2017 Intense Tracer - Review

Feb 7, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  


Intense says that their most popular model has been the Tracer. Since its inception in 1999, the Tracer has been a vanguard trail bike, and its evolution is a living history of Intense, beginning as an aluminum, 26-inch-wheel dual-suspension chassis, designed by founder Jeff Steber and manufactured in the Temecula factory—and ending with the made-in-Asia carbon framed Tracer 275c, a breakthrough long-travel design that debuted on same day that Intense announced to the public that it had reorganized the business under a management team led by Andrew Herrick.


Through those six iterations, the Tracer remained true to a single purpose—the ultimate dual-suspension trail bike. The 2017 Tracer breaks that evolutionary chain. It shares a number of coils of its namesake’s DNA, but it is a whole different animal: longer, slacker, more aggressive, and a magnitude more capable on the downs. Its suspension kinematics are not tempered to broaden its usefulness. The new Tracer is a gravity predator. It climbs like a bird of prey, circling up the mountain, unhurried, thinking only of the next chase and a 200-mile-an-hour dive to the valley below.
original Tracer
The original Tracer. Intense image

Intense Tracer 2017 review


Tracer Factory Build Details:

• Frame: Tracer 275 SL carbon, 165mm travel, JS-Enduro Link suspension, carbon upper-link, internal cable routing, ISCG-05 mounts, Boost axle spacing
• Fork: Fox factory 36, Kashima, 160 mm, FIT4
• Shock: Fox factory Float X2
• Transmission: SRAM XX1/X01 Eagle 12-speed
• Crankset: Race Face Next SL, 34T
• Brakes: Shimano XTR, 180mm F, 180 mm R rotors
• Wheels: 27.5” Enve M70 carbon rims, DT Swiss 240s hubs 32-spokes
• Cockpit: Renthal FatBar Carbon 20mm rise x 780mm x 31.8mm handlebar, Renthal 40mm stem, Fabric Scoop Radius Pro saddle, RockShox Reverb Stealth seatpost, 150mm.
• Sizes: Small, medium, large, X-large
• Colors: Red/orange/yellow or matte grey/black
• Weight: 13.4kg/28.7 pounds (actual)
• MSRP: $10,399 USD
• Contact: Intense Cycles


About the 2017 Tracer

The 2017 Tracer’s carbon fiber chassis is a collaboration between Intense founder Jeff Steber and Cesar Rojo and his Cero Design studio in Barcelona. Previously, Intense handled the suspension kinematics and frame geometry, and drew upon the composite design resources of Germany’s SEED Engineering.
Intense Tracer 2017 review

The new chassis shares some of the trademark profile of Rojo’s Unno trail bike: a slim, ovalized top tube; clean, angular frame members; and a deeply sloping top tube with a triangulated seat mast. There is, however, no mistaking that it is an Intense.

Talking suspension, this Tracer has 165 millimeters of rear-wheel travel and sports a 160-millimeter-stroke Fox 36 fork. The dual-link configuration that used to be called VPP has been dramatically reconfigured to provide kinematics near those of a dedicated downhill machine. Gone is the regressive starting rate, intended to minimize pedaling bob and to guarantee firm pedaling. The new suspension curve progresses gently through the mid stroke, with a more pronounced rising rate to control bottoming at the end-stroke. The feel is huge and bottomless, but unlike its predecessor, the suspension doesn’t coddle its rider’s legs. If you want snappy acceleration or climbing, you are encouraged to employ that blue lever on the Tracer’s Fox X2 shock.

Intense Tracer 2017 review
The lower link encircles the bottom bracket shell.
Intense Tracer 2017 review
The upper link is carbon on the SL frames


Construction

Two carbon layups are offered. Both frames emerge from the same molds, but the top three SL models use a lighter and thinner layup, made possible by stronger carbon materials. Intense offers four frame sizes (small, medium, large and X-large) and five different build options ranging from the $10,399 Factory model we review here, to the “entry level” $4599 Foundation model.

Intense Tracer 2017 review
Flush-mounted seatpost clamp.
Intense Tracer 2017 review
No room for a front derailleur, sorry.


The quality of construction and finish are impossible to discern across the price range, with the only visual cue to define the high-end SL models being carbon fiber upper links. Expert and Foundation models feature an aluminum link. The rear suspension rocks on full-compliment angular-contact bearings and all the critical pivots use Intense’s adjustable collet system. Perhaps the most unique aspect of the chassis design is the suspension’s lower link, which extends from well below and behind the bottom bracket shell, over the top, to a pivot location on the down tube. The only explanation of the unusual link design is that the Tracer’s suspension kinematics dictated the forward pivot location.

Intense Tracer 2017 review
Internal cable and hose routing...
Intense Tracer 2017 review
...all run through tubular guides. Intense image


Key construction details include substantially oversized seat and chainstays, braced by a matched pair of vertical struts – a configuration made possible by the elimination of the front derailleur. The swingarm has clearance for tires up to 2.4 inches, and any chain-slap should be silenced by a large rubber guard integrated into the drive-side chainstay. Cable routing is internal, and lightweight plastic tubes are installed inside the frame to facilitate easy component swaps. Down below, a 92-millimeter press-fit bottom bracket assembly is flanked by ISCG-05 mounting bosses that are squeezed between the crankset and the lower suspension link. Intense did not make any provision for a frame-mounted water bottle, which could be a deal breaker for fashion-minded riders who can’t picture themselves wearing lumpy cargo bib-shorts or hydration packs.
Tracer Enduro Linkage
The Tracer debuts Intense's "Enduro Link System" - a deviation of the VPP design that produces a more constant leverage rate. Intense image

suspension curves
Last year's Tracer 275c (blue) had a regressive rate at the beginning stroke to support pedaling. The red line reveals the new Tracer's progressive leverage rate. Intense image


Geometry

Geometry is a moving target in the long-travel all-mountain and enduro categories, and at present, exaggerated reaches and mega-slack head angles are taking center stage. Intense’s collaboration with Cesar Rojo handily puts that debate to rest. Rojo was the man who designed Mondraker’s Foxy back in 2012, arguably the first production design to meld an exaggerated top tube length and slack head angle with an ultra short stem. Mondraker called it forward geometry – and since then, Rojo has been perfecting the concept. As a result, the new Tracer’s geometry is deeply rooted in the rider-forward school of design, but not to the extent that only the world’s fittest and most capable riders can enjoy it.



INTERVIEW


There’s a story here, but rather than feed you the information second-hand, I asked Jeff Steber and Cesar Rojo to comment on the Tracer’s geometry and design.


JEFF STEBER: Intense Founder

RC: What was the motivation for using Cesar Rojo and the CERO Studio instead of the folks at SEED to develop the new Tracer?

Jeff Steber: I had been wanting to work with Cesar on some projects for a while and now, with our European headquarters in Barcelona where CERO design is located, it also seemed like good timing.

I have always admired Cesar’s design vision and him pushing MTB suspension, geometries, and design forward. This is right in line with the Intense design philosophy and pushing our new models to the
Whistler
PB image
leading edge. We have been working on a DH project with the new Intense Factory Racing Team as well as some other exciting projects, and mostly on the longer-travel bike projects.

We also have some projects with Thomas at SEED - one that I personally am very excited, as it is a new category for us at the other end of the spectrum. We currently use both SEED and CERO as developers of the carbon bikes and, depending on the type of bike segment, they both have their strengths. They are both important parts of our development teams and work through alloy prototyping here at our factory, through developing those into carbon models, and through the manufacturing process. The whole process is overseen by our product manager, Chad Peterson.

RC: Did the new Tracer begin as a clean-slate design, or is it a continuing evolution?

Steber: The Tracer has always been one of our strongest brands within our brand, so really it is a redesign/evolution, but at the same time, Enduro has become a very strong global segment, so it was a perfect time to push Tracer a little further.

We have the Recluse in the line that really sits solidly in the trail bike/all-mountain segment - where the Tracer used to be, as far as its geometry and suspension feel, and it is still using our Trail Link setup. Whereas the 2017 Tracer has the new Enduro Link with suspension kinematics and geometry that are optimized for enduro.

RC: Now that Intense has a model dedicated to the genre, when will you announce an EWS enduro team?

Steber: We are currently focused on Intense Factory racing and pushing DH bikes to next generation for the next season. It just so happens that some of our DH team members are quite good enduro racers, especially Jack Moir, who placed really well in a couple of EWS events last season, including a second place in stage six and eighth place overall in La Thuile, Italy.


CESAR ROJO: Cerro Design

RC: The new Tracer rides like an entirely different bike than last year's 275c. Did you have any time on the original before you began work on the 2017 version?

Cesar Rojo: Of course. The first thing we did was to get me on the old Tracer to understand how it rides and also because I never before had a chance to ride any type of VPP suspension. So, it was really good to see the strength and weakness and try to work around them to hopefully improve it.

RC: You pretty much established the rider-forward geometry movement while working with Mondraker. The 2017 Tracer, however, seems to
Cesar Rojo
RC photo
be a step back from the more exaggerated numbers that we would expect from you. Can you explain?

Rojo: Well that initial Forward was developed around a ten-millimeter stem, so we did compensate the bike length for that. But, once Mondraker went back to the 30-millimeter stem, they never compensated, so the bike was 20 millimeters longer that it was designed for.

In the latest years, I have been jumping around some Mondrakers we still have in the office, and other not-so-extreme long bikes and the main difference for me was that those extreme long bikes are super stable, give lots of confidence, but also take away fun due to being so long and hard to maneuver - even more if you are not so strong.

So, in the end, when you buy a bike (at least from my point of view), fun to ride is on the high side and performance, for sure, is super important. But, since I am not trying to win EWS’s, I put the fun part as a quite important one. So, in the end, it is all about compromises, and those [long] bikes have advantages, but for a certain, very small group of persons. And, they still need to be proven by winning races. As you know, in downhill, Mondraker has no forward geometry, so really, no wins on long bikes yet.

RC: Why did you abandon the regressive starting curve that characterizes the kinematics of the modern trail bike, in favor of a continuously rising rate?

Rojo: That was the hardest part to achieve. What I found out of the regressive curve, is that when you are braking or riding light, the bike gets kicked all the time due to the very harsh initial part. So, this regressive made sense when XC bikes used to be ridden with zero-percent sag, but nowadays, you really don’t want this anymore for pure suspension performance. What you want is a suspension that can start moving with the smallest of the bumps, so this is what we tried to do here. And, it wasn’t easy, because it is something that is inherent of VPP with top-link driven shocks. But, I believe we have succeeded and this gives the bike a completely different riding feel than any other VPP out there.



