A Closer Look At Team Monster Energy - Specialized's 1 x 6 Gearing

Aug 2, 2010
by Mike Levy  
Specialized has been testing their unique 1 x 6 gearing for many months now, although the Val Di Sole World Cup is the first time that it has been raced at the top level of the sport. What makes this setup truly interesting is the very special 9 tooth small cog and prototype freehub body from DT Swiss that allows it to be used.

Inside you can see photos of the works gearing and read all the details directly from the man behind the scene!

*Edit - Updated with a photo of a prototype SRAM PowerDome cassette using a 9 tooth cog

Read on...
A Closer Look At Team Monster Energy - Specialized's 1 x 6 Gearing

Although we've known about the Team Monster Energy - Specialized team's unique gearing for some time now, the more keen eyed of you out there may have spotted it on the back of Curtis Keene's 2011 Demo that we featured months ago, just recently has Specialized taken the wraps off of the system, partly due to some overeager journalists letting the cat out of the bag a bit early! It should be noted that the gearing that you are reading about is still a work in progress and expect it to be more polished when you see it next. Don't ever believe anyone that tells you that racing doesn't improve the breed!


1 x 6 gearing as found on a Team Monster Energy - Specialized bike. Using a smaller chainring combined with a 9 tooth cog keeps the high and low ratios similar to a standard cassette, but with more clearance, better chainline, and the possibility of less weight. Is it a win - win?
1 x 6 gearing as found on a Team Monster Energy - Specialized bike. Using a smaller chainring combined with a 9 tooth cog keeps the high and low ratios similar to a standard cassette, but with more clearance, better chainline, and the possibility of less weight. Is it a win - win?


The arrangement consists of six cogs that have been spaced out correctly as on a standard cassette. The Monster Energy - Specialized team's gearing looks to use separate cogs for the larger ones that would allow them to fine tune the gearing for the course or conditions, although that must also be a byproduct of them building the gearing from scratch as well. Their spread uses a 17 tooth large cog on the low end and a tiny 9 tooth cog for the highest gear. This is where the ingenuity comes in, because as anyone who's had their cassette off may well know, the smallest cog that would previously fit would be an 11 tooth version due to the freehub's diameter. This is where the team's wheel supplier, DT Swiss, steps in with a custom made freehub body that accepts a smaller cog. As of right now the actual design of the freehub remains unknown, but to get an idea of what it may look like, have a gander at Shimano's commuter intended Capreo group that also uses a 9 tooth small cog. I'm betting that the DT Swiss freehub is also stepped and that the bottom few cogs used on the team bikes are a single unit. The 9-17 tooth spread is combined with a smaller 30-32 tooth chainring (and a modified e.13 guide) that delivers similar gearing to a 11-21 road cassette and 36 tooth ring. By looking at the gear comparison below you can see that both standard gearing and this new 'compact' system have similar high and low ranges, but a 9-17 tooth block would have much different jumps between gears.



Gear development comparison*

• 30 tooth ring x 9 tooth cog = 7.183m
• 30 tooth ring x 17 tooth cog = 3.803m

• 36 tooth ring x 11 tooth cog = 7.053m
• 36 tooth ring x 21 tooth cog = 3.694m
*Gear development (also known as rollout) is the distance traveled by the bicycle per one revolution of the crank
Team riders always race with the 21 tooth cog locked out.


A modified e.13 guide covers up a smaller than average chainring that gives the rider more clearance and in turn, more room for error
A modified e.13 guide covers up a smaller than average chainring that gives the rider more clearance and in turn, more room for error


There are certainly obvious benefits to this modified gearing arrangement, one of the biggest and most obvious being improved ground clearance. As you can see in the picture of Brendan’s bike below, today's bikes that use low and even lower bottom brackets shrink the room for error when traveling fast over rough terrain. There are certainly lines on many tracks that test a bike's clearance, especially when that rider is brave! Not only can that cause a race ending mechanical, but the bike also looses momentum every time its guard makes contact with the ground. Every advantage counts at this level and this advantage adds up to about 1/2" over a standard sized ring and guard.


