2015 Trek Fuel EX 27.5 and RE:aktiv Shock

Jun 19, 2014
by Mike Levy  
Trek Fuel EX 27.5 FOX RE active shock testing Photos by Dan Milner and Sterling Lorence

Given that Trek already offers their 27.5'' wheeled Remedy with a carbon fiber frame, it shouldn't came as a shock to see them add a 29er carbon model to the existing aluminum big wheeler platform. There is a more surprising bit of news, though: Trek is now offering the 120mm travel Fuel EX with smaller diameter wheels. Wait, smaller? Yup. The Fuel EX 29er is still available, but Trek told Pinkbike that they are aware that a 29er rider might be a very different animal than someone who prefers 27.5'' wheels: 'We have a philosophy that goes 'two riders, one trail' where, in regards to wheel size, we kept working towards rider-specific usage,'' John Riley, Trek Mountain Bike Product Manager, explained to us. ''Initially, we found that in the 140mm travel range there are really two different types of riders who are looking for a different experience on the trails. We also found that to be true of the 120mm Fuel EX platform.'' The type of rider that Riley is referring to could be someone who, while still wanting to feel fit and fast, might also not shy away from a fun bonus line on the side of the trail; the new Fuel EX platform that he's referring to is the 27.5'' wheeled rig shown here. It also should be noted that there is still a 26" wheeled Fuel model in the lineup for 2015, the $2,099.99 USD Fuel EX 6, meaning that Trek is offering their trail bike platform in all three wheel sizes.


Fuel EX 27.5

Have spent many, many hours aboard their Fuel EX 29er, flying down for two days of riding on the new 27.5'' wheeled version presented an excellent opportunity to compare the two. Now, the singletrack that we rode in Brevard wasn't the roughest, most testing type of terrain, but there's something about going through the trees at mach chicken that never gets old. Yes, there were plenty of Star Wars speeder bike references during the week. No Ewoks, though, just a few massive snapping turtles.

Trek Fuel EX 27.5 FOX RE active shock testing Photos by Dan Milner and Sterling Lorence
  Trek calls it 'Matte Volt Green', and it might just be the safest machine to be aboard come hunting season in your local woods. This was my chosen stallion for Brevard's fast trails, the $5,249.99 Fuel EX 9.8 27.5.


RE:aktiv Damper

The Fuel EX's FOX Float DRCV shock appears to be the same as last year, except for that small RE:aktiv decal stuck to it. What's that all about? You may have seen the press release a few days ago from Trek that talked about them working on new-to-mountain bike shock technology with the legendary Penske Racing, and while that blurb was heavy on the marketing, there is a real connection here between what Penske are putting inside the dampers that they provide for all sorts of auto racing applications and what is being used to control compression forces within the FOX shocks found on the new Fuel EX and Remedy platforms. And yes, the very same principles are being applied to the dampers that Penske builds for multiple Formula One teams, although a single one of those can cost more than what a Session 9.9 goes for. A lot more.

Trek Remedy 29 9.9 Photo by Sterling Lorence
  Same suspension layout as the Fuel 29er, but smaller wheels and new shock technology.


The RE:aktiv design is essentially Penske's regressive compression damper shrunk down and stuffed into the FOX Float CTD shock. It consists of a completely different main piston design that, in very simple terms, employs a spring loaded valve (the special Smalley spring is pictured below) that can open to allow a lot of oil flow through the compression shim assembly. However, when the valve is closed the damper provides added low-speed compression for more efficient pedalling and, more importantly in my mind, more low-speed control that helps to keep the shock from pitching through its stroke when you're on the brakes or throwing your body weight around. This idea is to preserve the bike's handling.