Tracer 2017 geometry


Key Components

Ten thousand dollar mountain bikes are equipped with most rider's dream list of components, and Intense's Factory build is exactly that: Fox's 36 fork and X2 shock are sitting at the top of the charts at the moment. SRAM Eagle 12-speed is both desired and necessary for a softly-sprung long-travel machine that is required to earn its turns. Renthal has become the must have among the sport's most talented descenders, and who's going to argue with an Enve wheelset that costs more than the shuttle trucks that some future Tracer owners drive? The Tracer's lofty component spec is the main reason that it hits the scales at only 28.7 pounds.


The Factory Build
Specifications
Release Date 2017
Price $10399
Travel 165mm rear, 160mm font
Rear Shock Shock: Fox factory Float X2
Fork Fox factory 36, Kashima, 160 mm, FIT4
Headset Cane Creek
Cassette SRAM Eagle 10 x 50t
Crankarms Race Face Next SL, 34T
Chainguide ISCG 05 mounts
Bottom Bracket SRAM press fit 92mm
Pedals NA
Rear Derailleur SRAM Eagle X01
Chain SRAM Eagle
Front Derailleur no provision
Shifter Pods SRAM Eagle XX1
Handlebar Renthal FatBar Carbon 20mm rise x 780mm x 31.8mm
Stem Renthal 40mm
Grips Intense Lock-on
Brakes Shimano XTR Trail 180mm rotors front and rear
Wheelset Custom build
Hubs DT Swiss 240s
Spokes DT Swiss
Rim Enve M70 carbon
Tires *e-thirteen TRS 2.35" front and rear
Seat Fabric Scoop Radius Pro
Seatpost RockShox Reverb Stealth 150mm
Intense Tracer 2017 review





bigquotes...The Tracer's ability to claw its way around corners is the first hint of its descending talents.

Intense gave Pinkbike a medium and a large sized Tracer for this review. I typically ride mediums, and initially, I felt stretched on the medium Tracer, but found it to be comfortable after I had some time on it. Test rider Harold Preston chose the large and reported a similar adaptation period. Taking the advice of Intense team mechanic Chappy Fiene, we set the shock and fork towards the stiff side of supple, which initially feels like it will result in a choppy ride. Once you build up some speed, however, the suspension delivers a supple, extremely quiet ride that is sensitive over the smaller hits, and with a lot of support in the mid-stroke. I prefer to set my shock at 30-percent sag, but the nature of the Tracer's gradually rising rate is such that increasing or decreasing the shock pressure simply moves the rear suspension to a different ride height while delivering a similar suppleness off the beginning of the travel. That blend of supple and support translates to predictable traction, and the Tracer's ability to claw its way around corners is the first hint of its descending talents.

Before you can enjoy the Tracer, however, you'll need to follow a couple of rules. The first is to keep your weight over the stem. There is no escaping the effects of the bike's 65.5-degree head tube angle, tiny stem, and long reach. Until you learn to take the reins and direct the Tracer where you intend to go, it feels a little cumbersome. The second rule is (as fellow test rider Harold Preston remarked), you have to be the boss. You have to make a conscious effort to push the front of the Tracer into the ground, unless you are descending steeply, in which case, your body falls naturally into position, more or less centered between the wheels, and with a noticeable amount of pressure on the handlebar grips. Reproduce that feel and the bike will do just about anything you ask of it.

Intense Tracer 2017 review

bigquotesIts rear suspension never settles into a spot where pedaling feels efficient without switching the Fox X2 damper into climb mode.

It should be no surprise then, that the bike's rider-forward geometry favors much steeper and more technical descents than its 2016 cousin. Spend enough time on it and you will begin to seek out rowdier trails - the ones that used to be the domain of DH sleds. While that may seem like journalist's cliche, the latest Tracer would be at home in any bike park, and by the same token, it isn't much of a trail bike. Descending trails that don't trace the fall line, however technical, can be a little boring.

Speed makes the Tracer happy. When you start doubling rock gardens and airing drops that you would normally roll, the Tracer awakens and the real fun begins. Push it hard through the turns and the worse you'll get is a grippy rear-wheel drift. It will slam through a nasty set of boulders, or if you choose, you can finesse your way through—as long as you keep your momentum up, all things seem possible.

Intense Tracer 2017 review

bigquotesThe Tracer is a forgiving platform for jumping. Think wheel high and the front end will stay up, keep an eye on the landing and the Tracer's front end will arc towards your target.

As important as it is to keep the front end weighted when maneuvering in earnest, the Tracer is a forgiving platform for jumping. Think wheel high and the front end will stay up, keep an eye on the landing and the Tracer's front end will arc towards it. It saved my bacon by shrugging off a few landings that should have tossed me. The better jumpers who rode the Tracer reported similar results—that it didn't buck and that they were comfortable jumping from uneven, natural terrain.

What the Tracer doesn't do all that well is climb. Its rear suspension never settles into a spot where pedaling feels efficient without switching the Fox X2 damper into climb mode, and even then, it is not all that inspiring. Once you get it and stop racing to the summits, the Tracer settles into a more luxurious pace and actually feels OK on the legs. Of course, the Tracer doesn't care about the work required to get to the top. All it wants is another crack at that short, sweet dive to the bottom.

Intense Tracer 2017 review


Technical performance

The Tracer's big numbers were on the money. Its 75.5-degree seat tube angle seems just right for muscling up steep and techy climbs and its front end is slack enough to take on scary vertical without causing the steering to go haywire on slower trails or seated ascents. Its smaller numbers were also well executed. The bottom bracket was just high enough to keep the pedals from smashing everything in sight. I only had a handful of pedal bashes and none so great that it sent me off line. I had to research the chainstay length (they are remarkably short, at only 17 inches/432mm) to discover how the rear tire could find grip on wet boulders while I was leaning over the front of the bike.

Suspension, both the Fox 36 fork and X2 shock, and the Tracer's revised kinematics are spot on. The bike felt right from the get-go. That said, though, I wonder what a coil shock with a climb switch could bring to the table?

Braking felt smoother and more controllable than I recall Shimano's XTR stoppers have been, partly due to the Tracer's rear suspension, which does a great job of keeping the tire glued to the soil. We did overheat a caliper shuttling DH runs, which resulted in a bleed session to remove the bubbles, but beyond that, the Tracer found enough traction to use the sharper braking power of Shimano's best trail brakes.

Our Tracers came with super grippy 2.35-inch e*Thirteen TRS tires, which hold onto the earth like scared baby monkeys to their mothers. Unless you are pointed nearly straight down, though, they feel draggy. If you shuttle most of your trails, then you will rave about the grip and consistency. If you earn your turns, however, consider investing in some faster rolling rubber. Harold switched to a Maxxis Minion DHF up front, with an Aggressor in the rear and his Tracer was noticeably easier to pedal on the flats and climbs.

Intense has nearly broken free of its loose pivot curse, but we did have to adjust the lower link bearings twice during this review. Nothing huge, just a small amount of bearing play that may have been natural, but it's worth reporting.
Intense Tracer 2017 review

Intense Tracer 2017 review




Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIntense, in collaboration with Cero Design Studio, has successfully reforged the Tracer from one of the more versatile trail bikes in recent history into a sharp-performing enduro racer that could double as an epic park shredder. Intense says that the 2017 Tracer is an evolutionary step, but I would describe the Tracer's transformation as a metamorphosis. The playful, ready-for-anything trail bike has enlisted in enduro boot camp and graduated with honors. The new Tracer is sharply focused, eager for mortal combat and (dare I say) far more capable than most of its owners will be. If you want to slay trails, Intense can now sell you a proper weapon. - RC





353 Comments

  • + 162
 "More travel, More of everything!" Neat-o! *watches helplessly with crying children as as house is repossessed
  • + 133
 Cant ride a house!
  • + 22
 @kiddlivid: you seen my bike?
  • + 27
 $10K USD ?... holy molly, I have to painted with orange spray, remove the decals, throw it away the invoice and then my girl won't kill me.
  • + 19
 @FabienTT:Yeti, SC, S-works and many others have 10K bikes and no one seems to question it. There are lower priced options on the tracer line, this is just the balled out one
  • + 13
 @kiddlivid: Agreed Yetti, Santacruz, S-Works sounds like what I'm looking for. Thanks buddy.
  • + 4
 I would like to know how the braking bump compliance "braking kickback" is on this bike? little to none I hope!
  • + 14
 @kiddlivid: Actually, I'm pretty sure someone makes a comment any time those expensive bikes are posted. It's a recurring theme in comments when PB reviews models that small segment of the market can afford.
  • + 4
 The old tracer had a 10g build so it shouldn't be too much of a surprise where the pricing is at. Actually all factory builds flirt in the 10g range
  • + 1
 @robwhynot: which is all the time
  • + 11
 $10,400 + tax + 3 cans of Dip-It spray to cover the gaudiness ...priceless.
  • + 2
 @loopie: It´s f*cking ugly! The recluse paint job is a work of art so was the previous tracer, and now this it doesn´t make sense, it looks like a cheap bike
  • + 17
 I'd really love to do a long term comparison between something like this (or a top spec S Works/Trek etc) and an equivalent from YT and Canyon. YT's equivalent is $5,600. That's pretty much half price, still comes with 36s and is specced out to within 15%.

I have no idea what would come out best, but this isn't like Ferrari vs Skoda. It's more like Ferrari 488 vs Audi R8.
  • + 11
 Yes that bike is damned expensive. Biking is damned expensive. Can we move on please and not turn everything PB review into debate on pricing.
  • + 82
 You better have a side-job for your-side-job.

$10,399 USD = $13,683 CAD at todays rate.
Add in the beauty 12% tax here in BC and the grand total is (cough) $15,324.

