The purple-ish vivid lens option was definitely nicer and had a much more crisp view, but the standard smoke grey lens didn't offer the most clarity or "pop" I had with some other lenses of the same or similar tint, like the POC or Fox grey lenses.

I tested these a few times on wet, windy, muddy days and they offered up plenty of protection and ventilation. Giro utilizes an anti-fog treatment on all of their MTB and snow goggles and I didn't have any fogging issues whatsoever, even on the warmer, humid, or downright soggy spring days. Changing lenses is possible, but it isn't the easiest affair as there isn't a quick-release mechanism, and it requires wrestling and twisting the lens out of the frame.

The Tazz is a high-quality, yet affordable option if you are looking for a goggle that fits small to medium faces and provides excellent anti-fog capabilities.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Giro Tazz MTB

Pros
+ Anti-fog treatment works well
+ Slimmer fit
+ Light weight
Cons
- Standard lenses aren't noteworthy
- Difficult to change lenses



100% Armega


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 190g
• Frame Colors: Clark, War Red, Falcon5, Genesis, Black, Lightsaber, Nuclear Citrus, Litkit, Royal
• Lens Colors: Clear, Silver Flash Mirror, HiPER Silver Mirror, HiPER Red Mirror, HiPER Blue/Red Mirror, Gold Mirror, True Gold Mirror, Blue Mirror
• MSRP: $90.00 - $120.00
100percent.com


Designed specifically for motocross, 100%'s Armega goggle offers shatterproof protection and a wide field of view. On the bigger side for MTB goggles, the Armega features large strap standoffs that improve fit on wider helmets (such as full-face helmets). Changing lenses on the Armega is easy and fast due to the 6-point locking/quick-release mechanism. Additionally, there is a removable "roost" guard for your nose that might be necessary if you are going to be riding with a more rowdy crowd or hitching a ride behind an e-bike. 100% has an expansive array of color options including the color "Lightsaber".

Despite the large frames of the Armega, I didn't find the field of view to be the best. I think this is because the goggles themselves are pretty thick, and the lens ends up being located pretty far from your face. It's almost like you are looking through a tube while wearing them. It's totally fine for looking straight ahead, but the extreme edges of the peripheral view weren't the best for me.

I only tested 100%'s clear lenses with these goggles, and I found them to be crisp and clear without any distortion or blurriness. The forced air intake system did a great job of keeping the goggles free from fog and kept my face cool and sweat-free. The goggles fit great on larger helmets such as the Giro Tyrant or the iXS Trigger, but didn't fit as well on smaller helmets such as POC's Tectal or Smith's Forefront. Something to keep in mind.

Overall, the Armega is a worthy contender if you are pushing into motocross territory in your riding adventures such as DH and enduro racing.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
100% Armega

Pros
+ Easy to change lenses
+ Lots of frame color and lens combinations
Cons
- Peripheral vision isn't the best
- Heavier weight



Oakley Airbrake MTB


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 165g
• Frame Colors: Black Gunmetal, Dark Brush Orange, Balsam Retina
• Lens Colors: Prizm Mx Trail Torch, Prizm Mx Low Light
• MSRP: $180.00 - $210.00
oakley.com


Oakley's Airbrake MTB goggle is a goggle with its roots in motocross that has been tuned specifically for MTB. The main difference is the Factory Lite Vent mesh on the top and bottom of the goggles which is constructed without foam and offers up lots of ventilation and a small grid spacing to block all but the smallest pebbles from entering your goggles. Large strap standoffs are integrated directly into the goggle frame and a massive nose opening keeps the pressure off your nose and your airways open for sucking air (something I actually really appreciated). A nice padded and zippered carrying case is included with the Airbrake for protecting your investment.

Due to the large strap outriggers, I found the Airbrake fit best on larger helmets, and didn't stay quite as locked on my face when using smaller helmets. I think this is likely due to the Airbrake coming from a motocross background where full-face helmets are the norm. The field of view was pretty standard, but I did appreciate that you can hardly see any of the frame while wearing the Airbrake. Ventilation with the foam-free upper and lower vents was excellent too (and only topped by the Smith Squad MTB); I never had any problems with fog or condensation.

For lenses, I tested the Airbrake with the Prizm Mx Low Light lens and found it did an excellent job of enhancing clarity. The Prizm Mx Low Light lens is almost clear, but with a very faint almost rose tint to it that makes the world look that much crisper and defined. If I had a choice between a standard clear lens, I would take the Prizm Low Light every time.

Lens changes with the Switchlock technology on the Airbrake are crazy easy. There are two levers you pop open and then simply lift the lens off two rectangular tabs and replace. Voilà, a thirty-second affair as opposed to some of the cage wrestling matches I had to resort to with other goggles. This is my favorite quick-release design of all the options I tested.

