10 Small Canadian Manufacturers Making Rad Things

Jan 24, 2022
by Matt Beer  
A year ago we featured a few major brands that manufacture select products in Canada with the usual suspects; Devinci, Race Face, North Shore Billet, and We Are One Composites included. Just over a year later, there is a fresh list of brands on our radar. Now, it's time to take a deeper dive into backyard sheds and small shops that feature dedicated individuals who are building brands from scratch or keep the machines running after their regular nine to five hours. In this feature lies everything from trail tools and apparel, to frames and custom painters.

LoamLab Components

LoamLab Stem
LoamLab Counterpunch
LoamLab Counterpunch

When a core rider like Mark Haimes, who previously held a Guinness World Record for "The Most Vertical Distance Descended on a Mountain Bike in 24-Hours", finds reason to create his own components, they hold a ton of merit.

Take for example the Counterpunch bar end and grip clamp. The small extension curves over the top of your pinky finger. It's not an burly or comprehensive as "bark busters" for off-road motorcycles, but they do protect those small bones against a direct impact with a tree, as illustrated in the video. The Counterpunch works with LoamLab's own grip or integrates with dual clamp grips from ODI.

The LoamLab grip is available with or without the Counterpunch, and although it is a lock-on grip the majority of the plastic sleeve under the rubber pad has been removed for maximum comfort. They are also the shortest adult lock-on grips that I've seen, sitting at 115 mm in length, and place a single lock clamp on the inside of the grip for those that like to ride with their palm hanging over the end of the grip.

LoamLab also offers a minimalist stem with clean lines, like zero gap on the top of the face plate, and is machined in Whistler. For $148 CAD, the 35 mm bar clamp stem is available in a short 32 or 40 mm length and starts at a weight of 160 g.

More Info: loamlab.bike





Farside Components


Another company with a busy CNC machine, located in Victoria, B.C., is Farside Components that make a beautiful stem in some classy colors. The small batch manufacturer is headed up by a duo of mountain bike enthusiasts: Emory Rempel, the machinist/former bike mechanic, and Grant Lestock-Kay, Cowichan Cycles owner.

Weighing in at 167 grams, the aptly named Cyclic stem is built for 35mm diameter handlebars and available in a traditional 45mm length. Cut from a chunk of 6061 aluminum, Farside goes all out and uses titanium bolts to complete the package. It's also no stranger to punishment - "The Cyclic is ISO certified, and exceeds additional “maximum overload” testing at the EFBE test lab in Germany."

Farside takes full advantage of their CNC machine and manufactures Forbidden Bike Co's Ziggy Link too, which converts Druid or Dreadnought from full 29er platforms to mixed wheeled setups.

More Info: farsidecomponents.com





Aenomaly Constructs

Sea Otter 2021
Sea Otter 2021
Sea Otter 2021

If you don't churn out components on your CNC machine in 2022, are you even a mountain biker? I tuned into what Aenomaly Constructs were creating from day one of their first prototype, eager to get on one of their SwitchGrade pieces. The component replaces the rail clamp of most popular dropper posts and articulates six degrees in positive and negative directions, in addition to having a neutral setting.The SwitchGrade plays well with the trend of long bikes that have mega-steep seat tube angles or those riders that wish for a shorter seat tube. This allows for more clearance on descents and a comfier ride on the way up.

Machined in Whistler by North Shore Billet, the SwitchGrade is actuated by manually depressing the lever under the nose of the seat while pushing or pulling in the desired direction. For what it achieves, the insignificant weight penalty of roughly 100 g and a cost of $248 CAD could revitalize some riders positioning on their bike. Look for a review on the SwitchGrade in the coming weeks.

More Info: aenomalyconstructs.com





Schön Studio

Schon Studio
Schon Studio
Schon Studio

Metal fabricator and welder, Danielle Schön, not only builds her own frames, but also repairs cracked and dented ones too. Based out of Squamish, Danielle brands some her pieces with a massive, but stylish emblem draped over the top and down tubes on her latest mountain frame. Brazed on badges decorate the frames as a signature and pop, even without the splash of any paint. In addition to custom frames and repairs, she also lends her trade to forks, racks, prototyping and general steel works for furniture and commercial work.

Danielle was a teaching assistant alongside Paul Brodie at the University of the Fraser Valley before he retired and the school cancelled shortly thereafter. If you take interest in this kind of work and would like to learn the ways of frame building, you're in luck. Danielle teaches basic frame construction and hobby welding classes, following in the footsteps of local legend, Mr. Brodie.

bigquotesI’m very passionate about doing what I can to help remove barriers to the craft (specifically Framebuilding) for anyone who feels it may not be a space for them, as well as encouraging more people to get out and experience the greatness that is bikes ...I would one day like to be able to have a scholarship/sponsored or at very least low-cost option to offer to marginalized folks who are interested in entering the craft/trade. - Danielle Schön

More Info: schonstudio.com





Wildwood Cycles

It's all in the details.