The valve stays closed when the bike is stable, restricting oil flow and giving you a more stable chassis, until a pressure spike begins to open it. This typically happens when an impact of roughly three inches per second or faster occurs, which is actually a very minor hit. Penske worked quite hard at making sure that the system absolutely doesn't behave like a typical pressure release valve, though, and it was made very clear to me that one of the main goals of the RE:aktiv project was to create something that didn't behave anything like an on/off switch, but rather offered a more open and variable feel on the trail. Valve spring rate, valve plate design, and orifice size all came into play in the search for zero breakaway feel, and both FOX and Penske feel that they've absolutely nailed it. Part of this is also down to the velocity sensitive nature of the system: "When the valve starts opening you'll get very quick relief because there's a lot of flow area exposed extremely quickly before it regains control. That's the regressive element that
you're feeling,'' Jose Gonzalez, Trek Suspension Engineer, explained to Pinkbike. ''As the velocity increases, the spring tries to work against that force, but at some point the force overcomes the spring to allow for a lot of flow, so there's no harshness. At the same time, because you've got the flow area constantly varying depending on the force that's pushing on the spring, as well as the ports that the oil has to then flow through, you get high-speed resistance as the velocity increases.''

Want to learn more about how the RE:aktiv shock works? Our look at the 2015 Remedy 29 Carbon includes more photos and information about the technology and the partnership between Trek, FOX, and Penske.




Trek Fuel EX 27.5 FOX RE active shock testing Photos by Dan Milner and Sterling Lorence
  As the song goes, one of these things is not like other...


On Trail with RE:aktiv


A little overwhelmed by the tech? Maybe you're as captivated by how RE:aktiv works as you are by your girlfriend's latest issue of Cosmo? I couldn't blame you for falling into either category - it's a hell of a lot of information to absorb, and, to be honest, it's probably not that interesting unless you're the kind of rider who stops to add or subtract a single click of damping or a few PSI to their shock every few rides... you know who you are, and you probably annoy the hell out of your riding buddies, but more power to you. What really matters is how this new RE:aktiv stuff performs on the trail. And even more importantly, how it compares to last year's non-RE:aktiv FOX Float CTD DRCV shock. Because finding out if the new shock is actually better than the old shock is all that counts, and because the only way to properly do that is to compare them back-to-back on the same section of trail, I had to do exactly that. Myself, a 2015 Fuel EX 27.5 with its new RE:aktiv shock, and Jose Gonzalez, Trek Suspension Engineer pictured to the right, with a handful of tools and last year's shock was all it took.
bigquotesWhat really matters is how this new RE:aktiv stuff performs on the trail. And even more importantly, how it compares to last year's non-RE:aktiv FOX Float CTD DRCV shock.

Most of the singletrack that I rode in Brevard was smooth enough to play billards on, which, don't get me wrong, is more fun to ride than playing tonsil hockey with Lucy Liu, but it isn't exactly ideal for evaluating new suspension. It took a while and I ended up having to import some large, pointy rocks onto the trail, but I soon had a worthy, if a bit short, section within an hour that suited my needs. This included a smooth climbing section, a rough climbing section, and then a rocky descent. The plan: start on the RE:aktiv shock before switching to the previous version (both run with the same settings), and then jump back to the new RE:aktiv shock in order to highlight any differences. What did all that back and forth prove?


• Trail / Descend Mode - I don't think I'm alone when I say that I feel like a well sorted 120mm travel bike shouldn't ask you to reach for the pedal assist lever unless you're faced with a long gravel road climb. Sure, a 150mm+ bike might require some sneaky tricks, but a machine like the Fuel EX should be able to just get on with it, regardless of the shock being left open. The bike pedals well enough with last year's shock that there really isn't much to complain about in this regard, but I did note a slight increase in efficiency with the new RE:aktiv shock when spinning up the smooth climb - the bike's rear suspension simply cycled up and down less under chain torque and body weight movement. No, it isn't a night and day difference, and it is in no way anything like the firmness that an inertia valve system provides, but I'd say that it's likely a bit more "useable" for a trail ride because of this. Climbing up our little test section of rough singletrack showed that both the Trail and Descend modes feel very much like last year's shock, and I'd be hard pressed to tell the difference in a blind test. Actually, I'd be far more likely to spot the distinction between Coke and Pepsi before noting the difference between a RE:aktiv and a non-RE:aktiv shock on a rough climb. This isn't really a surprise, though, because the rocky ledges and holes of our test pitch were enough to open the regressive valve plate and allow oil to flow through, which in turn allows the shock to do its job.