But clearance is only half the story. Specialized's own Jason Chamberlain fills us in on the rest:

"The gearing itself is the other half. The range of gears required for a DH course is not very wide. Road cassettes are really the only option, but that gives you 9 cogs with 1 tooth steps. With only 6 or 7 cogs, you don’t have to shift as frequently on a given course as 9 cogs. The theory is that you have the same range of gears, but bigger steps between them. This means you will shift LESS on a given course. This saves time, energy and preserves mental focus. Every time you shift, you lose time. Every time you shift, you risk a mis-shift (just ask Andy Shleck). And with World Championships being won by 0.05 seconds, riders will take every advantage we can provide. Many guys have trained themselves to “double shift” every time they shift. The Monster guys actually had to retrain themselves NOT to double shift."

This is a perfect example of the highest levels of our sport pushing for better equipment that makes more sense for the gifted riders that are using it. While you or I don't have a lot on common with Brendan Fairclough or how he rides a bike, we can certainly benefit from more reliable parts that are less likely to fail when we do mess up. I can also see the ability to run a 9 tooth cog on a wider spread cassette, picture a 9-36 tooth 10 speed block, working well on trail bikes when combined with a single ring between that ranges from 27-34 teeth. Expect more progression in the gearing department for consumers soon, but below Chamberlain lets us know what had to happen for the Monster Energy - Specialized team's gearing to see the light of day:

"For the concept to work, we needed multiple vendors to all come together on the same page. DT is making the hub. The cassettes were built from existing parts, or prototyped by SRAM. The rest was developed and built by Specialized. We modified some E.13 parts to work with the smaller rings and we have Gamut guides too."


You're looking at a SRAM PowerDome cassette with a 9 tooth small cog. This is early prototype has been machined as a 9 speed unit, but expect to see 10 speeds soon. Welcome to the future.
You're looking at a SRAM PowerDome cassette with a 9 tooth small cog. This is early prototype has been machined as a 9 speed unit, but expect to see 10 speeds soon. Welcome to the future.


Brendan's Specialized Demo after a single run that ended badly. Would half an inch made the difference? It certainly wouldn't have hurt matters...
Brendan's Specialized Demo after a single run that ended badly. Would half an inch made the difference? It certainly wouldn't have hurt matters...


I'll be attending the 2011 Specialized launch at Whistler in the coming weeks where they plan to release more information and photos of the new gearing system. There are also whisperings of a XC cassette in the works that incorporates that small 9 tooth cog - Stay tuned!


151 Comments

  • 14 0
 The entire drivetrain becomes more compact, out of the way, stronger and lighter. Whats to complain about there? bmx already made the jump to 9t compact drive 6 years ago.

reducing the smallest cog on the cassette from 11T to 9T on the rear means reduced chain wrap (engagement between chain and cog)

this creates much higher torque loading on each tooth (900 nm per tooth!!) and on the chain rollers, causing accelerated wear and tear to the drivetrain = shorter running life and more maintenance issues

microdrive setups for BMX make sense as BMX are singlespeed and are not ridden in filthy, muddy wet conditions whilst changing gear, and are not ridden the same distances as mountain bikes (even DH race bikes are used over huge distances compared to bmx)

I stopped using 9T microdrive on my BMX because I was riding too much distance over the city and regularly wearing out the rear cog, chaindisc and chain - I switched to a larger (11t) setup and got massively increased durability


George French of G-Sport (odyssey) bmx fame wrote a very interesting article about the downsides of microdrive for bmx use a while back

www.gsportbmx.com/2003/06/super-small-gearing
  • 5 0
 Nice to see someone making a welel explained, sensible and relevant point on pinkbike. You sir, are awesome.
  • 3 0
 ah yes, you bring up a very good point, Though how much time are you going to spend in the 9 and 10 tooth cogs?(I'd imagine if you're in these gears, chances are you aren't putting much torque through the drivetrain) I see this like compact drive in bmx, there are some drawbacks, but overall i think this is a good concept and the right direction.
  • 1 0
 game you are exactally right. its not like a bmx bike where the chain is always on the 9tooth cog and always has a lot of torque on it
  • 1 0
 In This instance the maintenance isn't an issue. They will be replaced as often as needed. No compromise.
  • 16 2
 wow.
  • 9 1
 good point
  • 7 0
 makes sense
  • 27 2
 So it's basically just bmx micro drive adapted for mtb. Good idea but nothing revolutionary.