Vancouver Island is growing as a hub for mountain bike brands and much like the renaissance movement in the U.K., there is a growing number of simpler steel frames being built on this side of the pond. From dropped bar gravel trackers and hardtails, to single pivot full suspension bikes, Wildwood Cycles in Victoria, B.C. focuses on solid geometry and basic operations over multi-pivots and carbon facade.

There's a good reason for so many steel manufacturers to choose a fixed front and rear triangle with a single pivot design. It's elegant, leaves plenty of mounting space for accessories, can be easily repaired, and does the job of keeping the rear wheel on the ground, when partnered with a quality tuned shock. Custom geometry and frame/forks kits are available, plus the hardtail and gravel models have titanium options.

More Info: wildwoodcycles.ca





WZRD Bikes


Yet another Van Isle steel frame builder that is operating in a small studio, churning out all shorts of cool shapes and wild paint schemes. There are a number of unique looking bikes that can't be pegged into a specific genre, but one thing is for sure - WZRD builds progressive geometry. Some of the mountain hardtails have gargantuan wheelbases and slack head angles that dwarf the appearance of 29" wheels. Not limited to mountain bike hardtails, WZRD also has a street background lending to everything from fixies to 26" dirt jump bikes, some of which are setup rigid and brakeless, all built for spending time jibbing around skateparks and jump sets.

They also do quite a bit of custom work which includes steel forks, stems, two-piece bars that resemble Bontrager's cult Crowbar; some combine those two components into one, with the option to bolt bike packing racks onto them. One of the stand out pieces has to be their front pizza rack with the consonants "WZRD" built into the bracing.

More Info: wzrd.bike





Dsastr Bikes


Former welder and machinist at the infamous Balfa and Xprezo Canadian brands, Phillipe Benoit's side project, Dsastr Bikes, is based in the Eastern Township of Bromont, QC. The one-man show builds custom frames, stems, seat posts, and headset spacers for every type of bike. Recent projects show stunning titanium frames that include a full suspension trail bike with a flex-stay rear triangle. Phil-Ben was way ahead of the current trend for XC full suspension bikes, as you may have recognized the design from Xprezo's Magic Carpet that Pinkbike reviewed back in 2015. The Dsastr version is absolutely stunning and since it's not mass produced, extra special attention to detail was taken into account while building this Ti steed.

His work shows extreme levels of finishing throughout with one frame displaying machined reliefs at the head tube that sync with the steer tube spacer. The stem is also a work of art with the clean, wrap-around clamp and pinch bolts forward of the steer tube.


More Info: Dsastr Bikes Instagram





Needs Factory Apparel

PC Brandon Artis
Clint Trahan Photos

Clint Trahan Photos


Needs Factory shouldn't need any introduction at this point. It's likely you've seen YouTube stars Matt Boltz, Yoann Barelli, Steve Vanderhoek, World Cup prodigy Seth Sherlock, and a slew of other up and coming riders rocking their apparel in bike parks or team videos. NF is best recognized for their comfortable and durable DP3 pants, but they also produce quality Merino wool and hemp tops and have an enduro style knee pad in the pipeline that their team riders have been testing out, using the popular D3O impact resistant foam.

The goods are constructed on home soil at their factory, located in East Vancouver, where they preach an ethical work practice and environment. Most of all, NF want to create, not produce apparel. That's why their business model is a little different than most and once items are sold out, that line may never take the same appearance. Their ability to adapt quickly and change from one run to the next is the best way to update and improve products for their scale. The "QuikStrike" jerseys are a great example of this and are made in very small batches that complement their approach to their limited designs and testing.

More Info: ridenf.com





MTN Metal Works







There is no lack of DIY metal fabricators in the Fraser Valley, just an hour east of Vancouver, but Spencer at MTN Metal Works doesn't just build things with metal. The arsenal of trail building tools in his portfolio is derived from demanding functionality as a trail builder. He puts his own equipment to test and can also shred on a bike. Spencer also possesses the skills to weld stainless steel and aluminum, taking on custom jobs too, like the underpass he built for Air Rec Center, an indoor dirt jump and skatepark facility in Maple Ridge, B.C.

In the MTN Metal Works shed are effective ground working tools, like Macleods and rough rakes, starting around $110 CAD. A wooden handle keeps the package lighter with less vibration and is easy to swap out if damaged. The sharp end of the sticks are available in a trick version with a bolt-on, adaptable head to change tools on the fly. This would be the ticket for dig spots that you need to ride into, because carrying multiple handled tools on a bike can be a nuisance.

