2018 Canyon Torque - First Ride

Dec 19, 2017
by Mike Kazimer  


It looks as if we're seeing a freeride resurgence, the return of long-travel bikes designed for seeking out the gnarliest terrain around. Today's all-mountain / enduro machines are incredibly capable, but there's still a demand for bikes designed to go even bigger, whether that's in the bike park or on a secret trail tucked away deep in the woods.

That's where the new Canyon Torque comes in. With 27.5” wheels and 175mm of rear travel, it's the latest entry into the new-school of freeride bikes, a class that includes the likes of the Commencal Supreme SX, Pivot Firebird, and Santa Cruz Nomad.
Canyon Torque Details

• Intended use: freeride / park / DH
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 175mm
• 65º head angle
• Aluminum and carbon frame options
• Boost hub spacing
• Sizes: XS (alloy only) - XL
• Price: $2499 - $7500 USD
www.canyon.com


Canyon
Canyon are also releasing new gravity-oriented stems and handlebars.
Canyon
The Torque's housing is sandwiched between a plastic cover and the frame.


Frame Details

Like the recently announced Spectral, the Torque's design was inspired by Canyon's Sender DH bike, although the suspension layout is slightly different. In order to increase the bike's standover height, as well as allow for the use of longer travel dropper posts, the shock is now activated by a yoke that straddles the seattube.

The Torque's suspension curve is designed to be sensitive at the beginning of the stroke, supportive in the middle, and then progressive in the end, which Canyon refers to as their “Triple Phase Suspension.” The end stroke ramp up isn't drastic, but it can easily be altered by adding or subtracting volume spacers. It's a gravity machine at heart, but the Torque does have more supportive pedaling platform than that Sender in order to make those long approaches to the trail more tolerable. You'll want to wear a hydration pack, though, because there's no place to mount a water bottle.

The Torque uses Canyon's new cable routing method, where the housing is sandwiched between the downtube and plastic “cable channel.” Found on both the carbon and aluminum frames, the plastic cover can easily be removed for maintenance, and also adds an element of frame protection.


Canyon
The Torque's suspension layout places the rearmost pivot on the chainstay, but above the rear axle.


Canyon
The new frame design allows for 170mm dropper posts on the L and XL sizes, and 150mm posts on the smaller sizes.
Canyon
Going downhill is the Torque's forte, but the Eagle drivetrain found on the higher end models should help take the sting out of the climbs.


Canyon
The Torque AL 7.0 is priced at 2999 Euro...
Canyon
...While the Torque CF 9.0 retails for 3999 Euro.


Frame Options / Build Kits

There are two different frame options: the Torque CF, which uses a carbon front triangle and a 6066 aluminum swingarm, and the Torque AL, which is a full-aluminum affair. Prices range from $2499 USD for the base-model AL 5.0 up to $7500 USD for the CF 9.0 LTD. That 9.0 LTD model will only be available in the US, and is spec'd with ENVE M70 wheels and 2.4" Maxxis Minion DHR II tires.


Geometry

Canyon experimented with several different head angles before settling on 65-degrees. According to Daniel Oster, Canyon's senior product manager, that number gave them the handling they wanted; quicker than a full-blown DH bike, but slack enough to avoid any nervous handling. With a 460mm reach on a size large, the Torque's measurements are modern but not wild, while the 425mm chainstay length is on the shorter side of the spectrum.

Canyon


Views: 10,072    Faves: 11    Comments: 0






I was able to spend one day of riding aboard an aluminum Torque, just enough time to start getting a feel for its handling traits. The day's trails included a mix of twisty singletrack punctuated by rock gardens that were made even trickier by the recent rainstorms, and a smattering of medium-sized jumps and drops. Nothing was overly steep, but the trails did fit the bikes' intentions.

Climbing: Stomping down on the pedals to power up a climb does cause a fair bit of suspension motion; this is a bike where the shock's compression lever will see plenty of use if you're planning on earning those turns. There's also the weight to consider. The claimed weight for the top-of-the-line aluminum models is a little over 33 pounds, and the carbon models is said to come in at a touch over 31 pounds. Compared to the freeride beasts of the past those numbers are certainly reasonable, but it is something to keep in mind if you're planning on pedaling more than riding lifts or shuttling.


Canyon
Drop those heels and let off the brakes and the Torque will come alive.
Canyon
Canyon
Fabien Barel was all smiles after sampling some of Madeira's best trails.


Descending: As you'd expect, the Torque is in its element when gravity takes over. Cornering was especially enjoyable; the short back end and the overall weight balance made it easy to really sink into a turn, then rocket out the other side. There's plenty of 'poppiness' on hand for getting airborne off of natural and manmade jumps, and I didn't experience any harshness in the rockier sections of trail. That being said, I'd like to spend some time on the Torque in some even steeper, rougher terrain - with only one day of riding on unfamiliar trails I I wasn't able to fully push it to the limit.

I kept trying to figure out what bike the Torque reminded me of, and then it clicked – Specialized's Enduro EVO. That bike had 26” wheels and a front derailleur, but funnily enough, the geometry figures are very close to those of the Torque – head angle, reach, even the stem length all match. That's not a knock against the Torque, it's more of an observation that certain geometry numbers don't go out of style.

Most build kits come with the tried-and-true Maxxis Minion DHF / DHR II combo, but 9.0 Pro is spec'd with Mavic's Claw and Charge tires. Those tires ended up on the bike I was aboard, and they made for an 'interesting' time in the wet rocks and mud. They're much less predictable than the Maxxis rubber, and I wouldn't recommend running them if there's any chance of encountering wet conditions. Other than that, the bikes are well equipped and ready to rally right out of the box.