On the bright side, that's only $534/lb. A bit more than Kobe beef, but a steal compared to Beluga caviar.
  • + 4
 First, let me say wow. Then, can they make it brighter? Then, wow. Then, a lovely machine that all of us may want, but few of us have access to the terrain to do it justice.The trail bike begat Enduro, which begat the Enduro bike, which became as narrowly focused as a DH bike.
  • - 4
flag CactusLover (Feb 7, 2017 at 12:22) (Below Threshold)
 @FabienTT: My Firebird XX1 was $1,900 cheaper with better suspension.
  • + 4
 @g123: I thought it was only 5% on sporting goods?
  • + 3
 @CactusLover: My thoughts too. Similar weights as well
  • - 4
flag CodeBlue (Feb 7, 2017 at 12:46) (Below Threshold)
 @FabienTT:

Friends don't let friends ride SpecialEd
  • + 8
 will I be 5x faster if I buy this bike instead of a 2000€ one?
  • + 2
 @g123: only 5% tax in BC on bicycles.
  • + 2
 @treymotleyDH: I think its a rip! Who would even buy one!
  • + 15
 @themegawatt @BEEner @charmingbob:
whoops, my bad you're right. That changes everything. Only $14,367 then... I'll take 2.
  • + 1
 @g123:
Import duties in BC are 13% plus 5% sales tax.
  • + 3
 So the real price all said and done would be 16,234.08.
And that will also be purchased from a company that can't get any other Fox parts aftermarket. (MEC)
  • + 0
 @g123: Only 5% tax on sporting goods... Still overall crazy expensive though.
  • + 1
 @g123: No HST on bikes.Only GST 5%.
  • + 4
 Get rid of those wheels (which are overrated anyways) and price drops to $8000
  • + 0
 If this is forward geometry, then my 2014 Enduro 26 (457 reach) is, as well.
  • + 1
 Prefer the Pivot Firebird to be honest.
  • + 4
 @CactusLover: What suspension does your Firebird have on it? The 36/X2 combo is basically the best money can buy as far as air suspension goes.
  • + 2
 @shredteds: Same suspension on the FB, but Fit4 cartridge, not RC2 in the forks
  • + 2
 @ButtersNZ: Ahhh. Personally, I'd rather have the RC2.
  • + 2
 @shredteds:
Have you tried the FIT4 with the E16 tune and PTFE damping fluid? I've tried both and while bother are amazing dampers I'd say the FIT4 would be better suited for 90% of riders.
  • + 0
 @z-man: I'd agree that the non RC2 fork is better for most,but I find that having independent compression adjustment is more valuable than a pedaling platform.

I would agree that the non RC2 setup is better for most - I just like to have more things to tinker with/excuses at the trailhead!
  • + 2
 @shredteds:
Yup! And that's the 10% I'm talking about.
Lots of people will just run the RC2 damper on a random spot because they either don't care or don't know how to set it up.

That's why they make both!
  • + 1
 I'm confused. If you mostly ride in B.C (%5 GST + %7PST) but live in Alberta (%5 GST only). Which province should you buy your bike in? Considering B.C. is where you would need your bike servicing most and many Alberta bike dealers/mechanics get flabbergasted with top of the line bikes anyway. What is this import duty in B.C. @z-man is talking about?
  • + 2
 @SithBike: Import duties only apply to complete bikes and built wheels.13%.
  • + 72
 What the Tracer doesn't do all that well is climb. Its rear suspension never settles into a spot where pedaling feels efficient without switching the Fox X2 damper into climb mode, and even then, it is not all that inspiring.

ouch.. not a great report for a $10k bike, unless it was a DH bike.
  • + 87
 Props to the reviewer for calling that out instead of trying to give it a more flowery description.
  • + 7
 $10,400 for a bicycle. Jesus Christ.

And that's before tax and shipping. But that's not a bash on just Intense, bike mftr's and parts companies have all been complicit here. MTB is becoming a sport for the rich it seems like. $1000 forks, $500 droppers, $200 pedals, $1500 drivetrains......
  • + 5
 Exactly. At this price point a bike needs to do everything well. Too many other options that can do it all with the proper setup.
  • + 32
 I have never understood why using a climb switch to climb better seemsoon like such a terrible thing? It would be better not to need to for sure, but if that little lever allows the bike to descend like a boss as well as climb better than a dh bike that's seems like a good tradeoff for all the effort of flicking a switch...
  • + 6
 @chrisingrassia: It worries me. Motorcycling did this, too. A lot of models are very expensive super machines (think $15k to over $20k USD). They are clearly aimed at baby-boomers with tons of disposable income who've been riding for 30 years. Who else has the experience and disposable income to handle a 700+ pound bike complete with stereo, heated seat and grips, cruise control, etc etc?

Several smart motorcycle manufacturers realized that they needed to start selling smaller, cheaper models (that don't suck!) to create a new generation of riders. After all, in another 20 years the current group of buyers will disappear.

I hope that is not also true of mountain biking (I know a guy in his 70's who still rips) but there don't seem to be too many mountain bikes that I'd call decent for less than $2500 USD. Sure for $1000 you can buy a bike with a RS fork you've never heard of and questionable brakes but who really wants to ride that? The trick is to sell a cheap bike that doesn't suck. Fox 32, Deore brakes and drivetrain, etc. Good enough, and won't poach the market of serious riders.
  • + 2
 For $10K there should be nothing left wanting
  • + 1
 @chrisingrassia: they don't call it the new golf for nothing mate.
  • + 7
 @warehouse: The new Slayer seems to have the everything part covered. Going strictly by the reviews here, it seems like the better bike. Would need to try both though.
  • + 1
 @VHarman - my thoughts exactly. Why wouldn't someone use climb switch for a climb longer than 15 minutes on a 160 bike (sorry - ANY, FS bike) is beyond me... why wouldn't someone buy a shock equipped with such switch while most DH shocks come with option to have it is beyond me as well... I guess it's partly because many journalists claim that they never use it. Just like they claim they don't use fork travel adjust if it's installed on a test bike. So fkng edgy indeed. Makes me think of them as bad ass experts almost instantly... instant respect. NOT
  • + 9
 @VwHarman: There are a lot of riding areas where there are quick transitions between climbing, descending, then back to climbing where the technical nature of the trails makes reaching down between your legs for the lever again and again. A bike that can handle both ups and down's reasonably without hittin' switches allows the rider to concentrate on the trail and not what mode your rear shock is in.
  • + 5
 @bicycle019: but this is a bike that is most likely to be climbed for a long time by most of it's owners. I would love to hear people's opinion on Nomad in that respect, because I have never ridden a VPP bike which wouldn't bob without loads of LSC... What is strange for me here is that there's Float X2 mounted to it and it's LSC should be at least as good as on CCDB Air, which you can tune rather well for frequent ups and downs, where you'd like to have more LSC anyways ( since you pedal so much). CCDB blows very well through LSC when a square edge bump comes along. Kinematics is one thing, but you just can't cheat the oil flow unless there's some weird wobble between Sag and the midstroke. Cesar claims that his take on VPP is very linear so... extremely suspicious...
  • + 4
 @bicycle019: It's fairly reasonable to make the point that this bike isn't meant for that kind of riding, though. With how capable trail/"AM" bikes are now, the only difference between riding stuff like that on a enduro race bike like the Tracer, & a "all mountain" like the Recluse, is the Recluse will climb easier, but you'll hit the limits of control on the downs at a slower speed than you can mange on the Tracer.

We don't complain that DH bikes don't climb well, & it's similarly silly to complain about the technical climbing skills of a bike designed around smooth, untimed ascents & nearly DH worthy speed & challenge on the downs.
  • + 3
 This is an Enduro bike not a XC or Trail bike so yeah its going to sacrifice a little in the climb department but makes it up going DH. In Enduro races only the DH segments are timed (not the climbs) so who cares if you are not first to the top of each segment. The shock has a climb switch so if you are climbing just turn it on, seems simple enough. Not sure whats the big deal? Where I ride (Southern Cali) I climb to the top, than take a couple minutes to gather myself, drink my water before I point my bike downhill. The only segments I care to look at on strava are the DH segments, I can careless how fast or slow I am on the climbs. This is my next bike, I currently have the 2015 T275 and love it. To me it climbs great, in fact, I took the Monarch off and put a Vivid coil on it. Obviously I dont have a climb switch and it climbs fine to me.
  • + 2
 @groghunter: I think the point is that there are many bikes that give us both options. I'm sure there's a group of buyers for an amazing bike like the Tracer (the new me, trying to be more positive on PB) but the vast majority of us are better served by something closer to the balance point between climbing/rolling terrain and downhill. Also, my skills allow me to ride close to the limits of my trailbike on the terrain I like to ride. I simply don't have enough terrain where I live, where this bike would make sense. Even the closest enduro series to where I live (CES), likely wouldn't justify this bike. That's not a slight on the bike, though.
  • + 4
 @codypup: point being, that means this bike isn't designed for your needs, the same way that the M16 or the spider aren't. If you want that bike, buy a recluse, or a Troy, or a Bronson. Not a Tracer, Spartan, or Nomad.
  • + 3
 @groghunter: I just don't really agree with the assessment.. I ride a yeti SB5 and have no problem keeping up with guys on the bigger enduro bikes (and I wouldn't say I am a better rider, we are all around the same level). The one and only place the Enduro bikes outperform are straight, fast, chunky terrain. That is pretty rare to find for long periods of time even here in the rocky mountains and the desert. An all around bike is just better all around, unless of course you are using it for a DH bike. So.. If it climbs like crap, I don't want it, we have big, steep climbs around here...
  • + 12
 @bicycle019: I get this perfectly, I promise. My take is that by the time we hit a full blown Enduro bike, or bike for any purpose that has 165 mm of rear travel, we have to be honest about what the purpose is. If people buy 160mm + bikes for xc riding, they are on the wrong equipment. A bike at 160+ is mainly designed to lose elevation not gain it. My only point is that a bike can be built to be awesome downhill. If a small switch makes getting that bike to the top of a hill less heinous, why are we bitching about this?
  • + 1
 @VwHarman: I guess it depends what you call XC riding?? I don't really know what that is, I ride a bike, usually up a big climb (due to where I live), sometimes its 2000ft of climbing, some days in the summer are easily more that 6000ft.. Like most "enduro" riders, I prefer the down not the up, however, if you are too worn out to enjoy the down, whats the point?? My main point is.. is 165mm, super long all that much faster going down and my assessment is that it is not.
  • + 2
 @warehouse: like a bottle cage spot
  • + 1
 Hey @RichardCunningham, was that climb in that pic cleared aboard the Tracer? Can I see more of it (the trail)? I think this review calls for some short riding footage clips.
  • + 2
 @TommyHuynh562: I've got a similar bike, 2015 T275 w/a CCDB Coil CS on the rear and that bike ultimately replaced my DH bike. Climbing isn't too bad, but it's worth the struggle to the top to reap the reward of pointing it downhill.
  • + 2
 @groghunter: @groghunter: I don't think that's the same. The difference between a Nomad and Bronson or a Troy and Spartan are not that extreme. Either bike is capable as trail or enduro, but obviously are better at one or the other respectably. Very few Spartan or Nomad owners are "burdened" by their bikes spending lots of trail time...

Granted, we should soon see a new Nomad and I'm sure a new Spartan not that far behind and I would expect them to be even more DH orientated. (because the last versions of the Troy and Bronson were more Enduro orientated) Though I'd be surprised if they gave up that much of their current climbing abilities in doing so...? (The test on the new Slayer makes it out as needing to be in the steeper geo setting, but once there it was a decent climber.)