More Info: mtnmetalworks.com





Fresh Paints of Whistler

Liam Wallace photo

Manufacturer might be a stretch of the word here, but their service plays on the local artist vibe. If you're searching for a bike that isn't one of fifty shades of black or aren't enthralled by four contrasting colors in one paint scheme, then maybe the custom route is the way to go. Fresh Paint of Whistler specializes in tearing down the stock colors of a frame, helmet, or basically anything you can throw paint at, and adding any color combo or theme you could wish for. They've tackled big projects for pros like Reece Wallace's 90s neon throwback Giant Glory and Chris Kovarik's Intense M29 with his matching Fox RPC helmet.

Located in Whistler's Function Junction industrial park, the team of creative minds evolved their craft from disposable spray cans to a professional level paint booth they built themselves. Their Instagram page is the best way to keep up with the latest projects, giving some insight to the labourous masking and complex layering of the pin striping world.

More Info: freshpaintsofwhistler.com

Note: Pinkbike staff member Mitch Gulliver is part owner of Fresh Paints of Whistler. He didn't ask for or have anything to do with this article.


206 Comments

  • 395 1
 I'm always amazed when small manufacturers make normal sized products.
  • 18 0
 Golf clap
  • 1 0
 @kiddlivid: that made me laugh!!!
  • 13 1
 what is this? a factory for ants???
  • 1 0
 @consularship: Ha ! I tried to think up some version of this but came up empty. Kudos.
  • 9 0
 Let's not forget the giant companies. The normal sized products they make for us are actually tiny to them.
  • 1 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: HAHAHA...priceless!
  • 118 0
 Can't have vowels in your name if you want to run a respectable small bike business.
  • 24 3
 We have enough vowels in all our words with the extra u’s like colours… vs colors etc.
  • 34 6
 @solarplex: Let's not adopt the incorrect American spelling of our words!
  • 100 0
 Supply chain issues - there are container ships full of vowels sitting off Vncvr unable to unload, and not enough trck drvrs to get them moving.
  • 11 1
 @number44: did the evrgvn shp gt stck agn?
  • 45 0
 @NatusEstInSuht: you mean ‘wourds’ I think.
  • 31 2
 @littleskull99: There is a vowel bubble in the Canadian market right now. Vowels are insanely overpriced. Its mainly attributed to speculative spelling and allowing foreign investors to drive the prices of vowels up.
  • 9 0
 Vowels cost money, why else are they buying vowels on the wheel of fortune?
  • 2 0
 @rustiegrizwold: You should watch this past SNL take on the Wheel of Fortune viewers. You may stop watching ;-)
  • 4 1
 seriously, what is Dsastr thinking leaving that "a" in there?!
  • 2 0
 That Wldwd looks pretty sweet, I must say.
  • 4 0
 A few years ago, marketers were taking two words, making them one and capitalizing the first letter of each word. (Example: BeerFest or whatever—don’t forget your hashtag!). It was all the rage. This is the new that. I blame social media. Damn kids and their internets.
  • 13 0
 Feels like home for Slavic people. Vrstva zmrzliny = layer of ice cream.
  • 5 0
 @rustiegrizwold: I don't have money, will they take an IOU?
  • 3 0
 @otterdirt asking the right questions
  • 4 0
 @adam102: haha, got a few from Croatia with 0 vowels
Krk - name of biggest island
Vrh - top
Trp - sea cucumber
Srk - slurp
Beat that Canyon!
  • 5 0
 Aenomaly over there being all baller, hogging em all
  • 1 0
 Glad to see others were thinking the same. Not a vowel to be seen. I think when I release my own brand of mountain bike specialty gear I will use ONLY vowels. AEIOU Manufacturing, Inc.
  • 2 0
 @kanasasa: Those are fun too! Stĺp, smršť, štvrťhrsť.
  • 60 0
 Farside Stem: one length, one clamp size, average weight, and a very average looking design... all for only 229 CAD. They must love their stems so much they don't want to give up a single one.
  • 6 2
 They look rad, but the prices are definitely not rad!
  • 16 1
 I can't even tell you how excited I am that there are more options for boutique stems now available. They're exploiting a true void in the market !
  • 52 13
 That Schon name badge is hideous. Why ruin a nice looking frame?
  • 8 2
 At first I thought it was too small, but then I realized if it was any bigger, it might make it hard to get the water bottle out.
  • 14 2
 @toast2266: it’s a stylized gusset hence the size, and it actually clears a 1L bottle out of there no problem.
  • 9 1
 @komischon: i like it.
  • 4 0
 I love it! But hey, I might be biased, it's my last name... might have to get my hands on one of Danielle's bikes.
