Ridden & Rated: 12 of the Best 2020 Flat Pedals

Jun 1, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  


Pedal Picking

As former Pinkbike tech editor Richard Cunningham liked to say, “flat pedals are just flat metal,” and he's not wrong. Unless they're made of plastic, of course, but I'll get to that in a bit. The basic design of a flat pedal is quite simple – take an aluminum body with traction pins threaded in, a chromoly spindle, some combination of bearings and bushings to allow them to spin, and bingo, you've got a flat pedal...

Except that it's not actually that easy. The dimensions of that platform, the orientation of the pins, and the size and number of bearings all have a noticeable impact on the way a pedal feels underfoot. Personal preference also comes into play when trying to decide if one pedal is better than another; some riders want the maximum amount of grip, while others want the ability to re-position their foot without lifting it all the way off of the pedal.

The following 12 options are some of the best mountain bike flat pedals currently on the market in 2020. They're all relatively thin and grippy and suitable for hard riding, but there are design features that elevate a few to the top of the charts. If you already own any of the pedals included in this round-up, congratulations – all of these are worthy options that should be able to withstand numerous seasons of hard riding without any major issues.

Are there other high-quality options that aren't mentioned here? You bet. These 12 picks are only a partial selection of what's out there, a compilation of some of the standouts that I've been spending time on over the last 24 months.

What about plastic pedals?

The focus of this article is on aluminum-bodied options, but I've mentioned if there is a comparable plastic version where applicable. Going with a plastic-bodied option is a great way to save money – plastic pedals are typically half the cost of their more expensive aluminum siblings, without that much of a performance difference.

Aluminum pedals do tend to hold up better to repeated rock smashing – they'll get scuffed and scraped, but typically don't get as battered as a more malleable plastic body. Some riders prefer the feel of a plastic pedal when it hits a rock, claiming that it glides over it rather than sticking, although I wouldn't say that's the best reason to choose one over another. Hit a rock with any pedal and you'll feel it – plastic doesn't really make that impact any less jarring.





Contents






Deity T-Mac


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 439 grams
• Pins per side: 14
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 105 x 110mm
• Internals: 3 cartridge bearings + DU bushing
• MSRP: $168.99
deitycomponents.com

Deity's T-Mac pedals fall into the big gun category, with a whopping 105 x 110mm usable platform, and 14 hollow pins on each side. There's no shortage of grip, and the very concave shape lets shoes really sink in and lock into place. The T-Mac's aren't ultra-thin, and the squared-off shape does create less obstacle clearance than a more tapered profile, but I didn't notice any more pedal vs. rock impacts than usual, even compared to the thinner options on test. I did manage to blast one pedal into a dead stump at full speed, an impact that nearly ripped me off the bike, and it emerged unscathed, which is a good testament to the T-Mac's durability.

That high level of grip may be too much for some riders, but there are enough pins that removing a few for fine-tuning is entirely possible. On a similar note, the wide platform worked great for my size 11 shoes, but the width might be too much for riders with smaller feet.

The pins are all top loading, but if the top of the pin is too damaged for easy removal it's also possible to access them from the other side by removing the pin on the opposite side of the pedal. It's a clever setup, and makes pin replacement hassle-free.

Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Big, concave platform
+ Easy pin removal
+ Loads of grip

Cons
- On the more expensive side
- May be too wide for some riders



Chromag Dagga


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 479 grams
• Pins per side: 12
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 117 x 10mm
• Internals: cartridge bearing + DU bushing
• MSRP: $180 USD
chromagbikes.com

Looking for the maximum amount of grip? The Dagga's deliver. The 12 pins rise nearly 6mm above the pedal body in the stock configuration, or if for some reason that's still not enough there's a washer that can be removed from each pin to give them another two millimeters of height. Those tall pins combined with a generous platform create the grippiest option out of the 12 pedals reviewed here.

As I wrote in my original review, “the Dagga's pins look menacing, but my shins have remained scab free over the last four months of usage. That's thanks to the fact that I've yet to fully slip a pedal – there's so much traction, especially when paired with Five Ten's sticky rubber, that sliding off the platform is highly unlikely. Now, not everyone will be a fan of having that much grip – riders that want to be able to re-position their feet more easily may want to consider removing some pins, or purchasing the shorter pins that Chromag uses on their other pedals.”

The platform is nearly flat, but the pins around the perimeter help make them feel more concave than they actually are, especially if the center and inboard pins are removed. Durability, especially the weather sealing, has been excellent, although that sealing system does mean they don't spin quite as freely as some of the other options feature here – there's a little more resistance compared to say, the DMR Vault, but I'd take that over having water getting in and contaminating the bearings.

Gram counters and penny pinchers will want to look elsewhere due to that 487 gram weight and $180 price tag, but the Daggas are an outstanding option for DH riders or anyone who places a high priority on durability and a slip-free performance.

Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Maximum traction
+ Excellent weather sealing

Cons
- On the heavier side
- Pricey



Nukeproof Sam Hill Signature Horizon


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 417
• Pins per side:10
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 100 x 101mm
• Internals: 2 cartridge bearings + DU bushing
• MSRP: $119.99
nukeproof.com

We've all heard the saying, “flat pedals win medals,” a statement that's still partially true due to Sam Hill's recent enduro excellence. Granted, Mr. Hill is more of an exception rather than the rule when it comes to the relationship between his pedal choice and his results, but he's an ideal torchbearer for all the flat pedal fans out there.

His pedal of choice is the Nukeproof Horizon, which recently underwent a slight revision to the platform shape. The outer corners were shaved down a bit for more obstacle clearance, while the overall length and width of the pedal remained the same.

The Horizon pedals are slightly concave, but it's really the lack of pins in the center that contribute to the Horizon's excellent feel underfoot. For me, this is my Goldilocks pedal, the one that strikes the perfect balance of grip and shape. I can re-position my feet when necessary, but there's plenty of grip to keep them from getting bounced out of place on rough sections of trail. It's also possible to extend the bottom-loading pins by another millimeter by removing a washer.

The price is on the more reasonable side, and the pedals have held up very well over the last few months of muddy riding.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Plenty of grip without going overboard
+ Shape works well with wide range of shoe sizes

Cons
- Won't make you as fast as Sam Hill



DMR Vault


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 430 grams
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 105 x 104mm
• Internals: cartridge bearing + DU bushing
• MSRP: $140
dmrbikes.com


DMR's Vault pedals show up in nearly every flat pedal compilation, and for good reason. They've got a sole-sucking (in a good way) portion in the center that gives them a very secure feel under foot, and that 105 x 104mm platform strikes a happy medium for a wide range of shoe sizes.

The 17mm thickness puts them in good company with the likes of the Nukeproof Horizon and ANVL Tilt – it's not crazy thin, but it's also not so thick that it feels like you're pedaling around with a brick under each foot. Downsides? The pins are on the thicker side, which means they don't dig in quite as tenaciously as thinner ones, and the outer seal against the pedal body can shift out of place, allowing water to get in to the internals.

The chromoly axle version shown here is the one I'd recommend, but if you have a wad of cash burning a hole in your pocket there is a magnesium bodied version with a titanium axle that's said to weigh only 290 grams.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Nice concave feel underfoot
+ Bottom loading pins

Cons
- Thicker pins aren't as grippy
- Could have better sealing



ANVL Tilt


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 406 grams
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 105 x 105mm
• Internals: 2 cartridge bearings + DU bushing
• MSRP: $100
transitionbikes.com

Third time's the charm? That sure seems to be the case with version 3.0 of Anvl's Tilt flat pedals, which is the best iteration of this model yet. Anvl is the component-focused arm of Transition bikes, and the latest edition of the Tilt gets a revised platform shape that measures 105 x 105mm, with a scooped out center portion to help keep those shoe soles firmly planted.

The pedal platform isn't the absolute widest, but the dimensions provided plenty of support for my size 11 feet, and the lack of an inboard bearing bulge opens up more foot placement options compared to some of the ultra-thin pedals out there.

There's enough grip from those 5.5mm high pins for all levels of trail roughness, although I do still wish they were bottom loading. It's not a deal breaker, but I prefer having the ability to adjust pin height by adding or subtracting washers, and in my experience it's easier to extract a mangled pin with that design.

The Tilt's price tag is on the more reasonable end of the spectrum, and they've held up very well to the last six months of use.

Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Reasonable price & weight

Cons
- Top loading pins





Yoshimura Chilao


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 371
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 105 x 100mm
• Internals: 2 cartridge bearings + DU bushing
• MSRP: $190
yoshimuracycling.com

Yoshimura are a newcomer to the mountain bike world; if the name sound familiar, it's because they're a well-known aftermarket motorcycle exhaust manufacturer. The Chilao pedals (the name comes from a Southern California riding spot) are made in the USA, and are available in two different platform sizes.

That made-in-USA tag does raise the price – at $190 these are the most expensive pedals out of the 12 featured here, but they also happen to be the lightest at 371 grams. That classic Keith Bontrager axiom, “Strong, light, cheap, pick two” is as relevant as ever.

The larger of the two options has a platform that measures 105mm wide x 100mm long, with 10 aluminum pins on each side. The overall platform height of 14mm is quite thin, especially for a pedal without an oversized inboard bearing.

As far as grip goes, the Chilao's fall in tmiddle of the pack. While the pin heights are staggered to help create a more concave feel underfoot, the raised inboard and outboard portions above the axle interfere slightly, preventing shoe soles from really sinking in the way they do on the DMR Vault or Deity T-Mac, for example.

It's still a little too early to comment on long term durability, but our test set is still spinning smoothly after nearly three months of regular usage.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Light weight
+ Thin overall profile

Cons
- Pricey
- Not the absolute grippiest



Shimano Deore XT


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 483 grams
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 110 x 108mm
• Internals: cup and cone ball bearings
• MSRP: $100 USD
bike.shimano.com

Shimano set the standard for clipless pedals years ago, but they haven't had quite the same level of success with their flat pedal offerings. They've been working to change that in recent years, and in late 2017 introduced an XT-level flat pedal to their lineup. It's the M-8040 that's pictured above; the current M-8140 model is identical other than a slightly different color scheme.

The M-8040s are a little thick for a modern flat pedal, measuring 18mm in the center and 20mm at the leading and trailing edges – that's the width of two OneUp aluminum pedals. Whether or not that's a factor will depend on your bottom bracket height and preferred terrain, but it's definitely something to be aware of. They come with two sets of pins, but the shorter ones are virtually unusable for off-road use – stick the 5mm ones in and forget about those little ones.

These pedals use Shimano's cup-and-cone bearing system, the same one that's found in their ultra-reliable clipless pedals. I've had these pedals in the rotation the longest out of all the pedals shown here, and they're still the smoothest spinning. They're also very easy to rebuild, as long as you have the very inexpensive plastic Shimano tool.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Super smooth bearing system
+ Easily serviceable

Cons
- On the chunky side
- Top loading pins



e*thirteen Plus


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 436 grams
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 103 x 110mm
• Internals: 3 cartridge bearings
• MSRP: $139 USD
ethirteen.com

e*thirteen returned to the pedal game this year with two new options, hoping to recapture some of the magic that was present in the original LG1+ pedals that debuted back in 2011. The pins are in the same location as they were on those LF1 pedals, but there's now an aluminum body, and an oversized inboard bearing.

The Plus pedals don't have the widest usable platform due to the bearing bulge, but their 110mm length and the distance they sit from the crank arm does create a decent perch to rest on. The pins provide enough grip for DH riding, and it's possible to remove the center two to give the pedals a more concave feel.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Plenty of grip, good pin placement

Cons
- Inboard bearing bulge won't work for everyone




Kona Wah Wah II


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 426 grams
• Pins per side: 8
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 110 x 110mm
• Internals: 2 cartridge bearings, 1 needle bearing
• MSRP: $120 USD
konaworld.com

The Wah Wah II's are right up there with the Dagga and T-Mac as far as overall dimensions go, although that oversized inboard bearing bulge does eat into the amount of available real estate. The bulge does allow the rest of the pedal body to be quite thin, right around 14 millimeters.

