16 New Pro Mechanic’s Tools – Pond Beaver 2021

Apr 20, 2021
by Dave Rome  
The never-ending flux of new “standards” in the bike industry means that the walls and drawers of workshops are never quite complete. With that, new tools seem to be revealed every few months, while increased competition at the professional end has seen these shiny new things continue to improve in quality.

Similar to Pinkbike’s Pond Beaver 2020 tool coverage, below is a small selection of new professional and consumer tools released recently that have caught my tool-obsessed eye (and suffering wallet).



Park Tool

New Park Tools for 2021.

It has been decades since the blue tool company released a wholly new derailleur hanger alignment gauge, but that’s exactly what the DAG-3 is. First covered on CyclingTips, Pinkbike's sister site, the DAG-3 (US$117) now sits above the pre-existing DAG-2.2 (US$80) and offers an extruded aluminium body that’s keyed for the sliding indicator. Tighter tolerances all around should provide for more accurate hanger straightening, while a number of the sliding components feature hidden wave springs to provide a reliable friction fit.

The most notable update, however, is how the indicator can be pivoted by 90-degrees, allowing the tool to clear chainstays and other obstructions without losing the measurement. This feature is comparable to what the likes of Abbey, Unior, and E.V.T achieve for quick usage, however, Park’s up-and-down approach is quite different.

Next up, the QTH-1 (US$57) offers truly one-handed operation and is a non-ratcheting quick change bit driver set intended for workshop use. The bits are held magnetically, while the lever on the side draws the magnet back to let the bits fall out for quick, one-handed bit changes. The bit holder itself can be mounted magnetically to the side of a (steel) workstand or bolted to any flat surface. Like the DAG-3, this one is made in the USA.

And finally, Park Tool has joined the likes of Feedback Sports by offering a universal handlebar holder (HBH-3). This simple device can be used for various tasks, such as holding the handlebar at a set position so that gravity can do its thing with brake bleeds. The US$43 price seems high, but it is built with workshop use in mind.

Park Tool Derailleur Hanger Gauge - DAG-3 bottom versus the DAG-2.2 above .
The new DAG-3 (below) versus the DAG-2.2 (above).
Park Tool Derailleur Hanger Gauge - DAG-3.
The DAG-3 features an indicator that pivots out of the way.


Park Tool quick change bit driver set.
The QTH-1 is designed for one-hand bit swapping.
Park Tool quick change bit driver set.
The QTH-1 is powered by magnets.



Pedro’s

Pedro’s has announced a handful of updates to some staples of the range. Below are just a few of the standouts.

Pedro’s recently announced the Vise Whip II (also first covered on CyclingTips), a revamp of its modified Vise-Grip plier that serves to replace the humble chain whip. This new model retains the rock-solid hold on just about any cassette but adds increased compatibility with the width and sizes of cogs it’ll clamp onto (it’ll now even fit some e-bike chainrings). It also adds a cog sizing scale for easy setting and an opposing notch lockring function (such as those found on older bottom bracket designs and fixed-gear cogs).

The Master T-handle Set II (US$215) has been completely overhauled, moving away from the previous generic out-sourced option to a unique design that’s produced in-house with S2 stainless steel. This set offers a few features to set them apart: colour identifiers for each size, a classy storage case and a combined 8/10mm hex that makes good use of the three tool ends offered by this type of T-handle. These are expected to be available by July, expect a review of them (and other T-handles) in the future.

Sticking with hex keys and Pedro’s has also overhauled the Pro T/L handle hex and Torx set (aka, P shaped). This US$100 set covers 2-8 mm hex and T10, T25, and T30 Torx, and does so with extended reach, easy size identification and an updated handle shape that’s said to be slimmer and more ergonomic. Additionally, the long legs of the keys are now covered for improved comfort – a feature that’s quite unique.

The new Demi torque wrench II and Bit Set is a 3-15Nm ratcheting torque wrench stored in a compact pouch. This US$199 set includes all the common sizes of hex and torx bits, and includes one wonderfully clever 8/10mm flare nut wrench for torquing those brake lever compression nuts.