And there was SRAM boasting about Minaar, Fairclough and Hill all doing so well at Maribor on the 10 speed kit. www.southerndownhill.com/images/stuff/sram-xo.jpg Seems a bit odd that both loads of gears and hardly any gears is the best way forward.
  • 2 0
 el-nombre, I agree. I saw this, and just thought "Ok...so they're just running less gears, and adapting micro-drive. Nothing new, nothing amazing and not that revolutionary". Less gears, smaller. Is that really something so amazing? (see: BMX for the past what? 5 years lol)
  • 12 0
 Put this on the market and i buy it as soon as it comes out. WTF does Dh and needs 9 or even 10 Speeds ? Not i. I manly use 3 gears off my current cassette !

WIN all over it !
  • 2 0
 set it up on my bike
  • 13 10
 Lol Nombre... it's not the way 'forward' that matters to companies like Spesh... it's the way into our wallets they care about. Just look at overeager posters like 'xetalx' ready to buy it sight unseen just cause Spesh said it's awesome and Fairclough rides it. Bottomline, unless it's drastically lighter, I could care less about having to tap my shifter twice instead of once to get to the gear I want... hell, I even get really wild from time to time and tap it thrice!!! You're not going to be any more or less likely to get a missed shift from going 1-3 on a road cassette than you are going 1-2 here if the number of teeth being stepped... if anything you're MORE likely to miss a shift with this set up since there's just six cogs. On a 9, at least if you double tap and miss one gear you're still likely to land on the second... with tihs, if you miss you just miss.
  • 29 5
 i just want it cause Specialized tells me that I want it and need it....







Facepalm
  • 4 1
 This also opens up the chance for smaller, lighter rear mechs.
  • 12 0
 Bout time! I hate having 9 gears. I want 4. Uphill, Flat, Downhill/dirtjumping, and fast fireroads
  • 9 3
 badbadleroybrown dude your full of it. It's not about the cash man and It's not about the spesh boys. It's about chain line ! Go criticize your mom instead of making pointless posts. Fyi i never miss a shift. Not now, not tomorrow, not on a 9 cogs or a 6 !
  • 5 3
 How is it a way into your wallet that they care about badbadleroybrown? If you don't want it, don't effing buy it. It's not hard. Clearly they built this for a rider who would actually require it for certain circumstances and benefit by it. It's not meant to be used for the day to day riding most people here do, and clearly isn't being marketed as such. I love the girly fits people like you throw.
  • 2 0
 guys drop the argyment, this new hub/casset is just something that dt swiss is bringing out for racing circumstances, i would buy this casset when it comes out if i have the money, i usually only use my 3 highest gears anyway.