(IDK about tracer/recluse, etc.)
  • + 3
 @stiingya: now you've got me thinking about the new Spartan. That's gonna a rad bike.
  • + 2
 @stiingya: As a Spartan owner, yes, it climbs about how the Tracer is described in this review. It's markedly less capable on the ups, especially technical ones, than my last bike at 150mm, even with the much better geo & 650 wheels(which I have found an asset on technical climbs, even more so on bikes with less travel than a Spartan.) This is especially true if I don't flip the climb switch, & keep in mind, I'm on a monarch +, while this bike has a DH shock. I doubt my bike would climb as well as it does now with a Vivid or X2.

Any company that makes a "AM" bike & an "enduro" bike, the enduro bike is going to be the fastest downhill weapon it can be without being a burden on the liasons. Any climbing ability it has past that is a bonus, not the expectation.
  • + 4
 Reading this review made me decide to add a Push ElevenSix to my 2015 Tracer T275 and forget about buying a new bike for a couple years.
  • + 2
 @bicycle019: Obviously you are in the minority or people would have bought Kona's Magic link bikes in droves.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Word! Unless anti squat is low (which i really doubt) i think theyre taking a piss here.
  • + 2
 @VwHarman: this is my favorite post in the page about the Tracer. Thanks. I was hesitating between the Recluse and Tracer. I want the travel of the Tracer but the climbing ability of the Recluse. But most of my riding like another poster said, revolves around climbing to the top and the downhill is the payoff. I don't care if it takes me 30 seconds more to get to the top. Plus, there's a nice little bike park about 45 minutes away, just north of Montreal, and the Tracer is the perfect bike for that type of riding too, un'ess you own a DH bike. The new tracer should be my next bike.
  • + 1
 @mrdirt76: That's it! For me at that point, as I pedal essentially a mini dh bike up a hill I'm stoked to have a little switch, I flick it with one finger and it climbs much more efficiently. Perfectly? Nope. Really well compared to a similar bike a short number of years ago. I think it's easy for us to forget how far bikes have come over the last 5-7 years because of how much new tech is thrown our way.
  • + 2
 @zooey: Yes, Preston is a beast on the climbs.
  • + 56
 "Intense did not make any provision for a frame-mounted water bottle, which could be a deal breaker for fashion-minded riders"

The word you looking for is 'comfort,' Richard.
  • + 29
 I really don't get this anti water bottle push. who the F decided that a backpack, either jumping around your back or limiting freedom of breathing, is a great thing that everyone should follow? Sideloaded bottle cages make it virtually impossible for the bottle to fall out. Ehh... and those blokes have a bloody nerve to laugh at fashion and Enduro.

Hello Mountain Bikers with limited world view. Enduro is not the most fashionable thing in MTB anymore. Laughing at Enduro is. This stupid anti-Enduro push, making people say they enjoy smaller bikes, trail bikes they call them now. Hey you found yourselves another safe space where nobody can see how slow you are. Because that's what Enduro did - it exposed who you are. Hey! There's nothing wrong about being slow or non- competitive. We all make different life choices. It is pretending you are fast, lying to yourself is the stupid bit. Keep hiding in whatever niche you can find and pointing fingers at water bottles, goggles in open face lids, fanny packs, too much travel, it won't change who you are.
.
  • + 43
 @WAKIdesigns: Im confused .... are water bottles cool or not?
  • + 3
 @DARKSTAR63: It's what roadies use, so in my opinion, no it's not cool.
  • + 18
 @DARKSTAR63: I duct tape my bottle to the frame. Way more Enduro, and therefore, cool.
  • + 15
 @DARKSTAR63: I don't give a flying dry pussy if they are cool or not. I like riding with one. I like my upper back free of dangling sht. I take backpack only on 25+C because then I need loads of water and I need to drink frequently. And that happens rarely on the western coast of Sweden. Total of 10 rides a year.
  • - 3
 @MTBrent: it is your joke that is trending Big Grin You are so no-enduro Big Grin
  • + 8
 @WAKIdesigns: I hope one day I log on to Pinkbike and see a Waki drawing of a flying dry pussy. That would make me happy. However, I think I heard of some guy recently who might grab it, even if it wasn't his...
  • + 2
 @VwHarman: hard to express dryness in a drawing... oooh if I could only make it rain tonight...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: thank you! That was pure greatness! Ha!
  • + 8
 Yeh it's not fashion, it's required to carry water so why not accommodate? Way easier to have a water bottle mount than wear funky bibs, fanny packs or a sweaty back heater. The less crap you have on you the easier it is to move around.
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: I was going to say "welcome back, we missed during the last T_____ bash", but now you've hurt my feelings.
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: While I totally agree, it just goes to prove that intense built an Enduro specific bike here, and most enduro racers are well kitted on their back, not just water, but food and tools as well. If they were marketing it as a trail bike I'd want to see bottles. I'm with you love minimalist riding and hate feeling restricted by a back pack.
  • + 1
 @robwhynot: I think there is simply no room for water bottle in the front triangle due to suspension layout... as much as I do like having a water bottle on the bike, I find it ridiculous to test a bike, love it, then not buy it because it has no bottle mount...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: fair... if a bottle mount is that significant in one's purchase decision why even test a bike that doesn't have a mount location?
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I find that ridiculous as well, which is why I bought my bike despite the fact it didn't.
  • + 2
 I guess Richard has his minion to carry his water around. Obviously doesn't want to be seen wearing a pack!

And how long have bottles been around for? Longer than back packs anyway. So to dismiss those who use bottles as fashion minded is simply way off the mark.

Another bike to never own. I don't care how good the bike is or how much of a good deal (YT etc) it's good to have the choice between the two ways to carry water. Taking a back pack on a two hour ride is a joke.
  • + 0
 @Jfm46: I bet that if you were living in California, you'd take 2 bottles for one hour ride, so maybe that's where he's coming from.

Meanwhile:
dirtmountainbike.com/news/exploding-e-bike-battery-causes-half-million-euros-worth-damage.html

Imagine if this News get's on Pinkbike... I can smell a poll
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Would you p*ss on an E-Bike if it was:
A) Over $10,000
B) had 26" wheels
C) on fire
D) Make freeride great again.
E) all of the above
  • + 0
 @nickkk: piss or pass?
  • + 36
 Ronald McDonald called - he wants his bike back
  • + 32
 So it is basically a single crown DH bike where they labeled a large a medium and an XL a large. Oh and they put XC brakes on it when they should have put Saints. Anything else I missed?
  • + 4
 disagree. 75* seat angle, not going to pedal like a DH bike regardless of lower anti-squat than Intense's trail bikes. I would be surprised if we don't see AS around 100% at sag in any event. leverage curve looks great for an aggressive bike. geo looks very well-thought-out to me with the steep seat angle, long-ish but not extreme reach, reasonable BB height, not stupidly short CS, short seat tube lengths. I could complain about the build kits and MSRP but they aren't so far out of the mainstream for high end bikes (no one pays MSRP anyway). for a guy who loves the Nomad, I'm surprised you aren't chomping at the bit to throw a leg over one of these. I am!
  • + 2
 @hardboiled: Looks like they picked up on the issues with the Nomad leverage ratio challenges during aggressive riding - not particularly interested in the bike...but it does seem to another one of the many.
  • + 4
 To each their own, but I don't get the trend towards ridiculously long bikes. If a medium is now a large then my only option is to ride a small with the seat post at or beyond max extension or use the shortest stem possible. Both options suck.
  • + 1
 @dangerousdave:

That hasn't happened here. Intense put RC on a large and the numbers are not out there.
  • + 3
 They put on Next cranks when they should have put on SIXC cranks?
  • + 1
 483 reach is longer than the majority of manufacturers make...
  • + 1
 @hardboiled: I think they nailed the geometry, it is the fact that the bike doesn't climb well that kills it for me. The one concern I have with the geo is the reach. I earn my turns and that is the beauty of the Nomad and other bikes in the category. They are the complete package going up and down.

Add in the fact that there is no water bottle mount and you have the true rebirth of the freeride bike.
  • + 0
 @dangerousdave: I agree as well, longer is better to a point, what I have noticed in my area is every ones bike is so long they are actually altering the trails so people with long wheel bases can ride them, and those the trails are more boring for people with normal agile bikes that like snappy tight handling
  • + 1
 I'm confused by the mini-DH enduro bike trend, sure some of the steeper EWS races might require this but why is Graves choosing to ride a stumpy (as did Brosnan when he made an EWS appearance)? Rocky Mountain also claim they are making both the new Slayer and the Altitude available to their EWS team...

On another note, what happens next when they relaunch the Carbine as a 29er Enduro sled that can climb as well, does it make this bike redundant for anything but park riding?
  • + 0
 @SonofBovril: if you are prepared to lash out some serious cash for a 160 bike, then skip carbon rims, invest in a exceptionally good shock (EXT, Ohlins, Push) and tuning for it. You will then notice that 160 bike can climb as well as a 120 bike, given most people put exactly same components on them (tyres play particular role here), whether it is SC 5010 or Nomad. So if you get a bike that is as efficient, then why cut down on downhill capability which vast majority of us focus on anyways.

The "too much travel, too slack geo" argument has been used in 2010-2012 when people were swapping DH bikes for 160 bikes. And it was bullcrap. People were doing it not for handling, but for ability to climb. These days this argument doesn't exist. People just don't want to be identified with Enduro. It's a fashion thing. And a rather self unaware and mistaken one. Because in one way (just like 5 years ago with DH bikes) they say, that they want a smaller bike, BUT they still want the very long reach and slack head angles - as you can see under this article where people say that this Intense is not long enough. Theeen as I wrote above, people say they want smaller bikes, but they keep components from the big bikes: 150-160 forks, big knobby tyres, tough wheels, wide bars etc. So the only real difference people say they want is that they want less rear travel. Which is... stupid because as I wrote above, great shock will make big bike pedal as well as small one. And people don't care for these shocks for small bikes because these bikes suck at bump eating anyways. Don't believe me about geo? Go look at articles on Pole bike or Geometron. Almost everyone is super excited for these. Then a bike like Intense comes along and people whine for them being short across the entire fleet.

I've been there with enduro bikes before enduro got cool and I've been there with short travel bikes before trail got cool. Bronson does sound like a good alternative for Nomad, but 5010 is plain stupid, unless you use it as a long travel XC bike in a very, very light build.