The supersized platform helps prevent unwanted slippage, despite the fact there are only 8 relatively small pins. A larger platform doesn't just help keep your feet in place, either; it also provides a large target to aim for if you need to take a foot off to drift around a corner, or to maintain balance on a long, sketchy skinny.

I do think an additional seal on the outside of that large bearing would help bump up the Wah Wah's wet-weather durability. There's a seal for the cartridge bearing itself, but water still seems to sneak in more easily than I'd like.

There's a plastic version of the Wah Wah II available that's nearly identical, other than the price and weight. That plastic version is also available with a smaller platform, while the alloy Wah Wah IIs only come in one size.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Extra wide platform
+ Thin height increases ground clearance

Cons
- Some riders may want even more grip
- Weather sealing could be better



Burgtec Penthouse MK5


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 376 grams
• Pins per side: 8
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 102 x 100mm
• Internals: 1 cartridge bearing, 2 bushings
• MSRP: $150 USD
burgtec.co.uk

The Penthouse MK5 is the latest version of Burgtec's classic flat pedal, with a little wider platform, a lower weight, and slightly more material carved out of the center. The weather sealing is excellent, as you'd hope from a company that's based in the UK, and the open platform shape prevents mud from clogging up the works.

I do wish that the pedals didn't sit so close to the crankarm – these are the narrowest pedals in this compilation when measured from the crank to the outer edge of the platform. According to Burgtec's Dan Critchlow, that's to keep them from hanging up on the edges of the UK's rutty, trenched out trails. The composite version is wider, and cheaper too; something to keep in mind if you like the look and don't mind a slightly thicker platform.

The amount of grip is similar to the Yoshimura pedals. It's decent, but not mindblowing. If I was doing rough DH laps all day, every day, I'd probably steer towards something with more pins and a wider platform, but I do like the MK5 pedals for general trail riding on less rowdy terrain.

Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Well sealed against the elements
+ Thin and tough platform

Cons
- Not that wide due to axle length




OneUp Aluminum


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 377 grams
• Pins per side: 10
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 103 x 110mm
• Internals: 4 cartridge bearings
• MSRP: $125 USD
oneupcomponents.com

OneUp's naming scheme is about as straightforward as it gets. Their dropper post is called the Dropper Post, and their aluminum pedals are called, you guessed it, Aluminum Pedals (there's also a composite version called the Comp Pedal). Like the Kona Wah Wah II and the e*thirteen Plus, the OneUp pedals use a large inboard bearing to allow them to shrink the height of the aluminum platform. In this case, it measures only 9mm thick at the edges, and around 11mm in the center. OneUp claim the convex shape allows the pedals to sit in the natural arch of your foot, but I'm calling BS on that one. I don't ride barefoot, and the soles of the shoes I use don't have a raised portion where my arch is...

Thankfully, that convexity isn't really noticeable – the 5mm tall pins around the perimeter help take care of that. There's plenty of grip, although the smaller usable platform width is noticeable – I had a decent amount of shoe overhang from the 103mm platform compared to the wider options where that number can be as high as 120mm.

The pedal's low profile does help keep them out of harm's way, and the solid platform (as opposed to one with cutouts in the leading and trailing edges) should help it take a beating without bending or breaking. It's also worth mentioning that there aren't any DU bushings inside these pedals – they rely entirely on cartridge bearings, which is good news for riders who avoid bushings at all costs, no matter what.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Plenty of grip, good pin placement

Cons
- Inboard bearing bulge won't be for everyone



Tenet Occult


Best flat pedals 2020

• Weight: 403 grams
• Pins per side: 11
• Usable platform dimensions (W x L): 105 x 110
• Internals: 3 cartridge bearings, DU bushing
• MSRP: $99 USD
ridetenet.com

Tenet may not be the first name that comes to mind when you're thinking about flat pedals, but they're hoping to change that with the new Occult pedals. They have a wide, square profile, with dimensions that are close to those of the Deity T-Mac, although the Occults have a thinner profile at the leading and trailing edges, and they're not quite as concave as the T-Mac's.

11 pins are spread around the pedal body's perimeter, and an extra set of grub screws are included with each set for riders who prefer screws instead of pins. The bottom loading design also makes it possible to customize the pin height with washers. As an added bonus, the Occults come with the socket needed to pull them apart, as well as a free rebuild within the first year of ownership. Factor in that $99 price and it's easy to see how Tenet sold through the first run of these – they're expecting more later this summer.


Best flat pedals 2020
Best flat pedals 2020

Pros
+ Excellent value
+ Includes grub screws and socket for disassembly
+ Free rebuild within 1st year of ownership

Cons
- Limited availability (for now)




Best flat pedals 2020
*All measurements are in millimeters. Usable platform width is the portion that a shoe will actually sit flat on.



Top Picks

Most Grip
Winner: Chromag Dagga
Runner Up: Deity T-Mac

Best Value
Winner: Tenet Occult
Runner Up: ANVL Tilt

Best Overall Feel
Winner: Nukeproof Horizon
Runner Up: DMR Vault










413 Comments

  • 258 0
 You should have included shin and calf gash pictures from each pedal.
  • 22 0
 Kovarik’s Dagga gash was pretty gnarly — nearly rivaled my 1998 Odyssey Black Widow gash that looked more like a grizzly bear swipe to my calf.
  • 43 0
 Huck to Hurt
  • 19 93
flag fracasnoxteam (Jun 1, 2020 at 2:02) (Below Threshold)
 I never have problems like this because I ride flats pedals since forever. This is as stupid as saying that you fall all the time because you can't unclip (or clip because they are no clip as they are clipless, so do I have to say "not without clipless you can't unclip no clip"?)
  • 16 0
 @WRCDH: My goodness remember the Crupi pedals?! My poor shins and lizard skin shin guards!
  • 5 0
 @WRCDH: I remember those. They where scary. I had the Triple Trap pedal. They didn't grip your shoes at all, but they sure did a number on my shins!!
  • 17 6
 @fracasnoxteam: I agree, have been riding flats for many a year and have only gouged myself when standing over the top tube chatting and inadvertently rubbing pedal against my shin. Never while riding.
  • 3 1
 @WRCDH:

Join the club! I have one of them bear claw gashes from a Crank Brother Stamp pedal..
  • 28 3
 @fracasnoxteam:

Bullshit.
Even the best riders can slip off of their flats. I had it happen when my chain broke...
  • 2 1
 @nug12182: Oh boy... Rode those for years and years.... Shin killers for sure!
  • 6 0
 @WRCDH: i had Primo Super Tenderizers, they didnt leave much in the way of gashes but f*ck they left a gnarly bruise.... i still have bumps on my shin bones
  • 7 0
 @fracasnoxteam: this is so wrong. I used to have some Truvativ Holzfeller pedals and they could cut your shins just looking at them wrong
  • 6 33
flag fracasnoxteam (Jun 1, 2020 at 5:47) (Below Threshold)
 @DutchmanPhotos: "bullshit" so I'm a liar? It didn't happened for at least 20 years for me, and all my bikes are with flat pedals, gravel included. Note that even the best rider can slip off their clipless too.
  • 8 0
 I used to routinely gash my calfs. Once I switched to 510 impacts I stopped having pedal slips, mostly.
  • 1 0
 @DutchmanPhotos: ha ha those and Billy root pedals.
  • 5 0
 I've been riding flats for 12 years and I must say I'm EXTREMELY lucky to never have gouged my shin. I have had a few bumps here and there, but only one while riding and it was more of a light touch (still painfull, no skin puncturing though), otherwise all of them while manipulating my bike in the parking lot kinda deal.

Hopefully my SPD pedals arrive soon so I can keep my streak alive now that I have jinxed myself Big Grin
  • 3 30
flag fracasnoxteam (Jun 1, 2020 at 7:57) (Below Threshold)
 @Primoz: caution : it seems like if half your calf is not missing because of flats you're a liar.
  • 2 27
flag fracasnoxteam (Jun 1, 2020 at 7:59) (Below Threshold)
 @Shredtheduck: I have a Japan knife and it's a razor blade. My hands are fine. It seems like pedal is not the problem here...
  • 1 0
 @DutchmanPhotos: I have one where I got nine stitches on my lower leg, and then one with no stitches on the upper part of the same leg, and then on the back of that leg, I have one that looks like I got attacked by a wild cougar
  • 1 0
 @nug12182: if you were a real man you'd ride the Crupi's with the trog cages. Ugh! even the memory brings tears to my 12 year old eyes
  • 13 1
 Brooklyn Machine Works Shinburger pedals are my favourite way to murder my shins
  • 14 2
 Has anyone else seen pedal scars on a women's shins and thought, "wow, she mountain bikes: that's so sexy." Or am I the only one?
  • 13 1
 The mother of one of my kid's friends approached my wife with concern that I was a "cutter". Nope, just a terrible mountain biker.
  • 2 0
 Anyone remeber the Dangerboy flats? Pins were machined little spikes. You hardly ever slipped a foot but if you did...
www.pinkbike.com/photo/2705091
  • 11 0
 Here’s my mega gnarly 1998 Odyssey Black Widow pedal gash. It took 3 months to heal from the inside out, as stitching wasn’t possible as there was no skin left to pull the gashes closed. I went to the Greek Islands for 4 weeks right after those 3 months — and the scars turned BLACK in the intense Greek sun (114-117F the first few days in Athens, a record). It turned black like a couple-year-old black tattoo...I had numerous European tourists ask if I got a tattoo to represent an animal attack I had experienced. They were all shocked when I told them it was a bike pedal gash from 4 months prior. Those old pedals were so tall that they’d roll easily, especially with Vans and other shoes of the era with their waffle-type molded soles.

Here’s a picture of my leg: www.pinkbike.com/photo/18793198
Close-up of the leg gash: www.pinkbike.com/photo/18793197
Mt Hood pro dual slalom on Rotec with Black Widows: www.pinkbike.com/photo/18793221
Mt Hood pro dual slalom finals with BMX legend & NORBA Pro Darrell Young as a stoked 16-year-old: www.pinkbike.com/photo/18793253
Here are more pictures of those pedals on my 1998 rigs: www.pinkbike.com/u/WRCDH/album/Odyssey-Black-Widow-gash
  • 1 0
 @nug12182: I was always afraid to use Crupis! I added some pics of my leg gash in the comments below!
  • 1 0
 @itsonlyaname616: Haha, yeah, Triple Traps have terrible grip — I was just reminded of that when I recently put a pair on a 2000 Intense Uzzi SL for my niece to ride...such awful pedals, haha. Found some Easton Flatboy pedals for her instead — much better! Those and Atomic pedals (Easton bought their design) were essentially the same size as many of these new pedals (93mm long without the ramp x 102mm wide, or 115mm wide from the axle/crank interface, and 20mm tall), and were such a vast improvement in flat pedal grip and control when they came out in 97/98. They’re still decent pedals, especially with Five Ten flat shoes — and I prefer these Atomic / Easton Flatboys to pedals like DMR Vaults, despite being 23 years old, ha!

Here are the Atomics: www.pinkbike.com/photo/18793371
  • 2 0
 I got a nasty set of scars from Chromag Scarabs
  • 1 0
 @nug12182: used to run those on my dh bike back in the day, along with very thick shinguards

bmxmuseum.com/reference/2652
  • 1 1
 If you're gonna rid flats, you should be wearing calf and shin protection, learned that years ago while riding muni. A good set of knee/shin combo guards or if you need to go lightweight and breathable then a soccer shin guard sleeve will work.