if anything i think it makes sense for a small 6 speed for dh.
  • 1 0
 nice. might do this on my hope trials hub, and be the coolist kid in town.
  • 7 0
 to those that think this was copied from bmx, suntour micro drive first apeard on XC MTB's about 20 years ago
  • 1 0
 DH are finally going Micro drive.
  • 3 0
 couldnt you just do this with a normal cassette? a bit of modding and a few cassette spacers is really all you need.
  • 1 0
 yeh but the current design only allows for a 11 tooth cog. put a 9 tooth on and you get a big difference in performance, not much difference in aesthetics (apart from smaller front ring)
  • 2 4
 needs a hammersmidt
  • 2 1
 the smaller cog is an advantage for racers, but for everyday riders, having to buy a whole new hub just to have 2 less teath would be a bitch. i would personally rather just get a bigger front ring and risk screwing up my taco.
  • 4 3
 go chainless, it makes you faster
  • 3 0
 Upgrade, maybe not... If it comes STD on DH race bike, two thumbs up. I personally think 9 or 10 gears on a DH rig is overkill.
  • 1 0
 Go to the local bike shop and buy old Six speed stuff for a fraction of the price of 9 or even ten speed stuff. And it's much stronger.
  • 2 0
 it is useful because it will make it so your chain is tighter over all cause ur derailleur wont have to "reach" for those lower gears. therefore it will have much less chain slap cause it will always be nice an tight. i thought it was dumb at first too but once i thought about it i realized the benefits. nice idea spesh!
  • 1 0
 small back and small front make less chainbring smashing on rocks and less weight. just gotta find a chainguide that will go really small. lol
  • 14 2
 I would use it loose wieght, I mean how many gears do they really need.
  • 11 5
 they should just go sinlespeed Razz
  • 3 8
flag nouser (Jul 31, 2010 at 4:03) (Below Threshold)
 maybe not singlespeed, fucks up your rear suspension
  • 4 3
 Not if you use a Shimano Alfine tensioner. (EDIT: Or any of the others listed below Smile )
  • 10 0
 ^^Bah, thats cheap crap. Use a Paul Melvin, a Rohloff, or a Yess.
  • 2 0
 or a shimano SIS 5spd mech
  • 4 0
 I think a lot of people are missing the point of this setup. The new Demos have a really low BB height and I personally have broke 2 LG1+ tacos already. With this rear setup you can run a 30 tooth front ring while not messing up the gear ratios and gain much needed ground clearance. An added bonus of the smaller front ring, rear cog and a tad shorter chain is the weight savings.
  • 3 0
 Just a thought....
I would love to have a 9 tooth on my AM bike (but does a 9T work on all bikes?), combine that with a 36t out back and then 1x9 would be even better.
As for DH I have been thinking about this for ages as it would allow people to use the Hope Trails rear hub which has more engagements than the standard ProII and is made for 6 speed.
Now a 9-36 on a hope trials rear hub......
Not sure if the trails rear hub allows for a completely dishless wheel to?
  • 2 0
 Betsie, A 9 x 36 spread with a single ring or Hammerschmidt has me excited! Gearing has really begun to come of age in the last season and it's looking to get even better.
  • 1 0
 Totaly with you Betsie! with 30t ring up front it should possible to skip the granny ring, while still having a good kick thanks to 9t cog.
  • 3 0
 Give me an old six in the back and a hammerschmit in the front and I'll be happy. Tighter gaps between cogs requires perfect precision in your derailleur and that precision lasts about one ride before you have to adjust. Leave the nines and tens to the roadies and bring back my sixes and sevens.
  • 1 0
 I have well over 100 days on a SRAM 10 speed group and it is still shifting perfectly, and that's through loads of shit B.C. weather as well. After using 10 speed I'm pumped on it, but even more excited for the possibility of a 9-36 ten speed cassette combined with my Hammerschmidt or a single ring.
  • 1 0
 Would be soo sick with a Hammerschmidt
  • 1 1
 How often are you messing with you barrel adjusters, mikelevy? What kind of riding do you do? For XC 10's might be fine but what is the point with a allmountain light freeride? Half the guys end up switching to single speeds anyway because we don't need to shift that much or worry about cadence.
Out here we deal with fallen timber and maples seem to drop a lot more than what I saw out there on the west coast (it might just be that the trails were better maintained where I rode). I hate that anything smacking lightly against my derailleur seems to knock it out of place and I won't even mention the drops off of skinnies gone wrong. It's bad enough that we all go through multiple hangers every year. I don't like such precision that it's gets hyper sensitive.
I'm running an x-9 dearilleur with x-0 shifters so it's not my gear, and it always starts nice so it's not my tuning.
I keep on waiting for that highly efficient internal rear hub that only runs five or six gears and doesn't weigh a million grams, but that's a dream evidently. I wonder if you added that to a hammerschmit that ran a belt drive. . .
That would be a dream come true!
  • 1 0
 Honestly, I need to fiddle with the barrel adjusters about the same amount as I did with my 9 speed setup - which is hardly ever. For sure less than once out of every 20 rides. When I do it is only to compensate for housing that is pulling through. I ride a shit ton of XC on my 6" Remedy, as well as some shuttles every now and then, but thats besides the point. I'd like to think I put a load of miles on my bike, more than the average rider and lots in bad conditions that should muck up just about anything. I'd disagree with you saying that there isn't much point for AM type riding.. I've been riding for a long time and know exactly what I want my cadence to be, having 10 cogs on the back can mean smaller jumps between gears which is something I appreciate. My take on the 10 speed is that if it works well in all conditions, why not use it?
  • 3 1
 different strokes for different folks I guess.
  • 1 0
 i like taletotells opinion here, i spend all day at work building super cheap bikes with 6 to 7 or 8 speed gears, and the 6 speeds index the best, first time every time. my 9 speed mechs have never indexed properly for any length of time
  • 2 0
 greatly increased chain wear, fine for racing if you can afford to replace parts often and for road bikes that run with smoother pedaling and forces... but for stomping the pedals on a downhill bike? they won't last many miles.
  • 1 0
 Sure they won't last that long but as meantioned in the article worldcups are won by so little margings these days that this could make a difference. Less shifting without the gain of ground clearance and the weight loss can also be achieved by using not a road cassette but a more regular mtb cassette with bigger steps between the single gears.
  • 1 0
 yeah i see the point at WC level and as for weight saving on the cassette my first 3 or 4 gears are hardly ever used, any weight saving is good, but especially on the suspension to lower the sprung weight and improve damping performance
  • 2 0
 The cool thing about this set up isn't the 9 tooth cog as everyone has said the micro drive has been around for ages, its that you can run a 9 tooth on an MTB wheel. You could never run micro drive on an MTB, only a BMX with a thread on free wheel. The part that specialized has done with DT Swiss is create a new MTB free hub that allows you to run a cassette with a 9 tooth. I think its great, the smallest you could do before on a MTB was an 11 tooth..
  • 3 0
 "Every time you shift, you risk a mis-shift (just ask Andy Shleck)."