Canyon also rolled out another new bike - an aluminum Sender. Based on the popular carbon-framed DH machine, the aluminum version was designed to work best with a coil sprung shock, and uses a simplified version of the linkage found on the carbon model. There will be two complete models, the Sender AL 6.0 and the AL 7.0, priced at 2499 Euro and 2999 Euro respectively.
Sender AL Details• Intended use: downhill
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Rear wheel travel: 200mm
• 63º head angle
• Adjustable chainstay length: 430 or 446mm
• Sizes: S - XL
• Price: 2499 - 2999 Euro


Canyon Sender
The aluminum Sender's linkage is slightly different than the carbon version - the MX link has been removed, and the bike has a more progressive suspension curve in order to allow it to work well with coil shocks.








268 Comments

  • + 212
 Now time to watch the PB commenters squirm. You got what you asked for; freeride, well specced, cheap (comparatively), available in Al. Looking mighty hard to find fault with in most places, though I'm sure someone will manage.
  • + 643
 No water bottle mount bro
  • - 24
flag Altron (Dec 19, 2017 at 3:30) (Below Threshold)
 Haha, my thoughts exactly. Not enough travel?!
  • - 35
flag TheCraziestGuy (Dec 19, 2017 at 3:33) (Below Threshold)
 thats not freeride
  • - 25
flag gpgalanis (Dec 19, 2017 at 3:39) (Below Threshold)
 It ticks a lot of boxes but I would like to see a "race" model similar to the previous Strive option, which means around 20mm longer in reach.

Other than that I wouldn't mind an even slacker head angle considering the travel it has.
  • + 41
 @Uuno: Just superglue them to a GoPro mount and clip them to the side of your helmet; Problem solved.
Now all bitching can be ended on Pinkbike.
  • + 49
 It's not a 29er!!!
  • + 86
 @fartymarty: Pinkbike confuses me. Earlier in the year everyone was still hating on 29ers and was convinced they were the devil's work.
Now I come back 6 months later and everyone is complaining that new bikes are NOT 29ers. I cannot keep up. Pleasing the PB crowd is impossible.
  • + 24
 @danspring: I think that was a joke, bro Wink
  • + 7
 @mentalhead: I guess he means the commencal article, where people were asking for a Meta TR 29
  • + 15
 @mentalhead: I know it was a joke (probably, maybe not) in this case, but it is indicative of the trend of comments on a fair few articles lately. I swear that the PB audience is literally incapable of being happy. Even if the perfect bike were unveiled, they would then complain to "not enough full carbon, super extra boost, 15 spd, plus tyre, EMTB options".
I guess most people are here to whine about things not being available, regardless of whether or not they would buy it/have any use for it/notice the difference/benefit in any way.

But perhaps that's the human condition. Rant over, let's slate the Sender AL because the crank arms aren't 100% level in the photo!!!
  • + 5
 @danspring: I was taking the p!ss

Altho I do love 29ers and have done for a few years now...
  • + 10
 @danspring: I think as a rule humans are generally not satisfied with what they have. Or at least we (in the west) have become like that. Always looking for the next latest and greatest thing to come out rather than enjoying what we already have.

I have been reading NSMB recently and the guys there seem to be regressing back to HT and rigid bikes to keep things interesting rather than lusting after the latest carbon wunderbike. Pinkbike is very much the opposite.
  • + 35
 @danspring: Stop complaining about people complaining, look what you've done already, you've got me complaining about complaining about complaining, it's like a chain reaction; where will the meta complaint end?!
  • + 28
 @danspring
@fartymarty:

No need to get philosophical about humans never being happy or whatever...

Your mistake is you consider the pinkbike audience as a single person. If someone says he's tired of high end bikes being reviewed, and then disappointed when cheaper bikes are reviewed, that person is STUPID.
But on pinkbike, the 2 opinions come from 2 different persons, which... makes sense. We're all allowed to have our opinions, right?

And if you feel like it's always the negatives that are said and heard, well yeah, we often write about things going wrong (example : "my capra cracked!" while 97% other capra owners are out there, riding).

Btw, complaning about pinkbike complains is... well, complaining too :p
  • + 3
 @mentalhead: There is some truth behind the joke though.. Pb is a funny place!
  • - 1
 @Uuno: thats a plus in my book
  • + 1
 Too much AS/PK build on gravity-oriented bikes (new spectral, new torque).
High speed cruising is 20% (>20 km/h) of my time on bike, the remnant is climbing, low speed rock crawling or rooty/rocky trail on which I need a lot of traction that is killed by high AS/PK.
I know most of bikes today must climb well and go down well (which is a lié) meaning strong AS, but obviously it means a lot of chain growth, particularly on the granny ring, and the suspension operation became strongly dependant of the weight distributed over the pedals.
I will not buy a bike with more than 70% AS at sag for 32/21.
  • + 10
 28 spokes only wheels. That's the only one negative point for me.
  • + 2
 @danspring: I've noticed this curious trend as well. Similar comments were being made on mtbr when the Nomad 4 was being rolled out; several commentors were convinced Santa Cruz had missed the mark by not making it a 29er.
  • + 4
 @Altron: 175mm and not 180mm. What were they thinking !!
  • + 6
 @danspring: It is quite easy to explain. People complaining in either pages aren't necessarily the same people.

So let's say there are pro 27.5 people and pro 29 people. On news mentionning a 27.5er bike, pro 29 people will rant about it. On news mentionning a 29er bike, pro 27.5 people will complain.