If you can stomach the high price, the Airbrake are great option for larger helmet riders who occasionally need to be able to change lenses quickly.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Oakley Airbrake MTB

Pros
+ Class leading easy lens changes
+ Contrast enhancing lenses
+ Lots of ventilation
Cons
- Expensive



Bliz Edge Drop MTB


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 125g
• Frame Colors: Matte Green, Matte Yellow, Matte Pink, Matte Black
• Lens Colors: Clear, Blue Multi
• MSRP: $84.95
bliz.com


The Edge Drop goggles from Bliz are a slimmer, lightweight option that comes with all the standard features you would expect from an MTB specific goggle. An unbreakable X-PC lens is wrapped in a flexible frame with small pivoting strap standoffs and is then lined with soft three-layer foam. Over the glasses compatibility allows you to wear these over your spectacles if needed. There isn't a quick release lens changing mechanism here, so you will have to channel your inner Hulk Hogan to swap lenses. Note: I couldn't find any lens options for the Edge Drop that came with posts for mounting tear-offs or roll-offs, so keep that in mind if you anticipate having to race on muddy or wet days.

Unique to these lenses is the double layer anti-fog design that should help keep things crisp and clear on even the most drippingly humid of days. For me, I had zero fogging or condensation issues and things stayed moisture-free. However, I did find that the lenses on these goggles didn't seem to be the most high-quality: things were a bit hazy and lacking contrast when viewed through them. This may be due to the double lens design, where the light has to travel through two separate planes each with potential for distortion and imperfections before reaching your eyes.

The Edge Drop goggles had the most narrow profile out of all I tested and they fit best on small helmets. However, the trade-off was that the peripheral field of view was not the best as compared to some of the other wide-angle options out there.

All in all, for those with smaller face shapes, the Edge Drop MTB is a worthy contender.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Bliz Edge Drop MTB

Pros
+ Over the glasses compatibility
+ Double layer anti-fog lens
Cons
- Not the best optical clarity
- Difficult to change lenses



Fox Vue


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 160g
• Frame Colors: Black, Red, Fatigue Green
• Lens Colors: Grey, Red
• MSRP: $119.95 - $134.95
foxracing.com


The Vue goggles from Fox are a sleek MTB or motocross goggle that offer a wide viewport for excellent peripheral vision. The frame is constructed from a soft TPU material that forms to your face for better comfort without any pressure points. Lenses come standard with posts for mounting tear-offs/roll-offs, and there are two sets of posts on the left side (one on the lens and one on the outrigger) so that you can mount up multiple sets of tear-offs if needed.

For Fox, the innovative outrigger design doubles as a locking quick-release mechanism. This helps to minimize both volume and weight and leads to quick lens changes. Although in my testing I found Oakley's Airbrake to have an easier lens change mechanism as the design on the Vue requires lining up the lens onto four separate posts, instead of the two on the Airbrake.

The lenses on the Vue are treated with an anti-fog coating and are pre-curved for better optical clarity. The grey smoke lenses I tested had excellent contrast and definition enhancement. Additionally, they offered a good balance of a small bit of sun protection (100% UVA & UVB) while still providing enough light transmission for riding in the woods. These lenses and the Options from POC were my favorite all-around lenses from the goggles I tested. They worked great for the majority of my riding conditions.

The Vue was a comfortable, medium to large option with a sleek and modern look. Riding around the trails in these black goggles with my black Giro Tyrant helmet whispering "I'm Batman" to unsuspecting hikers never got old.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Fox Vue

Pros
+ Easy to change lenses
+ Lenses enhance clarity
Cons
- Expensive



Melon Diablo


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 140g
• Frame Colors: Countless
• Strap Colors: Endless
• Outrigger/Nosepiece Colors: Innumerous
• Lens Colors: Clear, Dark Smoke, Green Chrome, Red Chrome, Blue Chrome, Silver Chrome
• MSRP: $75.00
melonoptics.com


The Diablo MTB goggles from Melon optics are an improvement on their existing Parker MTB goggle and feature improved venting, better helmet fit, and more color options. Unique to the Diablo is a single-piece strap outrigger design that spans the entire goggle to evenly distribute pressure across your face, instead of two pressure points at each attachment point as is the norm with other outrigger equipped goggles. Posts for tear-offs/roll-offs come standard on all lenses and the nose-piece is removable so you can tailor things to the roost conditions du jour.

One fun aspect of Melon Optics is you can completely customize the strap, lens, outrigger/nosepiece, and frame colors. By my calculations, you could potentially have 4,320 distinct goggles options if you so desired. You know, a new goggle for each day for the next 12 years. Worth it, I would say. Furthermore, you can easily remove and swap straps if you want to mix your style up even further.

The Diablo is probably the most middle of the road medium fit out of all the goggles tested here. They fit great on both small and large helmets and I found the size ideal for my medium-sized face with zero pressure points or the squeeze job on my nose that I find with some goggles. The triple layer foam has a baby-smooth outer layer that was easily the softest and most comfortable of this test.

Although there are a huge number of vents on the Diablo, they are all covered in foam and this didn't lead to the best ventilation compared to the goggles in this review that didn't have any foam in the vents. Things can get a bit sweaty during high exertion while moving slow (such as steep climbs). On the other hand, the foam covering will reduce the potential for dust and particulate matter to penetrate your goggles. A trade-off, depending on your riding conditions.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Melon Diablo MTB

Pros
+ Customizable color options
Cons
- Difficult to change lenses



iXS Hack


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 135g
• Frame Colors: Cobalt Blue, White, Black, Racing Red, Camel
• Lens Colors: Cobalt Mirror, Gold Mirror, Clear, Crimson Mirror, Smoke, Polarized Smoke
• MSRP: $45.90
ixs.com


The Hack goggle from iXS has a huge panoramic view, offering up loads of peripheral vision. iXS claim it has a field of view of 78 degrees in the vertical direction and 178 degrees in the horizontal direction. For my fellow engineers, that's almost a whole pi! Additionally, the Hack doesn't have any tabs or posts for mounting tear-offs/roll-offs and this further improves the view out the sides of the goggle. From what I can tell, these are the only goggle that offers a polarized option—super helpful for reducing glare. Maybe these are a good option for fishing in the next snow squall?