Lastly, there are two new chain keepers to aid in drivetrain cleaning without the risk of splashing degreaser onto your rear rotor or into the hub bearings. First is the US$35 Pro Chain Keeper that works with both quick release and 12mm thru-axle dropouts. Another addition is the Travel Keeper that’s designed as frame support in travel (nobody likes a crushed rear end) that can double as a chain holder for washing.

Pedro s Vise Whip II.

Pedro s Master T-handle set II.
The Master T-handle Set II.
Pedros Pro T L handle hex and Torx set.
The Pro T/L set is wholly new, too. Both of these new sets come in a canvas tool organiser.



Pedro s Demi torque wrench II Bit Set.
.All of this comes wrapped in a compact case.
Pedro s Travel Keeper.
The Pedro's Travel Keeper can be used to protect your frame or help clean your chain. It'll fit up to 157 x 12 mm frames.



PRO Bike Gear

The accessory branch of Shimano recently added the Pro Team Digital torque wrench to its tool range. This 2-25 Nm infinitely adjustable torque tool comes from the same manufacturer that produces the digital torque wrenches for Unior and Topeak, and the tool doesn’t differ a whole lot from those two proven options.

A recent review on CyclingTips of this tool detailed that its accuracy is spot-on, while the speed of use is hard to match. The tool offers both a visual and audible warning when your desired torque is reached, while the tool can also be used in a live read mode for dialling in things like Shimano derailleur clutch break-away.

The ratcheting head is compact and works with regular 1/4in bits, while the tool’s handle is more comfortable than the Unior and Topeak versions. The tool comes in a blow mould plastic case with a few common bit sizes. It’s priced at US$250, which is a little less expensive than the direct competition.

Pro Bike Gear Team Digital Torque Wrench.
Digital torque wrenches won't be for everyone, but there are some benefits to having them battery-powered.
Pro Bike Gear Team Digital Torque Wrench has a 1 4 hex drive.
This torque wrench features a compact 1/4in hex drive.



Noble Professional Wheel Lacing Jig

This one isn’t all that new, but rather it’s made a recent transition from being extremely rare to reasonably available. It’s the Noble Wheel Lacing Jig produced by London-based Johnny Bell, and it does exactly what the product name describes.

Designed with professional wheel builders in mind, the stand is designed to support just about any rim and hub for easy spoke lacing. The stand can be quickly adjusted for various rim diameters and hub types, or completely compacted for easy storage. The tool is built from aluminium and stainless steel to withstand daily professional use, while the rim is delicately supported by angled rim rollers that turn on sealed bearings.

Noble Wheels sell the stand for £295.00, while those in North America can purchase it for US$450 through Wheel Fanatyk (which is an amazing store and resource for the enthusiast and professional wheel builders).

Noble Wheel Lacing Jig. Photo by Noble Wheels.
The Noble Wheel Lacing Jig is certainly aimed at the professional user. It can be used on a benchtop or raised from the ground with a support (not provided).
Noble Wheel Lacing Jig. Photo by Noble Wheels.
The tool is designed to be gentle on all rims, including those with delicate decals.




PB Swiss
Do you find yourself stripping Torx bolts all the time? Well, often the issue can come down to the tools you’re using. And when it comes to Torx tools, I’ve found it almost impossible to beat the fit offered by certain European brands.

The 100-plus-year-old Swiss tool manufacturer, PB Swiss, is one of the benchmark offerings and recently released a new knurled L-shaped Torx set (PB 3411 H). These feature an impressively positive fit with Torx fasteners and do so while offering perfect knurling and a longer than usual handle length.

PB Swiss PB 3411 H.

Noticeably amiss are the T27 and T30 sizes (a deal-breaker for me, but hey...), but otherwise this T6-T25 is just about perfect. Perfection comes at a not-so-small US$70 price (approx), but hey, think about all those Torx bolts you won’t strip from here on out.



Abbey Bike Tools

The Oregon-based cycling tool maker has been busy catching up with demand, but that hasn’t prevented a few small tool updates, with more on the way. The latest release sees 38 and 40 mm Delrin inserts for use with the company’s suspension seal press tool. These are US$27 each.