Descending revealed a very familiar feeling, with the RE:aktiv shock coming across a lot like its predecessor on our short test lap when in either the Trail or Descend mode. That's not a bad thing, though, as I've never felt that it's left me wanting for anything more during my time on it in the past. Gonzalez did mention that it should be possible to lower the shock's pressure by 5 - 10 PSI due to how the regressive valving helps to hold the bike up in its travel, which in turn should create a more forgiving ride without sacrificing any ability to "push" against the travel when you're pumping the terrain. This is something we'll have to investigate on more familiar trails, but it does sound promising.

Trek Fuel EX 27.5 FOX RE active shock testing Photos by Dan Milner and Sterling Lorence
  Consistency is key when doing back-to-back testing. That means carrying the same speed and hitting the same lines.


• Climb Mode - Here's where it gets interesting. While the difference in performance between the new and old shocks when in Trail and Descend mode is certainly notable on a smooth climb, the truth is that it is also subtle enough that a rider who maybe doesn't know the difference between a shock pump and tire pump might not take note of it. Flip the little blue lever to Climb mode, however, and there's no way that anyone could mistake the RE:aktiv shock for the standard unit. It's firm on smooth ground, as it should be, but then manages to open up and take the edge off of impacts well enough that it could almost convince someone that it isn't the shock's firmest setting. Yes, it's still harsher than the two more forgiving modes, as it should be given that it takes a harder impact to open the regressive valve plate, but I'd say that it's far more functional than the Climb mode on last year's shock simply due to the fact that it offers both a firm and efficient ride on smooth ground, but can open up to dissipate hits. Back-to-back-to-back runs up and down our little test section revealed that while the older shock felt locked out, the new shock felt firm but allowed the bike to carry more momentum over the rocky ground. Interestingly, the RE:aktiv shock felt much more balanced and in-tune with the fork during this part of the testing, while the old shock, when in Climb mode, had the fork feeling harsh and underdamped.

Trek Fuel EX 27.5 FOX RE active shock testing Photos by Dan Milner and Sterling Lorence
  Gonzalez swapping shocks on my Fuel EX 27.5 test bike while I did the important job of holding the bike up.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesFirst, the downside is that, much like the DRCV air spring, RE:aktiv is entirely proprietary to Trek. The dirty 'P' word is one that gets many heads shaking, and, given the shock's unique upper mounting configuration, I can understand a lot of readers' apprehension to the idea, especially if you think you might want to run a different shock down the road. No one likes to be boxed in, even if said box works very, very well. Boxes aside, the bottom line is that the RE:aktiv shock pedals better when it's left in either Descend or Trail modes, but is also much more forgiving when in the firmest Climb setting. It's true that last year's FOX Float DRCV CTD shock was no slouch, and I've always thought that its two-chamber DRCV air spring allows you to get both sensitivity and big hit control, but the new RE:aktiv damper further increases its versatility. - Mike Levy