  • 1 0
 @caribooyj: Tom! Build one up for a trail building rig! This is the time of year that I start getting impatient - still 3 months before we can ride/build- so I end up building new bikes!
  • 2 0
 @Jvisscher: Ha ha, great idea! I've just finished a complete service of the Druid.
  • 1 0
 @komischon: love that paint and would love to see more pics of that frame.
  • 37 0
 That DSASTR full sus frame is NICE.
  • 3 0
 Interested, I am.
  • 4 1
 It's pornographically georgous you mean! The frames, the brand name, the logo, the material... it's not craft anymore, it's pure witchery. Hail DSASTR!!!
  • 2 0
 Looks like a titanium flex stay. Really interesting and unique!
  • 2 1
 Noice
  • 24 0
 First time I saw those Counterpunch grips I thought WTF why??
But then afterwards I remembered the occaisions I have hit a tree with my fingers and it can properly hurt!!
So I have totally done an about turn and now think they are a great idea!!
  • 8 2
 Surprisingly easy to snap your pinkie when clipping a tree... US medical bill to fix it at a top orthopedic surgeon before insurance was around $20k. These small bar ends seem like a decent investment.
  • 17 1
 @rbarbier12: wow! When I got. One fixed here in the UK by a top hand surgeon it cost me nothing. $20k? How can people in the US afford to get broken?
  • 3 0
 My friend bought me a set after I shattered my pinky on a tree. We've all done it. I've clipped them so often that I didn't even think much of the hit that shattered my pinky, til my pinky didn't pop back in. The end caps look dorky tbh, but they integrate perfectly with ODI grips, most importantly they offer some level of protection from those glancing strikes that we've all dusted off.
  • 1 1
 @CustardCountry: I was working in a government job at the time and had a $0 deductible, so the surgery was free. The PT... not so much
  • 7 1
 @CustardCountry: We can't. If you get hurt and don't have insurance it kinda just f*cks your life up.
  • 9 0
 @rbarbier12: Top orthopedic surgeon… that’s your problem. Gotta go with Dr. Nick!
  • 3 0
 I've only done two rides with mine so far, but I like how precisely I can dial in my controls since my hand now lands in the same place every time, up against them. For the particular kind of people who use an angle finder to set their lever angle, this is a pretty cool bonus
  • 3 0
 The bone it is protecting is actually the 5th proximal phalange... medicarpal isn't a thing
  • 2 0
 Rode the counterpunches since last summer. My little pinks would feel all naked and exposed without them now.
  • 26 0
 Waiting on the bike company that over uses vowels. Diisaasteer biikees Coumeenciicaulz Mooantaen biykez
  • 3 1
 Waiting for them to start leaving out consonants!
  • 3 0
 Seems like Kona loves, or loved vowels at one point in time. But these are different times.
  • 28 0
 If someone comes out with a brand called "AEIOU," they should do quite well. The only brand to crush them is the new company called "Sometimes Y."
  • 5 1
 @rrolly: If this doesn't get comment gold, then nothing should.
  • 1 0
 Check out Amazon.Com
  • 14 0
 @Pinkbike: please fix the numerous misspellings of WZRD, my brain almost exploded reading that paragraph
  • 1 0
 So true :-)
  • 9 0
 I am pretty psyched that Roach is making a comeback through HMPL Design here in Vancouver. They have stem protectors available now with proceeds going to the NSMBA. Would LOVE to see a collaboration with NF.
  • 1 0
 Rad! I have a Roach jersey that I've been wearing for 20 years. Classic shore
  • 1 0
 I guess Race Face don't the Roach brand any more then?
  • 2 0
 @whitebirdfeathers: Courier culture too - wish I still had my bag but sold it 20+ years ago. There is one messenger I still see rocking one.
  • 3 0
 @wallheater: evidently HMPL are in talks with them (per their comment on one of their Instagram posts) - hope it all works out for Ingrid's legacy.
  • 1 0
 wow thanks for this info, I need a stem pad
  • 2 0
 Not the same without Ingrid.
  • 8 0
 When I was staying in Victoria I walked into the shop that houses WZRD bikes, can’t recall the name, and was super impressed. The staff was knowledgeable and answered all my questions. Absolutely loved the atmosphere, massive shoutout because they’re doing a lot right over there.
  • 9 0
 Broad Street Cycles! Great crew all around.
  • 1 0
 @komischon: oh so is WZRD bikes CURB WZRD? Or Broad Street is just all about WZRD? Is there a DIRT WZRD?

I'll never forget that Norco threshold vid with curbwzrd.
  • 2 0
 @eh-steve: Correctemundo. Em's an em-f'ing bike rider good god.
  • 1 0
 @slimjimihendrix: I had no clue.