Abbey Bike Tools Seal Driver.



Knipex

Released last year, the TubiX is the first metal pipe cutter from the German plier specialist. This will cleanly and easily cut down aluminium steerer tubes and handlebars much like other pipe cutters, but it adds a unique quick-adjust feature that saves you from having to wind it in and out to match the tubing size being cut. The tube being trimmed has needle bearings to turn on, and once cut can be cleaned up with the integrated de-burring tool.

More versatile than a Swiss Army knife, the parallel-jaw Knipex Pliers is a staple in the toolboxes of just about every competitor of ToolBoxWars and/or mechanic working the World Cup circuit. Knipex has slowly been updating the tool range with a lightened construction that adds sizing markings, thumb grips, and a revised jaw shape. This new Pliers Wrench started with the 250mm length version, and Knipex has now trickled the update to the smaller 180mm version (my favourite size for general bicycle stuff).

Knipex TubiX pipe cutter.
The Knipex TubiX will cleanly cut through tubes ranging from 6 - 35 mm in diameter.
Knipex Pliers Wrench - 180 mm new version. 86 01 180.
The Pliers Wrench is a staple in many pro toolboxes, but it's now 10% lighter.



Enduro Bearings

Got a spare US$399 and have a desire to own 3.5 kilograms (7.7 lb) of wonderfully machined stainless steel? Well, Enduro Bearings has the blind hold bearing puller for you.

Yet another one first covered on CyclingTips, Enduro has overhauled its Pro Bearing Puller (BBT-222), moving away from the previously lightened and compact design and moving toward one that emphasises forceful persuasion.

The sliding hammer weighs 808 grams and slides on a 28.6 cm (11.25″) length shaft. There are nine expanding collets for bearings ranging from 6-30mm, and each one offers a trimmed-down profile for better clearance into tight spots.

And when not being used as a slide hammer the tool converts into a shop hammer. On one face of the stainless steel hammer head sits the choice of a polymer or brass threaded insert for whacking, while the opposite end is a socket holder to fit common 25.4 mm (1″) cassette and similar bicycle-related sockets. All items come wrapped up in a nice tool roll, and all told, the high price is surprisingly comparable to the blind hole bearing pullers made by Park Tool and Unior.

Enduro Pro Bearing Puller - BBT-222.

The new Enduro Pro Bearing Puller above versus the previous version bottom .
The new Pro Bearing Puller (above) looks simper to the previous version (below), but it's much more persuasive at removing bearings.
The new Enduro Pro Bearing Puller collet left versus the previous version right .
The new bearing collets (left) offer a narrower profile to the previous versions (right). This should assist with getting them into tight spots, such as the inner bearing in some freehubs.



Enduro Pro Bearing Puller - BBT-222.
The BBT-222 converts to a regular shop hammer with changeable tips. Here it's pictured next to Park Tool's biggest hammer.
Enduro Pro Bearing Puller - BBT-222.
There's a socket holder on the other side of the hammer face.



There you have it, 16 new tools sure to make any mechanic drool. Expect to see a few more tool-related pieces in the coming few months.


144 Comments

  • 295 3
 Am I the only one that LOVES tools?
  • 41 0
 No brother, you are not alone!
  • 5 0
 I LOVE tools, too!
  • 16 0
 I just bought my wife a new set of t-bars
  • 8 3
 You must ultimately become a tool to be a true tool lover
  • 6 7
 You become a tool when you have bought one too many overpriced tools.
  • 5 0
 Nope, definitely not alone.
People who have never felt a Beta or PBSwiss Hex key snap firmly in place into a hex bolt head don´t know what they´re missing out on lol
  • 1 0
 I'd be more worried about those who claim to NOT love tools!
  • 2 0
 @OLDGHOST: stupid instagram!