These goggles strike a good balance of wide field of view while still being slim and fitting great on smaller helmets. I preferred this smaller and more unobtrusive fit, but I found they weren't the best fitting on larger helmets such as the Trigger AM from iXS which has huge crush zones on each side of your face, just above the temples. The Trigger is another goggle from iXS that looks like it might be a better option with a similar field of view but large strap outriggers.

In terms of lenses, the Hack comes with a 100% polycarbonate impact certified lens that includes XOptic iridium tinting for enhancing definition and clarity. The lens is also treated with anti-fog and anti-scratch coatings to keep things condensation free and clear long into the future. Compared to other lenses though, I didn't find iXS's option to really wow me in terms of enhancing contrast or improving clarity. Additionally, I found the Cobalt Mirror color to be too dark for a lot of my riding, especially when under heavy tree cover. Send me out to the sand dunes in a high summer dust-storm and I may be singing a different tune though.

In total, the Hack is an excellent option for a slimmer and lightweight goggle that has an expansive field of view.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
iXS Hack Goggle

Pros
+ Huge field of view
+ Polarized lens option
Cons
- Difficult to change lenses



Smith Squad MTB


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 110g
• Frame Colors: Sage, Sunburst, Mystic Green, Citron, Black, Gravy, Jade, Mauve, Klein Fade, Moss, Iron, Iceberg, Get Wild, Jade, Red Rock, AC, Tusk
• Lens Colors: Clear Anti-Fog, Sun Black, Red Mirror, Violet Anti-Fog, Contrast Rose Flash, Everyday Green Mirror,
• MSRP: $60.00 - $85.00
smithoptics.com


On the light and slim end of the spectrum, the Smith Squad MTB goggles weigh in at a scant 110g (just 5g more than the Giro Tazz MTB) and feature cylindrical carbonic-x lenses for improved durability and foam-free open ventilation paths for an airy and sweat-free ride. All the lenses are built with robust posts on the goggle lens for compatibility with tear-offs and roll-offs. The face foam is constructed in three different layers with different density for sweat management and improving face fit. Frame and lens color combinations are numerous including the "Get Wild" frame color, which I am quite curious about how it might improve my confidence on the bike.

I was only able to test these goggles with a clear lens, and although unremarkable, the lens felt high-quality and didn't have any blurry or hazy bits. The clear lenses are treated with anti-fog and provided lots of light transmission, but didn't do anything for enhancing "pop" or clarity. You can look for Smith's ChromaPop lenses to fix this shortcoming; I have tested ChromaPop in their sunglasses and it does an excellent job of improving contrast while blocking the sun.

These goggles have the largest vents out of all I tested; there are huge openings on both the top and bottom of the lenses. Additionally, there is no foam obstructing the vents allowing excellent airflow. While riding, I felt like I had a constant stream of cool air blowing on my face. Furthermore, the excellent venting kept the lenses totally free from fogging or condensation. Without the foam covering though, there is potential for dust and debris getting to your eyes.

These goggles are smaller than others and fit well with slimmer helmets such as Smith's own Forefront 2 and POC's Tectal. Additionally, the visor on Smith's Forefront 2 has a lot of vertical movement available, so you can easily perch your goggles on your helmet during climbs or while chugging the beer from your fanny pack while waiting for your buddy to catch up.

All in all, another great option for a lighter weight, slimmer fitting goggle with high-quality optics and loads of ventilation.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Smith Squad MTB

Pros
+ Very lightweight
+ Lots of ventilation
Cons
- Difficult to change lenses



Leatt Velocity 5.5


Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.

• Weight: 185g
• Frame Colors: Lots
• Lens Colors: Many
• MSRP: $69.99
leatt.com


Very similar to 100%'s Armega, the Velocity 5.5 is another motocross ready google with lots of protection and large strap stand-offs (or "Out-riggers" as Leatt labels them). These babies look and feel bombproof and are certified to some crazy high impact tests such as the Military Ballistic Impact Standard (MIL-DTL-43511D). These could literally stop a bullet if needed! A permanent anti-fog coating applied to the lenses keeps things clear and fog-free. Lenses come with tear-off/roll-off posts attached. One unique item about these goggles is Leatt labels them as Over The Glasses (OTG) fit, so you should be able to wear them over any prescription lenses if you need that.

In terms of size, these goggles are fairly large and fit quite well on larger helmets, but weren't the best when a slimmer lid was involved. Compared to the Armega, these have a slightly better field of view as the lenses aren't offset from your face as much.

I really enjoyed the 78% light transmission Iriz lenses I tested with these goggles; they worked great for the majority of my riding conditions. They weren't too dark for post-work rides stretching into sundown territory yet still provided sun protection on bright spring days. For reference, Leatt's clear lens has 83% light transmission. Even with the double layer, anti-fog design, I found they were crisp and clear and helped to enhance clarity without any haziness or distortion.