Photos by Dan Milner and Sterling Lorence

Must Read This Week

125 Comments

  • + 168
 full floater, you don't say...just left one a dem in the office bathroom.
  • - 34
flag nouser (Jun 18, 2014 at 18:22) (Below Threshold)
 lmaooooooooooooooooooooooooo
  • - 34
flag Its-That-Guy (Jun 18, 2014 at 20:37) (Below Threshold)
 Laughing my ass off, off, off, off, off, off, off, etc...?
  • - 33
flag nouser (Jun 18, 2014 at 20:59) (Below Threshold)
 No. Laughin my ass off, on, off, on,off ,on, off, on
  • + 41
 you are eating too much fat if your poo is floating.
  • + 43
 They got me at 26.
  • + 1
 Fight the future.
  • + 31
 What happened to the mountain bike, wheel size this, shock, batteries, electric, give me a dirte old rigga and some illegal trails, a few beers afterwards hot Zocchi chicks and good mates stoked on riding what ever we had, dem were the days, this marketing shit is doing my head in, really what happened to good times and KISS! Its all Justin Beiber and Active X, Pinky and the Brain and wheelie big wheels ahhh get me out of this nightmare!
  • + 0
 lol well said!
  • + 23
 I dunno, I'm still having a pretty good time without dwelling on the "good ol days". My bike sure rides a lot better.
  • + 0
 Too right scottrallye, people need to stop living in the past and realize that this sport (industry) is maturing.
  • + 1
 Yeah, because bicycles are a pretty new invention that needs a lot of fixing and tweaking before they come into their own. I mean, it's not like they already have been perfected for centuries...
  • + 3
 Progression... The car has been out a long time. I'm glad they didn't settle for a model T with 20 hp...
  • + 2
 Keep It Simple Stupid
  • + 0
 you keep it simple.. ill beat the model t on my 2014 trek then
  • + 7
 Don't be dissin pinkie and the brain yo.
  • + 11
 Sorry if I'm dumb when it comes to shock internals and stuff but after reading the article it reminds me a lot of Brain technology that Fox and Specialized developed years ago. My question is what is the differences between this two guys?
  • + 21
 Brain by spesh uses an interia valve in an external canister. This senses the movement, and the external (as opposed to the internal workings of the penske trek shock) canister *must* be as close to the rear wheel as possible. A weight sits on the valve and is moved when the wheel encounters a bump. This is why some people complain of "clunky" noises coming from their brain-equipped bikes, especially the older models. Brain is supposed to figure out whether the force on the bike is from rider input like pedaling, or from a bump, by using the external valve. If I read this article right, Penske is using an internal valve to create more of a platform on smooth ground, instead of an external on-off damping solution.
  • + 4
 Thanks for the explanation, helped me a lot!
  • + 7
 that was a legit question.
  • + 6
 To elaborate on parkourfan's post, practically it *should* mean that the reaktiv system should feel more seamless than the brain, since it's pressure activated instead of motion activated. By the time the brain allows blowoff the wheel has already moved, so you'll get partway up the first hit then feel it smooth out. The regressive valve works more instantaneously and should be less of an on/off feel; as soon as the oil pressure builds up, the valve allows flow. The wheel doesn't have to be displaced for the valve to do its job.

The original penske article has some good discussion on the inner workings
  • + 2
 @rabocse
No problem! Definitely a legit question.
  • + 2
 The funny thing is motocross bike shocks had better valving a decade ago.
  • + 9
 Now going back down in wheel size for a trail bike because they found "two" types of riders. I don't care... but wow. Who knows they might find a 3rd type of rider who might need the original experience.
  • + 2
 Way to corner the market TREK(26-27.5-29)!
  • + 7
 I'm sorry but your previous experiences with 26s are not available and were found to be invalid.
  • + 1
 ..
  • + 1
 ^you are right. I use a spray that I bought for my motorcycle on my Kashima and its ultra smooth.
  • + 1
 So basically its a bottle of lubricant?
How long does it stay on for?
  • + 1
 I apply it every two weeks or so depending on weather and riding conditions. Honestly, worth every penny and its cheep az sh*t.
Basically a can a year/2.
  • + 6
 No wanting to moan too much...but I will. These 'reviews/first looks' are about as much use as a fart in a space suit! Good amount of geek info, but wtf else is there here? Its a full sus that rides well on a path. Woowoo!!! I'll pop out and order all three wheel sizes to fit my tri-polar riding preferences.
  • + 8
 How about a comparison between 27.5 & 29 versions of both Fuel & Remedy? And why no Talas for the Fuel? And why no Kashima? Gimmee Kashima!
  • + 9
 There is Kashima on the EX 9.9, and no Talas because there is no 32 650b 120mm Talas. Actually there is no 32 Talas at all.
  • + 3
 There is a 650b 32 talas, but it's a 140mm travel fork
  • + 4
 Right. That's what I meant. Salute
  • + 9
 kashima=marketing golden pile of shit.....its all about the seals
  • + 2
 Actually Kashima is a clear coating on the stanchions. Fox chooses to anodize them gold.
  • + 6
 Plus the real expensive kashima is the black one, used in motocross forks, the mtb cheap kashima is just bull***t for us hobos mtbikers
  • + 3
 If you guys are interested in what we might see from fox next...http://motocross-showa.blogspot.co.nz/2013/03/suspension-coatings.html?m=1
  • + 9
 id rather have hookers and blow
  • - 3
 I'd kashima the shit out of my entire bike if I could hehe.
  • + 1
 I miss my old THE forks made by Showa. The original fork to use "kashima"(before it was called that).
  • + 5
 The prices for bikes go through the roof. Don´t get me wrong, I value quality and pay for it.
But technology developments such as the above do not really justify those prices in my opinion.
As manufacturing costs / cogs should come down and economy of scale hit in. Whilst development costs might go up, it must be getting cheaper and cheaper to produce bikes nowadays.
  • + 4
 So this is an essentially useless upgrade.