it only lets me see one page if i dont have an account!!!
  • 8 0
 Nope. This is the kind of PB article that makes me breathe a little heavily...
My wife thinks I’m weird, but I think she’s (*twitch*) 8mm bolt @ 54NM anyway, so whatever.
  • 1 0
 @syeve: some of us have it worse than others....when we justify tool purchases as being for our wives, we have it bad. I put together a nice tool bag for my wife's car. She claimed it was really for me, but she has already used it a few times and been glad it was in there...
  • 1 0
 Show me yours, I'll show you mine Smile
  • 1 0
 Go find toolbox wars on insta, so many tools I want but don't need.
  • 2 0
 of course not! I mean we are all here in the PB comments and this place is full of tools!
  • 2 0
 @2-1RacingUK: what case are u using there?
  • 1 0
 @INS4N3: looks like a Nanuk.
  • 1 0
 just bought a tool box with draws for all my acquired bike tools - genuinely feel like my life is complete now (damn you can't hand 3 kids back lol)
  • 3 0
 I love tools that aren't labeled "for bikes" because they cost 50% less money...
  • 2 0
 @INS4N3:
Go take a look at "Auer Packaging" cases. Cheap even compared to most Chinese cases, made in Germany, lots of great sizes. I love my Auer case.
  • 1 0
 @Loki87: Of course that assumes you aren’t a mechanic that also works on a ton of garbage. I remember a few big brands supplying steel bolts for their house-brand products that might as well have been plastic. I felt I needed my good tools and a standard tri-Allen.
  • 1 0
 @b1k35c13nt15t:
Yeah, I feel ya. Not all bolts are created equal and companies using crappy bolts should get beaten with a stick. Still, good tools make all the difference in not rounding those damn things on the first go. I'm always surprised by how well those PBswiss fit even in the lesser quality bolts on my bikes.
On the other side of the spectrum, my Answer stem has bolts that feel like they're made from tool steel and hardened accordingly. Those things are super fun to work with. Zero give in those things, it's honestly impressive. Compared to them, everything else feels like cheese.
  • 2 0
 My wife says she loves a tool. Then gently pats me on the head
  • 1 0
 @WhipNC: these people are called "pro's" I think haha
  • 2 0
 For every new & smartly designed tool I buy...there is a more expensive repair I must pay a mechanic to fix what I break twice with said new tool.

I am so BAD at wrenching on anything I mean awful!
  • 1 0
 @INS4N3: this is a pelicase 1730 capacity. Loads of room. Probably a 20-25kg full weight.
  • 1 0
 @asmtb: cheers dude!
  • 2 0
 @2-1RacingUK: Thats so sick!
  • 1 0
 Nope! Since you love tools definitely do not go to kctoolco.com
  • 1 0
 @PAmtbiker: you sonofabitch! you just cost me untold thousands!

thank you
  • 1 0
 Tools rule!
  • 55 0
 I'm somewhat of a tool myself
  • 6 0
 You either die the hero, or live long enough to see yourself become the enemy
  • 2 0
 best pb comment of the day.
  • 55 3
 Feels like I'm on a Buzzfeed "16 extra cheesy grilled cheeses" article or something. my mouth is WATERING
  • 28 63
flag JoshieK (Apr 20, 2021 at 14:16) (Below Threshold)
 Well pinkbike has largely turned into buzzfeed. Social justice, largely garbage articles and readers/commenters who all have the exact same thoughts and opinions and get extremely upset when challenged on said opinions.
  • 44 0
 My wife thinks I compulsively buy tools. I tell her it's really not a big deal... It's my vice.
  • 15 0
 Get a grip man.
  • 11 0
 It's only a big problem when you have to lever.
  • 37 0
 No way, 10% lighter? That will make sure I win those races!
  • 9 1
 The $400 bearing puller is gonna be so much better than my hammer-sheet metal-c clamp-screwdriver setup that costs about 10 for the whole thing and has many uses on and off the bike, and even can be used while disassembled
  • 25 0
 @tech-floguy: but does it come with a butt plug?
  • 2 0
 @iliveonnitro: I would hope
  • 4 0
 @iliveonnitro: depends how much peatys wet lube you have kicking around
  • 9 0
 Yeah, the weight of tools seems silly at first. However, when you're a World Cup mechanic, traveling with a tool case means that you not only need to consider what tools you'll need to do your job; but also their size and weight in order to keep your kit manageable and cost efficient with respect to baggage fees. The more you can bring and stay under the weight limit and within a reasonably sized box, the better.
  • 3 0
 @jmc361: I think you mean "when you PRETEND you're a world cup mechanic".
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: Ha! Well, there’s that too.
  • 30 0
 One handed bit swapping? like I needed a more efficient way to lose bits on the shop floor. Seriously - where do they go after that first bounce??
  • 19 0
 Well, actually the idea is that you’ll never lose them again, because you’ll only pull the release lever after inserting the bit in the bit holder...