Unsatisfied people whine, satisfied people stay quiet. That's about it.
  • + 15
 @danspring: I bet the vast majority of readers aren't commenting, so really, the comment section is just the negative distillation of PB readers, not a true reflection the community.
  • + 7
 @opignonlibre: Oooohhh you forgot the pro-26 people.... fatal mistake on Pinkbike. But yes, I do fully understand that the situation isn't as simple as I made out. I was not expecting everyone to take it so seriously and come up with logical, well considered replies. Normally pointing and shouting without thinking is the order of the day.
  • - 5
flag diego-b (Dec 19, 2017 at 7:19) (Below Threshold)
 Did they not get the Memo on 29ers being superior? :S
  • + 16
 2 affordable reviews in a week... it's a Christmas pinkbike miracle
  • + 9
 RIP Enduro!
  • + 8
 @danspring: The pro-26 people have given up on complaining and just chime in to remind us of their existence wherever there is a 27.5 vs 29 debate. ;-)
  • + 2
 seat tube is over 20 inches long in the xl which essentially makes it useless as you can’t get your seat low enough for steep terrain. What’s the point in a 180mm travel freeride bike where you’re constantly being menaced by your seat by any trail with anything over a 25% gradient?
  • + 6
 @drivereight: Long live FreeDuro™
  • + 7
 @Franziskaner: Freeduro -The practice of never going full Enduro.
  • + 7
 No 26, man.
  • + 3
 @drivereight: long live freeride
  • + 3
 #Enduroaintdead so lets kick it a few more times in the head.
  • + 4
 @catnip: Since you mentioned chain reaction, I'd like to complain about their customer service.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: totally agree, I’m lucky I fall into a small bike (on these) and one glance at the seat tube numbers had me very pleased about that. I’m glad there are people still making bikes that aren’t longer than Ratboys house boat but they really ought to make those seat tubes shorter, especially on bikes like this one.
@drivereight I’m looking to upgrade from Freetrail to Freeduro, this may be just the bike I was looking for.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: born to be free
  • + 2
 Cables under the downtube maybe? Uhhmmmmm... no free Juggs subscription included?
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 19, 2017 at 9:53) (Below Threshold)
 Many of us have endured freeride long enough... it will never return. It died. Building crappy jumps without landings, hucking to flat and doing half arsed X-Ups will never be great again. All hail long travel Enduro Bikes
  • - 5
flag bohns1 (Dec 19, 2017 at 10:04) (Below Threshold)
 @danspring: u mean pro 26er riders still exist? Wow!
  • + 17
 @WAKIdesigns: BS, I still huck to flat, drift sideways, do half arsed Xups, case landings, bonk shit and a tail whip is mandatory everytime my wheels leave the ground regardless if I have enough time to bring it back, more often not, and all my friends are doing the same. Thats Freeride, where we worry more about style than time. But yes, I do this all on my DH and Enduro bike, but its just a bike so who gives a f*ck?
  • + 1
 @danspring: Maybe you haven't spent enough time with this site.
  • + 1
 @vweb: Ensures you will purchase a whole new wheel out of frustration of sourcing a durable rim in a 28 hole drilling. It's likely part of a wheel conspiracy.
  • + 0
 We'll add me to the list of whiners. With downhill 29ers in production, the technology is there to make a freeride 29er. I understand that people want to twerk, but big guys can twerk a big ride. PXLs in 29.
  • - 5
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 19, 2017 at 12:48) (Below Threshold)
 @Boardlife69: we all know what freeride was before 2006-08. A bunch of dumb dudes in too big jerseys who can’t ride who come to a weird place with terrible jumps and drops and do their best to break their bikes and bones, stucking up their nose calling everyone pussies. Meanwhile BMXers and street riders were hucking to flat concrete from way higher up. But they didn’t have the cool Marzocchi Monster and Azonic Eliminator. It all fell apart after ROAM movie, poliferation of mtb internet and those losers saw that an average dude on 160 bike goes faster and bigger than they do, in half lid and knee guards.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: Maybe try the Specialized " tilt a world" or what ever the POS is called, but probably not, what were the engineers and designers smoking when they had that Brain Fart
  • + 2
 uhh I don't like how the tires are black on this bike
  • + 1
 @danspring: the value of putting top dh pros on a new product, they become cool
  • + 5
 Stop complaining about how a 33 or 31 pound bike is so difficult to pedal...it is not. It is more tiring to get beat up trying to go DH fast on a ninny short travel bike than to flick a switch and climb a heavier bike that is well hung.

This is a gnarly trail shredder. Go for a long "enduro" --ahem-- ride plodding along until a nasty, timed "segment" --cough cough-- comes along and guess what? I don't want my sissy-travel 130mm bike. I want a DH bike and you should too unless fast isn't your thing. This thing is the ticket.
  • + 2
 NO THREADED BB, NO BUY. now, can somebody answer....does this thing have a threaded bb?
  • + 1
 also, @Canyon-PureCycling . your website is f*cking incredible....incredibly over the top. KISS.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: Tell that to Tippie And Wade my man! Lol
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: hahaha Amen to that dude!
  • + 0
 @SeaJay: Yes it does. All models.
  • + 2
 @thenotoriousmic: except that it will actually fit someone with long legs. All these new “XL” frames are perfect for guys that want an extra long size large, but the seat tubes are too short for anyone that needs an actual XL. I’m really impressed that canyon has made a bike that I could ride. I’m not trying to be rude, but I’m just tired of seeing all these redesigned bikes coming out with 19.5” seat tubes and everyone telling me I can just put a longer dropper on, it’s just not that easy. Once I got heckled in a race because someone thought I didn’t drop my seatpost, they didn’t bother to look at how tall I actually was and how much post still sticks out when it’s down.
  • + 2
 @Snakes4arms: It really is that easy. How long are your legs? Mine are 36" (inside), and I ride an XL Bronson with a 19.5" ST. If I feel like I need maximum extension for ultimate pedalling, I can just run my 150mm post slightly higher in the frame. I'm 6'4", so if I were 2-3 inches taller, I could buy a 170mm post and do the same.
BUT with the shorter ST I appreciate the ability to drop the post all the way down in the frame for the steep stuff.