Of course, if you ride flats all the time the rate of injury drops off substantially as you learn how to use flats ... just saying Wink
  • 1 2
 @WRCDH: Try riding muni, you'll have those kinds of injuries on both sides, even bad enough to warrant an ER visit. What I see in your pics are some love stripes, no chunks removed, therefore weaksauce.
  • 2 0
 Still waiting for Burgtec to bring out either a 'Readers Wives Edition' or 'Council Estate Edition' pedal.
  • 2 1
 Shimano Saint FTW
  • 3 0
 @nurseben: Naw, they were deep gouges, flesh fully removed, tendon injured a bit too...the medics at the race were commenting on how bad the injury was, especially as it couldn’t be stitched and needed to be bandaged with antibiotic ointment for 8-10 weeks. That’s pic was 3 or 4 days after. I was wearing Dainese leg protection...tall old pedals roll much more easily — common back then. Even V-Top semi-wrap-around would’ve only protected me from about 1/3 of the injury, area wise. The picture resolution and swelling just doesn’t do it justice. Even my doctor 1 week later thought it was a bear attack wound when I asked what it looked like to him.

No idea what Muni is...but if your injuries are so much worse, post some pics, haha. I’ve seen crank-break gashes and whatnot, but not many worse pedal injuries. It was a pro dual slalom race I was in, age 16, and was also a runner-up, injured, in the bunny hop contest at 28”, lost to a guy at 29”...so yeah not much learning to ride flats going on at that point.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: Fun fact — it was pro Casey Northern, who now runs the NW Cup race series, who I lost to in the bunny hop competition at 29”...he was a shred-mentor at PA/Dry Hill andany other places we rode together in the mid-90’s.
  • 2 0
 This. I loved the grip and feel of my DMR Vaults but I had enough of scars on my calves and shins
  • 1 0
 Can confirm, the gashes from the Daggas are no joke. I guess I need to stop wearing vans
  • 2 0
 @WRCDH: SO gnar.
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: you sure did jinx yourself i wouldnt go riding ever again if i where you.
  • 1 1
 or simpy just ride cleats and call it a fun day
  • 4 0
 If anyone remembers the DK iron cross pedals from back in the day, those bastards partially severed my Achilles.
  • 2 0
 @Ironmonsoon602: Yeah, I scraped mine with the Black Widows — took months to not hurt when walking.
  • 1 0
 @kcy4130: you're not the only one my friend.
  • 3 0
 @thook: I'd never felt fear looking at a pair of pedals before I picked up a pair of Daggas for the first time. Those pedals are murder weapons.
  • 2 0
 Nukeproof Horizon on new years eve got a drop so wrong that the pedal got me with the full weight on the opposite pedal to the shin bone with 1x 12 and 1x 5 stiches in one session no pictures here though...too gnarly
  • 41 0
 A little rant about pins. Somehow for Deity top loaded is a pro, but for XT is a con, and some other even not mentioned. When it comes to pins, there are only 2 designs that make sense:
- top loaded
- back loaded, but pins are narrower towards end
Both solutions are OK.
What is not ok is having full width pins screwed from the back, bacause they are impossible to replace when bent, you need a hacksaw or a grinder to "unscrew" them.
So the real con goes for: Nukeproof, DMR, Yoshimura.
I ride Nukeproof, they are great, but still undecided if i throw them away or try to replace pins for few hours...
  • 5 0
 I've Broken multiple pins as expected from normal riding. (regarding Yoshimura)
My dad has a set and dropped off a curb completely shaving 4 pins off. There was no issue replacing pins, nice rounded head. No pedal body damage. Nice!

Have fun out there! Yeww
  • 4 1
 @lkubica
I came here to say exactly this. Bottom threaded pins are a pain in the ass. Luckily my DMR Vaults have pins that can be reversed (for less traction, but the correct side to thread in) and my chromags have thinner ends to their pins. Bottom-load pins with full threads to the end are a 100% negative when shopping for pedals
  • 5 2
 And if they are making half standard screws anyway, can they be torx? The OneUps have a 2.5 mm Allen key bolts which is easy to round off if the pin corrodes in the thread a bit (different metals tend to cause this). The a torx bolt would make this much easier to solve.
  • 5 0
 I have Chromag Contacts and Shimano XTs. The Chromags had a pin get pushed out from a rock strike and it took the pedals threads with it. I had to helicoli the pedal to repair it. Not a big deal, but it happened. My Shimano use top threaded pins with a 2.5mm hex that is essentially useless. I've had to go the vice grips route to remove or install pins since, even when new, the thread locker they use made the internal hex strip out, even when I used my high end Wiha hex bits. No real clear advantage to either design as far as serviceability goes. I do like that I can adjust the pins on the Chromags with the supplied washers. And the XTs have roughly 4k all weather miles on them and spin better than new.
  • 4 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: +1 for the Wiha hex bit mention!
  • 6 0
 regarding pins, a few minutes with a dremel solves the bent pin issue
  • 6 1
 @lkubica, the Deity’s pins are top loaded, but as I mentioned you can also access them from the opposite side.

A Dremel tool and a pair of vice grips can be your friends when dealing with stubborn pins. Luckily it’s usually only a few pins that need replacing - it’s rare that you’d need to swap out all the pins on both sides of your pedals.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: true, but if you have to pull out the opposites you’ll end up replacing those too. Personally I prefer the dmr vault pins that can be turned with a socket or wrench and avoid the Allen screws altogether. If only the vault lasted longer than a wet ride before needing more grease.
  • 1 0
 You can also drill them out...
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Yeah, I know but a need of buying a Dremel is a real con for me. I have recently replaced pins in Cranks in a few minutes using pliers. But my Horizons have like 6 bent per pedal. I can buy a new set of composite pedal for the price of a Dremel Razz I have a grinder, but will probably damage pedals with it.
So what's the point in buying long lasting aluminium pedals if there is so much fuss with rebuilding them.
  • 1 0
 @collintimmermans: I want to order a set of these. Have you had any problems?
  • 2 0
 @deiselpower123: diesel power! Gonna put the TORQUE down! Haha
Nope, nothing at all. stoked with the and spindle strength and countless pedal qualities over the others. Like I said, I've already broken and damaged pins (as expected from normal riding) and had no problem changing them out.
Currently in my garage I have a pile of broken and bent pedals;
2 sets ht03 flats, 2 pairs Shimano xtr 9000 spd, 1 set xtr9000 trail spd . Shimano saint 985's (flats) , and kona wah wah.
These are heat treated, ceramic coated alloy steel. Sweet!
  • 39 0
 The pins on my DMR vaults slice through my shins like a hot knife through butter. 10/10
  • 3 0
 One way to show people that you shred on mountain bikes with legs covered in permanent scars. In reality, they were all from dumb crashes.
  • 5 0
 @rowdypatty: I was riding with my new-to-pedal bikes almost four year old the other day. She is obsessed with trail riding so we go to the little park by my house and she is shredding the gnar like most 3+ year old girls do. I ride ahead of her to encourage her down a small descent and she has a pedal strike and lowsides. I rush over to her on my bike and in my mild panic, slip a pedal and bash my shin. So now I'm trying to get her calmed down while my shin bleeds out slowly. Naturally I can show no emotion to keep her calm.
Dumb shinner if I've had one.
  • 1 0
 Good pedals are only half of the deal, you also need good shoes. But probably you only wanted to be funny, it's a real pundemic here!
  • 33 0
 I miss here two of relevants and bests brands - the Hope F20, Crankbrothers Stamp.
  • 4 0
 Love my F20's. They are just grippy enough and won't kill you like my OneUp pedals do.
  • 6 0
 Maybe F20s are just as unavailable on the other side of the pond, as Deity and Chromag are here...
  • 3 0
 @Podoba I have the large Stamp 7, the version that’s all bushings. Extremely comfortable underfoot, good for tricks as they don’t spin much, bad for trail riding as they don’t spin much, noticeably less grip than dmr vault or race face atlas but more grip than Chester. Had one massive pedal strike on a rock, sent me over the bars, the pedal is fine other than some scratches.
  • 3 0
 @FuzzyL: I haven't had too much difficulty getting Hope parts here in the USA. Generally major vendors like Jenson or CRC will stock them.
  • 2 0
 @4thflowkage: I wouldn’t know - it’s just that I noticed that the Deity and Chromag pedals usually rank really well in tests, but I never succeeded in buying them here, and just thought it might be the other way round with Hope since they rarely appear in those tests. Could have of course tried to verify that on Jenson’s website first...
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: bike24 has chromag, deity is a real problem
  • 5 5
 The crankbothers broke while they were taking them out of the box. ????
  • 1 0
 @makkelijk: What do you mean the oneUps will kill you? As in shin destroying?
  • 1 0
 @Van-kiwi:The One ups are deadly. I got 7 stitches (actually staples) after they slashed a big gash in my shin. That never happened to me from many years of Mountain Biking and Bmx. I ground the pins down a bit after that.
  • 3 0
 I'm running the Hope f20 pedals and Cranbros Stamp7. I was running the Hopes on my enduro bike and the Stamps on my downhill bike. I ended up taking the Hopes of the enduro bike and replacing them with another set of Stamp7s (Hopes are now on my old hardtail)
I love Hope gear, I run their brakes on both bikes and I only choose their hubs, but I found the grip and support of the platform on the Stamps far superior. The Hopes are gorgeous to look at and still perform really well, and I think they will last much longer than the Stamp7s, (I've had no problems with either set of stamps) but they just don't feel as secure and controllable.

I think a lot of that has to do with the pins, the Cranbros use threaded grub screws, with the threads offering more bite into the sole of the shoe. Whereas the Hopes use smooth sided pins, admittedly they seem to be really strong.
  • 2 0
 @sansarret: 9 stitches from the oneups as well. Hospital did a shit job with sewing it shut, got infected from the inside, had to be scraped out and heal up from the bottom. Was out for 8 weeks in total. I mostly ride SPD now lol
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: bikeart.com has them all and so does amazon, at least in the UK
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: You can get Chromag stuff over here biketheworld.ch
  • 22 1
 So when is the composite flat pedals test coming? That would be of much more use for me than this one.
Not that I dislike looking at these fancy aluminium pedals...
  • 18 9
 The only rational reason to go alu vs polymer is vanity.
  • 2 2
 @mikaeljc: concur
  • 14 6
 @mikaeljc: is it vanity that I'm a metal worker and would prefer to carry that aspect of my life into my bike components too? It's the same reason I prefer frames made out of steel or aluminum instead of carbon.
  • 7 0
 I hear you. My plasticky Race Face pedals changed my mind about whether or not I need aluminum. Don't think Ill spend the extra money again.
  • 12 0
 Been using the Nukeproof plastic pedals for a few years now and see no practial reason to spend more on alloy (for myself at least).

I say no 'practical' reason, because the finish on the alloy NP Horizon is absolutely beautiful. It wouldn't be too difficult to talk yourself into it when you seen them up close. As is the same for most NP products actually, i'm a big fan (the Sam Hill bars are a delight to ride with).

@Nukeproofinternational I'm happy to be a brand ambassador if you like, i could talk about the quality and finish all day. You don't see the brand enough out on the green trails and i could be the man to make that market explode. I do blue trails too. I can also do red depending on the trail but we'd have to talk about it first. Anything else, well, you're already paying Sammo so i'd best leave some work for him.
  • 1 0
 I bought my wife some chromag synths (because inexpensive) and they are great. Super grippy, nice size. I wouldn't have ever tried plastic pedals had I not been cheaping out.

No clue on how they'll last but replacement body's are available for a reasonable price (albeit black only). My XT trail spd pedals look like I threw them in in the dryer with a handful of rocks so I was nervous about plastic pedals for serious riding.
  • 2 1
 @mikaeljc:

I have had two saddles crack in extreme cold temperatures,like -30 cold. No issues with a Brooks leather saddle.

I have asked a polymer pedal manufacturer if they have tested their pedals at -30 (I don't care if it is C or F at that point) and got no response, so I will keep on riding with Al pedals.

One note about polymer pedals: not all polymers have the same characteristics. Even the same monomer can behave differently depending on the way it is polymerized, what is added to the polymer for reinforcement, how the pedal is manufactured, etc.