However, one day I’m going to invent the magnetic workshop floor tile - everything will stay where it first touched the ground...
  • 1 0
 The bits won't drop out accidentally, there are magnets in the bit holder that help to draw them out of the handle.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: take my money now!
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: take my money now!
  • 18 0
 I have no problem buying good tools but I have to admit sometimes I skimp out a bit and I don't have a Park brand hammer.
  • 5 0
 My hazard fraught dead blow has been to hell and back and I'm at the point where I'm getting attached to the stupid thing now
  • 5 0
 Some say the Park hammer is the only good tool they make!
  • 2 1
 You can get good Taiwan great S2 tools on Amazon for less than half these prices. But the Master t handle set from Pedro's does look amazing and worth it.
  • 2 0
 My 15$ pipe cutter from crappy tire has lasted for 5 years so far of cutting soft aluminum bars.
  • 15 0
 Do you find yourself stripping Torx bolts all the time?

Seriously, if you are stripping Torx bolts you shouldn't be wrenching at all.
  • 1 0
 That was my first thought as well. I over-tighten just about everything, but I've never had an issue with a Torx bolt. Maybe I should start though so I can justify those wrenches because they're gorgeous!
  • 4 0
 with crappy bolts and crappy wrenches combined, stripping happens. you get a big bolt and a small wrench (bad tolerances not improper wrench size) and thats a recipe for eventual stripping even with proper skill
  • 1 0
 It depends on the material on the bolts and how deep the groove is for a hex or Torx pattern. I've rounded the Fox remote clamp bolt because the groove is shallow and the bolt material is a lot softer than a steel bolt as it's made of aluminum. I just contacted Fox on this as I cannot find a replacement bolt anywhere with the size they have. I stripped the bolt head on the first tightening using a torque wrench lower than the recommended setting. If I can get the dimensions of that bolt from Fox, I'll find a bolt that's made of a harder material and better quality allen key groove.
  • 1 0
 Another guy with the same thought. I think most non-mechanics have a problem identifying the correct size though. Like a t25 will fit in a t27 and to someone that doesn't know any better it's the correct size. It's hard to get people out the phillips bit mindset.
  • 15 1
 New tools get me more excited than new bike parts...
  • 3 0
 Glad I'm not the only one Razz
  • 8 0
 I go to my tool-aholics support group meetings regularly and I'm usually ok. But then stuff like this comes along and all my progress goes out the window. Thanks a lot pb.
  • 3 0
 Do you know of there is a tool-aholics group in Canada. I could use help too...
  • 1 0
 We (I) definitely need a 1-800-Tool-Anonymous.
And QTH-1,
Where have you been all my life!
  • 10 0
 I freaking love tools!
  • 9 0
 I need that bearing puller set in my life...
  • 2 0
 For real. Why must it be so much money? Frown
  • 2 0
 @jayacheess: 3.5kg of hardened stainless steel machined in the USA is a big reason. Smile
  • 2 0
 One of my favorite tools is the press fit bottom bracket tool. I don't get to use it a lot, but it makes easy work of removing or installing a PF BB.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: The Enduro press-fit BB tools (BRT-002 and BRT-003) really are the pinnacle for the task. However, they're also big money when you consider that mechanics (and people with a number of bikes) will need to buy both sizes.
  • 1 0
 I'm of the conviction that if a bearing can't be beaten out with a hammer and screwdriver then it must not need replaced! I guess I do too...
  • 4 0
 @DaveRome: Many tools are for industry guys that use them every day the cost is warranted. However if just a DIY mechanic, it doesn't make much sense if only using it is far and few between. I bought the non-industry one for about 60USD. Worth every penny. Very well designed and quality tool.