A dream ride for me would be Em and Craig Lunn together at Hartland, but I don't have the lungs or legs to keep up with either. I've ridden with Craig, so I know that for a fact.
  • 8 0
 Always glad to see some local love here. Not gonna lie, I'd love to get ahold of a fully rigid WZRD bike but I can't just magic up the money.
  • 4 0
 It’s not rigid. It’s RgD.
  • 11 1
 Didn't realise that Starling is an open mould design
  • 5 0
 @jeza08 that’s what I thought. That wildwood fs Basically looks a carbon copy rip off of the #starlingcycles murmur
  • 2 1
 Single pivot bikes will all look similar, surprise!
  • 1 1
 Steel full sus bike - totally pointless. You have suspension why make a flexible frame?
Hardtail steel frame -makes total sense.
  • 2 0
 @phutphutend: Starling know diddly squat about frame design. That article has no data and is just speculation.
  • 6 1
 I quote Xprezo on my frontpage (sorry in trench) denouncing this industry pushing our over-consumption:

zoobab.com
www.velovert.com/news/11995/xprezo-a-cesse-son-activite

"Le domaine du vélo est un domaine ultra compétitif qui cherche constamment à se renouveler et qui rend cette industrie malade à trop pousser notre consommation" -- Hugo Bardou, Xprezo dans Velovert: Xprezo a cessé son activité
  • 4 8
flag y0bailey (Jan 24, 2022 at 10:03) (Below Threshold)
 Then maybe they should build bikes that weren't complete dog-shit and end up in the landfill.

Crumpled a down-tube hitting a stump on one (my fault, but I've done worse and had a bike survive), and the next one decided to just split in half at the down-tube welds hitting a whopping 1-2 foot drop to flat.


Then they were conveniently out of business and I was screwed.

f*ck those guys, and now f*ck Dsastr Bikes too.
  • 8 0
 That WZRD frame is beautiful - clean lines and a Klein-inspired paint job. Love it.
  • 1 0
 She just did an awesome Racing Point F1 team-inspired paint job on a rigid singlespeed. So cool.
  • 6 2
 Slight bit of a BC bias here, but clearly great to see so many treats. Omission of Lyle Wiens Fabrications in Altona MB, another Brodie acolyte (ltwiens.com), is to me conspicuous if you really want to take a coast-to-coast perspective on the CDN homegrown score while not forgetting the middle part. His bikes are as rad as any, imho. For example:
www.pinkbike.com/photo/21050185
www.pinkbike.com/photo/21050172
  • 5 0
 I guess you go where things are happening.

I remember seeing some of Danielle Schön's bikes at a trade show when she was still based in Toronto.
Superfun pieces of rolling art.
  • 4 0
 @alexanderpwolfe @cedric-eveleigh used to run the Intsagram account The North American Bike Project, before putting all his attention towards Lal Bikes, and helped to kept an eye on any other emerging small Canadian manufacturers. We've featured his Supre Drive here before and awarded it with "Pinkbike's Innovation of the Year", so I wouldn't say there is any bias.

Omission Bikes looks incredible too. If there are any other suggestions that the readers may have, we'd love to know about them.
  • 4 0
 @mattbeer: here's a guy building frames in Calgary.

www.kruchexperience.com
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I really miss Daambuilt in this list.
  • 4 0
 @Andykmn: Ah right! They made a Fat Bike for the legendary Reg Mullet. We'll get them on the next round up.
  • 2 0
 @suravida: We featured them in last year's article that is linked in the first paragraph Wink
  • 2 0
 @mattbeer: Oh yes, completely forgot that was the case...Sorry!
  • 8 0
 WZRD!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 6 0
 Where is Rollingdale cycle!? He builds beautiful custom titanium hardtails out of Alberta.