The review states that in Trail and Descend mode the shock feels basically the same, maybe letting a rider get a slight bit more plushness out of a few less psi and a valve that still allows the shock to sit high in its travel.

But it makes a noticeable difference in Climb mode, a mode, which as stated by the author up front, shouldn't even be required on a 120mm trail bike if it is "well sorted".

I have the 201 EX9 and only ever use Climb mode for extended road climbs, otherwise the bike is in trail mode 99% of the time. Descend is just too soft, unless I jack the air and sacrifice other performance aspects of the fork and shock.

Trek, this is a great frame, the geo feels so nice… please do something about the suspension in Trail and Descend mode, where most all of your riders will use the bike.
  • + 4
 The one thing I don't understand, why only a shock with the valve, I'd must rather have my bike get slacker under hard compression than my fork dive but shock remain composed.
  • + 1
 I asked Dave Campbell about adding the RE:aktiv to the fork. He replied "No comment". I suspect they are already testing. Maybe they want to see how well it is received in the shock before adding to the fork? It sure seems like a good idea to have it in both places.
  • + 3
 I take it there were a lot of pre boost valve RP series penny washers and H/S comp springs from van RC4 shocks on the shelf then. Whatever works, I guess! Clever marketing guys at FOX!
  • + 2
 Heck yea!!!! Fuel EX 27.5!!!!! I knew it was coming, even if some of my buddies said Trek wouldn't make a 27.5 version because the Fuel Ex is a cross country bike and that is a 29er, but I kinda figured the market will demand the 27.5 because it's just very popular now days. Looks like not much changed from the 2014 29er model except the color and that RE:activ shock. I test rode the 2014 29er model at the local Trek shop, it is a nice bike, very maneuverable, especially for a 29er. I hope our shop will have a demo of this too, I would love to try it out and compare it to my 2014 Remedy 9.7 that I ended up buying which is a 27.5 version. I like the idea of the 27.5!!! I think it rocks!!! Well done Trek again!!!
  • + 5
 The two shocks look identical.. wonder if Trek will sell the parts to convert your old DRCV shock to the new tech!?
  • + 6
 I just want the new sticker! Wink
  • + 7
 stickers add 20 horsepower
  • + 2
 Trek bikes are good bikes,but they just don't have the wow factor,I just wouldn't get excited about riding a Trek,efficient,functional-yes.But there are better,more fun bikes around,that you just can't wait to get on and ride,not exactly cheap either.
  • + 1
 Yep, I agree. They obviously put a lot of money into tech and marketing, and their bikes look nice enough (some of their paint is gorgeous), but they just don't excite me. In the same way that I'd never buy a Toyota, even though they make good cars.
  • + 4
 Smooth trails in Brevard? Must have been at Dupont. The real testing ground is back in Pisgah.
  • + 1
 I was thinking the same thing!
  • + 1
 Went to buy my girl a 2014 lush, she is 5 ft and already has a 2012 lush but all trek offers is a size 14 29er. The damn wagon wheels are taller then her.What a shame all we own are treks and now we have to find a new brand because company's are focused on changing out every ones bikes to make more money. I had to order a 26 tire for my sessiin, no longer in stock.
  • + 2
 Damn 27.5/29ers! I had to search for my tires in 26 because they are no longer made, thanks Maxxis, Trek, Specialized, Niner, Kona, Giant, Cannondale, etc etc etc and especially Huffy!