www.ebay.com/itm/Bike-Bottom-Bracket-Bearing-Press-Fit-BB86-BB92-BB30-PF30-Install-Removal-Tool/174347222087?hash=item2897e77c47:g:g-UAAOSwGcFf8oH8
  • 12 3
 this could have been a video Facepalm lol
  • 2 0
 ...with people exclaiming "where are the time stamps" and "this should have been a list" because "I can't watch videos at work".
  • 1 0
 Follow the author Dave Rome on Instagram (@romeandstuff) for lots of short videos on these and other tools
  • 1 0
 @bykeco: I concur with this message. Smile
  • 7 0
 My wife still doesn’t understand why i need duplicates of my Snap-On tools in Park Tool blue........
  • 12 1
 Maybe you should get a duplicate wife...
  • 1 0
 That is in the "need" category. She doesn't understand the difference between want and need. Lol.
  • 1 1
 Tell her to check her shoe wharehouse
  • 2 0
 @Tykebike: Just remove half of each pair - they're "duplicates" too right?
  • 5 0
 If that tube cutter leaves a clean cut on a thick walled aluminium steerer I will eat my hat. These type of tube cutters displace material, to get a clean cut you have to remove material. Give me a saw every day.
  • 4 0
 Pinkbike: "Got a spare US$399 and have a desire to own 3.5 kilograms (7.7 lb) of wonderfully machined stainless steel?"
Me: "Nope"
  • 1 0
 LOL...dittto...but I want that freaking bearing puller!!
  • 2 0
 While not always a reflection of an increase in utility- kind of like a nice bike; I do find it easier to drop money on the nicest tools because, unlike a bike, next year’s version isn’t the exact same only 10% lighter. KNIPEX!!!!!
  • 3 0
 That was bad timing on the article, I'd just paid off my last bike purchase! Now to wait for that bearing puller to come into stock...
  • 1 0
 Those Knipex pliers look pretty slick. I have an ancient set of Eifel gear pliers ( i.ebayimg.com/images/g/MeMAAOSwadhe89cm/s-l300.jpg ) that are one of my favorite tools. Way more leverage than a normal set of pliers or channel locks. I've actually used them to dimple the chainstays for tire clearance on my bar bike. If they ever dissappear or something it's nice to know that it would be possible to find a modern replacement.
  • 1 0
 Knipex rule. I use them to work on cars. Ive never really needed them on the bike. Theyre nice because they dont round out bolts like normal pliers do. I NEVER take normal pliers to a bolt but these are the exception
  • 2 0
 Still waiting for the tool companies to make a bit driver set with a locking magnet adapter so the bits don't fall out. They have them with impact driver adapters.
  • 1 0
 You can achieve this now with any bit driver handle and a locking bit adapter.
  • 1 0
 @DaveRome: But then the locking bit adapter with the bit falls out of the driver because it is only attached via the magnet.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: How about a bit of glue or silicon in there to make the fit a little tighter?
  • 1 0
 I’ve got one on the electric screwdriver I use. It’s the Skil one available on Amazon. Can do 8Nm of manual torque in a pinch with that thing.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: After watching the Park Tool video, it may have a clamp that locks the bit into place with the lever. Don't know for sure though. If it does, I recant my original statement. Lol.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: No clamp, just magnets.

Something like this may be what you seek: products.wera.de/en/screwdrivers_series_400_t-handle_416_r.html
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: im 99%sure that little lever is for a locking detent.
  • 2 2
 I don't get why everyone use the Knipex pliers so much : these kind of pliers are the most destructive tool you can find for any bolt or screw. To me this the last resort tool, you only use it when the right tool for the job has failed.
  • 3 0
 The favorite tool isn't usually the most used, its the one that saves your ass the most.