Overall, the Velocity 5.5 are a solid, burly option if you need to stop a bullet or follow a fellow rider down a pebbly rocky chute where ballistic debris might be an issue.

Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Pierce Martin testing goggles on the Syncline Trail network.
Leatt Velocity 5.5

Pros
+ Literal bulletproof construction
+ Over the glasses compatibility
+ Double layer anti-fog lens
Cons
- Heavier weight
- Difficult to change lenses



About the Tester:

Pierce Martin is 5'11" tall, has a 31-inch waist, and weighs 160lbs on a low beer week. Usually, he is right in the middle of the bell curve wearing medium for most cycling shorts, jerseys, gloves, and helmets. Pierce lives in Hood River, OR where he spends his working hours as a desk jockey in the cube farm.



165 Comments

  • 185 3
 Why don't test them on a full face helmet? Sometimes googles (especially the bigger ones) don't fit the shape of DH helmets. I think most riders still use these kind of googles in pair with a full face helmet.
  • 59 2
 Yes... look how far we've come...
Goggles tested on a half lid helmet, instead of a full face...
If they took the effort to try these goggles with different helmets, why not include a full face with it?
  • 100 22
 goggles an a half shell will never ever NOT look fkng stupid
  • 14 1
 And talking of fullface helmets, what is about wearing optical eyewear under the goggle? I know some goggles that make this possible, but which of these tested goggles are large enough inside????
  • 17 3
 For real!! Testing goggles on a pedal bike?! C’mon Pinkbike what the heck, show us the true test...on a full face DH helmet!
  • 23 12
 @Morrrice:
This used to be a downhill/freeride site, but these days are long gone.
Seeing tests like this makes me sad Frown
  • 14 5
 @nojzilla: I am with Team Robot on this one. Haf lid and goggles may not look good but they look much better than most glasses out there. The return of these stupid gigantic fluoro shades is extremely cringworthy. I’d rather wear spherical skiing goggles to a roadie helmet
  • 4 2
 12th pic down I rest my case Enduro can suck a fat one
  • 5 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Totally agree on the 80's style shades, they died out for a reason Big Grin
  • 7 13
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 21, 2020 at 7:01) (Below Threshold)
 @nojzilla: I am not sure if there is anything from IXS that doesn’t look like a reason to check out from the sport in case I would be identified as one of these people. Maybe they knee guards, if I would cover them with pants.
Uvex and IXS are the spirit of Euroduro and They are horrific. IXS is what happens when Garda/ Trans Alp crowd want to do ze extreme biking ouiv faest dyscandz in difficylt tarrain. At first I thought they are handed out for free when buying something pricier than 250€ in a German online shop.
  • 5 0
 @nojzilla: What once was old is now new again. Haha, silly shades are just funny and seriously who really cares?
  • 3 5
 @nyhc00: people wouldn't buy funny glasses for 120$ if they weren't a bit too serious about appearing super cool. Sooner or later we all gaze into the void and once something becomes a trend, the void starts to gaze back at you"
  • 4 0
 @cxfahrer: The leatt ones are the only ones that say they are “over the glasses compatible”
  • 12 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I get my funny glasses for 20 bucks off Amazon. If someone wants to appear super cool or is just trying to make their friends laugh how does that impact your life? Gaze into that void and realize it’s just wasted energy caring about other people’s accessories.
  • 1 7
flag TheUnknownMTBR Plus (Apr 21, 2020 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 nobody needs to wear prescription eyewear under them either edit meh, as others already said ...
  • 2 0
 @cxfahrer: it is listed in the pros and cons as "Over the glasses compatibility"
  • 6 0
 @nojzilla: I never wore goggles until I started riding with contacts in. Riding glasses didn't cut it for me at high speeds so I started wearing goggles. For me, it's not how I look but if I can see while riding chunk at high speeds.
  • 2 2
 @nyhc00: Yes! I agree. What also gets me is that people laugh at half lid + goggles as some Enduro thing. Really? What’s wrong with eye protection that stays put? For some time slope stylers used to ride like that, maybe it was even them who started the trend pisspot + goggles and then it got into heads of some people “why not for normal riding in the woods?”. But now most slopers are riding with no eye protection - how smart is that?! It isn’t. Sending 12-30ft jumps in the middle of summer with all sorts of bugs flying around - how cool is it to get a fly or a mosquito into your eye just before you are about to do a 360 on a 20footer sending you 20ft up in the air?

I ride in old Jawbones (racing jacket) because they have replaceable lenses and sit relatively tight against my cheeks so I don’t get mud into my eyes, otherwise I’d ride in bloody goggles. Why not? If you remove upper cover foam from 100% Accuris they don’t dim, even in the summer on uphills.
  • 1 0
 What kind of idiot wears "enduro-specific googles where visibility & protection are a must" with a full face helmet?