Definitely worth checking out
  • 4 0
 @KyRob Maybe we can do a full feature on Albertan manufacturers next time!
  • 1 0
 Very True. A talent that deserves his recognition!
  • 6 0
 Naked bikes outta Quadra gets no mention? Did I miss that?.. www.nakedbicycles.com
  • 2 0
 @CDT77 We'll get them next time! I must have missed their hardtail frames and thought they focused on drop bar bikes.
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: They are OG's...
  • 3 0
 I love that in an article celebrating a handful of the many talented people in Canada, everyone is getting their knickers in a bunch then firmly lodged up their cracks over lack of vowels in company names. Jesus wept, then he went to see Danielle at Schön for a sweet rig and a kick-ass brazing course too. Beautiful and fun as ever mate and we loved the styled gusset. Much more inventive than a boring old cross brace.
  • 5 3
 I'm curious - I see "easy to repair" as one of the reasons to have steel bikes. I've had several steel bikes over the years (and broken or bent a couple.) I've never taken one to a welder and had it fixed. I realize I'm a sample size of one, but who actually does that?
  • 10 1
 I personally have repaired at least a few hundred frames, and I know many of my colleagues are consistently doing repairs. So, lots of people do.
  • 8 0
 Ive had numerous steel bike frames repaired/re-welded over the years. Why wouldn't you get your steel frame fixed? That's part of it's charm Smile
  • 6 0
 I mean, the fact that you didn't get your bike fixed is on you. People definitely do it, myself included.
  • 3 0
 I cracked a seat stay bridge on my most recent steel hard tail, and the guy who made it fixed it up for me. He's a friend of mine, but the process is the same for anyone looking to have a cracked weld repaired. Obviously, a dented or crumpled tube would pose more of a repair process, so there are a few factors that decide if repair is possible in that case.
  • 1 0
 Wow well ok then, I guess I'm in the minority. I suppose part of the reason I've never bothered is that I really just wanted to spend the money on a new bike? My broken steel frames were: 1) an enlarged head-tube, perhaps from running a fork that was too long. 2) Dimpled top and down tubes from casing a jump really hard and 3) a crack near the seat tube (not sure what from.) In each case, it just didn't seem worth the trouble. Would it really have been worth fixing these problems?
  • 2 4
 @komischon: you've personally repaired a few hundred steel bike frames?? That would be one a month for 25 years! That seems crazy. I hope these aren't frames you built. . .
  • 2 0
 @gtill9000: Whether it's worth the trouble depends how much you love the frame, really. There are some frames I've had that I messed up, feeling nothing more than "crud, I have to shell out for a new frame", while others hurt to lose, they were so perfect for me. Didn't have the resources at the time to fix them, (or keep them until I COULD fix them,) so to the scrapper they went. My current bikes are aluminum, but next one will be steel specifically so I can repair it.
  • 5 0
 @gtill9000: have never had a frame I’ve built come back with any issues.

~3 repairs a month over the course of 8 years = a few hundred.

My previous shop was attached to a commuter-focused bike shop so that perhaps contributed to the volume.
  • 1 0
 not me, but maybe someone who buys custom hand made bikes?
  • 1 0
 I've had things brazed onto a steel frame (cable mounts), but they could have been disc tabs, or to fix a frame, butI've never broken one that was worth fixing.
  • 5 0
 Loam Lab stuff looks pretty sweet.
  • 1 8
flag ligament (Jan 24, 2022 at 11:38) (Below Threshold)
 Uhuhuuhuhuhuh like ur momma Uhuhuhuhuhuh
  • 3 0
 They listed some great small companies. Sooo many frame builders to choose from. A couple of others: Chris Dekerf, Rollingdale Cycles, Mike Truelove, Daambuilt
  • 8 3
 Sheesh, I hope all Schon made frames don't have that level of branding!
  • 5 0
 Y'all seriously mispelled WZRD's name 3 times.
  • 14 0
 And for the record I am aware that I misspelled misspelled.
  • 2 0
 I'll pick up one of the Aenomaly Switchgrades as soon as they develop a handlebar-mounted remote for it. As long as it plays well with my dropper post and suspension lockout remotes, of course. That will be awesome.
  • 1 0
 I was looking forward to the SwitchGrade and was in the loop during their development. Couldn't hit "unsubscribe" quick enough when they announced the price.
  • 1 0
 No one else is getting deja vu from this? Remember the Specialized WU dropper post? It was derided as completely unnecessary and I think it was Pinkbike that said it was a product no one was asking for… Granted it only tilted back when you dropped it and not otherwise whenever you wanted but I think that’s the exact pitch of this overpriced rail clamp device.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: I think if these are going to really catch on, they need to be made offshore with the price to match. I respect the small batch local model but let's see a $50 version for us peasants... Doing both wouldn't hurt sales of the fancy version.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: I can appreciate basing the price on the cost of goods, manufacturing, and a margin to make it all worthwhile, but at the end of the day the agreement between buyer and seller determines the price and the amount of goods sold. The benefit of this product is not necessary enough to warrant that price tag. Those that can afford that price would likely be buying better fitting bikes, imo.
  • 1 0
 Thanks @SJP! We're always keen to hear from the community. We originally considered this but early tester feedback/survey data unanimously returned with 'KISS' for now. Still, we really appreciate the input and pride ourselves on listening to customers input.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: Thanks for the feedback. You're spot on with your assessment re: agreement between buyer and seller. At the end of the day, those that readily see how the SwitchGrade can address their current pain points will consider our solution and that's all we can hope for to start. We recognize that building awareness and 'changing minds' is our largest hurdle, given that we're all accustomed to having fixed saddle positions since the inception of the sport (barring elevation adjustments vis a vis dropper posts). Case in point: while it's true that the SwitchGrade can help 'fix' ill fitting bikes, it's true value is in increased performance, comfort, safety and saving energy - and that's just for the climbing aspect. Descending, the benefits are increased maneuverability, precision steering and safety.