With a 21" ST like on the XL Torque, that option is completely removed. Which is crazy for a 180mm park / big-mountain sled.

If you genuinely need a 21" ST along with a 170mm post, you must be close to 7ft tall, and by that point you should be looking at getting a custom frame made as you are in a 0.0001 percentile.
  • + 3
 @Uuno: @Uuno: What I love about that is water mounted on the frame is heavy. It may be sprung weight, but it is even more sprung when it is located on the rider.
I'm not saying I hate water bottles on frames. I'm just saying throwing 3lbs of water weight on to a frame you paid a mortgage worth of money to get built light seems counterproductive. Every time read an article where the writer knocks the lack of a bottle mount, when the same reviewer knocked another rig for having a heavy frame I can't help but roll my eyes.
PB loves drama, but it is funny that even the reviewers aren't immune to the silliness.
  • + 3
 @taletotell: Water on the frame is being supported by the bike and wheels. Water on your back is being supported by your legs, especially when you're standing, or supporting your weight as you suck up a bunch of huge bumps. It's actually much more preferable in terms of energy used to have the water on the bike. Either way you have to push that weight uphill, but you're legs don't have to support the extra weight whenever you're off the saddle like with a hydration pack. So it's not counterproductive at all. It's actually the most efficient way to carry the water.
  • + 3
 @TucsonDon: Dont know about efficiency but having the water lower is better for the center of balance.
  • + 2
 @TucsonDon: It's a Catch 22... Water on frame has better COG which will make the bike handle better but isn't as "suspended" as water in backpack / hip pack however that comes with a higher COG.

I've just gone back to a bladder in my hip pack as it makes the bike feels more lively. Plus it's muddy as crap here at the moment and i'm sick of eating mud and faffing with a mud cap on my bottle.
  • + 2
 @fartymarty @TuscsonDon @inverted180: C'mon, y'all. This is all theoretical nonsense. True in theory, not in practice. None of you feel your bikes handle any differently with or without a water bottle. It doesn't affect your climbing, and it doesn't affect your control of the bike. A pack might, depending on how big it is -- some people might be sensitive and not like the feeling of a pack on their backs, but mostly, I think once it's on, you forget about this, too. You're all overthinking it. Pick a place to carry your water and forget about it.
  • + 1
 @TheR: I think you are right and truthfully I doubt a pound or two of frame weight makes a difference most times either.
  • + 2
 @Snakes4arms: I’m 6,3 and ride a xl process which has a 18 inch seat tube on it. Absolutely perfect because I can slam it for steep trails and I can just raise the seat post for everything else. There’s nothing stopping you from raising your seat ether and still have the option of dropping it every now and then. Most xl’s these days have 20 / 21 inch seat tubes that essential make the bike useless on steep trails.
  • + 1
 The only fault with it is it's a Canyon. If you've ever owned one and had to deal with there customer service, it would be enough to put you off the best bike in the world.
  • + 31
 still riding a 2012 torque
  • + 11
 2014 torque here! Such a versatile bike.
  • + 4
 Me too!!!
  • + 9
 ....26!
  • + 4
 I sold mine and sometimes I miss it...
  • + 3
 2014 torque dhx, what a beast!! Beautiful, fast and light.
  • + 31
 It's back. Thank God. Freeride ain't dead.
  • + 25
 I would absolutely love to see a comparison with the Kona Process 165 - both look like awesome bikes.
  • + 7
 And the new Nomad! Might as well throw the new Reign in that matchup too..
  • - 3
 @BeaverCreaker: New Jekyll is almost the same of those bikes you mention,near to freeride numbers. Those bikes feel at home at the bikepark.
  • + 3
 canfield balance is right in there. pretty similar numbers.
  • + 1
 @adrennan:
Would love to have a Canfield in my collection, much $$$ to get one in Aus sadly.
  • + 1
 @OzMike: they were practically giving them away for a bit there. pretty sure i saw balance frames listed for a grand for a while. it is a really amazing bike; i have never found its limits.
  • + 16
 Too late in December Canyon...its a good thing that I got all the kids/wife presents already... no money left, no problems ; ) ....
  • + 13
 What's the go with the yokes on all these newer frames? Are the shock rebuilders still having issues with the sideload forces they can cause? Genuinely interested in feedback from the suspension gurus.

Alloy sender is rad.
  • + 4
 I think in many cases it is purely about location and packaging of the suspension system and shock, side-loading would not be the primary motivation here in my opinion (horst link bikes are not known to be hard on the shock in this manner)

Just look at it like they have effectively increased the shocks length by 150mm (or however long the yoke is) - it has allowed them to position the shock further forward in the frame where it would usually have to interrupt the seat-tube etc and they may not be able to obtain the correct position to give the kinematics they want.
  • + 12
 The side loading is only on the Specialized bikes- they have that proprietary mount that screws into the back of the shock, making rear flex loads get directly transferred into the shock body. Every other company just has the eyelet turned 90 degrees, so the yoke can pivot side to side, not up and down. This isolates the shock from stress, unless you carry your bike by the shock or push down on the linkage while its moving (very stupid).