My 2 favorite tools are a 3# mallet and locking needle nose pliers. I rarely need them, but when I do there is no exception. Doesn't matter what I'm doing, both those tools are coming along.
  • 2 0
 Have you used the Knipex Pliers Wrench? It's not at all like a regular adjustable spanner or plier.
  • 2 0
 Knipex pliers are only destructive in the hands of someone who does not know how to use them.
  • 1 0
 @DaveRome: ya, it makes me wonder if he's actually tried them... they have smooth jaws, and they stay parallel to each other, (unlike single pivot pliers). There's also a little cam mechanism that makes you be able to squeeze really tight knee. They're completely awesome
  • 3 2
 Has anyone, anywhere, ever stripped out a torx head due to a generic quality torx wrench? A $70 solution to a problem no one has.
  • 3 0
 No, but I have snapped the tip off of a Park Tool PH-T25.
  • 1 0
 "On one face of the stainless steel hammer head sits the choice of a polymer or brass threaded insert for whacking..." - WTF? The toolheads will love the options!
  • 2 0
 The vise whip is sick! I use an impact to loosen cassette nuts with... no messing around!
  • 2 0
 I build two or three wheels a year at home... I think I need that Noble stand.
  • 1 0
 Wera must be making a killing with their colour-coded hex keys, seeing as more companies are jumping on the rainbow tools bandwagon
  • 1 0
 Wera makes great stuff, but credit should go to PB Swiss for the rainbow colours.
  • 2 0
 Need an article on . "Whats in your Bike Park Toolbox" Seems every year my toolbox gets larger and heavier.
  • 2 0
 And I just bought the older park tool derailleur gauge...
  • 1 0
 Yeah I did this too. Still, it can’t be all that different functionally. It seems to be easier to store.

Essential tool though innit
  • 3 1
 (Insert snarky Pinkbike comment hereSmile
  • 2 0
 Oooh, watching this I really miss my Birzman tools
  • 2 0
 I want the Knipex TubiX more than 99% of the crap that is pedaled on here.
  • 3 0
 Cool Hhhhhwhhhhip.
  • 1 1
 ouf that Noble wheel building stand, nothing worst than building purely resting on the hub cap and the rim keeps going up and down. Future buy!
  • 1 0
 The Noble stand is fantastic. We have had one for a couple years, and can't imagine living without it now!
  • 1 0
 Why get the Pedros torque wrench, when you could get a Wera Click Torque A5, that has more range for only 120 Euros
  • 2 0
 Torque wrench choice is pretty personal. The design of torque wrench that both Park Tool and Pedro's sell are vastly faster to adjust through the torque range when compared to the Wera (which requires a full turn for each Nm adjustment). The Wera is a great tool, but it's not necessarily better in every regard.

I've written about the Wera torque wrench on CyclingTips before: cyclingtips.com/2020/11/tech-round-up-12-new-gear-from-pro-wera-fizik-and-more/#Wera

You'll find a bit more detail here, too: www.instagram.com/p/CNCaXvPh-MN
  • 2 1
 some of those came from 50 shades of grey secret room!!
  • 1 0
 I’m an idiot for tools!
  • 1 0
 I'm here for a new generation of allen Y-keys!!!
  • 2 0
 I have been aroused
  • 1 0
 I never heard of Abbey tools, but damn are they sexy.
  • 1 0
 OMG, you should use the chain tool.
  • 1 0
 @cycling-jokester: I really wanted it, but couldn't justify nearly $200...
  • 1 0
 Bearing puller looks good!
  • 1 0
 Ya Bunch’a tool whippers
you put it on pumpkin pie
Coool whip?Smile
  • 2 0
 All take everything
  • 1 0
 These all look expensive and unnecessary. I want.
  • 1 1
 Lacing jigs are for amateurs. Set your hub on the edge of the bench and you have all the access you need.
  • 1 0
 These lacing jigs make the job neater and faster. Which is why many very fine wheel building outfits all over the world have bought one from Noble. I know quite a few well respected professionals who own one, as a matter of fact.
  • 1 0
 Ooooh I want that wheel jig.
  • 2 1
 Cool whhhip!
  • 4 0
 Why are you putting so much emphasis on the 'h'?
  • 2 0
 @JonnyTheWeasel: because Stewie does.
  • 1 1
 Nice knock off park tool.
  • 1 0
 tools

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