Hope that clrease things up a bit.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: Think you're onto something! We're big fans of supporting local ourselves but we truly get that the extra costs to keep things onshore can be prohibitive. As a micro startup we're focused on quality first, and with the supply chain being as it is, we simply wanted to keep on top of things as best as we could with the limited resources we have. Just know that we are very mindful of pricing and will always be looking at many options to scale responsibly and in step with customers' expectations. Thanks for your input.
  • 1 0
 @gnarlysipes: I was a HUGE fan of the WU when it was first introduced, in fact almost bought the 2018 Specialized Enduro just for it! We designed the SwitchGrade to work with a wide range of seatposts after learning how loyal people are to their selected posts and saddles. The major difference is that the SwitchGrade offers on-demand tilt only when desired and not in step with elevation changes.

Check out our blog post to learn more www.aenomalyconstructs.com/blogs/news/how-to-make-better-use-of-your-dropper-seatpost

Cheers and thanks for chiming in!
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: yes, we own up to it for sure. SwitchGrades aren't exactly the cheapest upgrade you can buy with your hard earned dough which is why we introduced payment installment as an option. Hope you'll reconsider! Cheers.
  • 2 0
 @AenomalyConstructs: props for wading into the comments. I think your product is a great idea and would like to see it more accessible mostly for selfish reasons Smile
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: Thanks for the kind words!
  • 4 0
 I really think Farside missed an opportunity to have a cow or aliens on their stems. How can't you with that name???
  • 4 0
 So much cool stuff going on in our backyard. Thanks for including us Pinkbike!
  • 1 0
 "They are also the shortest adult lock-on grips that I've seen, sitting at 115 mm in length, and place a single lock clamp on the inside of the grip for those that like to ride with their palm hanging over the end of the grip"

ODI makes 100mm lock on gripsfor many years....
...But I prefer the standar large one as most adults...
  • 1 0
 Yes, ODI made lots of grips in this length for youth BMX bikes, but with a dual clamps.
  • 2 1
 I hope in the next 5 years, most dropper posts have that saddle tilt that can be actuated with the same lever as the height adjust...using your tuckus to adjust angle. Sit on the nose, press the remote lever, lower the nose angle. Sit on the back, press the remote, raise the nose. That is what we really need.
  • 1 5
flag ligament (Jan 24, 2022 at 11:42) (Below Threshold)
 Uhuhuuhuhuh penetration Uhuhuhuhuhuhuh
  • 4 0
 fuggin love wzrd bikes so happy to see it on the list definitely got to get a rowdy hardtail from them one day
  • 1 0
 After I bought a Devinci Spartan Alloy because it was "made in Canada", I bought a Banshee Rune v2 frame second hand because it was "made in Canada", but when I received it, there was a nice Canadian flag on the seat tube, with a nice "made in Taiwan" behind the bottom bracket.
  • 1 0
 Hey guys, don't forget about us! Just because Covid sucks and we haven't been able to make the huge splash we intended to make in March 2020 doesn't mean we'll ever quit, and our bikes are even better than we let on. Come ride with us and see.
  • 4 0
 WRZD Bikes frame has a lovely shape.
  • 5 0
 Gandalf was my favorite Werzid.
  • 5 0
 @nixgame22: You're a werzid, Harry.
  • 1 1
 Looks like a Pipedream Moxie....
  • 2 0
 @kiwikonadude: moxie has a curved seat tube + down tube, and the seat stays are above the top tube. no real resemblance.
  • 1 0
 Anyone have first hand (no pun intended) experience with Counterpunch? I've broken a metacarpal bone in my hand hitting a tree with my handlebar and that looks as it might have saved me.
  • 2 0
 Love the double thru-bolts on the tools. My McLeod only has one bolt, and will loosen up over time as the wood takes hits and compresses.
  • 1 0
 Come on PB editors. "Fifth medicarpal, better known as the pinky finger"..... the fifth *metacarpal is the fifth long bone in your palm that the pinky, or the fifth digit, is connected to.
  • 2 0
 what do you call this one here in the middle, the long one I got sticking out for anyone talking about stems?
  • 1 0
 They are called phalanges.
  • 3 0
 @labrinsky @subwaypanda: I mixed up my broken bones! Gotta check my head now too!
  • 2 0
 Love the look of that DSASTR FS frame! Can you mod the swing arm and squeeze a Supre drivetrain in there?! Maybe you QC guys are already scheming about it.....
  • 1 0
 Anyone have any other recommendations for trailbuilding tools? Probably going to snag one of these MTN Metal Works tools but curious what others are out there now that Rogue no longer seems to be an option.
  • 2 0
 I have the rough rake from MTN.Metalworks and i love it. I will be grabbing some more of their tools when it gets closer to trail building season up here.
  • 2 0
 Zactools.com makes a really tough yet relatively lightweight Mcleod and some other tools. Quality steel on the business end and reinforced fiberglass handles that last forever.
  • 5 4
 NO WAY!! There is companies in Canada, too, that make overpriced stems in small quantities that are far better than the other overpriced stems made in other countries?
  • 1 0
 The Loam Labs stem just looks like a copy of the Race Face Turbine R, and the Farside stem a copy of the old Straitline SSC stem...
  • 3 0
 How is North Shore Billet not on this list?
  • 2 0
 Yay Jesse!!!

