First Ride: Marin's First eMTB - the 2021 Alpine Trail E2

Dec 1, 2020
by David Arthur  



The Alpine Trail E is Marin's first foray into the world of electric mountain bikes. The company has used its existing Alpine Trail aluminum 150mm platform and added Shimano’s drive system, with the brand new EP8 on the range-topping model, a mixed wheel size setup and coil shocks across the range.

Marin Bikes likes to remind us that it makes bikes for fun - it’s printed several times across the bike including the top cap - but it’s more than a marketing buzzword; this is truly a fun bike that doesn’t fail to make you giggle all the way around the trail. Anyone who has ridden an e-bike - a number that is growing fast - will talk enthusiastically about how much fun they are and Marin has done well to retain the handling of its regular Alpine Trail with the added capability the motor provides.
Marin Alpine Trail E2 Details

• Wheel size: 29" front 27.5" rear
• Rear wheel travel: 150mm
• Shimano EP8 drive system
• 640Wh removable battery
• 63º head angle
• Aluminum frame and swingarm
• Size: S - XL
• Weight 25kg / 55lb size large no pedals
• Price:$4499 to $5999 USD
marinbikes.com

The Alpine Trail E comes in two flavors, the E1 costing $4499 / £4295 / €4899 and the E2 tested here priced at $5999 / £5695 / €6199 with both bikes using coil shocks. The E1 will be available in December with the E2 following in Spring of next year.


26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography
26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography


Frame and Drive System Details

Marin is also big on value for money and has eschewed an expensive carbon fiber main frame for an aluminum one just like that found on its regular Alpine Trail. The Multi-Trac linkage-driven single-pivot rear suspension is ported over from that bike too, dishing out 150mm of wheel travel via coil shocks across the range, driven by a one-piece linkage mounted to the seat tube. Marin then pairs that with a 160mm fork for an emphasis on descending capability.

26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography
26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography


Wheel sizes are mixed, as appears to be the trend for e-MTBs, with a 29in front-wheel and 27.5+ rear wheel. Marin says it reached this decision after much testing, concluding the smaller rear wheel increased the playfulness of the bike with maximum traction for climbing and descending, while retaining the rollover capability of the 29in front wheel. There’s generous clearance around the 2.8in tire with no mud clogging issues on a typical British winter ride.

The frame is packed full of nice details like bump stops on the down tube, internal cable routing and lots of protection around the chainstays. Oh, and there’s space for a water bottle cage with a 500ml fitting inside a side-entry cage. It’s tight, but it fits.

26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography
26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography


Powering the new Alpine Trail E2 is Shimano’s brand new EP8 on this range-topping model - E7000 on the more affordable model. Production bikes will feature a 630Wh battery, though my test bike had a 500Wh battery, and the battery is housed inside a custom made case and easily accessed by removing four Allen bolts. Charging can be done by removing the battery or using the charge port located just above the motor. The main power button is located on the top tube so it’s within easy reach and you get a display and remote control on the handlebar. More on those later.



Geometry

Marin has been pushing the geometry of its bikes in recent years - I was very impressed with the shorter travel Rift Zone I reviewed - but the company says its “reach numbers are long but not too long” because it wants its bikes to by playful while being as capable as progressive geometry surely provides.

There are four sizes to choose from, S to XL, and with short seat tubes and low top tubes you can size up or down more easily. The size large I rode gets a 485mm reach, 63-degree head angle and a steep 78-degree seat angle, 340mm bottom bracket height and 1264mm wheelbase. The chainstays are 435mm across the range, only 5mm longer than the regular Alpine Trail.


Build Options

Marin’s first foray into e-bikes provides us with a very simple range of two bikes. Both use the same aluminum frames and mixed wheel sizes, and there’s a strong emphasis on solid equipment choices with no real signs of corners being cut to achieve a target price.

The E1 uses Shimano's E7000 system but gets the same frame and attention to detail


The cheaper E1 uses Shimano’s E7000 drive unit with a 500Wh battery, RockShox 35 Gold fork and Super Deluxe Coil R shock with a Shimano Deore 10-speed drivetrain and four pot brake and Maxxis EXO+ tyres.

The more expensive E2 gets the latest Shimano EP8 drive unit with a 640Wh drive unit, Fox 38 Performance Elite fork and DHX2 coil shock, Shimano XT/SLX 12-speed drivetrain with e13 crank and four pot brakes, Deity handlebar and stem and Maxxis EXO+ tyres, Assegai front and Minion DHRII on the back.

The wheels are Marin’s own double wall tubeless rims with a 32/38mm front/rear inner width and there’s an X-Fusion Manic dropper post, 125mm on size small, 150mm on M and L and 170 on the XL.