This is why I didn't get a Specialized Enduro 29 last spring. I had the first gen Enduro 29er, and after blowing up the rear shock, and watching my two buddies with the same bike blow their rear shocks on reasonable trails, I didn't go back.
  • + 9
 @hamncheez: I forgot Spesh screwed the shock directly to the mount, the bike industry loves this kind of almost pointless crap, then customers go out and buy aftermarket yokes.....
  • + 3
 What @hamncheez said. I found clear signs of excessive side load on several shocks used with the previous generation Demo frames, but I´am riding a Commencal Meta now and it seems to be absolutely fine there
  • - 3
 Pretty sure there is potential for sideload issues here too. Poorly maintained bearings in that link is gonna make the shock sad. So just don’t poorly maintain shit?
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: Side loading moves the pivot a small, small fraction of a degree. Pretty sure even a terribly maintained eyelet would still be fine.
  • + 0
 @hamncheez: I’m not quite sure what you mean but if you think it’s fine that’s good enough for me. I do worry about the two yoke contact points being right where the rear wheel will deposit crap. But not so much that I care. IIRC Vorsprung Steve pointed out that being a weak spot on some bike and the cause of some side load problems? i.e the bearings stiffen up and the loads end up in the shock. I tend to glaze over when reading about linkages so forgive me if I’m mistaken.
  • + 1
 Most of the time you have a bearing at the end of the yoke. With a normal mount you had to use bushings ... until metric shocks came
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: side loading is caused when the frame flexes, it causes premature wear of moving parts.

Multi link bikes almost make this a non issue, it is particularly an issue with single pivot bikes, I imagine steel single pivots being worse if they have some engineered compliance.

I really doubt there is much in the way of axial load issues on this type of frame, with out without a yoke, unless it is a noodle that is.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: I understand that. But also that there are other causes of side loading. I’m gonna have to go and trawl a tonne of posts from Vorpsrung now..I’ll come back to you. If i don’t die first.
Cylinders don’t have sides Razz
  • + 1
 @Racer951: nope, I give up. I’m dead. Basically my point is that if the two points at which the yoke contacts the frame become seized - even with one pivot point left in the forward most eyelet - it may put a sideload on the shock. I’m pretty sure that this has been mentioned (possibly by Steve, apologies if not) as the one of the causes of the issues on the Spesh design as, like you say, side loads on the shock from the left and right aren’t all that common with multi link designs (yes I’m aware that they chose to bolt the shock directly to the Yoke without a traditional eyelet pivot).
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: oh, ok, not so much a design fault as customers letting bikes go to crap but it makes sense.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: yeah that’s how I read it but that’s not to say it was the only cause of the issues. And since I’m not a suspension expert and can’t back it up with a reference you can just ignore me Razz
I do think that any time you add a big lever to the shock you’re asking for trouble and it kind of seems a bit of a lazy option to me. But there’s a lot of that in bikes and not all of them look as rad as this one.
  • + 3
 @emptybox: bearings aren’t always moar better than bushings. In this case I think bushings are a better interface than bearings. Better yet would be a spherical bushing but obviously that isn’t gonna work with the yoke end. As I understand it this is one area that the Rockshox Super Deluxe is superior because of increased bushing overlap in the shock helping to ward off side load issues. And though spherical bushings would help dissipate side loads before they get to the shock they present other issues (they’ve been tried already and left alone). As always it’s one big compromise of other compromises I suppose.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson:
But bearings do feel a little smother
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: its more than the Big S frames. Kona process frames, same issue (first hand experience). Devinci Spartan also same issue, but in that case some people experienced a complete failure of shock due to this (complete air loss). Running a shock this way leads to more side loading and thus wear or failure of shock, hence the new designs for process and spartan doing away with this mount completely.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: yep, I've heard of many of the yoke based designs having issues. Vorsprung touched on it as mentioned above. Would like to hear more about his experiences with it. It's put me off this linkage since its initial inception. I'd have a feeling many weren't using metric shocks either. The new Dartmoor blackbird/shine etc use it and I see this setup on a slope rig not really liking it with failed spins/whips etc.
  • + 10
 Enduro is dead! Freeride is in again! See how the bike industry is going through their spin cycle? Next up is 26!!
  • + 9
 I find it weird how the seat dome design works on the Sender but looks just wrong on the Torque and Spectral.
  • + 2
 on the Spectral CF is fine honestly, here it just seems to conflict with canyon's usual straight edges
  • + 7
 The Knolly delirium is the closest thing to Freeride bikes returning, I'm just seeing a lot of long travel Enduro bikes in my eye
  • + 4
 Surely the commencals latest sx is in that, it's all about park days.
  • + 0
 Antidote still builds a 26" bike. THATS freeride
  • + 2
 honest question: what's the difference?
  • + 1
 @wowbagger: mainly overbuilt frame, strong, I see that canyon and cube advertise them more like long travel Enduro, with just normal trail riding you would do on an enduro, meanwhile you see James doerfling tracking some sick raw lines and big jumps
  • + 6
 While Strive looked dull as hell, this looks damn good. The first Torque was preposterous, but this is new quality. Sender looks sweet too. Good Job Canyon.
  • + 2
 Surely an amazing looking 160/140 29er Strive is just around the corner?
  • + 2
 @graeme187: either that or a 29 Spectral, they need a contendant to the Jeffsy 29, badly.
  • + 1
 @wowbagger: I don't think so, otherwise they would have made the latest Spectral release 29. New Strive has to keep up with E29, Wreckoning, Slash etc etc...
  • + 1
 @graeme187: you're right, it would be more in line with the latest 29er craze, going big and all. we shall see Smile
  • + 7
 Please Canyon, ditch SRAM brakes, please
  • + 4
 Hey it could be worse. At least is itsn't Formula...
  • + 0
 Formula brakes on 4 of my 7 bikes. Little to no problems.
  • + 0
 @Trailsoup:
Could be worse, could be magura ...
  • + 1
 Please SRAM, stop selling brakes
  • + 6
 I think it's gonna be my next bike!
  • + 3
 Was hoping to see one minute of SENDING for a promo video for a bike like this. Instead mostly saw monochrome split-screen of the riderless bike and its parts flying through the air. Now I'm sad.
  • + 4
 Give it to Larry, he's still gonna send it
  • + 2
 This an the spectral are great looking bikes, can’t wait for the updates Strive, If they are to but a LT 29er in their line up I think this will be the spot. With the travel on the Torque the 29er option would have been a challenge.
  • + 1
 can't wait for it if you're right, these bikes are looking killer
  • + 2
 The horst link is really making a 'comeback' isnt it, it is definately the most used suspension system right now, Canyon, YT, Transition, Specialized, Scott, etc etc.... No more crappy IS bottom bearing for the headset either so you can run an internal angle headset if needed, the old one did a lot of peoples heads in and bearings seemed to wear fast too.
  • + 3
 Well it is... but this isn't a horst link design. The rearmost pivot point is above the rear axle.
  • + 1
 @Trailsoup: Good call, what would you call this one then? Just a multi-link?
  • + 1
 Does this design work well with a coil?
  • - 1
 @Racer951: Some form of linkage-driven single pivot I guess.
  • + 7
 @Trailsoup: Nah, take another look, though the pivot isnt below the rear axle in a 'technical' horst link manner (e.g. marketing term) the rear axle is still located on the seatstay and not the chainstay so it isnt a single pivot - it has a migrating instant centre / centre of curvature.