As to what pros use - it is beyond our comprehension. They use whatever feels right to them. Jared Graves surely deadlifts 10x 300lbs with ease, comfortably clears a double on BMX track at speed that would make you not even make it to the landing - how about trying to mimmick these treat of his? Their physical and skill capability far exceeds what we can do. Try riding Yeti Sb66 down PMB track and open some gas - you'll fkng die. Treating a 160 bike as an otpimal park bike is not smart by any means - why wouldn't you ride a DH bike? Forgives more mistakes of a person that doesn't ride like Jared graves, and is more durable. The last two years is where downsizing in MTB started going wrong. And call me a conspiracy theorists, I feel it has to do with A:bad taste left by Enduro hype, and B: the current hype for short travel bikes. It has nothing to do with actual performance
  • + 2
 @dangerousdave: Because making a man feel short, narrow, and inadequately stiff is still a good way to sell him something, and sales reps would like to get paid. Besides, your bike has neither post nor saddle! Some Pivot models are still short (429 Trail, Mach 6). Also Karate Monkey or Switchback, if a more trialslike chainstay length is desired.
  • + 0
 @salespunk: Have you rode the bike? I've read a lot of reviews that say it climbs great in this category.
  • + 3
 @creativefletch: I have not ridden it yet. Every review I have seen has mentioned the need to utilize the climb switch. This also points to the probability that those difficult mid stage climbs where you are hammering out of the saddle for 30-60 seconds are not going to be it's strong suit either. Maybe my mind will be changed once I get to ride one, but as of right now the lack of a bottle cage and multiple reports of bobbing while climbing says they shot for a true mini DH bike and hit that mark very well.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I have been saying the same thing for a while about 160 bikes climbing as well as 120 bikes and even went as far as buying both to compare Strava times myself. Same wheels/tires=same times going uphill, but a lot less fun going downhill. Everyone boohoo'd me as well. For some reason it boggles people's minds that the amount of travel has nothing to do with climbing performance even if the suspension is not moving.

I also pointed out that Mitch Ropelato won the Enduro National Championship here in the US on a 5010 even though 99% of the riders would have walked certain sections on a 160 bike. Roughest courses I have seen in the US ever.
  • + 33
 Sunglasses and a beanie, indoors.
  • + 0
 Valid point, but Cesar Rojo is a serious force to be reckoned with. He has a lot of mtb history in his pocket! Clever chap!
  • + 10
 Cool story. He's not wearing sunglasses. Jeff is though.
  • + 1
 @nickkk: you're right! My apologies. Both have hats n goggles on mind!
  • + 2
 Thats when you know someone is cool...or hungover.
  • + 1
 I noticed that too. I don't know this guy but that look indoors is pretty douchey.
  • + 10
 Steber looks intense, and Rojo looks like he gives cero f*cks.
  • + 4
 And dude's sweater game...
  • + 3
 @MTBrent: You found the roots of the brand name right there.
  • + 1
 I guess thats what you wear when you charge 10k for your bike. Gotta stay rad to sell product even if you're past the age limit.
  • + 20
 "climbs like a bird of prey, circling up the mountain, unhurried, thinking only of the next chase and a 200-mile-an-hour dive to the valley below." We have now seen the most retarded sales pitch of a review. ever.
  • + 2
 wait for the "Climbs like a sloth during hibernation "
  • + 18
 Like all previous intense bikes this one will be on clearance by fall as well, so just wait and buy at 30-40% off at end of season. I like to buy the latest and greatest and sell the next year which is why I don't ever plan on buying another intense as you can buy new online for what people are asking for used... resale value just ain't there
  • + 17
 But even at 30% off the thing is still outrageous at $7300.
  • + 2
 Good point. Also intense already released a bijillion new bikes recently (primer, recluse, and the acv. Even though I don't know what the differences between all of these are lmao) so the bikes will probably loose even more value at the end of the year since Intense made so many new bikes and will have to get rid of them
  • + 1
 Funily enough, I've found Intense to be more marketable than other, newer, more relevant bikes, should those bikes be from a less known brand. I had far more lookers for my M6 last year than I did for a 2012 Titus El Guapo, & generally, DH bikes are a nightmare to sell these days compared with enduro bikes. Thing is, people actually type "Intense" into the search box on buy/sell. Ain't nobody typing "Titus."
  • + 1
 @groghunter: I wouldn't own a titus for that reason haha...
  • + 1
 @manchvegas: I got an extremely good deal on it new (basically, I asked if they had a sponsorship program, they said yes, made me a brand ambassador, & gave me a great price on a new frame) So it was the right decision at the time. Even at the low price I sold it for ($1400 with a Lyrik RC2DH, I9/WTB KOM wheelset, & a lot of other high end parts) I really did well on a bike I rode for 5 years. I didn't make money on it, but I didn't lose too much, especially since they ended up giving out forks to a bunch of the early buyers after mistakenly saying it should be run with a 160, rather than a 170.

Conversely, I fully lost my ass on that M6. More interest doesn't always translate into getting a good sale price. Basically, lots of people asked me about the Intense, but most of those offers didn't pan out. On the Titus, rather than getting interest via brand name searches, I got interest when I dropped the price enough to show in the searches of people who didn't search by brand, but instead looked at every bike for sale under a max price.
  • + 17
 Yeah yeah I know it just came out, but can we PLEASE get reviews of bikes that are a bit more reasonable? This model is $10,400...of course it will feel good when riding it. We want to know how their lower models (the ones we can afford) ride. Because lets be honest, this gives me almost no idea how their middle of the line model rides.
  • + 3
 Your argument is tired... it wont ride any different with a different crank or derailleur. You want to know the difference in components, go find a review of the components.
  • + 17
 @mattsavage: But if everything is different on it from wheels to crank to suspension, then yes it will ride differently.
  • + 2
 @ianswilson815: That totally true, the suspension components being the major factor. The factory with the Yari and Monarch is going to ride differently than the more tuneable 36 factory and float X2
  • + 2
 and it's also available as a frame only option, so any review is moot at that point. why bother doing reviews...?
  • + 1
 @mattsavage: Ha fair enough. Touche.
  • + 4
 @ianswilson815: you also have to take into consideration that the bike company wants the best possible review for their bike. Yes, it may not be the highest selling build option but if they reviewed the lower end model and then started having issues with components it would take away from the bike review.

In this day and age, the high end components are great and the mid range stuff is just as good to the average rider. The low end stuff isn't even bad. Bike tech has come a long way in the last couple of years to add very small compromises between price points.
  • + 0
 @mattsavage: They should *definately* review it as a frame only, with no parts fitted (not even a shock, as the performance of those will vary between models), so that all frames can be tested and compared equally... Then everyone will be satisfied!

I learned a while ago that top of the range suspension on an average frame is better than average suspension on a top of the range frame. People can do demo rides and decide for themselves...
  • + 1
 If they would just give it up on the overpriced ENVE rims they could hit $9,500 or maybe even crack 9K...there must be some people that feel the need for it or they wouldn't keep doing it.
  • + 1
 @Snowytrail: The Elite build comes in at 8k with E13 carbon rims and XO eagle...
  • + 15
 What an embarrassment the MTB industry can be: a porky 29 pounds beast for a staggering $10,400. Add 3-4 pounds for an "entry level" at the fantastic price point of $5,200 and you are going around with a weight that used to be downhill bike territory. And all for a bike that does not climb unless one locks the rear shock? wow!

We are going backward performance-wise, think early 2000, but cost is up 4 times to what it used to be!!!! Ridiculous!
  • + 0
 Keep in mind that this is the top of the line model, and it spares no expensive on spec at that price. Pretty comparable to other brands with similar spec. But adding 3-4 pounds puts the base level at 33-34 pounds. Thats MUCH lighter than almost every DH bike today. Most DH bikes today that are around 35 pounds are considered pretty dam light.. The only bike i've seen be crazy light is a V10 (XL at 32.8 pounds) and the M16C with a custom build to be about the same. I admit that Intense are a bit out to lunch on their pricing at the low end as you can get a Carbon Devinci Spartan with similar spec for $5000 that weighs 32 pounds. But these bikes would out perform the living shit out of a bike from the early 2000s. The top end bikes are definitely going up in price with inflation, but the trickle down technology in the base levels has come a long way from back then.
  • + 3
 There must be at least $200.00/ 2lbs of paint on that thing
  • + 0
 @FarmerJohn: being sexy ain't cheap
  • + 17
 The "foundation" version has Shimano BLM506 brakes (on a 5300 euros bike........)
  • + 13
 only 10,5k$, still don't know why canyon and yt are successful ..
  • + 2
 there was a dude riding a Tracer at the bike park 2 wknds ago....but then again his car was an Audi A8...so I'm guessing he was rich all the way around.
  • + 1
 @preach: Pro(bro) deal are something Intense loves to support. Friends get the hookups...
  • + 1
 @nicolai12: I imagine pro/bro deals will account for a fair percentage of sales of the top end model.

At north of 10k the industry is pushing pricing well into completely mental territory.
  • + 7
 @preach: I got a 2014 Tracer t275, $10k model, for $3000 no tax, used, from a bicycle shop. I'm broke as f*ck. I work part time. I drive a 1998 Ford Ranger extended cab with bucket seats. Just gotta look around the deals are out there for the taking.
  • + 9
 Good review and interview, love the bike, but I have a question regarding use of language when talking about geometry: when looking at the numbers it seems fairly "normal", 460mm reach in large, 65,5° HA and 432 chainstay is not extreme in my eyes when comparing to other similar bikes.. of course numbers dont say everything and small differences add up to different experiences on the trail.
But while reading the review it sounds like a very "modern" geometry, like Mondraker or Geometron inspired, I dont really get it compared to other reviews- for example the Merida One-sixty has in size Large (granted, they seem to not offer an XL but still) 475mm reach, 430 CS and 65,3° HA and the reviewer says "It might not they longest or slackest bike out there, but I found One-Sixty's numbers worked really well for me. "
  • + 5
 This reviewer is ~20 years older than the Merida reviewer; he made his mark making full suspension knobby-tired road bikes.
  • + 3
 Here is the Dune's geometry so you can compare.

Mondraker Dune 160mm Travel
FRAME SIZE S M L XL
A Seat Tube Lenght 380mm 420mm 470mm 510mm
B Top Tube Lenght 608mm 633mm 656mm 678mm
C BB Drop -2mm -2mm -2mm -2mm
D BB Height 343mm 343mm 343mm 343mm
E Chainstay 432mm 432mm 432mm 432mm
F STA Actual 68.9º 68.9º 68.9º 68.9º
G STA Effective 74.7º 74.7º 74.7º 74.7º
H HT Angle 65.5º 65.5º 65.5º 65.5º 65.5º
I Fork Offset 44mm 44mm 44mm 44mm
J Wheelbase 1190mm 1215mm 1240mm 1264mm
K Head Tube 110mm 110mm 120mm 130mm
L Reach 450mm 475mm 495mm 515mm
M Stack 593mm 590mm 602mm 611mm

The medium Tracer has an effective TT of 597mm and a reach of 436mm compared to the Dune's 633mm and 475mm.