My time aboard the Alpine Trail E2 was all too short, one local ride plus a trip to the local bike park for a day of gravity-induced smiles. That's not nearly enough time to form a well-rounded conclusion but it is enough to share some thoughts on how it performs.

I found the size large a good fit, with the 485mm reach in my sweet spot combined with a stubby stem and 800mm handlebar. Setup time was limited, but getting the suspension dialled in was straightforward, using the recommended settings for the Fox 38 got a good base tune from which I opened up the rebound and compression to my liking, and the coil shock was set and forget. Fitting a coil shock is a good move; the weight penalty is negligible on an e-bike but the performance it offers is so good. It’s supple and sensitive with good ramp up for bigger hits, and was a real star of the package.

Climbing is a comfortable experience with the 78-degree seat angle helping to make light work of the trickier climbs, keeping weight over the front wheel and balancing the power to scramble up some ridiculous climbs, while the short back end helps you nip and tuck through tight bends. There’s a lot of fun to be had from riding climbs you wouldn’t even contemplate on a regular bike, the only real limit is traction on the wet trails at the time of year the test was conducted. Tricking along in eco mode on mellow fireroads lets you conserve battery for the more challenging trails and when they arrive, the trail mode is the perfect setting for letting you scamper up root-infested tracks. The coil shock has a climb mode, but I left it in open the entire time. While it does move about when you’re riding, pedalling efficiency concerns aren’t the same as a regular bike so I revelled in all the traction and comfort it provided.

26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

Pulling the bike out of the back of the car you’re reminded just how heavy and cumbersome e-bikes are compared to regular 30lb trail bikes, but on the descents, the weight largely fades away. Naturally, you get up to speed quickly, a few forceful stabs on the pedals and you’re up to speed - gassing out of slower speed corners, especially if you’ve made a mess of the entry, is great fun. But when the trail gets steeper the Marin is really in its element. I spent a lot of time well above the speed limit, but when you’ve got gravity working for you, the Alpine Trail E2 is very maneuverable. I was really impressed with how I could chuck it about with the ease I’d expect from a much lighter regular bike. Hop over jumps, hip around stumps, the agility of this bike is highly impressive. And when you come to a very rocky section you can smash right through, the tires and suspension soak it all up. I will say that despite its agility, muscling an e-bike around a bike park all day is a full body workout - I need to start adding some press-ups to my morning routine of drinking copious amounts coffee and scrolling the ‘gram.

With my bike having a smaller 500Wh battery than the 640Wh that’ll feature in production bikes it’s unfair to talk about range, but a day at the bike park saw me totalling 50km and just shy of 2000m climbing which I’d call a good ride. The new Shimano EP8 is a nice refinement with some appreciable improvements. The trail mode is much more usable in a wide range of situations, so much so that I never needed the boost mode even on trickier climbs. Shimano has reduced friction in the motor and this enables eco mode to be more widely employed on flatter trails to eke out the range. Heck, I was even able to turn the assistance off on flatter trails and I don’t recall ever doing that on an e-bike before.

26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography


The motor is pretty quiet for the most part and you get used to the faint whir. Thankfully issues with earlier units rattling weren’t present on this bike, save for a few instances when you can detect a faint rumbling but it never really became an issue or annoyance.

I didn’t have time to delve into the available customisation via the smartphone app, but toggling between the eco and trail mode was easy with the control unit, and as the boost mode was rarely needed I spent less time switching frantically between boost and trail as I’ve experienced in the past. The display unit gives clear readouts of useful data by as Ralf pointed out in his detail first ride of the new drive system, I would love a percentage display of remaining battery level to just make it a little easier to judge how well you’re doing at conserving battery.

26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography

Marin nails the equipment on its bikes and this Alpine Trail E2 is no exception. It pays attention to what matters, from the excellent tire choice to the solid rims, reliable Shimano drivetrain and brakes (which gave no bite point issues) and sorted suspension. I’m no fan of the X-Fusion Manic dropper lever - the upgraded PNW Loam Lever fitted to the Rift Zone Carbon would be nice to see here, but it's an easy aftermarket upgrade.

Even though my time with the Alpine Trail E2 was brief, it’s abundantly clear Marin has nailed it straight out of the blocks with its first attempt an e-bike. By using the tried-and-tested Alpine Trail platform, incorporating Shimano’s newest EP8 drive unit, and giving the bike geometry numbers that maximize capability and fun on the climbs and descents it's a very appealing entry into their lineup. I’m already wondering how I can persuade Marin to let me keep the bike a bit longer...


26.11.20. Marin Bikes Alpine Trail E2. Pinkbike. PIC Andy Lloyd www.andylloyd.photography







97 Comments

  • 133 4
 Dear Marin

Someone in your R&D department has their ear to the ground, and whoever it is needs a serious pay rise. This last couple of years you have produced some of the best bikes I have seen from a 'big' brand in a long time!