So happy to see you on this list Smile

Wildwood makes beautiful frames
  • 3 0
 Wildwood bike looks like a Starling to me??
  • 2 0
 Pentagram etched onto the faceplate-I don’t even want the whole stem. Just make those faceplates available!!!
  • 2 0
 9point8 stem is beautiful and bombproof. I'm sad they weren't included this time around.
  • 1 0
 @Dreifert @sarahmoore covered 9Point8 in last year's round up! The link to that article is in the first paragraph.
  • 1 0
 Something is an innovation towards the safety of our bodies... Should be main cover alone... Seems it has more importance to destroy a delirieur than your finger...
  • 1 1
 N Cndns wll vr hv th rght t cmpln bt th cnn cllctv. Damn near unreadable, but no Canadians will ever have the right to complain about the Canyon Cllctv.
  • 2 0
 Love seeing some awesome Canadian innovators featured!
  • 2 0
 Nothing in here I didn't like.
  • 2 0
 This would make a great series - a different country each week or month.
  • 2 0
 Always curious to see who is making $200 run of the mill stems around the world.
  • 1 0
 Awesome seeing the craftmanship and innovation coming from our own backyard! Thanks for the love PB!
  • 1 0
 Dsastr hell yeah! Bromont represent!
I really hope they put out a DH bike soon Wink
  • 1 0
 I know they don't make bikes, but Canadian Lumber in Halifax is a small manufacturer making rad cones!
  • 1 0
 Great to see the Balfa artists still at it! If that is anything as rugged as their former builds, I am all over it.
  • 1 0
 Thanks now I could build a Canadian manufactured chromag with Canadian parts
  • 2 1
 Whts wth th crzy nms, wzrd, dsastr and mtn.
  • 1 0
 They need an X logo tho..or is that already over ?
  • 1 0
 BRXT
  • 4 3
 WZRD looks rad. can't get down with that giant badge on the Schon.
  • 2 1
 Some really nice parts, yet some horrendous typography
  • 1 0
 Wild wood, I've enjoyed it over the years.
  • 1 0
 Altruiste Bikes is missing from this list
  • 1 0
 Vanna, I’d like to buy a vowel please.
  • 6 6
 WEAREONE? i guess they arent small, but sure are rad.
  • 12 0
 They literally mention them in the first para.
  • 4 0
 They were in the first article about small Canadian manufacturers
  • 1 0
 We see you Griffin!
  • 1 1
 yes!!! Canadian hardtails!!!
  • 1 0
 Small Canadians? where?
  • 1 0
 That WZRD!
  • 1 0
 What about Knolly?
  • 1 2
 Wizard bikes: Progressive geo, progressive politics. lmfao... clown
  • 3 5
 her welds look good but the massive badge is hideous. talk about gawdy
  • 4 0
 WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT HOW ELSE IS THE BRAND GOING TO BE SCHON TO OTHERS
  • 3 0
 @whatshubdoc: this is the only comment I care about, thank you, goodnight.
  • 2 0
 Schön means rad in German but Rad is german for bike, and then there is bikes that say Schön ... blows my german mind (.. OK Schön really means beautiful- puts the the Asprin down)
  • 4 0
 No way. That "basset" (badge mixed with gusset) is rad! Not everything needs to be flat black with gloss black decals.....yeah and the welds are tidy too.

Anybody that works/worked with Brodie is legit in my book and can most certainly fabricate. Period.
  • 2 4
 Banshee.
  • 3 0
 I don't think they do any manufacturing in Canada. My frame was imported to the US in a container, then shipped to Canada. I don't even think the HQ is still in Canada anymore (California?). The website has no information on physical location.

I would be really really happy to be corrected though. Strong Canadian heritage, but I think KS and others virtually from different locations
  • 1 1
 They are a pretty major brand
  • 3 0
 Banshee was never manufactured in Canada, always Taiwan. Original designer was Canadian, currently run by a Canadian (living in Taiwan) and co-designed with a Scot.
  • 1 0
 made in Taiwan I believe





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