/s>
  • 1 0
 This is just my opinion but goggles really need to stay with DH. Just wear some good fitting sunglasses if you're wearing an open face. I think it's pretty funny how now there are specific MTB goggles, I had/have always bought MX goggles, is there something special about MTB goggles? Do they have better anti fog characteristics or is it just part of the 'look at my kit' mentality?
  • 2 1
 @coyotecycleworks: everyone is entitled to their own opinion. I just don’t get opinions which want to limit freedom of other people
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Relax bike website Confucius, you don't have to like my opinion. People are going to wear what they want. This a comment section on a product showcase, people offer their.....opinions.
  • 2 2
 @coyotecycleworks: I didn't tell you that you should never speak again. I just found it fascinating that someone comes up with an idea that wearing goggles to half lids should be abolished. You have virtually zero chance of convincing a larger group of people to do it, you'd have to force them and that is impossible Smile

I am not a Confucius, I am a Roganist.
  • 1 0
 @cxfahrer: Try reading the article. He mentions at least two brands that work with glasses.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: How you got abolish out of my opinion of not liking a particular riding gear style is a bit extreme. You realize that you yourself have zero chance of convincing a larger group, kind of like commenting on every PB article. But hey it's just your opinion.
  • 38 2
 The Smith lenses are hard to change? Literally takes me 30 seconds but I guess that is just longer than the other goggles?
  • 51 0
 When almost all the lenses are difficult to change maybe it’s about technique
  • 2 0
 Smith lenses are hard to change -for me at least. Leatt lenses are easy to change for me, which shows its very much down to the human. (Otherwise both goggles are brilliant, Smith as a lightweight trailchoice and the leatt as a fullon dh-goggle)
  • 1 0
 @singdinger: Yeah that’s true. You have to put lots of muscle into the lenses, and the outer shell but once you realize you won’t break them it becomes much quicker and easier.
  • 5 0
 I think you just get used to the system. At first it took me ages to change them on my Smiths because I was scared to break something. Once you get the system (and the plastic gets a bit softer) they're easy to change
  • 2 0
 @samslichter I thought the same thing. I have only ridden Smith for the last 8 years or so. Several pairs of Squads, plus their Snowboard series. 30 seconds or so, quick wipe of my finger prints and good to go.
  • 1 0
 When I first got mine it took me five minutes to swap lenses. On my third year of having them I can swap lenses in less than 20 seconds. It's certainly more of a technique thing.
  • 3 0
 meh- i have had several different smith goggles and the squads are by far the hardest to change.
  • 1 0
 i hav smith and i cant change them whatsoeva. if i pull any harder i might break something. but yh maybe theres a technique. if any1 has any tips. Razz
  • 24 0
 I have Spy Klutch (old)
Spy Klutch (new, 2 pairs)
100% Accuri (2)
100% Strata
POC Iris Flow

I bought them all in various end of season sales.

They all work in exactly the same way, full face, open face...

Don't overthink it.
Just buy the ones you like the look of.
  • 6 0
 We need content! Any kind of content!!!
  • 7 0
 I honestly don’t get who buys expensive bike goggle, all of mine get scratched to shit after one muddy park day, cheap goggles with cheap lenses!
  • 1 0
 I bought a pair of Oakley Crowbar goggles based on a review that said they were the most comfortable they’d ever worn. I’ve only used a few, and pretty much hated or disliked them all. Turns out the Crowbar is comfortable, which means I’m much more likely to use them, if the dh parks open this season around here.
  • 1 0
 @C0yotekid: 2018 I didn’t bother with goggles for park season. Last year I wore them every day except for the muddiest two days where they get dirty within two corners even with a fender.