Would it be possible to select a polymer that can withstand -40? Yes, but it might have implications above 20C/70F, just like winter tires.

Also, I can't stand to even look at pins that are just machine screws with threads to get buggered up all the way to the end. And I do not believe that Al is the correct material for pins.
  • 6 2
 IMO composite pedals are better in both price AND performance. I've ridden two pairs of DMR Vaults and while they look amazing, alloy pedals make a god awful sound and bounce off rocks rather than a muted hit and slide off like plastic. Pins get bent irreparably out of shape on alloy pedals, and they show wear much worse than plastic. And they're often twice the price or more without lasting any longer.
  • 1 0
 @Dangerous-Dan:

I’ve ridden the oneup composit pedals down to around -25F with no issue. They’ve lasted a few seasons of switching between the fat bike and trail bike with no issues!
  • 1 0
 @bikekrieg:
thanks for the info. I have been riding on a skinny tire bike all winter but I am planning on building a Fatbike for next winter and for $50 US these sound OK. They do have plain old machine screws passing as traction pins, but I can probably live with that... maybe file them down or buy some decent pins from someone. I suspect that the decision to use machine screws is a cost cutting decision.
  • 1 0
 @Dangerous-Dan:

I honestly think the machine screws work well. They have plenty of grip and they are dirt cheap to replace at the hardware store. I’ve been running these for several seasons now and I’ve never had an issue with slipping pedals. Plus the pins are a uniform size so you can buy longer ones if you want them
  • 1 0
 This got me looking up some plastic pedals and when search for el plastiques I found theae bad boys. I never though I'd consider RockBros as a pedal option, but their 2018-12a model look big and grippy with great reviews. For $24 on ebay I might have to try them.
  • 3 0
 @mikaeljc: Recycling aluminum vs plastic could be a consideration. They say 75% of all aluminum ever made is still in use - plastic is just the devil's excrement.
  • 1 0
 I use the nylon Bontragers on my fat bike. They've held up well and are really grippy with the death screws they've installed from the factory. They're a bit narrow compared to my Chromags or XTs but with the fat bike's crazy wide q-factor I don't notice and it gives a tiny bit of extra clearance. I've got two season on them without issues and even with some rock strikes they've held up incredibly well. They're the second generation so hopefully I won't have a spindle issue like they had with the aluminum versions. They don't spin super free like my XTs, but I bought them through EP and the price couldn't be beat. No complaints. Plus they are nice and matchy with my Farley.
  • 1 0
 @Dangerous-Dan: another plus of plastic pedals for cold-weather riding is that they don't suck the best out of your feet like metal pedals do. Same with carbon bars.
  • 2 0
 @mkul7r4: I agree, and most plastic pedals seem to have a better curved shape that helps them slide off rocks instead of bashing them on the hard edges. Only two pedals in this review, the Kona's and the OneUp's have the curved bottom outside edge that helps prevent the straight-on impacts that can break your pedals. The cheap plastic Fookers, RaceFace, PDX D10 and the 25/9 Ronin on Amazon all have it and will actually hold up better against rock strikesthan most of these aluminum pedals. The T Macs and the Tenants in this review both look like they have the worst shape to survive rock impacts because they have no chance to slide off and just impact everything straight- on. I wasn't too impressed with this review and the assumption that alu is better for pedals.
  • 2 0
 @Warburrito: I paid $40 for my rockbros aluminum flat pedals, sealed bearings, extra spikes, nice and wide. going on 3 seasons now - bearings still perfect and no bent axles, and I've had plenty of steep climbs and pedal strikes. I will never spend $100 on a pair of pedals.
  • 21 4
 Nice article. Gotta say though, I've been running a pair of Superstar Components Nano Evo for about 5 years now, on 3 different bikes, and they're still as solid as ever... and about half the price of any of these for UK made, CNC aluminium sealed platforms.
  • 24 19
 I've been running Superstar El plastique with one service since 2011 or something. Mostly on commute in awful weather., but also DJ, skatepark some forest. Now on my wife's bike. I can add that I als bought Switch Evo hubs at that time, used them like pedals, one bearing change and they don't want to die...
  • 3 0
 I have Superstar Ultra Mag since 2011 - still alive and running smooth. Bought a second pair recently - Nano-x Evo, which are freakin' GRIPPY! The Ultra Mags weigh 324g, Nano-x Evo about 450g. Highly recommended Smile
  • 4 1
 I've had a pair of Superstar Nano Evos for 3 years - I like them but recently bought a pair of Sam Hills which I have found to be way better in terms of shape and feel, with slightly better grip. The square profile of the Superstars hangs-up easily on roots and rocks, they only run one bearing per pedal and the outer seal is terrible - they only last a month or two after each bearing/bushing replacement before starting to grind. Hard to recommend them over a better set of pedals you can get for £20 more which won't need servicing every few months
  • 8 3
 @WAKIdesigns: downvoted your pedal info. Some people here really have it out for you.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I have these on both my bikes, they are light, work fine and have lasted pretty well. I'm not the hardest rider but I'm pretty heavy at ~95kg.

Also last pair I got from Planet X for silly money - they're currently £15 but could swear I got them for like £8 or something.
  • 1 0
 I have some Superstar Nanos, super happy with them, but the pins are a bit long. I was looking for shorter pins, ones that do not destroy your tibias.
  • 3 2
 @zoobab2: I always file my pins...
  • 2 0
 Yes the Mags were great! I wish they sold them still. The finish rubbed off quite easily but they were very tough. Lasted me 6 years or so.
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I always file my tibias...
  • 20 1
 Superstar components - same stuff, half the price.
  • 10 0
 Maybe its because I'm a tight git, but I've ridden superstar nano for ages now. Great pedal and if you time it with a discount code they cost £35. I do agree the nukeproof are lovely though....
  • 8 16
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 1, 2020 at 0:45) (Below Threshold)
 Agreed. Kind'a. One Ups are worth every penny over Superstars.
  • 9 0
 They are good but not reliable - they quickly develop play + pedal body crakcs around bolt holes (previous generations of their pedals were better, more durable).
Some examples of body cracks: www.pinkbike.com/photo/18790366
  • 2 0
 I suppose they are a 'basic' option compared to the others here and are a very old design (essentially a copy of the HT Nano they were named after but made in-house) they are very cheap though if bought on sale price (which everybody does, as there is a sale every other week) - Got some on my hardtail, they do the job but one has always spun more freely than the other.
  • 3 0
 Plus superstar has the axle bulge.
  • 3 1
 @Andrazzz: Christ, that's me never buying their UK made stuff then. I've got five year old Nanos and they've been very dependable.
  • 7 0
 @gkeele: WTF man? One dude says something and you're going to blacklist the entire company? I've had nothing but good experience with them. I've had like 5 pairs of them across different bikes and never had any issue (being around 220 pound in full kit).

And no, they don't f*cking have an axle bulge.
  • 9 8
 @YanDoroshenko: It would be funny if whole comment section was a bunch of influencers pushing their sht and fighting over it.
  • 4 0
 @Andrazzz: I cracked the bodies on my superstar nanos in several places, and they developed a pretty significant rattle. The set I had before from Superstar were better and some of my friends have had better luck, mostly with their other designs.
  • 2 0
 @YanDoroshenko: Really? They don't? What's this green stuff around the bolt in the middle then? The part that is thicker than the surrounding body: www.superstarcomponents.com/library/product/nano-x-evo-pedals/NANO_EVO_PEDAL8.JPG
  • 3 0
 @YanDoroshenko: Well I've also bought two sets of wheels, a stem, several tools, and a few other bits. Both wheelsets are shit, one went baggy twice in short order and the other ate its freehub pawls. They sent me an awful seat collar which they replaced with another awful one. The stem is great, and as old as my pedals.

If anything I've given them too many chances, I wouldn't buy anything as complex as a pedal off them these days.
  • 1 0
 @tom666: The other designs are HT designed / manufactured (inc the plastic model) not their own / current pedal which seems to have some issues, like I say one of mine spins more freely than the other and has since being new, maybe the Taiwainese are capable of making decent parts after all....
  • 2 0
 @tom666: I have same experience - older models were better. I am back on my old Nano Thru Pin:
www.pinkbike.com/photo/18792879
  • 2 0
 @Andrazzz: Our pedals are so similar it's fantastic. Yours look like mine in a couple of years. They've had a hard life!
  • 1 0
 @gkeele: Very interesting to hear different experiences. I've run wheelsets on both roadie and mtb without issue. I've even had to use the crash replacement scheme after I shat a rim on ardrock a few years back. I'm on my 3rd set of nano pedals (across various bikes) and never had issue. Again I'm over 18stone without riding gear...
I will admit I've not tried the newer V6 hub but I believe they had an issue with the pawls initially but replaced all customers hubs for free.
  • 2 0
 @eddieantifreeze: This was a Fuel hub. Glad not everyone gets crap! Tbf that set was £125 on Flow EX rims, so something wasn't right. I've got them in the attic awaiting a set of Hopes which I'll have handbuilt. Robot wheelbuilding has not convinced me yet.

Their customer service can be pretty good, I'll give them that. They don't argue much and they're good communicators.
  • 1 0
 @gkeele: I think I have the same wheelset www.zoobab.com/superstar-components-fuel-hubs-are-rebranded-aivee-mt2 Years ago, I was at Bike Park Wales, the rear wheel went totally out of tension during the last descent. I had to retention them myself. Superstar complained about the reliability of those hubs pawls from Aivee, that's probably why they went their own way with manufacturing their own hubs.
  • 1 0
 @gkeele: A friend of mine broke 3 axles for a QR rear hub in about 2 months after swapping out a freehub (which separated into 4 pieces). First a 7 year old axle and then 2 new ones. He was told to send the broken ones back, he was buying new ones because their replacement process was so slow, etc.

In the end he bought a 12x135 axle and a dummy 12 mm to QR adapter to fill that axle and it's been working since then.

@zoobab2 if those are the Teslas (if I'm not mistaken), another friend had issues with that as well. Plus had issues warrantying it too. He then put a completely different hub on the bike.
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: no they are the Fuel, I also ride a pair of Teslas, no problem so far. I am wondering who is manufacturing the Teslas.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: Yeah that's the one. I pulled them out yesterday after I posted that, the Fuel set is baggy as a wizard's sleeve just like my old Tesla set went, in fact I believe they scared the crap out of me at BPW just like yours did! But the freehub's messy death was the end of the line for me, they don't stock Shimano freehubs any more!
  • 15 1
 Annoyed how you missed out ht. I was loaded with trolling negativity on how poor my me03's lasted! Bearings were terrible and literally lasted 3 months. I still run v12 mags and they have lasted a year with no servicing so far. Very impressed and they aren't too big that they catch on everything too. I do like the look of those burgtec's though.
  • 16 0
 To be fair, they missed out absolutely loads of pedals, this could be a review with 30+ products in it, I suppose you have to draw the line somewhere, maybe HT didn't provide any, or didn't get asked, or they though the options chosen were most interesting, who knows.
  • 4 0
 My V12's have been going 3 or 4 years no problems...Mint pedals and imo, the go-to if you don't want massive platforms. I have Burgtecs Mk4's on the big bike with the Boost axles and love them. Can order spares easily from Burgtec, so should last a long long time!
  • 2 1
 The article is about 12 of best pedals, not a random group test with both good and bad options. It should be fairly self explanatory why your HT's weren't included.
  • 8 0
 +1 for DMR V12s:

- light (esp. in the mg and/or ti version)
- not too big
- great concave shape
- any colour you like
- cheap as chips (~£40)