"Rojo: Well that initial Forward was developed around a ten-millimeter stem, so we did compensate the bike length for that. But, once Mondraker went back to the 30-millimeter stem, they never compensated, so the bike was 20 millimeters longer that it was designed for."

The math doesn't add up. Note that Intense put RC on a large, when he normally rides a medium and that the dropper is almost as slammed with the seat tube as it can get. The dropper is a 150mm.
  • + 2
 This is just a normal, modern geometry bike. Nothing especially "forward" about it.
  • + 2
 Why not put a 50mm stem on it so people can properly weight the front wheel without having to lean forward?
  • + 2
 @Vanguard @daweil that comment confused me too. It's very similar to the old Process line that seems to be the new normal
  • + 13
 When Meastro and VPP have a baby
  • + 2
 DW link
  • + 12
 id only pay if its over $15000
  • + 4
 With tax and exchange it's very close. . . .
  • + 6
 How come it's called "JS Tuned" when Cerro really did the work. Guess you can name your own suspension when you cut the checks.

Intense used to be special. Sure they use to crack all the time and had horrible customer service but they were "special". Welded up in right here in the USA.

Cerro designed it.

Generic Chinese Carbon Factory builds it.

Intense designs the graphics and picks the colors?

What's the difference between them and Transition? Not even going to compare them to a company that actually engineers their own stuff.
  • + 3
 Transitions have straight rear triangles...?
  • + 10
 12K CAD for something that will be old standard in 1-2 years, no thanks.
  • + 5
 The foundation model is 5200 USD according to another source...5k for the base model! At first I thought, "oh sweet, another option to consider this summer when I go shopping", but nope. It's just to hard to consider a base model bike for 5k when there are other options available for just as much and better components.
  • + 5
 Almost every comment is about the price. (Including mine)

YOU ARE NOT ENTITLED TO OWN EVERY BIKE. Yes YT, Commencal, and Canyon offer bikes for much less but guess what? Intense will still sell many of these regardless of the complaining. There are A LOT of people that will buy this bike. And you will be riding the YT's and Canyons having just as much fun. So what's the problem? This bike isnt driving the direct sale bike company's prices up. This is a Ferrari 458. The YT is a Z06. They can perform basically the same but no one complains because it's a Ferrari. This bike is for those that want the Ferrari.
  • + 8
 Intense has no where near the quality or brand recognition of a Ferrari. Get real.
  • + 2
 @skelldify: you know what I mean. No one is forcing you to buy this bike
  • + 4
 The bike aint a ferrari just cause it costs 10k.

There is a demographic here who can afford this sort of bike. But even if there wasn't, the criticism of its value for money is still very valid since it doesn't seem to offer anything over other "boutique" frames like the Nomad or SB6C.

10k? 10k for what? The tracer doesn't seem like a real winner here. May as well buy a mondraker
  • + 1
 @Ninjasstolemytv: then buy a mondraker. It's that simple.
  • + 2
 @joalst: may as well close this whole comments section down then. bike manufacturers can obviously do no wrong, nobody should have anything to say
  • + 5
 If the upper link was black, I'd really, really like this bike.

I like the paragraph starting with: "before you can enjoy the tracer" - it describes the proper way of riding a bike... I just don't know why nobody writes that in reviews of modern DH bikes which feel like sht unless you ride them on steep sht full of huge rocks, keep the gas open and commit to everything.
  • + 7
 Nice bike, but a lot of people were bashing the similarly spec'd Rocky Mountain Slayer reviewed a couple of days ago, which is $3400 USD less!
  • + 10
 Lol, 10k.
  • + 8
 Are these bike companies losing their minds. It is a bike. 10K USD is just plain stupid.
  • + 4
 Did Intense do something different to their marketing structure or the way they sell to local bike shops recently? It seems like around here anyways that all the local shops have gotten out of intense and taken on other premium brands.

Is it because of MEC carrying the brand now?
  • + 5
 I'm curious too about MEC carrying Intense, and why Intense would choose MEC. MEC is a co-op, and was founded on the whole notion of quality gear for less money than you would pay elsewhere, so why would they take on a very expensive "boutique" brand like Intense? MEC doesn't even stock high-end replacement parts for bikes like that. Similarly, why would Intense think that MEC is going to sell more bikes for them than having a greater number smaller bike shops, (who have now dropped the brand). A similar thing happened when MEC took on Ridley bikes; all of the other local sellers were forced to drop out.
  • + 4
 @Blawrence: You make great points. I agree with all except the less money. Every time I go in there I feel I have been ripped off and I could get what I need online much cheaper. 50 dollar T shirts what the hell are they made of. I think the over priced Intense is perfect for them. I bought an over priced Ridley in Aug when they discount their road bikes.
  • + 10
 The shop I work in carried Intense. Basically the Canadian distributor dropped Intense. Intense came to us, and wanted us to carry ONLY DH bikes, and no trail bikes. They said MEC was going to carry the trail bikes. Given that we never sell their DH bikes, and, if anything, sold a few trail bikes a year (always around cost because no one wants them), we declined. They seem to think MEC will do well of them, but no one buying a "boutique" bike is going to go to MEC for one. I think they are committing suicide in Canada with that move. Especially when you can get a Santa Cruz for cheaper, which has MUCH better warranty, and bearing warranty, and overall a better finish with better quality control..
  • + 3
 @Blawrence: thanks for the insight on this. I know the local shop dropped intense cold, hard and fast. Last year. From one day being a great brand to the next day saying "they are all on clearance and we're switching brands"

Seems like they are just fostered a really bad reputation for themselves.
  • + 1
 @tigerteeuwen: I think you're talking about Intense earning themselves a bad reputation, but if your shop was hyping them as a great brand only to drop them stone cold the next day then the shop isn't looking too shiny either.
  • + 1
 @dsut4392: It may not be a reflection on the local shops. I'm not sure, but MEC may have an "exclusivity" clause with Intense, which if true would mean that the other shops had to drop Intense. I believe MEC does have an exclusivity clause with Ridley, so the other shops had no choice but to drop Ridley.
  • + 1
 @Blawrence: we had the choice of whether we wanted to keep some of their bikes in our shop. But they only gave us the option of DH bikes.
  • + 5
 Admire Intense Cycles, but can't get past the loooooong, off kilter Intense logo on the down-tube / head-tube. Drives me bonkers.
  • + 3
 Stupid question here.. but, how do they get bikes to balance like this for the picture? Do they use some kind of unseen stabilizer; photoshop; or does someone just outside the picture frame quickly release and re-grab before it falls..?
  • + 5
 So does the $10k model still use a press fit bottom bracket ? I only skimmed the article but any mention of color combos besides the Mcdonald 's / specialized enduro one?
  • + 1
 They have AGrey/black model on Jenson.
  • + 5
 It does use press fit.
  • + 1
 There were a few other colours shown on the other article they posted
  • + 3
 Let me break it down: It's labelled as a trail bike,but it only excels on steep downhill. It's a pig on the climbs,pivot bolts STILL come loose,and costs 10k+ .
For that kind of money,I would go full custom,and not with a Intense frame.
  • + 3
 What advantages does this have over a nomad? Seem the regressive to progressive rate is what makes the nomad so grippy and therefore good, this loses that for a typical progressive rate. But going to the typical spring curve they've lost the traction and pedalling platform advantages of VPP, correct me if I am wrong.
  • + 9
 No, you're the only one noticing the huge elephant standing in the middle of this review. Intense has released a slightly more progressive/supportive version of the Nomad 3, which came out about 3 years ago. While the suspension feel may be slightly better for jumping/playful riding, it begs the question: is that it? The Nomad probably pedals more efficiently, can take a bottle and uses a threaded bb. I don't see the point besides the name on the downtube.

Nomad 4 drops later this year. It'll be interesting to see what direction SC go considering the Bronson 2 covers most peoples 'all-around' needs. I'm guessing a mini version of the V-10...
  • - 3
 This level of bike should be designed for a rider of a certain abilty, the Nomads suspension does not support that kind of riding with its wallowy feel when pushed.

This more linear progressive design will make for a more predictable ride which faster riders will appreciate.

Problem being a lot of the people who buy this kind of bike will be older more well off types who wouldnt have noticed the Nomad is a turd (do any SC riders use one at all in EWS?) and will instead like the fact that it feels 'plush' and they can mash on the pedals with little technique and still climb at a decent rate.

I may be biased as I hate bikes with odd leverage curves, this new Tracer looks great but I simply cannot afford one.
  • + 4
 @Racer951: the nomad is by no means a turd and if you think the suspension is wallowing you haven't taken the time to get it dialed in with a proper shock it's probably one of the best bikes every created and it has been a trend setter for the industry
  • - 2
 @poozank: I think the Bronson was a success, the Nomad however not so much, the suspension is flawed, the next gen will see a new leverage curve to give the bike more composure under faster riders.
  • + 3
 @Racer951: The Nomad is excellent it's a high skill level bike whereas the Bronson is more accessible. To really take advantage of the Nomad's geometry and suspension you have to be going significantly faster than you would on a Bronson. For expert level riders who have the terrain and the skills to make the Nomad shine it's a brilliant bike. As far as composure the Nomad with the X2 is more composed at speed than many DH bikes.

The Bronson gets more mainstream attention because it caters to a much larger percentage of riders who can make the most of it. To get the most out of a nomad you probably have to be in the top 10% skill wise versus a Bronson you can be in the top 45% and really enjoy it. By saying the nomad is a bad bike all you are revealing is that you aren't a high skill rider who can appreciate or push it to where it needs to be to excel.

Think about an F1 car as an extreme example. Unless you have the skills to push that car fast enough to create downforce and heat up the tires you will slide off the track and crash, this does not mean the car is bad but rather it demands a high driver skill threshold to perform properly.
  • + 2
 @poozank: I would love to agree with you but you are basically arguing that the most skilled riders benefit or extract most from a bike with lots of travel with a low amount of mid stroke support and a geometry that causes almost all riders to upsize due to lack of length.

Also if you were right would Josh Lewis and other sponsored riders not have used them at the EWS? They all used bronsons until the Hightower was available.

The truth is many Nomad riders are middle aged weekend warriors, the comparison to F1 is hilarious.