I don’t have watery eyes, but I do sweat a lot.
  • 1 0
 @C0yotekid: pretty rarely actually.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: I always cringe when I see people riding with bare eyes. It's one of those things that once you've had a damaged cornea and two weeks of photophobia, followed by six years of discomfort every morning when you wake up, you take eye protection more seriously. Until then, it's not something you think about.
  • 1 2
 @jaame: Accuri with removed covering foam to vent better at the top. With right helmet no crap gets in and they don’t dim. And they have a nice slim profile so rather comfy to pedal around in them. I do love Oakley fire iridium lenses but I had these here on my face several times as I wantes to buy them. Couldn’t motivate even the sale price. The beat goggles are ones with fresh lenses and I had Oakleys before and they scratch like everything else. Particularly the reflective lenses like my beloved fire iridium. 100% Gold mirror and red mirror are not that far off.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I tried removing the foam once and it made my contacts really dry and sticky with the airflow! I won't do that again.
  • 19 0
 Tear-offs piss me right off. I understand their purpose in a race, but why do people insist on using them at out on the trails when not racing and leave them laying around everywhere. It's not a fucking race so pull over and put the thing in your pocket. I guess in hindsight I hate the inconsiderate people that use them rather than the actual tear-offs.
  • 3 0
 S T R A V A
  • 20 1
 Why do we need to know the size of this guy’s waist for a goggle review?!
  • 14 0
 Just in case your belt breaks. You can use the goggles like some mid-2000’s fashion statement.
  • 3 0
 Its existing text put in all the reviews Pierce does including clothing - we keep it the same for consistency "about the tester"
  • 16 2
 Tear offs are not OK
  • 8 0
 Exactly, I really hope no-one is actually throwing plastic in the nature where we ride. If you must use something like that, do roll-offs.
  • 5 0
 it's OK if you stop, tear it off and keep in it in you pocket, same as any other thing you carry. Said so, I don't know how many people actually do that, cause it must feel super pro tearing off mid run. Sad.
  • 1 0
 As been said above, if you are in a race and someone is cleaning up after you, why not... I just wish there was an option, that doesn't have the tear-off mounts on it.. I feel the googles look better without, plus I have zero use for them...
  • 1 0
 @saladdodger: he mentions at least one brand that doesn't have tear-off mounts - the IXS Hack. I have the IXS Trigger and they don't either.
  • 5 0
 Have the smith squads and they are brilliant goggles. Suffered from nose getting pinched using other brands such as 100% etc. But the shorter height of the Smiths has completely eliminated that for me. Build quality is solid too.
  • 2 0
 I have an older model and a relatively newer model. The newer one has the foam compressed so it fits larger noses better (like mine). On the original one I've just cut the foam to fit it betterWink Would have liked that 100% Racecraft had the same thing.
  • 1 0
 I have the Squads with Chromapop lens & they are brighter than my Smith Attack MTB riding glassed clear lens.
BUT....within a month, they started fogging up inside if you so much as sniff moisture. The Attack MTB glasses lens has no issues & actually sit further down my cheek to ward off rain & mud. The ports in the top & bottom actually let more mud & water inside and even into my eyes than their glasses.
I gave up on my Squad's for rain & damp days.
  • 1 0
 100% goggles really cut off my breathing. Smith squads are the best for big nose riders like myself.
  • 5 0
 This test is a great example of HOW SHITTY all of them fit when you have a bigger nose. You can clearly see on this pictures that mostly the forehead of this guy is protected by goggles and eyes are just little above the lower part ...
I was trying to find goggles which would fit me and failed. The only thing that worked was trimming the foam on the nose part. They "fitted" him only because he was standing. But wear a longer (e.g. Evoc) backpack, put your ass behing a rear wheel on some steep stuff and bum, now you goggles press the helmet back, which then collide with backpack ...
  • 3 0
 I also have to trim the foam around the nose on all of my goggles.
  • 4 0
 I bought the IXS Trigger (next model up from the Hack) and am stoked with them. Fit great with my Fox ProFrame full face (size L), super comfortable, vents work well and the red lens has great contrast and works great in both full sun and full shade. Sweet!
  • 6 1
 it's crazy that Pinkbike hasn't even considered Scott Googles, which are on the top of the MX market and provide from my point of view the best balance between durability/quality and price of the product
  • 3 0
 Love my Prospect, great quality and vision. Also pretty stupid to test them on half face helmets which most of them just aren’t designed for, not to speak of how daft you look wearing that combination..
  • 3 0
 I reached out to Scott and didn't hear back. It can be difficult to get their product in the US
  • 7 1
 Oakley O-frame? Can be had for £30 and replacement lenses easy to come by and cheap.
  • 2 0
 I love the O-frame. Very affordable, MTB-specific, and like you said, easy to get lenses cheaply and in a good range of colours.
  • 2 0
 Everything you need in a DH goggle! O-frames with plain clear lenses for the win.
  • 5 0
 Oakley airbrake mx with no doubt.. They are expensive, but worth it, all parts are replaceable easy to take off the lenses, the only ones that came with a case.
  • 3 0
 Oakley is crazy expensive but I'm so happy with my bike and my ski goggles
  • 2 0
 The writer should have mentioned the protective factor of the "near bullet proof" toughness factor of the Oakley Airbrake without forgetting to mention the optical correction in their thick ass lens! I'm hooked! The are quite simply the best, most comfortable goggles I have ever worn!
  • 2 0
 A bunch of Moto websites sell them for cheaper. I picked up a $220 pair for $120.
  • 3 0
 The Smith Squad MTB are very very good...used them all winter with the full face TLD Stage helmet and they are perfect fit and never really steam up, even in winter damp, foggy UK conditions. Only used mine with the Chromapop lenses and they are incredible.
  • 3 0
 Chromapop lenses are awesome, especially if you find them on sale...
  • 6 3
 I've got the melons, and I cannot recommend them enough, the fit is second to none, and the build quality is amazing, and to top that all off, you can customize everything to your hearts content
  • 6 0
 The customisability is both a pro and a con IMO. You could very easily, as I did, choose something that looked cool on the website but looks a little bit ridiculous on your head...
  • 1 0
 @boozed: Very true, luckily they are very popular where I live so I could see how different colours looked irl.
  • 5 0
 @Jaib06: I find that a ridiculous jersey diverts attention from the goggles. Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @boozed: I did the same, and ended up changing the most offensive part to plain black. Boring but you can't go wrong!
  • 2 1
 No one else going to chuckle at @Jaib06 saying 'I've got the melons'? No? Just me? Ok then. *chortle*
  • 2 0
 I have the Giro Tazz, great for my "oval" shaped face/head. No issues with fogging over winter. Fit really well with my Bell Moto helmet, size M (no surprise, same company).

Just a note on tear-offs. You need to be lightening quick if you´re gonna be using them, otherwise you are just gonna be "that guy" Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Im pretty certain that on the WC last year one of the top riders was wearing a set of goggles with a magnetic lens attachment so you could take the lens off to allow air flow and cooling and then snap it back on when you need it. Maybe I was dreaming? The idea makes so much sense because most of the damage to goggles and the foam in particular is from taking them on and off after every run.
  • 2 0
 Maybe Oneall B-50? www.oneal.eu/en/b50
  • 1 0
 I have ski goggles like that.. never seen it on DH goggles
  • 3 0
 Have got the Smith Squad with chromapop rose flash, work really well for variable light conditions. Enrich colours and detail, highly recommend
  • 1 0
 Always liked Melon stuff, I very rarely wear goggles, never in the UK but took a trip to Queenstown so got some snazzy customised goggles which did the trick. Had numerous shades from them too, good bang for buck. I ride Electric goggles on snow and have some Electric shades which are sweet but twice the price for similar performance of the Melons.
  • 1 0
 I bought the Melon ones.. great goggles and they are quite cheap.. they are a 'young' company, so like to support them.... plus they look awesome
  • 6 2
 He wrote difficult to change lenses for almost every pair.