I had Vaults but found them a bit too wide. I also had some HTs and Superstars but found them too flat, they were less grippy and became uncomfortable after about an hour’s riding. The only pedal I like as much is the old Specialized Bennies or Saints, but they’re heavy...
  • 3 0
 @Altron5000: I've been running V12 Magnesium for 2 years now and at ~$80CAD and 350 grams they're pretty amazing for the price.
  • 1 0
 Brings back memories. I had both V8s and V12s back in the mid 2000's... I have fond memories of grease ports and DMR grease syringes. Now, about my Trailstar...
  • 1 0
 @wohwee: I came here to say the same thing. HT's are incredible.
  • 2 0
 @chandomtb: A fair number of the pedals tested here are HT's in realty though - they make pedals for petty much half of all of the other brands.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: yeah HT make Horizons along with the vaults are the only two pedals worth mentioning and they probably make them as well.
  • 1 0
 Same for me, DMR V12 mags is the perfect fit, great size and shape and have lasted very well. Also, the mag based pedals don't seem to get much attention. For me they feel nicer than alu and they are not as cold in winter. Got some gusset slim jim mag pedals on my second bike, they are a pretty decent mag pedal too, though not as reassuring grip as the V12s.
  • 1 0
 ME03 has _THE_ _WORST_ design of a pedal I have ever seen. Pure garbage.
  • 1 0
 @Braindrain: honestly v12’s are class. Cost about £30, plenty of grip. The right size to get through most stuff without catching a pedal and will last for at least two years before you need to replace them.
  • 12 0
 Love the feel of my vaults but it bears talking about the fact that the bushes need regular replacement, they don't wear well. That definitely isn't aided by the mentioned bad sealing inboard. If you own them buy better bushes direct from igus and I've had good luck with the wider lip seals from hope as well
  • 4 0
 Can you give details on the hope lip seals that fit? Are they just the ones from the hope pedals?
  • 4 0
 Do you have the v1 or v2 vaults? I thought they sorted that on the v2
  • 1 0
 Non-issue here. I've been switching back and forth between two sets that I have for over four years now. I'm averaging a tear apart, clean and re grease every two so so years. That's an estimated 2000-3000 miles on each set!
  • 2 0
 DMR axles are also built out of butter. I keep bending them. Also had the same problem with Spanks (even worse sealing, last one muddy ride before they lock up). Currently on One-Up, axles appear stronger.
  • 2 1
 @JustinVP: Yoshimura won't bend!
  • 11 0
 Interesting raceface atlas didn’t make the cut and can’t say I’m surprised cromag got the nod. I personally love tmacs and have ridden a better flat. I find at times I have to lalmost pop my foot out like you would a clip pedal. I just bought two more sets of tmacs.
  • 1 0
 Have you tried their Bladerunner pedal? How do they compare? I've ridden clipless almost my whole life and with kids I put a pair on my hardtail and have gotten quite accustomed to them. I'm building up another hardtail and trying to figure out what flat pedal I want to use on it. I've been very happy with the Bladerunners but as they're my first pair of flats I'm a bit curious as to what others are like.
  • 4 0
 @lifeofloon: I've ridden both and TMacs have significantly more grip and a larger platform. I like that for rough trails but honestly for my hardtail (dirt jump bike) I prefer a little less grip, so the bladerunners could be perfect. I currently have Deity Compounds on my dj bike though and don't like them much—not enough grip and weird axle bulge through the width of the pedal
  • 3 0
 Raceface Atlas have been reviewed numerous times and we all know they're good. I've been riding Atlas pedals for about 5 years in the nastiest conditions and have yet to need to rebuild them. Their grip is good and pin replacement is easy. It seems this review included a lot of lesser-known pedals or ones that I haven't seen reviewed before.
  • 2 0
 @lifeofloon: I've run both, the Tmacs are far gripper than the blade runners. I like my foot to sink into the pedal and the blade runners axle bulge would cause my foot to move around, mostly while pedaling. Took the tmacs off my dh bike and no more foot slipping. By far the grippiest I've run. Have also used chromag, vaults, atomlab, answer, hope... tmac platform is big too
  • 1 0
 @highcountrydh: @steezysam: thank you guys. I might try the T-Macs on my new build.
  • 2 0
 OneUp is like the evolution of the Atlas pedal.
  • 1 0
 @davec113: except that the OneUp has a convex body and the Atlas has a concave body. I have the OneUp composites and have mixed feelings on them. When I get my foot into the right spot on the pedal, there's plent of grip to hold me in place. however, its not always easy to get to that right spot. I recently picked up the Deity Deftraps to replace them and quite happy that I did. My foot lands in the right spot and the grip is equally as good.
  • 13 1
 Nukeproof Horizons are amazing pedals. Best I have owned and they look fantastic!
  • 5 0
 I had some plastic versions and they wouldn’t die, no matter how hard I tried to kill them
  • 8 0
 FYI, OneUp moved away from the three small outboard bearings and are now using a bushing in their place. I've destroyed a set of bearings in a set of mine and am now on the bushing version, which has started creaking and clicking after a few months.
  • 2 0
 Damn. I destroyed one set of the pedals (outboard bearings fell apart and gouged the inside of the pedal body), got a free replacement set of pedals, and have now killed one of those pedals as well, and was happy to see that they’ve moved to bushings. Hopefully I don’t get the same creaking

I’ve been happy with the pedals, because the warranty helped me out, but will be moving to other pedals that hopefully won’t fall apart.
  • 6 0
 Let's quiet that pedal down for you. Fire me an email and we'll tackle this with you. Thanks!
  • 6 0
 @sdurant12: Pedals do take a pretty serious beating. I hope you'll stick with us, we won't stop standing behind the products. Send me an email and we'll have you sorted. info@oneupcomponents.com Thanks!
  • 2 0
 @OneUpOwenF: if this was for me, thanks, but I'm moving to cleats through no fault of your pedals, it's flats in general that I have a feeling are 'holding me back' on a really long reach bike. Also, regarding creaking, at least one pedal has some slight play in one of the bushings, that's why I'm thinking it's the one creaking, but it could also be the BB/crank. I'll investigate this soon, I'll also pull apart the pedals after I get my SPDs and will shoot you an e-mail when I'm sure.

And yeah, sorry, I know it's bad taste to say 'pedals X are creaking' when you're not actually really sure it's that, but I've just started thinking about the BB/crank being a possible issue on my ride (that I finished an hour ago), I was pretty sure it's the pedal yesterday.
  • 9 2
 Interesting to see that one of the complaints for the DMR Vault is that the pins are thicker and don't grip as well. This is exactly the opposite experience that I have. I've run two sets for the last four + years. Half of that on the Freerider Pro shoes. The thick pin is one of the DMR Vaults greatest attributes.

This is the only pedal I've never slipped. Of all the nasty pedals scars I have, none are from the Vault.

I'm an Arizona rider and hitting pedals on rocks is as common as getting your tires dusty. Soft thin pins get mangled easily. That mangled pin gets dirtier and turns in to a wicked piece of flesh destruction. The damage to skin from thing mangled pins is brutal!

I'm a DMR fan boy and for good reason.
  • 3 2
 If you think Vaults are grippy and fit well, yor mind will be blown if you try some Horizons. I had...and never looked back.
  • 3 1
 @eugenux: i have jorizons but my wife gifted me daggas on my bday ( i could not justifie the price but kept drooling over pics for months). The grip and feel is jead and shoulders above horizons and all the rest. Feels clipped in but with better support. Get those if you want maximum grip. Really well made too.
  • 2 0
 Sorry for typos my phone drives me nuts
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum:

Yeah man but, if I wanted more of a lockdown feel, I would go back to clipless; for me, the horizons in combination with my 5-10s are more than enough. I never-ever had a slip and the feel underfoot is good. Maybe if the die, I'll try something else but, for the moment, it is more than enough.
  • 3 0
 I was thinking the same thing, love the vaults, and the thicker pins.
  • 7 0
 "OneUp claim the convex shape allows the pedals to sit in the natural arch of your foot, but I'm calling BS on that one. I don't ride barefoot, and the soles of the shoes I use don't have a raised portion where my arch is..."

You don't, and they dont, true. However the fact that your foot has an arch means the pressure is distributed towards the ends of the arch. The portion under the arch doesn't have as much force through it. So raising the center of the pedal slightly will increase that pressure in the middle, making the central pins do more work, potentially increasing overall grip.
  • 5 0
 Glad someone called BS on the BS BS call. OneUp doesn’t strike me as a company that would take any design decision lightly.
  • 9 1
 Would have been good to see the Pedalling Innovations Catalyst in the mix, a flat pedal with a unique approach instead of just a change is aeshthetics.
  • 4 0
 Started with them on my trail bike, they have migrated to my commuter single speed road bike. Kinda awesome, still kinda weird.
  • 1 0
 @twozerosix: still getting used to mine. Can kinda see the theory behind it, I need to learn to pedal differently
  • 1 0
 Agreed but PB has already done a review of the Pedaling Innovations Catalyst pedal and the reviewer has positive things to say. I purchased a pair of their Evo pedals a few months ago and I absolutely love them. Zero drawbacks and I have noticed more power in my pedal stroke plus less quad fatigue on long descents. I will never go back. It took about three rides to get comfortable on them and find my exact mid foot placement but after that they feel great.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree. I have bought my second pair and have done multi-day epic rides as well as xc, trail and AM riding and will never go to another flat pedal. These are my go-to fo long days and short days on the bike. My feet never come off these and they do come off my Saint and RF pedals. These are perfect for wider feet too. To me, they're the best of the lot and I have tried many, many pedals
  • 1 0
 I have a set of Catalyst EVOs that are going to spend some time on my bike this year. Curious to see how they do.
  • 2 0
 I've been on the Catalyst for a few years and have nothing but good things to say, The best for DH and very good for trail. My only complaint is that with the foot forward I have hit stuff with my toes that I might not with my foot back. However with 510's on my feet my foot is planted!
  • 10 1
 Tenet Con: Could be mistaken for a Christopher Nolan film stuck to the end of my crank arms.
  • 1 0
 The logo is even the same as a lot of the promo materials (second half mirrored/upside down).
  • 5 0
 I have on bike at the moment

DMR vaults
Burgtec mk4
one up resin

vaults are the grippest (more so that the horizons I've tried) followed very closely by the one up's then the burgtec are noticeably less grippy but still fine.
  • 5 0
 Had the Nukeproof Horizons -> good grip, terrible bearing life - shin killer. Swapped to Chromag Contacts -> good grip, great bearings - slipped pedal once in blue moon. Now w OneUp Aluminum -> best grip, great bearings (so far) - not once slipped a pedal. I changed to the OneUps specifically for how thin they are (to avoid pedal strikes). Very impressed so far.
  • 5 0
 Crank Bros. Stamp 7 One of the best in all around best grip and long lasting in PNWeather. Got to love that outer bushing. Tag metals plastic pedals One of the best in all around grip and lon lasting PNWeather. Got to love that price!
  • 9 0
 no crank brothers?
  • 4 0
 I’m surprised crampons aren’t in this review , they are one of the only pedals out that has a design that bucks conventional pedal design . Not to to mention they’re low maintenance, light weight , super thin , bombproof and grippy as anything else . My shins are scared from flat pedals crampons have never seen a drop of blood .
  • 3 0
 I had the Vaults for 3 years and now, since 2 years, a pair of nukeproof's horizon pro. The difference is night and day. I feel like I'm back in time 5 years ago when I used clipless everywhere, including on enduro/dh style courses..., but on flat pedals, that is how grippy they are!, clipless only for road, gravel and xc.
  • 1 0
 So the horizon pros made that difference?
  • 1 0
 @Warburrito:

At least for me, with 5-10s

I never had any problem repositioning my foot on the vaults. On the horizons, the sole is stuck, feels like glued to the pedal.

On occasion, I had feet slip of the pedal. With the horizons, never, not a single time.