Sucks for him, this was his year too! Oh yeah, this gearing stuff is cool for dh
  • 1 0
 So if I'm reading into this correctly - Which I believe I had been - the basics of it are:~

increased distance per crank rotation, more ground clearance, simplistic shifting, reduced weight
-- with ground clearance it is obvious that this would be during coasting. Sorted. Most people don't have the steelies to keep pedalling anyway... Reduced options during shifting means a faster reaction based on terrain. This is DH "Racing" for a reason; we really don't need the larger teeth options out back... as for reduced weight; not much unsprung weight lost in my opinion so I'm unconcerned
  • 1 0
 I used to run a Capreo groupset on my commute bike with a 53t front ring (53x9 was a manly gear!), but the capreo freehub body was shit. I can't imagine it will be much good in the mud, but shrinking down the gearing is a pretty neat idea... A friend has a Brooklyn Racelink and it has a 26t front sprocket which gives so much clearance that they don't even need a bashguard!
  • 1 0
 I run a 30-10 right now on a banshee morphine, with a hub i adapted for it, and it works great, but like everyone said its nothing new, in fact, i used all my old bmx parts. The advantage is clearance and weight of shorter chain, less gears, smaller gears, etc, which isnt much, though you also have to realize that when you step to a 9 tooth driver you produce a lot more friction and resistance from the chain, which seems like a hinderance to the race, and if its dh racing, can an ounce really matter that much if you're causing more drag in your drivetrain? idk, i like the smaller gears but i also dont race so its just something to think about. pretty sweet that they are actually making it for mtb finally though!
  • 1 0
 Hey I posted this above

Does anyone know of where you can get a 30 tooth chainring? As far as I knew the smallest 104MM BCD chainring you could get was 32 teeth. Is that a modified crank they're running?

I didn't know you could get a 30 tooth cog for a MTB 4 bolt 104MM BCD crank.
Where would I find one?
Thanks,
  • 1 0
 Glad someone mentioned the dish thing. A non-dished wheel will either be stronger for a given weight or built lighter to the same strength level so that's good for any rider. Not sure it's a better solution to ground clearance issues than a Hammerschmidt though but still everything helps and could suit a lot of riders/racers. Although they don't yet offer race level performance, a belt drive system and an internal hub like Rohloff or Alfine solves so many of the short comings of a geared derailer system.
  • 1 0
 It is FAR lighter than hammerschmidt...belt and rohloff would be awesome if they lightened it up a bit and dopped the price a lot.
  • 1 0
 True, I reckon Shimano might be working on an all-mountain version of the Alfine. I think it could be made reasonably light if aimed at the XT/Saint price level. Like you say weight wise, I can't see it tempting DH or XC racers.
  • 1 0
 Can someone please tell me if they are running a 30 or 32 tooth front chainring, and if they are running a 30 tooth chain ring, how is that possible I thought the smallest you could fit on a 104mm bcd was a 32tooth chain ring? Someone please tell me!!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 In This instance the maintenance isn't an issue. They will be replaced as often as needed. No compromise.