I wont bother arguing the point, just wait until the next gen bike is released with geometry and kinematics similar to this Intense.
  • + 2
 @Racer951: I've spent some time aboard both the nomad and bronson in the last few months, and the nomad is by no means a turd. Like @poozank said, with the right terrain and rider, the bike is amazing. That being said, The new gen Bronson closed the gap to the current nomad. I found the Bronson to put a bigger smile on my face given that it's so playful, corners like a demon, and tracks better than most 150mm bikes. I do, however, believe the nomad is more capable in the super rough, borderline downhill bike worthy trails. The nomad is a better "one bike" to have, give you can pedal up and ride down basically anything a downhill bike can. If you own a downhill bike, the bronson is going to be a more fun "in between" bike. Personally, I didn't find much to separate the two bikes, other than the nomad needs to be going faster to really get into corners, and it plows faster. I'm going to be getting a Bronson later this year as I have never ridden a bike that has put a smile on my face like that one did. I personally think the new Nomad coming out this year will be a 29er with 165mm ish travel. That is the only realy way they could get more of a difference between it, and the bronson without just becoming a DH bike. My two cents
  • + 3
 I don't understand all of the price haters. There are several levels at different ranges to fit your budget and if you can't afford the foundation build then this is not the brand for you. Components are components and I understand you can sometimes get better components for the same price on a different brand. That being said I would not trade my solid Santa Cruz for a rickety Trek or some factory direct brand. Just like everything in life you get what you pay for. Intense frames are a higher quality that the bargain brands these price complainers are noting. If you disagree, buy a different bike, its a free country, find something better to do with your time than trolling pinkbike to complain about everything.
  • + 1
 The point is to let people now that, no, you aren't getting what you pay for in this case.
  • + 2
 @skelldify: Explain how someone is not getting what they paid for if they buy this bike?
  • - 1
 @jgreermalkin:

1) Press fit BB
2) I had three (THREE!) defective Intense frames over the course of 15 months.
3) Sh!t customer service
4) Countless other weird quirks
  • + 2
 @skelldify: Oh I understand, anyone who buys this bike will have your same personal experience and therefore will not get what they paid for.

1. The bike specs clearly state a press fit BB, am I missing something? Are they not going to get the BB they paid for? Of course I understand you don't like press fit BB but unless the bike was advertised with something different the buyer is getting exactly what they paid for.
2. There are a-lot of factors that can lead to a defective frame but again this is your personal experience. I can guarantee you are thrilled with parts that I have had fail on me, does that mean you did not get what you paid for because of my personal experience?
3. Personal experience
4. Personal experience
While I understand you are not a fan of the brand because of your personal experience, your personal experience does not = people who buy this bike will not get what they pay for. I have several friends who ride Intense bikes without issue, did they not get what they paid for?
  • + 2
 @jgreermalkin: Roll the dice with $10,000 then.
  • + 6
 Intense is late to the party. Some years ago its was cool now nobody need another "playfull" 10K bike
  • + 2
 My dirt bike cost $6,000.00 new. Do you know how bad ass it would be if I put $4,000.00 more into it? Why are people spending that much on a bicycle? I will take my '12 Enduro, 26", coil, aluminum sled and my not so KTM dirt bike and be just fine. Props to Intense though, nice bike!
  • + 6
 Did they fix the pivot hardware? Particularly in the upper link?
  • + 6
 Shootout review: 2017 Tracer vs. 1999 Tracer.
  • + 6
 So a $10,399 enduro bike that can't climb? I'll pass.
  • - 2
 Can't?
  • + 2
 Very Expensive indeed.
It not that it can't climb, it thrives on descending, you wouldn't want this whip between your legs on a 50 mile epic with 10000 feet of climbing.
The New Tracer is suited more towards an "Enduro World Series" lifestyle, Intense needed a bike in their fleet to compete at this level. The prior Tracer was a tad under gunned in this league and still a brilliant do it all bike.
  • + 5
 Holy shit... 13699 canadian .... I know it's all subjective, but wow! That's a spicy meat a balla!
  • + 4
 Not a fan of Intense. I've seen way too many broken frames. Over priced, over hyped.
  • + 1
 The genuine advantages of a VPP design are a) the unique anti-squat profile that is so readily attainable with classical positioning of the VPP links and b) the heavily manipulated wheel path that is possible through the use of well positioned and dimensioned counter-rotating upper and lower short links. The characteristic anti-squat curve when charted relative to travel often approximates an inverted "U" with AS above 100% and rising at SAG and then deeper into travel AS levels fall rapidly due to a wheel path design that mitigates chain growth in the deeper reaches of travel in order to reduce pedal feedback. (note: Dave Weagle and Yeti have been able to achieve somewhat similar results in respect of anti-squat profile and pedal feedback attenuation using quite different linkage designs.) The idea that a high performing bicycle suspension was well served by using a regressive Leverage Ratio, however, was always a rationalisation. It just so happens that, as Cesar Rojo says, a regressive Leverage Ratio "is something that is inherent of VPP with top-link driven shocks."

But while the promotion of regressive Leverage Ratios as an exemplary characteristic of mountain bike suspension geometry was a wholly misguided exercise the modifications that have, evidently, been needed to dispense with the regressive Leverage Ratio bathwater have resulted in the baby, i.e. the first rate anti-squat profile so common to VPP bikes, being thrown out as well. With the anchored pivot of the lower link being in the position it is (which is at odds with Steber's other Santa Cruz influenced designs) this linkage can't possibly result in the high anti-squat levels of a common VPP design. From the common elements used to turn out VPP designs exhibiting all the classical qualities Cesar Rojo has fashioned a bike that shares none of these qualities. I doubt that it will be up to the standard of other VPP bikes. That's a pity, because ridding the bike of the regressive Leverage Ratio was a laudable objective. But this is not the right way to achieve it.
  • + 5
 YT must be laughing. Their bikes ride up hill and are half the price.
  • + 6
 Canyon is licking their chops...
  • + 4
 The comparable Capra is not a very inspiring climber either.
  • + 1
 Capra is 4 bar crap that requires lockout yo climb.
  • + 4
 Will they have this one at MEC? $14,000 CAD seems like a bit much for the MEC cycle buyer
  • + 2
 OHHH i hope they offer it in old school MEC colours,eggplant and teal green combo would be perfect.HA.
  • + 1
 So much hate on the $10k price tag... Did everyone skip right over the $4,500 dollar option? You can buy a Nomad for as little as $3,800 or as much as $8k. I'd say it's pretty standard across all manufacturers to have a range of build kits and prices. Of course they're going to give the reviewer the best option they can.
  • + 3
 FYI, Nomad with Enve wheels is 10k
  • + 2
 Sure you can get the base model, but the build will probably hold the frame back so much it is pointless and you may as well get a well specced bike elsewhere with a less 'premium' frame.
  • + 3
 The $4600 version has a terrible spec.
  • + 0
 @Racer951: Then go ahead and get yourself a well-specced bike elsewhere with a less premium frame. Nothing wrong with that. I hear YT is all the rage here on Pink Bike.
  • + 1
 The whole longer, lower, slacker thing has gone too far. I happen to live in the steep, tech gnar playground of Laguna but today's 'enduro' bikes have gone too far. They're basically the old shuttle/freeride bike of long ago. Fugly to pedal, push like crazy on anything less than a 20 degree pitch, and a handful to work on slower/tighter/techy trail riding.

I love my T275C in long setting for most everything. Just wish they'd make the short travel setting more usable for the occasional low angle punchy/tight turned trail riding (e.g., Gooseberry) by making it steepen the HA/SA and raise the BB.
  • + 1
 The T275c doesn't have a long setting. It has two lower shock mounts that do not change the geometry one bit, other than 30% sag of 145mm will have you riding a touch higher than 30% sag on 160mm. I guess that's probably what you meant. You wish the 145mm setting DID change the geometry to a tighter, higher bike.
  • + 2
 @herzalot: Correct. I would find the 140 setting useful if it raised the BB and steepend the HA and SA. It would make the 'enduro' bike I ride 99.9% of the time capable of being a 'trail' bike for the times I travel to the flatter, slower areas.
  • + 4
 10k pfff get your s**t together mtb industry!!!
  • + 4
 Does anyone else at PB review Intense bikes besides RC?
  • + 0
 I should have listened to my dad, " be a doctor or an architect, make a good living so you can enjoy life and retire someday." I heard "blah blah college is for girls and beer." I tell my self I wouldn't want a bike like that anyway.
  • + 2
 reading this review it sounds like an awesome bike that id love to ride, pity ive already got a kona process 153 that does all this already!
  • + 2
 If only it had a threaded bottom bracket, who am I'm I kidding I'd never spend 10k on a bike. I'm more than happy with my Alu 26 inch non boost trannie
  • + 1
 Good looking indeed, great specs and all but nah. Also, how the rider can be different from the writer? *The rider is describing the feeling and the writer is typing? (confused)
  • + 0
 I really like the re-worked lower link and the longer links. Seems much less prone to jamming with small pebbles and dirt, and the longer links give a more fluid feel to suspension. Cant wait to see one in person.

Frame only option?
  • + 4
 Over 11k after sales tx. B.S.!!!
  • + 4
 10k and you get a reverb? lol
  • + 3
 If it was made in Temecula by an intense employee I could see the 10 gees. Outsourcing blows.
  • + 1
 I have a 2015 tracer 275c factory build, its been a fantastic bike. I used it mostly at the bike park, so this new tracer is perfect, and is going to be my next ride. Well done Intense!
  • + 1
 I have a t275c as well, awesome bike! Did you get the new one? Thoughts?
  • + 0
 Here in the UK the company didn't have a good 2016. Rumours of a near 40% warranty rate and long delays dealing with these issues had owners upset. They changed distributor which usually suggests things aren't right.

Puzzled that the response to this is the launch of an increasingly expensive product. When brands have run themselves into these dead ends before, it usually takes a few years of "buying business" to rebuild brand faith. Marin are doing it now. Whyte did it five years ago.