If there are gripier pedals, I cannon imagine where and how ppl use them.
Please note that I have shims under the pins and I am not using them at full height. Personally, I don't need that much grip in my life. Cheers.
  • 2 0
 @eugenux: My old E-13's with the long pins were insane, I could do a whole race run on my heel and not feel any slipping. Once I swapped those out to hardware store 15mm screws I was stuck like glue in any direction which is perfect for DH racing but not normal days and practice when you inevitably strike the back of your calf with a pedal while pushing the bike.
  • 2 0
 @adamdigby: I loved the old e13’s as well and have been in the new Plus versions for about a month. Very similar. Love ‘em.
  • 3 0
 Not sure what version my nukeproof at least 4yrs old and indeed nuke proof. What I have not seen on many pedals is some knurling or texture on the pedal surface itself for added grip between the pins, would only make a minor difference but better than a polished surface.
  • 1 0
 It would be more than minor. This is actually most of the reason I wont use aluminum pedals anymore, I feel they are half designed. Between polished surface and not being able to tell if pins from above or below are the "right way" I take plastic any day.
  • 3 0
 Some time ago Pinkbike was testing the one up in the 2 flavors.. Quite interesting (tester even ran one composite and 1 alu at the same time to spot the differences in real time ????) :
m.pinkbike.com/news/oneup-composite-pedals-review.html
  • 4 1
 Wow. These pedals are all so heavy and none are concave. Maybe these are all downhill pedals as most of pinkbike is DH focused. I've got about 800 miles on a set of HT MEO5T's and they are still perfect. I also weight 200lbs, so they can handle more weight than they claim.
  • 7 0
 How can you not include Cranbrothers Stamp and Raceface Atlas?!!
  • 2 0
 Cool, Nice to See the Burgtec, Deity, Chromag and Yoshi' pedals. All of which I have been considering as my next to replace my old Spank ones. Nice also to see them in one place to glance over and visually compare them. Wonder how the Canfield Magnesium Crampons would have compared here as well. Just in time. Now to chose one set, lol.
  • 3 0
 I do love my Canfields. Never tried the magnesium but I've had several sets of the Bros' regular Crampons. Can't imagine riding a thick ass pedal again.
  • 1 0
 Canfield mountain pedals are the best but After they moved out of Kazmier’s home town no more love!
  • 1 0
 I have two pairs of Canfield Crampons that I had to shelf because I couldn't get rebuilt kits for them. After many e-mails and then waiting, I went with Oneup pedals. Looks like Canfield finally has parts in (only a year and 1/2 after I needed them), perhaps I'll order the rebuilt kits as the pedals were fantastic, but then again, so are the OneUp pedals.
  • 7 0
 No Xpedo Spry??
  • 3 0
 Like these as well, very light (magnesium), thin (11mm), affordable (70€). Maybe not so durable for tough riders (I mean tougher than I am, which isn't too difficult :p ) and when the pins get teared off the bolt thread (?) may be dead.
  • 4 0
 @Will-narayan:
Got my pair of Spyr from AE for 30€ and changed the pins with longer setscrews for 5€.
So far I really like them. Around 285g and the grip is insane. And they use bearings on both sides instead of bushings.
Have them for 6 months now on my trail bike. If they hold up well I would buy them again.
  • 5 0
 Been using Spry's for 2 years. Love them and have held up well.
  • 1 0
 No clue how these aren't in the test. They're all I'll ride where there aren't too many rocks involved--plenty of big hits on them and I've had my oldest pair running strong for over 3 years. These are one of if not the most knocked off flat pedals out there so before anyone talks durability, think twice about whether you bought them from a reputable Xpedo dealer...
  • 2 1
 I have a set for trail bikes when I don't want to be clipped in. Stupid light, shockingly cheap, and somewhat durable. The grip is only decent, but you wouldn't run these on a DH bike anyway.

Downsides: you need an extra-stubby T25 to get into the pedal for service, the bearings haven't lasted super long, and I did tear a couple of pins out (although I was able to save the threads). I assume that anodizing magnesium has issues because most of the SPRY colour options other than Oil Slick are paint instead of anodizing—which looks bad once it wears.
  • 4 2
 Wooo Yoshimura! 2 years of testing on them, stoked to see us here!
They have some extra qualities over the others. Which puts price and quality up as expected.
-Heat treated alloy steel ceramic coated spindle (extreme strength, seal-life, and corrosion resistance)
-angled pins for platform comfort
-bearing spacer (similar to what you'd find in a hub driver) for bearing life
-recessed access/maintenence cap. Hidden from damage, easily rebuildable
-full USA made, almost entirely in house. and killer warranty
-CRAZY seal life and weather proof.
Yewwww
  • 4 2
 My left shin is a war zone. But when you nail a move you know it's done right. For the detractors of flats I would rather a dented shin , but be able to bail off the bike in a proper crash, the time is small but that half a second makes all the difference. There are some great crashes on this week's Friday fails of people nose diving and can't unclip in time.
  • 5 2
 Why do people make pedals with no concave ?
Concave is in the top 3 most important things for a flat pedal to have, all these super thin ones feel so ugly under the foot with huge axle and bearing bulges.
  • 3 4
 Not everyone has convex feet
  • 3 0
 You are telling me there are people out there with the ball of the foot that is some how higher inside the foot thatnthe toes and heel ?
  • 1 0
 @bigburd: He may be telling you that some people prefer to ride more mid-foot where a convex pedal feels good against the concave arch.
  • 1 1
 Itsa weird mountainbike thing... since flat pedals are a severe minority compared to Clips, there's been much less true design progress. Only very recently have good concave or dual concave pedals been manufactured and marketed in MTB. Like, I remember when BMX was really excited to adopt hydroformed tubing and euro bottom bracket tech from MTB... I can't wait until MTB discovers dual concave pedals from BMX! It helps immeasurably with grip. You can bunny hop higher, moto whip wider... and you don't have to rely on trash/soft rubber shoes for good grip.
  • 1 0
 @filmdrew: I didn't even know dual concave pedals existed, this is pretty interesting stuff, might have to get a dirt cheap set to try out for comfort. I'm guessing they kind of ' grab ' your shoe when it sinks into the concave causing the pins to pinch/bite ?
  • 3 1
 I've been riding flat pedals for 20 years plus and I ride in rocky terrain all the time . I love the Tmac and have them on my DH bike but for pedaling I prefer a smaller platform and the Nukeproof horizon fit the bill perfectly. also over the years I have found that the STRAITLINE pins are the toughest pins known to man, and I feel sorry for the rocks I smack,,,,I use them in all my pedals no matter what !!!!!!!!!!! most pedals use the same size threads..if they don't fit I make them fit...
  • 2 0
 On my second set of XTs now. Sold the first ones with my Remedy, regretted it and bought more for the Slash.
Yes they hit things, the leading pins looked very second hand but nothing would break no matter how many rocks they hit. Bearings are stupid smooth (not even considered servicing them after a good 12 months of abuse) and run like butter.
Only mod I have made its to put the long pins in the 4 outer most spots and have to stay put when it gets rowdy with twisted feet because the grip is just mad and don't want to try and move my feet around.
I have Saints as well, they're fantastic but the XT is just a nicer feel. Small size with sz 10 shoes is perfect. Bmx history makes me less likely to feel comfy on big slab platforms.

I do however miss my old Syncros Mental stainless flats I had years ago. 23 stitches from a pedal also but goddamn they were indestructible.
  • 5 0
 No Race Face pedals, not even for comparison? Been riding the Atlas for a couple years now and love them.
  • 1 0
 I've gone through a couple of bearing changes on mine but the bodies have been nothing short of impressive.
  • 2 0
 I have been very happy with my OneUp pedals, if your foot is in the sweet spot then you don't notice the bearing bulge but I will admit that I had to make adjustments at first when I first started using them. I also liked my RaceFace Aeffect but they weren't reviewed (gotta brand new pair of blue ones still in the box as I'm one the OUs currently).
  • 3 1
 So do a plastic pedal review next . The impact may be the same but striking a pedal on a rock with metal pedals sounds and feels nasty. I don't mind trashing a 50$ set of pedals. Buy another pair and recycle the metal and plastic bits. So far I have not destroyed any of my plastic pedals.
Cheap , light strong. Pick all three.
  • 6 0
 No Crank Brothers Stamp 3, 7 or 11?
  • 2 0
 I feel like this is choosing bike geometry from 2014. Has anyone tried the pedalling solutions pedal? Total game changer. Loved my horizons, but when I go back on them now it feels like I’m riding on the axle of the pedal and there is no support. I predict longer pedals for you all in 2 years....
  • 1 0
 Edit*Pedalling Innovations Pedal - 128mm long by 95mm wide. Give them a try, what a difference!
  • 1 0
 My new Daggas are way longer than the Horizons i ran before and despite the more agressive pins of the Daggas i feel the main reason why they feel so much better, is their length.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Yeah they are getting there... 120mm long x 115mm wide.
  • 2 0
 "- Inboard bearing bulge won't be for everyone"

That's a silly con. Why don't the other ones (except the Cromags & the Yoshimuras say "Inboard empty space won't be for everyone".Unless you expect people to be standing partially on the spindle? The bugles don't take away from usable space since of other pedals that space is non-existent. Could maybe say it takes away usable position, but is anyone really pedaling with their shoe that close to the crank? I know my size 9s would do more than just rub on the cranks if stand all the way inboard, partly on the spindle.
  • 2 0
 This While I'm yet to try a pedal with said bulge, I don't really never ever step over that area on pedals where it's just the axle there
  • 2 0
 Does anyone have a comparison for a CrankBros Stamp 7 Large to a Deity TMAC? I love the Stamp platform, but I could use a bit more grip. I had Raceface Atlas pedals before, but I didn't think the platform was big enough for me.
  • 1 0
 There was a running change on Stamp 7's moving to longer pins on the fore and aft edges a couple years ago. You can also back the pins out a bit to make them effectively longer without issue. I'd start there first - good luck!
  • 1 0
 @aj-allen97: wow! I backed them out 1 and half turns and it’s a whole different pedal with a concave shape. Thanks for the tip man.
  • 2 0
 Overall, I'm liking both sets of my Vaults. Only issues I have I forget to Loc-Tite pins and they fall out and I need to rebuild the left pedal on my get-radder bike about twice a season. The bushing seems to come displaced super easily push the seal toward the crank arm, and then spin like crazy and rattle. Last time I rebuilt them, DMR's recommended using Loc-Tite 691 on the bushing - which I didn't have or ever use, of course - so next rebuild I'll give that shot.
  • 2 0
 yeah, i like my vaults overall, but i swear one of the pedals starts clicking everything 3 months or so and needs a bushing replacement. just replacing the bearing doesn't eliminate the noise. I'll give the loctite a try next time. I'm assuming you mean 641, not 691, though. I can't find a 691 and 641 is used by a bunch of bike manufacturers to prevent pressfit bottom brackets from creaking. I've found 641 definitely does that, but it also make the BB really, really hard to remove
  • 3 0
 www.upgradebikes.co.uk/files/technical/dmr/DMRVaultServiceGuide080316.pdf

Yup - 641 it is! I was too lazy to search up the service guide before posting. ...Maybe that's telling about how and why my pedals find themselves in the state they're in haha.

Not sure how to edit my original post, but I appreciate the clarification!
  • 1 0
 @CarolinaPanthers: awesome, thanks!
  • 2 0
 I've had 4 of the pedals described in the article.
My personal conclusion is that the OneUp aluminum pedal is my favorite and the most reliable I've ever owned.
I like my Deity T-MACs, but they are too expensive, a tiny bit too wide for, but mostly crappy quality for the price (compared to the OneUps). The OneUps can take a beating and the pins never rip off, the T-MAC can't take a beating at all. I had 3 warranty replacement on my enduro bike before switching to OneUp, I keep the T-MACs as backup.
  • 1 0
 Have to agree with this, have found the oneUps to be amazing
  • 1 0
 It may look like a flat metal, but it’s probably one of the main things I freak the most. I has tobe grippy, concave, medium size cause I don’t have huge feet (euro 41) large screws cause the thin ones will eat your shoes after 6 months, thinnest possible to avoid pedal strikes and a respectable weight: That’s why I keep riding my Dmr v12 for a loooooong time! And they complement my dmr deathgrips!
  • 15 14
 If OneUp bulge is interacting with your foot it means you are standing on pedals in a wrong way. Just saying. They were irritating me a lot at first, but then I realized that changed foot placement was a game changer for pumptrack, skatepark and dirt. Simply: when you need to push some more serious loads through pedals. I then dremelled my clipless shoes as well to move the cleat as far back as possible. #midfoot4life
  • 3 0
 I ride the composite version and I love them, the grip is great, if you have some interaction troubles, yes you're doing it wrong. Gotta say I loved Chromag Scarabs before (big feet) and Saints from Shimano, but I would not come back from one-up. Cheap, so fine, so good.
  • 4 1
 I also have OneUp, but composite pedals. I agree with you. #midfoot4life They are concave for a reason, mid foot position. I am not going back to ball of the foo over axle. It is much more stable an much less tiring for the foot muscles.