Maybe the dude just needs to learn how to change lenses??
  • 4 0
 If the Smith Squad MTB goggles have "Hard to chhange lenses" then I'm a freakin roadie.
  • 1 0
 I tried the POC goggle and Tectal combo... Just didn't work for my head and face shape. Large helmet on my big melon, comfortable enough but no amount of adjustment would prevent them from riding really low on my forehead. Add the goggles...weird pressure down my face and nose from the helmet pushing them down my face.
  • 5 0
 We not gonna talk about how many helmets this dude has???
  • 4 0
 Let’s not forget that tear-offs let you leave plastic on the trail, where roll-offs let you keep your trash with you
  • 2 0
 Sounds like they needed someone better to test the goggles apparently every goggle on the market to this guy has very difficult lenses changing. Would of loved to have seen better Pro's/Con's
  • 3 0
 We need a PNW version of this article. 45 degrees, pissing down rain, maximum humidity. Would pay good money for goggles that don't fog and don't scratch.
  • 3 0
 10000000% agree. I quit using goggles in pnw bc they always fog so i just live the mud in my eye life. Furthermore, this review needs to be done by someone who sweats HARD, this dude seems like one of those light sweaters who has a few drops of perspiration after a 20 mile ride. Im looking for a big dumb christmas sweater to do these reviews lol.
  • 1 0
 I just buy 100% Accuri. I don't bother buying new lenses. It ends up being cheaper to just but mirrored Accuri goggles on sale and steal the 2 lenses from them rather than buying the lens on it's own. Plus I get a sweet pair of new goggles.
  • 1 0
 Ryder's tall cans are the best goggles I've used. Double lens so do not fog up, even when riding in the winter and in rain. Reg price is pretty affordable at around $70 but they go on sale often. I never use my expensive 100% goggles anymore.
  • 1 0
 Availability of clear perforated/vented double lense should be one of the criteria of ranking or pros/cons. Too many brands do not offer it. It is the most basic and effective lens to avoid any kind of fogging. 100% and some Oakleys provide that
  • 1 0
 I only had to take a light tumble one time and have a pointy stick scratch the lens on my sunglasses to convince me that riding without eye protection is one the stupidest things one can do. Goggles are even better, they don't slip or let things get past them so easily. The Melon and Giro for me have been fine. Exceptional service from Melon too.
  • 1 0
 Gonna be Oakley every time for me. You can't beat their quality. When stores were starting to reduce hours, Oakley topped up their staffs pay for the hours they were forced to miss. They've gone the extra mile to take care of their athletes and employees. Also everything is 30% off right now on the website and always free shipping. #youcantbeatlove !
  • 1 0
 It's really too bad that this article didn't cover which goggles had lenses that are difficult to change. Seriously, just pick-up a decent pair of Scott goggles and be done with it. I agree with some of the earlier comments about trying with a full-face helmet too.
  • 1 0
 My personal favorite goggle is hands down the Scott Prospect, which was strangely left out of this review, perhaps because it's technically a moto goggle. It's got everything you'd want, a great easy to change lens, comfortable foam that is great at moisture management, excellent field of vision, and great price point. What really set's it apart for me is comfort and vision, but also the consistency in which it can be bought for around $30-$50. I only wear full face helmets nowadays (TLD Stage) even for casual trail riding, and the outriggers make for a perfect seal and I've never had fogging issues, even when I moto in the rain. They made me realize how overpriced Oakley and Fox goggles are. $100-$220 is just an insulting price point to consumers.
  • 1 0
 The 100% Armega are the best for me. Really don’t care what anyone needs to say about goggles. Everybody is different, getting tired of some reviews that make no sense, specially the one with goggles and no full face helmets.
  • 4 0
 Is there any option for us living with myopia?
  • 2 0
 Oakley L frame(My pick because its 40 bucks) or the leatt velocity 5.5 in the article apparently.
  • 7 0
 Contacts
  • 1 0
 100% Accuri
It exists in OTG (over the glass) version but is not better than the normal version (more foam to have more distance from the face).
For me the main problem is to fit the mask over the external top corner of my glass but the accuri is ok.
  • 3 0
 Sometime is not possible ...@serveflystyle:
  • 1 0
 @serveflystyle: yep, I got astigmatism and myopia and contacts are the best option. I guess we gotta adapt to what we were given
  • 2 1
 I have the IXS hack, I have had multiple crashes where the lens have snapped. Lens break easily, but the frame is bullet proof and it’s a very reasonably priced option. And the lens crack, they don’t shatter.
  • 3 0
 Are there any cheap goggles? Can't really justify these prices. I can get cheap Ski-googles for 20 euros
  • 2 0
 Look up the Fox Main and thank me later...
  • 2 1
 Then use your 20 euro ski goggles for mtb as well. I think there is literally no difference between them, except mtb goggles usually come with cheaper single lenses. Be careful with your eyes though, improper lenses can fry your eyes.