@FindDigRideRepeat - Depends entirely on how they have designed the kinematics of this frame, you could make this kind of layout work brilliantly with a coil or on the other side you could make it so it is terrible with a coil shock - entirely down to kinematic choices but it looks like a standard rising rate suspension curve so I dont see why a coil wouldnt be fine.
  • + 2
 With that pivot placement would the rear wheel move inwards rather than outward as it would on a Horst link? Even more so than a traditional single pivot? I'd like to state I know a fraction of next to nothing about suspension, I'm just curious.
  • + 1
 Without riding of course its hard to tell exactly how it will behave, but its the same idea that Rocky Mountain did a few years back to get around the horst link patent. However, when you read the patent, it talks mostly about isolating torque and breaking forces, not the exact pivot locations (www.google.com/patents/US5509679). The power/braking torque is isolated because the rear axle & brake mount is on a member that isn't a swingarm, and so rotates much less as the suspension is compressed than a swingarm does. I would still consider this a Horst link design, and I'm surprised Specialized didn't go after Rocky Mountain back in the day- I would think a patent judge would have concluded that the elevated pivot location is still a Horst link as well.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez: That was my thinking, the specific location of the pivot being below the axle doesnt really offer any real change to the fact other than the ability to use a certain marketing term - All of these designs are the brands own arrangement of the same system.

Its like Santa Cruz 'owning' the term VPP - The bike industry loves to patent old tech and use buzz terms for marketing, you can add short-links like the DW / maestro into that one (though DW was pretty much the first to apply the tech with the aim of producing specific anti squat results etc)
  • + 2
 @racer951 Horst link is pretty easy to design

@kickmehard it probably has a fairly traditional axle path, but the derailleur can be expected to swing in a bit since it’ll be a bit lower than the axle, but nothing drastic because of how it looks like the suspension moves
  • + 3
 Many of the European brands (Scott bicycles is Swiss unlike the snow sports dept.) have been designing around the Horst link for quite a while. They simply didn't want to pay Specialized for it so they just didn't bother with the North American market. Now that the patent has expired you see many of those brands explore that market, but it isn't like they're suddenly switching to the Horst Link design.
  • + 3
 It’s just marketing! Making the old, new again...like polishing a turd! The ability to lockout the new shocks makes these bikes rideable with this linkage when climbing, otherwise at full open they are just anchorweights!
  • + 5
 @hamncheez @racer951: I've never read through that patent before, but decided to now. I am not a lawyer but I know a few things about patents. Not that it matters now, since the patent is long expired, but it requires the pivot to be below the axle. In claim 1:

"...said upper arm members receiving a rear wheel axle at hub points located on a hub axis spaced above the horizon of said rear pivot axis..."

This same sort of thing is stated more clearly (IMO) in the other independent claims (15 & 18 ):

"...about a second pivot axis spaced below the hub axis..."

Interestingly, I think 1x drivetrains killed that patent on their own, regardless of pivot location:

"a crank mounted on the main frame for rotation about a crank axis, said crank having a _plurality_of_chainwheels_ [emphasis added..duh] of differing diameters fixed thereto"
  • + 2
 @feldybikes: I did read that first quote, but not being trained in patent law I was thinking it meant the main pivot is higher than the hub, creating chain growth. I thought it was relating the axle path that "intersects the tension run of the drive chain" to create chain growth and anti-squat. After reading it more slowly, it appears you are correct.