The side are, that from the riders perspective effective seat angle becomes steeper and chain-stays grow.
  • 6 11
flag WAKIdesigns (Jun 1, 2020 at 1:29) (Below Threshold)
 @s-master: I have the alloys but tried the composites and somehow I prefer composites but I don't think alloys will die any soon Big Grin
  • 2 2
 My One Ups don’t spin freely, only one rotation max when I flick it with my finger (One Up said this is normal). I like how they stay in position for getting my foot back on, but do you think I’m losing efficiency?
  • 1 0
 @masonskis: maybe so little you can't even notice more than the stars on your shins if they'd moved freely
  • 2 0
 Like... Don't forget the finger is barely any weight, try to spin skate or inline wheel on a fresh bearings and you notice the same, it doesn't mean it's not working properly when loaded
  • 2 1
 @masonskis: no. You don’t want them to spin too freely.
  • 1 0
 @masonskis: yes, but are you so fit that your pedals turning perfectly freely would be a no go ? I'm sure we could find other weak spot before this one (tyres, chain...)
  • 1 0
 @fracasnoxteam: haha if I was perfectly fit then the slight drag probably wouldn’t bother me! I’m just looking for a “scientific” answer whether there’s measurable power loss
  • 3 3
 @masonskis: that’s your problem then. Everyone around the world deals with draggy pedals. If you do worry about drag then you should also replace your cranks with some square taper, since these BBs spin way smoother Than any modern crankset. Most pedals these days have resistance because they use well sealed DU bushings, at least one per pedal instead of full on bearings on both ends of the axle. Thanks to this you can have a very slim pedal. And slim pedal is way better than a fat one, and bushing is always better than little bearing. Well sealed system always has more drag than poorly sealed system. It is called compromise or “you can’t have it all baby” but well... we are not criticizing your priorities. Buy whatever you like.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: or just get shimano pedals and not have to deal with drag
  • 2 2
 @clink83: erm... they are not as slim as OneUps and their clipless pedals have no float. Priorities
  • 2 0
 I've tried the OneUp composite and alloy. Much preferred the alloy (my composites only lasted 4 months before there was a ton of side to side play). The alloy held up great but I just never got along with the convex shape. I'm back on concave pedals now and my feet are much happier...Different strokes for different folks.
  • 9 8
 IM PRETTY SURE YOU MEANT TO INCLUDE THE REMARKABLE $50 PLASTIC PEDALS THAT WEIGH A HEAP LESS THAN ALL OF THESE (caps may have come on a bit strong, but I cannot justify spending twice as much or more and getting something heavier...even if it's made by a sweet Japanese motorcycle exhaust company...for some odd reason)
  • 25 1
 I AM PRETTY SURE YOU NEED TO READ THE PART WHERE THEY MENTION NOT INCLUDING PLASTIC PEDALS.
  • 4 7
 FUCK PLASTIC PEDALS ! I had some nukeproof ones and the pins ripped out like they were screwed into toffee leaving no option to replace any pins.
  • 3 1
 Been running $50 plastic deitys for 3 years with no problems
  • 3 1
 Hmmm, why mention that the T-macs maybe too wide for some at 105mm when the Yoshimura, Chromag, DMR, Kona, ANVL, Shimano and Tenet were the same width or wider? Only 4 out of the 12 were narrower.
  • 4 0
 Take a look at the measurement from the crank to the edge of the platform - the Deity's and the T-Macs are two of the widest in that regard. And Shimano offers the XT pedals in a smaller platform width.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Fair play Mike. I must of glossed over that measurement. I'm guessing then that width issue is a combination of platform width and q-factor.
  • 5 0
 Im pretty happy with my Vaults.
  • 5 0
 Canfield brothers crampon!
  • 1 0
 just removed my composite wah wahs and went back to harrier vps as the grip on the wah wahs was driving me nuts trying to shift foot position while pedaling.....cant imagine levels of grip on some of these if "not enough grip" is a con for the wah wahs
  • 1 0
 Have fun getting those sheared off top loading pins put, better be good with a reverse drill bit. And personally I think the chromag contact pedals are the best flat pedals, concave, lots of pins if you want them, sealed ect. Glad to see chromag on the top of the list regardless
  • 4 0
 Rebuild kit availability, cost and ease of changing bearings/ bushings would have been a useful addition to the article.
  • 5 1
 Give me a break guys. How are Crank Brothers Stamp 7's NOT on a best of list?
  • 4 1
 Winner: DMR Vault. Hands down best pedal I've ever ridden. Runner up is the T-Mac though. Both great pedals. But the Vault is a workhorse.
  • 1 0
 Gotta show love for my Wah Wah 2s. At least my shins and calves thank me. I'm 200bs, size 12 US mtb shoe. Had OneUps and was slipping a lot with Five 10 Freerider Pros. Plenty of scars. Finally the OneUps snapped, straight up snapped, on a on mid speed rock strike, and luckily did not cut my leg. Wah Wahs eliminated the foot slippage by 95%. Much comfier and wider. Bearings have been awesome, too. Foot size, foot placement and riding style will massively effect what pedal works best for you. Trail riding WahWah 2s have been great.
  • 1 0
 I feel like I see so many different pedal comparisons only testing like the same 10 brands. It would take a good while but why not make one long article or spreadsheet of every pedal on the market, updating it as new pedals are tested? Vital did something similar using a numerical spreadsheet with a few criteria to rate pedals out of 10, but still only for 20 pedals. If it's the shear time of testing that's the problem, I'd be happy to take that project on Wink
  • 1 0
 The Yosh pedals look a lot like Blackspire sub four. Bad design as there is little reinforcement for the pins. That thin exposed metal won’t take much of a hit.
And if Yosh is anything like Blackspire, good luck with warranty if you do break off a piece.
  • 1 0
 I have had several sets of Wellgo flat pedals, I have a fatbike that I have had them on for 5 years, it gets used daily (commuting and trails) in Northern Manitoba winters and I can`t complain.
I don`t use them on my mountain bikes though, I have a set of race face plastic pedals on my Honzo since 2016, it is my most used bike. I also have two sets of older wah wah pedals on my old demo and my Hei Hei, they work great but perhaps some other pedals would compensate better for my lack of riding skills and tear and slash my lower legs less. Almost 40 years of mtn biking have left my lower legs a scarred mess. There was a time when I rode clipped in all the time, but I think even then I tended to unclip and smash the pedals into my shins when crashing anyway.
  • 1 0
 Curious how Straightline's amp pedals would stack up in this lineup - Their site has them at about $121 CAD (~$90 USD) right now, so pretty competitive with the options listed here. They may be 9 years old, but for durability and ease of maintenance they are hard to beat.
  • 1 0
 hey nice pedal review..and decent pics. i have ridden t macs and chromag contacts for 5 years now. removed the inside pins and i changed my shoe brand to help deal with any inboard bulge. any pedal strikes these days seem to be operator error and theres fewer of those after getting used to a lower BB height. servicing the contacts? havent had to yet. must be my fair weather riding hahahaha
  • 1 0
 I doubt that most riders outside of pros and highly skilled sport riders even think about their pedals .
I have no idea what kind of pedals came with my bike .
All i know is that my feet don’t slip off of them so that good enough for me. ????
  • 1 0
 "Aluminum pedals do tend to hold up better to repeated rock smashing – they'll get scuffed and scraped, but typically don't get as battered as a more malleable plastic body."

Ten years with metal pedals and on nylon one since 3 years. I have the exact opposite experience. Broke or bend many metal pedals... My raceface chester are still ok despite many rock smashing (and it seems they absorb part of the impact too, sending me and the bike a little less out of my way on such impacts).
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer would be really cool to add a simple poll to a post like this to see what pedals the readers are using and how they rate them. Sort of like fan favorite / people's choice best flat pedal. So much discussion on this topic!
  • 1 0
 Once fully rehabbed from shoulder reconstruction due to a pedal strike catapault, I may try a composite pedal for DH for the first time ever. Though I have to say I am very impressed with the durability of the Hopes, barely a scratch on them. Wish my connective tissue was that tough
  • 1 0
 QUESTION: I'm going to buy another set of pedals. Which style of screws gives the most grip?

I only have experience with 2 kinds: the kind that have grub screws that screw in with an allen from the top, and the kind that have longer, narrower screws that go through the whole pedal and out the other side. I prefer the latter so far.

The other kind I see look like they screw in from the top with a wrench, but the width of the pins make me worry the grip will be less...similar to grub screws. Any opinions would be appreciated. Thanks!
  • 3 1
 Cant believe the OneUps did'nt get into the Top Picks, one of the lightest, good grip, not the most expensive, but were the thinnest which IMHO is a deal breaker !
  • 1 0
 What do people think of DMR V6's? I am building up a sub £250 singlespeed Hardtail and looking to put those on. If anyone has any other pedal ideas under £20, it would be great to hear your suggestions.
  • 3 0
 V6 feel like DMR and are cheap and light. I had some on a BMX and on a unicycle. They were ok, bearings not good but it didn't matter for that purpose.
Pins are moulded plastic though so wear out and also not as good if wet.
Wouldn't recommend for a proper bike unless it was for really casual rides or a pub bike or whatever.
The new shape v8 can be found really cheap and are like the v12 but not sealed bearings.
The Nukeproof Horizon plastic version is great for the price but CRC seem to have pit all their prices up at least 10% since lockdown. It's cheeky.
I got some plastic Horizons for about 20 quid a few months ago , now they are 32.

Same for loads if other products.