psst: sorry to go off topic.
  • + 1
 Flyr - If you look around at some of the other coverage from this launch you'll see that Trek also released a Lush 27.5
  • + 5
 you have to admit thats one sexy frame.
  • + 1
 It is rather sexy, Im not a Trek fan either ... man we need some proper shootouts on here , I know the bikes good blah blah, I want to know how they stack up, which ones the best
  • + 1
 The full floater system is great, same for the split pivot. Too bad its held back by treks proprietary shock mount and now this ridiculous 148mm axle.
  • + 1
 Too bad you're either stupid or not paying attention. The new 148mm axle is only on Remedy 29. It's not on Fuel EX, nor any 27.5 bikes.
  • + 4
 Not paying attention. No interest in trek anymore.
  • + 5
 What is the weight of the test bike inquiring minds want to know?
  • + 1
 I am confused. All this time on dirt bikes, many ways of increasing damping on big hit are employed to prevent bottoming. And methods are used to keep the damping open through trail junk. Now, I have a DCRV shock on a fuel which opens another chamber after an amount of motion is reached softening the damping. My new Remedy has the Re:Activ shock which has a pressure relief that opens the damping on a hard hit, but keeps things tight for pedaling efficiency. On both, the bigger hit sends the shock to the bottom. Lets say a 3 foot drop. This is mitigated on the old DCRV by jacking the pressure to hardtail proportions, but removes the benefit of rear suspension. No amount of air removes this tendency from the Re:Activ shock. Any help would be appreciated. gblair0957@gmail,com
  • + 1
 Exactly what I figured, lots more marketing than actual reinvention. Its clearly an improvement and the way it works is clearly different from previous shocks but for those who read the release thread, the marketing makes it sound like it had made leaps and bounds in improvements, it hasn't its added slight improvements. Good idea, but not much different at the end than a speed sensitive shim stack really. As you increase the velocity the more shims open up, with this they use a spring that improves it and allows for a stiffer LSC delivered smoothly. It is just a variation and another type of speed sensitive damper. A good one but still nothing revolutionary. They have essentially improved the application of LSC. They have removed its harshness and found a way to have a high LSC damping curve that is delivered smoothly and without having a negative effect on the mid and high speed compression by making is regress back. Good improvements. Could do without all marketing hype though.
  • + 1
 How long before the settings all stop doing anything? On my rp23, when new and after a factory rebuild, it was about 2 months. Then it was open setting no matter where the switch was set.
FOX, I don't need new cooler settings. I need reliability. Any thoughts?
  • + 0
 Who uses lockout? Also, I think a 32 fork on even a 120mm bike is the technology of the past. All of these bikes are capable of so much more with a 34/35 fork.Of Trek can get /fox to build them propritory shocks, then why not a 120/150 Talas ?
  • + 1
 Fuel ex is more of an xc bike and if u climb a lot why would you not lockout?
  • + 3
 "32 fork on even a 120mm bike is the technology of the past"

Seriously? Why on earth would you need fatter stanchions on a 120mm bike? Revelation, Fox 32, Epicon, etc are all plenty stiff now that thru-axles are standard. Back in the days of QR axles I might have agreed with you, but there's nothing wrong with any of those forks at 120mm. Plus 120mm bikes are made to climb like goats, the tiny bit of extra stiffness wouldn't be worth the weight IMO.
  • + 1
 120mm on 27.5 is similar axle-to-crown length as 150mm on 26". For a trail bike, 32mm is still gonna be noticeably flexy.
  • + 0
 You don't get sensitivity and big hit control at once with that DRCV thing.