I'm guessing it was written this way to differentiate it from the 'faux bar' where the rear pivot location is above the axle & brake mount AND means that the rear wheel is directly on a swingarm. Putting the true Horst link pivot above the axle most likely doesn't effect the torque isolation, but rather the amount of chain growth. The original patent was probably written poorly, like you said.
  • + 6
 Damn the orange looks spicy.
  • + 1
 Great looking bike, but can't justify one as already owning a DH and a trail bike. Also, prices of this one are soo much better than the prices of the new Spectral. The Spectral is equiped with forks and shocks one will want to swap immediately.
  • + 1
 I have ordered one and it's due to ship Mid April... Has anyone got theirs yet? I am dying to find out what it's like to ride... It is probably the biggest gamble with a bike I have ever made. Always ridden them before I bought, It's also the most money I have ever dropped on a bike as well! Unboxing vid?
  • + 3
 15.1 kg for the high end Al one, 3000€. What's going on there ? Similar intentions, cheaper (heavier components) swoop is 13.85. just wondering

Gorgeous bike !!
  • + 5
 That's why I am afraid of Swoop. A sturdy FR alu frame simply must weight ~3.5kg, especially if it is a horst link (which is generally more flexy).
  • + 3
 @lkubica: Ive got the Radon Swoop 170. Im 83.5kg and have spent this summer riding jump lines (with zero style) at a local bike park. Its felt solid and reliable from the go. Although mine in a large weighed in @ just over 14kg so not sure on the "factory figures"
  • + 2
 @lkubica: At 100kg geared up I can't fault mine, durability is another thing though.

Maybe Canyon just really went low cost with the 6066 (which was my guess), knowing that there's a CF version aswell. Radon have the Swoop only in Al, maybe they made it better.

I've never weighed/ridden a liteville, but isn't that supposed to be an example of how light Al frames can be, while still being durable?
  • + 1
 @Smokey79: Good to hear that. Have you ever disassembled the frame? From my experience only when you examine the bearings and shock hardware mounting areas can you tell if the thing is rigid and robust. I am affraid that 4-bar designs like this (with 2-piece upper link) transfer a lot of side load to the shock.
Just compare the bearings on Radon and Canyon ...
  • + 1
 @lkubica: Funny you should ask me that, the answer is YES. From what I understand, a large volume of Radon Swoops left the factory with no thread lock on the pivot/linkage bolts. Mine was one of these (the lower pivot bolt worked loose @ Bike Park Wales Frown Soooo, I had to do the job myself and can report after removing the shock and pivot/linkage hardware, there was no play or sign of disaster.
  • + 4
 Wish they would stop with the 520mm seat tubes on the XL. 500mm max please.
  • + 2
 True that, 480mm even!
  • + 0
 @BeaverCreaker: Preferably!
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer - What is the fork offset on the Torque? It looks shorter than normal, a la Transition SBG. Is this an industry trend now?
  • + 2
 As far as I know, the Torque is spec'd with a fork with normal offset.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Next article "Why the bike industry is no different than the fashion industry. A chronicle of the bike industry and the engineering innovations that don't matter" You're welcome.
  • + 2
 And that is my new favorite way to do cable housing. All bikes need this frame protector/housing. Looks good and is simple to service.
  • + 2
 well that makes the short list for my next bike, and looks like the spec I would pick makes it the cheapest of the list- not the end all to be all but a very real issue
  • + 4
 Santa Cruz, bring back the Bullit!
  • + 3
 There's one thing we can thank Canyon for : they are amongst the last big players that didn't go the Ebike way
  • + 1
 Even though it's similar to the new spectral, the torque just looks better. Not sure why but the Ali paint jobs are also more attractive, although the welds are on the ugly side.
  • + 3
 Oh. I was holding out for this as I really liked the old one. No dual crown fork. Comencal furious is still top of my list.
  • + 7
 Best of both worlds... Knolly Delirium. Run it single or dual crown without voiding your warranty. Air or coil shock.

www.knollybikes.com/delirium
  • + 2
 Furious has a longer wheelbase, shorter front center and reach, and 15mm longer chainstays.. the torque should be significantly more playful
  • + 2
 they gave you a top spec AL version but won't sell one? kinda sucks ... but nice bike #freeride4life
  • + 4
 Madeira!!!
  • + 3
 How durable are canyon AL frames/welds??
  • + 3
 Damn, N + 1 strikes again
  • + 1
 Kinematics analysis of the new Canyon Torque 2018!

mrblackmorescorner.blogspot.com.es/2017/12/canyon-torque-2018.html
  • + 4
 Freeride is back baby!!
  • + 3
 The aluminum sender looks better than the carbon version!
  • + 0
 I'd say both as good Smile
Love those shapes
  • + 2
 I am really happy to see an aluminium version too - Carbon is not for me (nothing to do with the bullcrap ocean 'story') for a variety of reasons which I wont go into with a geeky rant.
  • + 4
 I think all their new ally frames look nicer than the carbon ones. Something a bit vulgar about the carbon models.
  • + 3
 goddamn wallet please stop crying this is just a thing of beauty
  • + 1
 Hey guys, I believe the geometry table in this review is wrong. At least Canyon website has different numbers. Look at the ST length...
  • + 2
 So, when do we get it in the Advent Calendar Giveaway? Not many days left...
  • + 2
 That Sender... affordable park/DH bike... and it looks good...