UK mountain bikers check your prices, CRC are ripping you off during lockdown coz they know loads and loads of people want bike stuff at moment.
  • 2 0
 @Shredtheduck: @Shredtheduck: I noticed that too. I've been pricing stuff up for a complete new build and I ended up going with the german competitors to CRC for the larger part of the components I bought as CRC was not at all competitive anymore. That, and there seems to be a pretty big stock problem at the moment as literally everything seems to be sold out. They're not alone though - it appears that other bike related retailers are in the same COVID-19 related position.
  • 5 1
 Without Pedaling Innovations this isn't a shoot out....
  • 3 0
 You'd think a Canadian website would have included Squidworx in the comparison.
  • 2 2
 Why no Pedaling Dynamics Catalyst pedals? All twelve of these are virtually the same pedal in comparison to the Catalyst. The extra large platform of the Catalyst offers a substantially improvement / design departure from all the above pedals, as well as a significantly improved riding experience. Been hammering mine through the rocks of Colorado's Western Slope for 4 years now, and they are still going strong.
  • 2 0
 Came here to to say this, would've been great to see a mid-foot contender!
  • 1 1
 Yeah, I know I'm an old curmudgeon, but I still prefer a conventional pedal with an open toe clip (like Zefal Christof). It gives all the indexing of a cleated pedal with none of the knee pain or complexity of unclipping. It doesn't require knives & saw teeth to keep my foot in place. And is sure doesn't cost $100.
  • 3 0
 Canfield Crampons are some the best pedals out there! Have been for a long time! No love here
  • 2 0
 Pinkbike Global HQ: "There's a shortage of Big Brand Press Releases. Release the Flat Pedal Shovel Content. It will Drive Engagement."
  • 2 1
 Plastic pedals are different, they typically are convex vs concave as the amount of plastic necessary for structural integrity creates a hump. Convex pedals are always grippier than concave.
  • 2 0
 My man, check out the Deity Deftrap. Just did my first day on a set and I like them a lot. I have a set of OneUp composite pedals and while they are pretty grippy, I feel like I have to be in the right spot on the pedal to get that grip.
  • 4 1
 Chromag Dagga for the win . If you say anything negative about these pedals you have obviously not tried them.
  • 1 0
 I have them, I love them , but ... Rock strike not only took one of the pins but tore it out of the pedal on the edge leaving a ragged hole. I never even noticed the incident until I was cleaning my bike post ride. Sent an email to Chromag asking if replacement pedal bodies were available and got no response. Next pedals will be Oneup or Nukeproof.
  • 1 0
 No response ? That’s odd . I always have great communication with them . You also can also use the pine washers to shorten up the pin length . @Bailey100:
  • 2 0
 Interesting that only 3 (Deity, OneUp, Tenet) are symmetrical. Every other pedal has more platform length at the front. What's that all about?
  • 1 0
 Without doubt the best pedals I’ve used recently are the Hope F20s and the Specilaized Boomslang. The hopes hare such a good pedal but the Spaz’ Boomslangs take the crown by a county mile.
  • 1 1
 Really? I guess I have my opinion on the topic but all of these pedals cost too much and/or weigh too much. The classic VP Components VP-001 out classes all of these. Lighter than everything here and I don't think I have ever paid more than $50 for a set. It's not for full-on downhill racing but I've been using them for years on several bikes and I've never had a problem.
  • 1 0
 Really cool that Christopher Nolan is releasing some flat pedals to go along with his new movie, strange marketing move but anything to bring flat pedals to a wider market is good in my eyes!
  • 1 0
 You should really have included Pedalling Innovations Catalyst pedal. For folks with large feet these are a full 5 inches /128mm long and 3.75 /95mm wide. Best foot support out there and $129 totally reasonable.
  • 2 0
 I'm not one to care about bling but yosh making pedals hits me right in the feels. Want so bad!
  • 1 0
 I would bite the bullet! They're amazing pedals. I left a little comment below on some extra qualities some may not know! Price comes with real quality! Shred the trails!
  • 3 2
 Must admit they all look like bricks apart from oneup. I love super thin pedals, canfield currently but think the oneups will be next.
  • 6 4
 I've been riding for more than 10 years, still cannot accept pedals with the price of 100$+ per pair.
  • 2 2
 Billet isnt cheap
  • 3 0
 CB stanp 7 is not on a list?
  • 3 0
 A battle for 2nd... the champ remains, the Crankbros Stamp 7.
  • 4 0
 You forgot CANFIELD.
  • 5 1
 no straitline pedals???
  • 1 0
 Interesting review, thank you. I dont use any of the aforementioned at the moment, so food for thought for the future. Cheers
  • 2 0
 I'm cool with my off brand flats for a fraction of the cost. They work just as well
  • 3 0
 What they didn't review Fooker pedals!!!!
  • 4 0
 Long live straitline
  • 1 0
 top loading pins is not a con. yes they can be hard to remove, but they will not strip the threaded holes when you remove them.
  • 1 0
 There must be loads of "why no ... pedals" here. In my case that'd be, why no Pedaling Innovations Catalyst pedals? I love them and have them on all bikes (and a unicycle).
  • 1 0
 I wonder how many of these are actually made by Hsing Ta Pedals (HT Pedals). They used to make lots of pedals for other brands.
  • 2 0
 Kind of surprised the oneUps didn't rate better, granted I haven't tried most of the others, I just find the oneUps money
  • 2 0
 Those Yoshimura pedals are on my list. The looks plus made in the USA. I'm in!
  • 3 0
 Why are Stamps missing? They're awesome flat pedals.
  • 2 0
 When your bike has Kashima on it its totally necessary to have Yoshimura flat pedals !
  • 1 0
 there's also the slightly smaller DMR Vault Midi version, with a 95mm x 104mm platform and a weight of 420g
  • 2 0
 Any thoughts on offsets? I prefer a slightly wider stance
  • 3 1
 I can't believe you didn't include Spank spike!
  • 5 0
 They are horrible. I can believe they didn't.
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: you mean aesthetically? Or on therms of performance? Could you elaborate?
  • 4 0
 @Lrvz1: performance. The igus bushing wears out in a month or two and gains clearance, which is normal for a bushing. The problem is that this makes the pedal noisy since it rattles around. Dropping the bike on the ground causes all sorts of clanks which is horrible.

Putting new bushings in helps, of course, for only a month or two.

Then the inboard bearing, it's a special bearing in unstandard dimensions, meaning it can only be bought in their rebuild kit (sometimes hard to find). Plus it's badly sealed, due to which I've had to superglue the bearing to my axle twice when I sti had them in order to loosen the bearing after it seized and the inner race slid over the axle instead of the bearing rotating.

Granted one of the cases when this happened was when the bike was on the rear of a car on a ride home during a rainstorm but all the other bearings survived with no problems.

I sold the previous bike with the spanks with an original gxp pressfit bottom bracket (that went through the same rainstorm) with the rainstorm supergluing occurrence happening on the original bearing set, after which I replaced them, but the same thing happened later on on the new set as well. Yet still the same BB bearing set...
  • 1 0
 @Primoz: I've been riding Spikes since summer 2019, mostly in dry conditions for 23km each day when commuting to work and doing some bunny hop series and huck to flats from 70cm height onto street road. Pedals are still nicely tight and dependable, no play can be felt. I had to retighten old Sixpack IONs on my other bike however.
  • 1 0
 @fluider: Lucky you. Like I said, it's been 1 to 2 months for me. And I swapped out the bearings and the bushings at least once, maybe even twice. I think it was once and I then said to hell with it if it only lasted such a short period of time.
  • 1 0
 i prefer pedals with 12 pins so i can remove some ( if that makes any sense ) - shimano saints ftw
  • 2 0
 Purple pedals win medals.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, but only in the mid 80's ;-)
  • 1 0
 Fireeye or Reverse Escape should be there as cheap and better grip them half on those!!!!
  • 1 0
 Don’t get the one up aluminium pedals if u have xx1 Eagle cranks THEY DONT FIT
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer Next time, you should do a composite pedal comparison. Maybe include the fookers for fun.
  • 2 0
 OneUp Aluminum

cons: cracks too easy
  • 1 0
 plus on that, had two pairs that've cracked at the exact same place
  • 2 0
 Nice to see those pedals from that new movie...
  • 2 0
 Pedals don't grip well. Get longer pins . Makes a huge difference.
  • 1 0
 Check out Black Kats by Deity!! Super amazing and not as huge as the T-Macs.
  • 1 0
 top loading pins on any pedal is basically a deal breaker if you ride anywhere w/ rocks lol
  • 1 0
 Sorry but tmacs have such little grip. Tired them with free riders and impacts and they have very little
  • 1 0
 Huge fan of the OneUp aluminum pedals. And their customer service is top notch!
  • 2 0
 I have a new pair of DMR Vault pedals for sale.
  • 2 0
 The numbers chart is so awesome!
  • 2 0
 No pedal innovations new evo? Son much better than tilts or wah wah 2s.
  • 1 0
 None of them have spare pin storage, like Specialized Boomslang and Race Face Atlas. Booo.
  • 1 0
 Nice to see more choices with more length than width. More support with less overall width is a bonus.
  • 1 0
 Bent my daggas the other day. Kinda pissed because I've only had them since last October. Well have to see about warranty
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: slid out on a rooty, off camber left hand corner and kinda dragged the left peddle on the ground
  • 1 0
 I've only used plastic bmx pedals for the last 4 years . Cheaper, lighter, resilient, always looking good .
  • 2 0
 That axiom is far older than Ken. Just saying.
  • 2 0
 Whatever happened to Fookers?
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer you should really try the pedaling innovations catylyst pedals
  • 2 0
 Syntace, the best ever pedal knowone knows of !
  • 1 0
 I've bent 2 pedal axles in 2 months on the Horizons...amazing grip though it must be said.
  • 1 0
 question. Are V Sixtys still a thing? I can barely find a website for them.
  • 1 0
 Just got my new XT pedals, I don't mind the thickness to much but I'm hoping that there will be plenty of grip in'em
  • 1 0
 I love my OneUp pedals, but why do they spin like molasses??? Even when new
  • 1 2
 Anyone that is interested in DMR Valut - they have 85 kg rider weight limit (www.dmrbikes.com/Catalogue/Pedals/Vault-2/Vault-NEW)
  • 4 0
 Just spoken to DMR about this - the 85kg limit is only for the Ti axles - no weight limit on the standard steel axles. They’ll correct their website ASAP!
  • 1 0
 The nukeproof downhill flats are even better
  • 1 0
 @stuwiltshire there ya go
  • 3 2
 I hope this comment won't fall flat
  • 3 1
 it did.
  • 1 0
 Vp harrier is another good value option.
  • 2 0
 Spank Oozy for the win!
  • 1 0
 VP Aim. 105x105mm. 425g. $50.
  • 1 0
 Should I consider swapping my DMR V8s?
  • 2 1
 Catalyst by Pedaling Innovations beats them all hands down!
  • 2 1
 Straitline Components Amp's
  • 1 0
 Slightly surprising there aren't more options with different sizes...
  • 1 0
 2004 Azonic A-Frames all day
  • 1 0
 Duuuuude the azonics!!! I remember having some on my old iron horse! Haha!
  • 1 1
 Really disappointed that you didn’t include Pedaling Innovations Catalyst Evo.
  • 1 0
 Burgtec make a longer axle version. Have for a while now.
  • 1 0
 2 favourites @mikekazimer ?
  • 1 0
 Pedaling Innovations Catalyst!!!
  • 1 0
 Hope F20 aren’t in the list ????10/10 flat pedals
  • 1 2
 DMR Vaults are terrible! Over priced, rubbish grip and they flip really easily. My worst shin tear was from Vaults. Hate the things!
  • 1 0
 No Hope F20? Its hardly a fair test then is it.
  • 2 0
 oneup would be my pick!
  • 1 0
 Superstar Components- Bargain Price- Last forever.
  • 1 0
 No way I'm paying more than $60 for any flat pedal.
  • 1 0
 I wanted to see the superstarcomponents nano X evo in this as well.
  • 1 2
 shame you guys didn't include superstars nano pedal. half the price of these options and equally as well made.
  • 2 2
 BURGTEC all day.. every day!!
  • 3 0
 Just upgraded my old Raceface Chesters to some silver Penthouse MK5's I'd been drooling over for a couple of months. I've never owned a pricey pair of flats before - the MK5s cost me two bills - so my wallet is still feeling the sting. But sweet baby jeebus those MK5's look fine and I love the feel of the platform - definitely an improvement over my Chesters. Almost bought the OneUps but they weren't available locally (no touchy feely).
  • 1 0
 *sad spank spike noises*
  • 2 0
 Sad spanking noises?
  • 1 0
 Crampons, for the win!
  • 1 0
 That's what I'm saying!
  • 1 2
 @fracasnoxteam: let him speak... what does a dutchman know about mountain bike anyway?
  • 2 1
 Flat pedal yourself.
  • 1 0
 Wellgo mg-1 FTW
  • 1 0
 Two words: Fireye Broil
  • 1 1
 @mikelevy podcast needs a flats vs. clips debate.
  • 1 0
 No Wellgo models ?
  • 1 0
 No Race Face Atlas?
  • 1 0
 Atlas ??????
  • 2 0
 The title is 12 of the best flat pedals, Atlas would be included in "12 of the worst"
  • 1 0
 No Crankbrothers Stamp?
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