DRCV could provide big hit control if the float 32 CTD wasn't underdamped. It nose dives and bottoms out too easily unless you choose to put a lot more air and have an harsh ride. 2014 flow divider does not make much difference to me.

Rear shock behaves not too bad but I am constantly afraid of blowing it.

It's a shame because the Fuel Ex (26'') is a very well balanced bike overall. I would expect the same of the 27.5'' .
  • + 1
 How about explaining the reason so many DRCV and CTD rear and for that matter front shocks are "travelling" their way to the local service centre. FOX explain please??? I know, I know!!!
  • + 0
 My rough calculations indicate that if a dealer wanted to stock just ONE of these bikes in each wheel size, frame size, color and build spec, they would have to order 126 bikes! I like choices, but I feel sorry for bike shops these days. The real tragedy is that the accountants forced them to compromise the valving technology (as stated in the previous article) by stuffing it in the existing shock body. If Trek is making this bike in 126 different versions, you would think they are doing so much volume that the cost of producing this shock in its ideal form would only be a few extra dollars. I guess that's how companies get big, by cutting corners on the little details.
  • - 1
 How are you going to do this Fox when CTD does'nt even work yet? Waaaay to much Marketing these days not enough quality. DRCV=Disaster Rate Certainly Very. Does anyone remember the old days when Fox shocks never got sent to the service centre?
  • + 0
 Seriously, DRCV is a joke. I'm not buying any bike that has one single shock option and a mediocre one at that. Can't tell you how many people I've talked to looking to upgrade those shocks because they love those bikes but hate that shock, then they get all butthurt when we tell them its DRCV only. Trek, Spec, Cdale, drive me crazy with all the proprietary parts.
  • + 2
 Mine seems to work fine, had it for over a year.
  • + 2
 so was this a review of the bike or the shock that you can only have if you buy said bike?
  • + 8
 Just a look at the bike and some ride impressions of the shock. The RE:aktiv PR from a few days ago stirred up enough chatter that it was worth a look at.
  • + 1
 the shock apparently
  • + 1
 Are we gonna see a review of the bike as well?
  • + 1
 it's cool Mike- sorry I was quick to criticize. Knowing PB there will probably be a full report on the bike at some point.
  • + 3
 Is it an over simplification to say that they just added a speed sensitive damper to the shock?
  • + 0
 No its not a over simplification to say that at all.
They have essentially created another type of speed sensitive damper. However the spring and curve they have used allows them to essentially have very high LSC that does not negatively cross over to the mid and high speed compression. It has not eliminated the issue of more LSC = less traction internally (like they would have us believe) because this high curve is still very heavily damped. What they have done though is remove the negative effect it used to have on reducing the mid and high speed sensitivity by regressing the curve. It has just improved the LSC support and made the transition and into mid stroke smoother with more sensitivity and more traction after the initial stroke.

They have also slightly improved the way LSC is used, in that mostly increasing LSC can create a harsh point where it blows off this aims at keeping it as smooth as possible, although while you will not get the same curve with a shim change you can make the current dampers smooth like that too with the shims rather than the LSC external adjustment.