I can't see this bike relaunching their brand. Just ripping off their existing loyal client base. Get this wrong and theyre on a hiding to nothing. Watch this space I guess.
  • + 3
 10k for a taiwan made frame, that has nothing to do with Intense after all.
  • + 3
 www.pinkbike.com/video/463858

When I think Intense this video comes to mind.
  • + 1
 Was there a happy ending with the warranty guy... or girl?
  • + 1
 @AlexS1: "It broke" Watching him drag off the bike at the end is priceless. Warranty covered it the guy said.
  • + 2
 @happychucky: They had to with the number of people that saw that video.
  • + 4
 Massive casing, not the bikes fault.
  • + 1
 Why is everyone acting like this is the first 10K bike ever reviewed on Pink Bike? Seems like every manufacturer has something in the neighborhood of that price. There are cheaper builds for this model, too.
  • + 1
 Ya and I'm sure with the cheaper build and heavy wheels, it will fly up hills. Reminds me of a silk purse out of a sows ear.
  • + 2
 @lake-st: Ummmmm... Ok... Don't buy one then?
  • + 1
 @TheR: Not to worry, I can buy two decent bikes with real warranties for the same as, one Intense that doesn't climb , will have pivot problems, and possibly a head tube issue and questionable warranty service.
You and Ronald Macdonald can be buds
  • - 1
 @lake-st: Carry on, then, soldier.
  • + 0
 10k lol...im sure someone with more money than sense will be along soon to tell how this is justified but dont bother. Other than that it looks nice enough but not 10k. i know the components cost a lot but do you even get a discount buying the thing built up nowadays or would it be the same if i purchased the bits myself?
  • + 3
 • Weight: 13.4kg/28.7 pounds (actual)
• MSRP: $10,399 USD

more of everything!
  • + 2
 Takes so much carbon shame it's gonna be juat as heavy bjt more prone to break, splinter and be worthless, hold out for the alloy one more bang for your buck
  • + 0
 I'd like to see a video of Richard Cunningham riding the bike. I would suspect if we did people would bypass any opinions he has. I'd much rather read a review from a veteran ripper like IDK like Phil Tinstman.
  • + 1
 Richard has edited magazines, run a bike company, ridden more bikes than you've had diners. I think that he would do alright. I'm just not sure that it's cool to make personal comments about someone who is providing you with FREE content.
  • + 1
 @NickBit: I think it's fair to question someone who has worked for magazines that failed, has never been proven to be a great rider. What did I say that was personal? I've seen videos of RC ride aaannnddddd it's very disappointing. What bike company did he run? pro-flex?
  • + 1
 @jonnycanfield: This is free content. If you don't like the reviewer you could just head to another website. Making personal comments about is pretty mean spirited.

www.pinkbike.com/news/lets-not-be-a-holes-opinion-2017.html

"ask yourself, "Would I say this thing that I am typing right now to their face if we met on the street?"
Vernon Felton
  • + 1
 @NickBit I would say it to his face
  • + 3
 My 4 year old loves the paintjob!
  • + 3
 Is this related to the maestro suspension? I'll take a Recluse any day!
  • + 3
 Blah blah blah ...10.500 USD.
  • + 2
 At the end its all what matters... choose between this and two or three Konas ... choice is gonna be quickly made
  • + 3
 10000$!!!!!!!
For a bike?
  • + 1
 After saw this "high-quality" carbon Intense frame cracking, I take two for spare. www.youtube.com/watch?v=BkpjfnP1aMI&feature=youtu.be ... at second 25
  • + 1
 Oh my freakin god. This is really bad. I had almost exactly the same situation when I was just starting with jumping. It was like 20 years ago. The fork was bend but the alloy frame was perfectly fine. This movie here looks really horrible. This should never happen. Not with this speed. Of course this was a massive error but still. Come on. This frame gave up like it was made of shit.
  • + 2
 I'm convinced the MTB industry models it's pricing after the F35 program...
  • + 0
 Nice to see Intense come out with an answer to the slew of excellent yet shorter travel bikes in the lineup. I I was a rich man, my stable would need only a '17 Tracer and a Primer.
  • + 2
 For the top end price I'd like to see more custom options available, starting with the frame color.
  • + 1
 You can check the kinematics of the Tracer in my blog. I hope you like it!

mrblackmorescorner.blogspot.com.es/2017/07/santa-cruz-nomad-4-vs-ibis-mojo-hd4-vs.html
  • + 3
 Hideous. Damn the 80s were bad the first time.
  • + 1
 Look aweosme and good review. This would be the ultimate park bike with a 170mm fork. I'm liking how everything is getting slacker tup
  • + 2
 Red-yellow-black intense - oldschool yeah!
But it's a little bit "plastic"
  • + 2
 How is that lower link not a Maestro knock off?
  • + 3
 Its a VPP (Virtual pivot point) similar to Maestro. But I'm pretty sure Maestro wasn't first VPP setup anyways. I think Santa Cruz was the first company to use VPP and Intense bought the right to use it.
  • + 0
 @Deadskittles: Intense was licensing. Patent has expired, thus "JS tuned". The VPP is uniqiue in that the shock link is rotates counter to the lower link.
  • + 4
 Love the maestro!
  • + 4
 @ReformedRoadie: It's funny that it's 'jeff steber tuned' and then they outsource the linkage tuning.
  • + 0
 @scottzg: lets be honest, the bike is probablg 90% a Cero / taiwan collaboration, Intense is just the sales vessel and money tree
  • - 4
flag white1414 (Feb 7, 2017 at 15:33) (Below Threshold)
 Actually intense designed the vpp and santa cruz used it
  • + 4
 @white1414: Actually, Outland designed VPP and then Santa Cruz and Intense both used it.
  • + 1
 I think it is maestro.
  • + 0
 @goroncy: How can people just look at a picture online and say 'Thats Maestro that is'? - What does that even mean?

I mean seriously, relocate one of the pivot points by a few mm, shorten / lengthen the link by a small amount or change its angle and you will make a huge difference to kinematics - Though you wouldnt notice this in a photo when on the end of a computer screen.

You give the name 'Maestro' etc to a system which has effectively been around for decades before use in cycling - Cycle suspension designers have just refined the principle in a manner specific to the bike to give the characteristics they find desirable.

Pretty much any design with a migrating pivot point is a 'VPP' by its definition as its pivot position is not fixed, hence 'Virtual Pivot Point' Santa Cruz just capitalised on the word game and seem to be the only brand associated with what is a very common form of suspension design.
  • + 1
 @Ginsu2000: Jim Busby designed VPP for Outland , His RTS for GT had the beginnings of VPP in 1991-2 .
  • + 0
 @Racer951: Educate yourself before making assumptions. VPP was licensed by Intense but Jeff worked with SC to fine-tune the modern VPP. Jeff and the engineers at Intense (Temecula HQ) worked to create JS Tuned which is a system that is optimized for 3 different riding segments: Trail, Enduro, DH. The JS Trail is found on bikes under 160MM, the JS Enduro is on Bike under 175MM and the DH is on over 180MM.

Alloy prototypes that were built and designed at Intense were being ridden and tested before Cero was brought in. Cero collaborated with Jeff and Intense engineers to create the carbon model and tweaks for production.
  • + 0
 @scottzg: Linkage was not outsourced, carbon engineering was a collaboration with Cero and Intense engineers. Just like how KTM has a team of engineers and they use CERO designs to collaborate on ID.
  • + 1
 @creativefletch: Keeps my 2012 Canfield One Current !! :-)
  • + 2
 Lol at the price.. no thanks. another dentist bike
  • + 1
 2017 Yamaha yz450f $8,699 MSRP. Top of the line MX race bike. Just food for thought...
  • + 1
 Was at the LBS today and they had three of them on display. The bike is HOT!! Very well done
  • + 0
 If you, americans, british, canadian people think thats expensive, imagine beeing the average person in Spain who makes 16.000 euros a year before taxes...
  • + 1
 Yeah but its warm in Spain compared to Canada!
  • + 0
 www.jensonusa.com/Intense-Tracer-2017?by=Intense-Tracer-2017

You can take out a loan to buy the intense or other bikes at Jenson.
  • + 9
 Lol. Just checked it out. Starting as low as $915/mo usd at 10%apr. I could probably get a better apr from a local loanshark.
  • + 1
 @SacAssassin: and have all your fingers and toes after its paid off as well!
  • + 1
 @SacAssassin: That is insane... Why even offer financing at that price
  • + 1
 @SacAssassin: Thats more than I pay a month for my 15 F350!
  • + 1
 can someone remind me the relationship between SC and Intense? Same design team? Intense purchases design/patents?
  • + 2
 Wait... Is that a Nomad???
  • + 2
 10k ahhh im gona be sick!! spew bag please!!
  • + 1
 Thats usd. Retail is 15k for the factory model here in Aus :o
  • + 1
 Rubbish.......Way out of my price! Only rich people and Factory riders can afford this bike........
  • + 1
 $4500 Will get ya top spec 1yr old, proly without enves tho.
  • + 1
 @jrocksdh: But then what am i gonna do with a toddler?
  • + 1
 @T275AM650B ...Says the guy with a 2014+ model year Intense Tracer user name.
  • + 2
 Anyway....
when are we going to get a new Tazer HT?
  • + 1
 Anyone notice the name sticker on the frame? Harold apparently likes, and is keeping this bike!
  • + 3
 I wish I could. All the reviewers had bikes with their names on the top tube, We pedaled them for the day, then Chappy the Intense mechanic tuned each bike suited for each individual rider / reviewer. Later through the course of the week they were delivered to each reviewer for the remainder of the test.
Class acted by Intense Cycles.
  • + 1
 @iMountainBike: Awesome! Been an Intense customer for many years. Love those guys!
  • + 1
 So is the Spider the last aluminum available? In the single crown category.
  • + 2
 Inb4 step up case and "it broke!"
  • + 2
 If intense made a unicycle would it be half price?
  • + 1
 That Cesar Rojo is some boy !
  • + 1
 bike nowadays are too expensive. enough said.
  • + 1
 that price is INTENSE Eek
  • + 1
 Did you hear about the fire at the circus? It was in tents.
  • + 2
 looks like a nomad
  • + 1
 Since I live in Temecula, can a local homie get a discount? Lol
  • + 2
 Flex-tense
  • + 1
 Cesar needs a better salary so he can buy new clothes.
  • + 2
 Lol that was quick.
  • + 3
 Ya, many reviews come a year or so later..strange
  • + 1
 @jrocksdh: This was the "quick" review, like you say, they do the in depth review later. I just haven't seen the initial review pop up the same day as the announcement before.
  • + 1
 Chain slap really shouldn't be a noteworthy issue any more
  • + 2
 Great another excuse to add 2k to the bike to fix that.
  • + 1
 Very nice bike and specs. Can't wait to try it on the trail!
  • + 4
 Lol, they say it's not a very good trail bike lol....
  • + 0
 To be honest, this thing is ugly AF...Did McDonalds sponsor them? cuz that's what the paint scheme looks like.
  • + 1
 I have a funny feeling i know what the new Nomad will be like.............
  • + 1
 i´m waiting for the new nomad
  • + 2
 "enduro link"? Blech.
  • + 1
 Bike looks so mint!!
  • + 0
 This thing will do 200mph?
Where do I get one!!!!!
  • + 1
 $11k Sign me up
  • + 1
 5 digits!! i knew it!!
  • + 0
 10k for a f@cking plastic bike
  • + 0
 Bit of minger in my opinion
  • + 0
 Sweet lookin Nomad!
  • - 1
 Haha Intense beat Santa Cruz to release the new Nomad Wink
  • + 0
 Best looking bike ever?
  • + 0
 this article is lit
  • - 3
 Saving a life costs 30$ in Africa ... so if you buy this bike you re responsible for not saving approximaly 350 people. Congratulations.
  • - 1
 That's a funky lookin nomad
  • - 1
 10k?? I'll take two then.
  • - 1
 That's a nice looking Nomad
  • - 2
 I am liking the custom suspension graphics
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