for a factory team rider its all good..

for a privateer racer or recreational rider - not so good

people comment "you won't use the 9T often, so it won't wear?"

unfortunately, the reduction in front chainring size means you will be using the 9T rear cog much more often, and wear / tear from reduced chainwrap and increase torque loads on each tooth/cog and chain roller mean much-more frequent drivetrain replacement
  • 3 0
 Igz has been running 1x6 on a hope SS hub for ever!, least it's been taken seriously now!
  • 1 0
 same (ish) my 4spd has done me well for the past 2 years.
  • 1 0
 He uses a King hub, and it's only 4 or 5. Unless you're talking about something else..

www.pinkbike.com/photo/4343689
  • 2 0
 very true lol shimano has it already haha; i love how these companies are bringing old school stuff back and labelling it new
  • 2 0
 i love that all this push is on 9 and 10 speeds in downhill for the past 5 years and then we go back to 6 the MTB industry is a strange place
  • 2 0
 Not really, a lot of guy's on the WC have been modifying their rear cassettes down to 5-sp with a machined spacer for certain tracks that are mostly steep. In situations where a race is held and theirs no pedaling they use the last 5 gears and move to the center for a better chainline.
  • 2 2
 LOL, I just say excuses for running weak ass crap. I smash my 42 & guard every time I go out and It's straight as an arrow. See what's happening here kids, it's not a clearance issue, the issue is parts are becoming so light and brittle they can't stand up to decent sized impact any more. This is basically marketing at it's best. Maybe if they didn't make parts that last only one big hit they wouldn't have to worry about it. I sure know one thing, something hitting my bash guard doesn't slow me down a second.
  • 3 0
 ^42? are you doing landspeed record runs? I'm guessing the bike you're out on isn't rocking a 13.5 bb.

Why is everyone hating on this like its a marketing scheme? its the first thing drivetrain related i've heard about in a while that actually makes sense. The entire drivetrain becomes more compact, out of the way, stronger and lighter. Whats to complain about there? bmx already made the jump to 9t compact drive 6 years ago.