So in conclusion they have slightly improved the smoothness of LSC but most the improvement will be seen in the mid/transitional velocity performance.
If you look at the curve though the shock will need to be set up very well so the curve lines up with the right force input due to the regressive curve that regression needs to be initiated correctly.
  • + 2
 @krisnayer yes. All shocks have "speed-sensitive" dampers. The force curve from the penske shock is totally different.
  • + 0
 Heres a review; just go buy a Enduro Expert 29er and trick it out with some Trek sticker. Best advice!! Much better than any Trek single crown other than the Ticket...
  • + 3
 Props to Levy for building his own trail to do a proper test
  • + 1
 If you want us to get excited about a shock, take a lesson from Cane Creek.
www.pinkbike.com/news/north-carolina-dbinline-canecreek-video-2014.html
  • + 3
 Found a floater in the bathroom this morning...
  • + 12
 Do you and Rocky-Mtn-Gman work together?
I think he left the floater.
  • + 2
 He works with me I posted first...
  • + 0
 I don't seem to get the new technology about this spring preloaded damper, 2010+ Boxxer R2C2 and WC dampers work the same way and you even adjust spring preload, so I think I must be missing something here.
  • + 1
 Or...take your current fave set up to suspension works or push and
Get all that "middle activity" support for very little concidering price and...
  • + 2
 Avalanche FTW
  • - 1
 nice looking bike, I really wanted a Trek Slash a couple years ago but really didn't want to deal with the proprietary crap, ended up buying an Intense Tracer 275 instead. #noregrets :-)
  • + 2
 Yep, Trek has reinvented the bicycle again. Everyone please buy this.
  • - 2
 Rode a trek remedy last year in scotland at glen tress. What a complete p.o.s. Ruined my trip. I can't see how this could be much better even with calving changes. Most over priced, over rated hunk of junk out there. Trek just need to ditch the whole concept and start again. But then that would mean they might have good bikes. Can't have that, they are lance loving bunch of pricks selling crap to the muppets... I like it that way.
  • + 0
 Did they really put the "next new shock technology" on a bike with a front derailleur? I haven't run one of those on my XC bike in over three years.
  • + 0
 I love how they made the new fuel shock 120mm. Now I can't upgrade my 2013 fuel that is 130mm. Freakin' Trek.
  • + 1
 Im more curious about the shocks in the foreground of the first pic.
  • + 1
 Good old bs with a new fancy marketing
  • - 1
 5400 bucks for a Full fox sus. Non kashima? why not the factory upgrade to kashima?
  • + 7
 Full XT 2x10 and a Reverb, plus an OCLV carbon frame is pretty good for $5400. Although the price increase to the next level, the 9.9, is pretty steep since it retails for $7999. It has full XTR 1x11 and Kashima suspension front and back though.
  • + 4
 Are you comparing apples to apples? 5k for a carbon 9.8 is pretty freaking sweet.
  • + 1
 Kashima is bulls. Just put some slickolene on your foam seals, keep em lubed and clean and it MAKES NO FRIGGIN DIFFERENCE!
  • - 1
 Coke and Pepsi, Come on man those are two different worlds ! PEPSI is better though
  • + 3
 Ice cold Cherry Coke is one of the greatest things known to man.
  • - 1
 Esoteric airdamper still a fail. Lots of oil and coil rule.
  • - 1
 So they reinvented pro-pedal? Sounds like a better idea than ctd at least
  • + 3
 I've yet to meet a single person who actually uses CTD. Everyone I know simply throws it into trail and leaves it there.
  • + 1
 Yeah that's pretty much what I do too, which is why I don't like CTD, because none of the other settings are really good enough to usually bother switching to, with the exception of "climb" mode on the road and such. Also kind of bugs me how "climb" doesn't actually lock the bike out
  • - 1
 I hate those stock trek seats
  • + 0
 Agreed. Bontrager is far from sexy.
  • + 13
 They don't need to be sexy. They're comfy. You're not looking at your saddle when you're riding so what does it matter?
  • + 0
 Dude riding a Slash on the group ride this weekend tore his Bontrager seat off at the rails, not on a gnarly trail either. Standing up the whole way back to the car is a bummer.
  • + 2
 ^^shit happens....
  • + 4
 I have an old Bontrager seat that is damn near my most prized posession. Sold the Trek bike a long time ago, but that seat keeps hopping from bike to bike because it just fits me perfectly.
  • + 0
 Looks like trek !
  • - 2
 27.5 = unnecessary
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