I need a Kleenex

Also Favorited
  • + 1
 nice a 175mm of rear travel is my sound of enduro/fr/dh machine but its must have coil shock as standart. I hate air it doesnt support me like coil
  • + 5
 maybe you and your air shock should consider couple counseling
  • + 1
 @leopaul: mmmhmh maybe we should but i already divorced an CaneCreek DB air and swaped it on old and sweet f*cking Fox Van
  • + 1
 As soon as Canyon wants to send that Sender to the states, we might start seeing them on the trails.
  • + 1
 Interesting that Canyon chose to release details of the aluminium Sender on TUESday. Just sayin Wink
  • + 1
 Dat Torque AL 7.0 tho!!! Kinda wish I'd never seen it. Let the dream haunting begin...
  • + 1
 I want it!
  • + 1
 @BeaverCreaker: but you can't have it. at least it's not sold with the shown components ...
  • + 0
 Oh, that's new! Oh wait... I'm thinking of a bike with 650b wheels, 170mm travel, and a 65.5 ht angle. And you can buy it at a LBS.
  • + 0
 Love the bike but horrible cheesy early 2000 style video. Sorry but the duotones and over all tone of the video didn't get me pumped. The pictures did though Smile
  • + 2
 2000 style? Dude, this is bleeding edge new promo style stuff yo! Now we don't only see riders do amazing moves, we can see the CAD programs do pretty unreal physically unbelievable stuff no one has ever done before. I'm baffled. 2000 you say? This would have been merely wireframe stuff. And you'd have to buy the VHS to watch that promo.
  • + 1
 Their new stem looks just like a Renthal duo, a stem they commonly spec. I see you Canyon.
  • + 2
 Looks like a kona process 167. Same suspension layout.
  • + 2
 Rose Soul Fire vs Canyon Torque ?! hmmm i`m curious about this
  • + 2
 I think it's the good year to buy a new Strive... ...says no one ever.
  • + 1
 Really cool to see both of these!
  • + 0
 I have a question. If some one buys a lower version but after that wants to upgrade to a diffrent shock
  • + 1
 No "Super-Boost" hub options???
  • - 1
 What about the Wrench?!?!? Are we suppose to wait until everyone buys a Torque before we get to see the Wrench 29 170? lol jk... kinda
  • + 2
 You get a torque wrench with your new Torque, if that’s any good for you?
  • + 1
 Both of those bikes are drop dead sexy Drool
  • + 1
 Aluminium Sender for rental market, Torque...?
  • + 1
 I must start są saving money for this beauty 3
  • + 1
 now thats a specialized bike
  • + 1
 Dear Canyon, Make your bikes available in Canada! -Everybody in Canada
  • + 1
 Please add a motor and I will buy this beast.
  • + 1
 What about knolly delirium, every major brand has copied them!!
  • + 1
 Its Literally a Kona process
  • + 1
 That al 7.0 on the picture is not the same as in the site that is bad
  • + 1
 Damn i have no kidneys left!!
  • + 1
 Sender Al looks noice! like a Teus and a mk2 Furious had a baby Big Grin
  • + 1
 The AL version looks sick, and for that price what’s not to like?
  • + 2
 Return of freeride?
  • + 1
 the look sick. love the pink and black
  • + 0
 I really really want to like these bikes but not spec'ing the lower end models with a GX Eagle feels like a misstep. =/
  • + 1
 Some of these bikes are getting to be so affordable! Awesome!
  • + 2
 Do want.
  • - 9
flag iqbal-achieve (Dec 19, 2017 at 3:42) (Below Threshold)
 No Ally frame available. Oh well, anyone wanna buy my bike?
  • + 2
 @ThomDawson: Did you even read the article?
  • - 5
flag iqbal-achieve (Dec 19, 2017 at 4:09) (Below Threshold)
 @mtbforlife4: sorry, I think you misunderstand me. No ally frame ONLY available. Thanks for jumping straight to the assumption that I’m a complete imbecile. You wouldn’t have even had to read the article to see there is an ally option, looking at pictures would suffice.
  • + 0
 @ThomDawson: Hah, he is taking the piss that you didnt read the article when he didnt really read your sentence / understand it properly himself, pretty ironic.
  • + 1
 @Racer951: ikr! I mean you would have had to have been blind not to see there are huge welds all over that bike up there. What is this guy a blindist?
Putting all that aside I am seriously disappointed there’s no alloy frame available but the base spec is well priced. May have to do the old Kansas City Shuffle and stick all the parts on a steel hardtail frame and win back some currencies. People love steel hardtails here.
  • + 6
 I think the issue here is that ThomDawson is simply incoherent.
  • - 5
flag iqbal-achieve (Dec 19, 2017 at 5:15) (Below Threshold)
 @catnip: well f*ck you Debbie
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: +1. Yes, actually +1; that comment made my day. Big Grin
  • + 0
 @catnip: glad you saw the funny side. Too many take their shit with heavy doses of seriousness here.
  • + 1
 The components are not the same ?
  • + 0
 Reminds me of... my 2018 Enduro Comp, including the weight.
  • + 1
 look like a bike broo
  • + 1
 Sickest bike of 2018
  • + 1
 Stoked on this bike!
  • + 1
 Freeride is not dead
  • + 1
 Sick,I want one
  • - 1
 Snedinf whatever the f&$k you can afford down the hill is what freeride is and always was
  • + 6
 And so is spelling sending correctly
  • + 1
 @HaydukeLives: I read it like you were so pumped about sending it you couldn't get the words out let alone worry about the gear. ; )
  • + 0
 Looks like a Session
  • + 0
 Nice
  • - 3
 Aint no nomad killer without water bottle Wink
  • - 1
 Looks like a sender
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.102616
Mobile Version of Website