10spd cassette on a dh bike, now thats a marketing joke.
  • 1 0
 I think everyone is hating on it because 2 months ago they were hyping 10 speed now 6 is the new cool. Well, Which is it?
  • 1 0
 I think if you want 6 speed, 4 speed etc, just put your own together. Other than that there is absolutely no reason anything outside of 8 or 9 speed should be bothered with for dh. SOme may dig it, some won't, but the reality of the fact is a new standard is not needed, especially after we are being bombarded with standards right now. It's one thing to completely change one standard, but shove half a dozen down our throats in less than 6 months is utter bull crap. But hey, at least people are tying to progress.
  • 2 1
 will there be the pedalling problems running a 30 tooth front ring, isn`t most of the dh bikes suspension set up to run 38 tooth rings? might get a bit of pedal induced bob going on i reckon.
  • 1 0
 No it will be fine.
  • 1 0
 I wish specialized would just make a decent chain guide, my big hit has snapped 2 chains piling them up, and i've had it in to the shop just as often to make sure it is all set up correct. very anoying
  • 1 1
 Hell Yes, Bring on Less gears, having 9 on my freeride bike is doing my head in i only use 2 gears 8th n 9th, this is a winning idea, i was thinkin just the other day that i couldn't believe no one had done this yet, Glad to see i'm not the only one thinking this
  • 3 4
 I'd like to know how they are strengthening the smallest cog on the cassette!! .. I snap teeth off and shred my 11 and 12 teeth cogs all the time. Sure a better chainline would help prevent this, but equally - less teeth is bound to mean less strength!
  • 6 0
 Improve your technique.
  • 4 0
 Or buy a cassette that isn't made of cheese. I've never snapped teeth off any cassette sprockets and only a couple on really crap chainrings up front.
  • 3 1
 Hope Pro2 Trials hub? 6 speed!!!! penny.... drop.... clinck... come on. just need a 150 version
  • 2 1
 But does that hub accept a 9 tooth cog? Nope.
  • 1 1
 I was wondering when this would happen. BMX. I always wondered if the chain would be under more stress with the smaller cog and big wheel. Sure it's fine on little 20" wheels. Time will tell i suppose!
  • 1 0
 Profile Racing has been making a 3 and 6 speed MTB hub for years. Both have centered flanges but are not made to accept a 9T cog.
  • 2 0
 Pffff, that's old polish patent from southern poland. My granddad told my brother about it. Nuthin new. Big Grin
  • 2 3
 let me guess, to be able to use this and save 130g of a 18kg bike, you gotta buy a new hub, a new cassette, and new mech, new shifters, new chainring, new bashguard too(?) and a new chain. Right ? So all this can be yours for only 1500€ Big Grin Awesome!
  • 2 0
 Lux, did you read the article? Weight, if it is lighter, is only a small side benefit of the system.
  • 1 0
 Lose the plastic pie plate guard and I like it. I've always felt stupid only using five or six of the gears on my Ultegra cassette.
  • 1 1
 As long as they make a 6spd grip shift for me to flip over and run on my left hand I'd buy it. Less sometimes is more. 9 or 10 gears for dh racing? most people will shift 2 or 3 at a time anyway. I'm a fan of simplicity.
  • 1 0
 this is nothing new (other than 9tooth cog), ive seen people doing 6 gears, sometimes less on downhill bikes for years! spaced out and the high low screws adjusted properly
  • 3 2
 About time. I've been thinking about something like this recently since I only use 3 - 4 cogs on my cassette anyways....
  • 1 0
 same here, i was wondering when they would click in...
  • 1 0
 is there a limitation on the size of your rear axle with a 9 tooth small cog?
  • 3 0
 not too much...remember bmx hubs use 9 tooth cogs on 14mm axles with bearings...they even managed to do 8 tooth drivers on 14mm axles..im pretty sure those are bushings though
  • 1 0
 well see false, the 6 speed isnt the new aspect. the new part is having a 9t cog on a mountain freehub
  • 1 0
 yeh yeh i know...the smallest yet is 11 right?
  • 1 0
 mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmhm
  • 1 0
 I would recommend a Hammerschmidt Big Grin

Personally I would prefer a Saint derailleur, but these guys are sponsored by Sram.
  • 1 0
 Any little edge a bike company can get on its rivals is worth alot to them.
  • 1 1
 skip this shit, and lets get on with the internals. i know you got some crazy labs in serbia with some beautiful light and cheap gearbox. so lets get on with it already!
  • 3 2
 1 x 6 seems like a very clever idea
  • 8 3
 4X and slalom riders have been doing it for years. It's not a new thing.
  • 2 0
 I dont think they have used 9 tooth cogs though but ya, you really shouldnt need 9 gears for world cup Dh racing anyhow
  • 4 6
 Steve Peat use 10-speed SRAM cassette on his way to world champ victory in canberra though..
  • 4 0
 yea but that was a quite pedally course, unlike the majority of World Cup tracks
  • 1 0
 i wanna do this to my bike please but i have 36front
  • 2 1
 its not a win bcuz only Gee wins.
  • 1 0
 it's just a proper a solution instead of using a road bike cog.
  • 1 1
 so basicly they have coppied a bmx dive system and addapted it to a mtb...........awsome
  • 1 0
 best bike with the best shit
  • 1 0
 Simple is better. Good work.
  • 1 0
 What is that plastic ring next to the cogs?
  • 2 0
 A pie plate. Delicious.
  • 1 0
 0.o dobry pomysł ile to ma zębów??
  • 1 0
 can that comment above^^^^
  • 1 0
 indeed wow
  • 1 0
 cheeers dude
  • 3 0
 how is that better? You've missed the point entirely of the rear 9 cog and the 30 front. Lots of people have done that,this is different
  • 5 0
 Fell321, you get an A for effort, but a F for reading comprehension. You're right, 6 speeds are far from new, but a 12 x 150 rear wheel with a 9 tooth cog is.
  • 1 0
 Less is more.
  • 1 0
 excellent idea
  • 1 0
 oh?
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