Besides, mtb goggles are considerably cheaper on average, at least for "core brand" ones you'll pay about a hundred bucks less across the board.
  • 1 0
 Oakley has a bunch of other goggles available and lots of different price points. In North America, Oakley glasses and goggles are 30% off. (not sure where you live is the point of that) Don't cheap out on eyewear.
  • 2 0
 we all get so pissed off with people leaving rubbish on the trails but still think it’s acceptable to use tear offs and leave these discarded in our playground?
  • 2 0
 Googles are the new men's razors in this era of beards - they make the money on super-expensive replacement lenses that only fit their google. WAKE UP PEOPLE!
  • 1 0
 And the Shore Goggle is missing from the test. Best fitting mtb google IMO.
  • 1 0
 Just bought my first goggles yesterday. A $5 (usd) “American Chopper” ones that fit my fullface well and seem to work. How do they compare to a $120 pair? Are they 24 times better?
  • 6 2
 Oakley
  • 3 0
 Does anyone have experience with wearing glasses under goggles?
  • 1 0
 I always wear prescription glasses under my 100% accuri goggles!
Not the most comfortable thing to do but completely possible.
  • 1 0
 I used to wear "OTG" goggles snowboarding. They drove me nuts as always seemed to need adjusting. My glasses never sat properly once the goggle were on.
  • 1 0
 I have a bigger nose, and most goggles cut off nose breathing for me. Other than the Oakleys which goggles have the widest nose fit?
  • 1 0
 Try the Smith Squad XL - they’re the big version of the ones reviewed here. Check helmet fit tho, they’re big enough to be a tight fit on some full face lids. Fit perfect on a medium Fox Proframe in my case.
  • 1 0
 I like the Melons, goggles that is, but what's the point of a lens with no impact protection, I'll stick with my Oakley Mahems.
  • 2 0
 Missed out the best of then all, the Scott Prospect. Amazing visibility, comfortable, stylish and relatively good price.
  • 1 0
 Come on. goggles for a mtb? its not like your facing the rear tire of a CRF450. Safety glasses are plenty of protection. Geezz its only a fashion thing.
  • 2 0
 poor guy is always blinded by the sun... ;-)
  • 3 1
 Yeah no, fuck those prices.
  • 1 0
 Leatt 4.5 goggles are more half-shell friendly.
Lighter weight and less $$$ too!
  • 2 0
 Goggles are insultingly expensive, what's new?
  • 1 1
 Difficult to change lenses? Do you have 2 left hands? And you forgot to mention how much a spare lens costs for each goggle. It is crucial.
  • 2 0
 NO Scott Prospect? Best goggles on the market...
  • 2 0
 10 goggles Ridden and Rated? Maybe ridden and reviewed.
  • 1 0
 Seems like almost all the goggles are hard to change lenses. Maybe that level of difficulty should be considered the norm.
  • 1 0
 Pierce should be required to do all photo shoots. He makes the same face that politicians caught in a scandal make hahaha
  • 2 0
 As long as an O frame can be had for €29, I'll stick with that.
  • 2 0
 Why not use the SAME helmet for all the goggles??!!
  • 2 0
 Invest in the Oakley airbrake. You wont regret it!
  • 1 0
 Have these all been tested in the operating room yet? Those doctors need the best!
  • 2 1
 So the reviewer change changes lenses?
  • 2 1
 My eyes! The goggles do nothing!
  • 1 0
 What is that yellow helmet in the test pics?
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Smith forefront 2
  • 2 0
 @mypinkbikeself: thanks. I guessed maybe Smith.
  • 1 0
 And now send them all to the dokters and nurses who really need them!
  • 1 0
 Sorry, stand corrected fellas.
  • 1 0
 The Poc and Ixs goggles are gigantic
  • 1 0
 The Smith Squads are the only ones that you don't look overly huge
  • 1 0
 Google test on open face helmets only = Fail
  • 1 0
 I sense a disturbance in the force
  • 1 0
 100% goggles are great for downcountry
  • 2 2
 Goggles? We need full-on full-face masks now.
  • 1 1
 Can we get a pinkbike class on lens changing please =]
  • 2 3
 Any OTG options for those cursed with having to wear prescription glasses...?
  • 6 1
 If you read the article you'll find he mentions two OTG options. :-)
  • 1 0
 100% accuri goggles work well with prescription glasses
  • 1 0
 Oakley Eye Brackets
  • 1 0
 FOG Rating's?
  • 1 3
 Should have tested viris brand alpha goggles, onhestly the best goggles I have ever used
  • 5 6
 Testing goggles in the dry? that's a new one...
  • 4 1
 You mostly have to deal with mud where you live, so wearing google make sense, but you know: in dry conditions, dust and bugs can be more than problematic ;-)
  • 4 0
 With only 50cm of rain a year, the 8 months of dusty trails in Christchurch demand goggles in all but the winter months.
  • 2 0
 @softsteel: the one time I didn't wear goggles riding is the time I had 2 flies shoot right into my eyes like 5 minutes apart. Now I wear goggles more.
  • 1 2
 Such a fail article. Do again properly please. One job yeah?
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