Good Work
  • 25 2
 If I had to pick out the one thing that bothered me about this bike it would be...that the label on the tires did not line up perfectly with the valve stem. LOL Great Job Marin!
  • 10 0
 My first proper mtb was a Marin bear valley back in the early 90’s, was gutted when they went all a bit geography teacher so stoked they’re back doing good stuff.
  • 5 0
 Yeah, it’s great to see Marin back in the game for real. Even if they just keep targeting the relatively affordable bike market with good modern geometry, I’m happy to see them producing bikes I can recommend to friends.
  • 2 0
 @vjunior21: I would argue the biggest issue is that the saddle is pointed at the ground. Ouch.
  • 2 0
 To me, their only gaffe was with the el roy. They messed wjat could had been a great steel hardtail with that bad top tupe rise decision...the rest of their line is brilliant.
  • 2 0
 Matt V. is the man!
  • 1 0
 @Zeeroone:
Well you picked out one bike one bike in their line with a minor rise in the toptube so I would still say overall they are doing well overall.

If you look at pictures they have two sizes in that bike. The small has the toptube and seat stays meeting at the same point on the seat tube, The large size has them offset a little bit. I imagine the rear triangle is fixed in its design, the offset doesn't impact the frame strength, and the cost of production is lower is the rear is one fixed design. If all that is true then I can't blame them for looking out for us buy simplifying production to keep the end cost lower.
  • 1 0
 @Segamethod:
Have you seen some of the racer's bikes at a world cup xc race. A lot of the bikes have the nose of the seat pointed at the front hub. Not sure how they ride like that for two hours but I guess that ever set up does it for each rider.
  • 2 0
 @Segamethod: That wasn't my doing by the way, it arrived like that and I promptly levelled before riding - I'm not keen on this nose down trend at all
  • 1 0
 @vjunior21: I'd swear this decision has an impact in overall strength, looks bad and is not functional at all. Some brands do right the opposite to counteract forces created by rider's weight when sit on the saddle.
I get what you say about cost reduction, but did it reflect in the the final price. I mean, look at the price. OH MY GOD. For that price you can get a stanton switchback and a half!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Not to mention enormous sizing. Their line is, as I said, brilliant. But they look like in the need of ,at least once, creating sometimeg ugly.
  • 32 0
 @brianpark Marin is a brand that needs to be watched and their bikes need full reviews. They are killing it in geo, spec and design. Please feature more of their offerings.
  • 31 5
 I would buy this 10X over the overpriced Stumpjumper featured today. Reasonable bike, reasonable components and (still expensive) fair price for the spec
  • 4 0
 Thinking the same thing.
  • 7 5
 When I first saw it I was hoping it was enduro, unfortunately it was an ebike. Please make an enduro version with an awesome frame like this!!
  • 6 0
 @send-it-bro: Marin makes a non-ebike version of this, the regular Alpine Trail. Also a very sweet build for the price.
  • 1 0
 @WY228: Same style frame, or an older one?
  • 2 0
 @send-it-bro: Mostly similar, just not mulleted with 27.5 rear. Just look up their 2021 Alpine Trail XR or Alpine Trail 7.
  • 1 1
 @send-it-bro: They already have one -- the Rift Zone
  • 2 0
 @WY228: Will do. Also congrats to Marin for switching to Fox suspension, I don't care for SR Suntour at all, probably too used to seeing those XCM forks on all those Walmart bikes!
  • 28 1
 I have never seen so many positive comments on a ebike review...ever. Are we being swayed over, hmmmmm
  • 24 5
 This is what e-bikes should be. Machines that let you avoid the shuttles/lifts. And before we start complaining about beating up the trails, my early Norco and Turner DH bikes weighed this much. Albeit, e-trail bikes make little sense to me.
  • 4 25
flag eugenux (Dec 1, 2020 at 8:32) (Below Threshold)
 In total contradiction to your opinion, having an electric when you have lift access to your trail network/system makes so little sense. At 180 degrees are the 140-150mm travel electrics in the weight range of 16 to 18 kgs. Now that is good use to a motor and a battery. All day epics that last 5 to 6 hours instead of 8 or 9, excellent, more time for beer and a good post-ride laughs. 2 laps on the xc/xco course near me...excellent body workout aams well as there is a considerably diff between a sub 10 kgs full susp xc bike(like my last one) and a 16-18 kgs electric. Actually, I could (almost) squeeze the weight of my gravel bike within the difference.
So, let's make a recap: big electric monsters are useless...everywhere. Light and ultra-light electrics are best every/any-where!
  • 11 0
 @eugenux: Get your point. I didn't explain myself well. There are places where I live that only run lifts a couple times a year, or just on weekends. Trails are open all the time though. Some places don't have lifts at all. Would be nice to have an ebike to rip it up to the top.
  • 7 1
 @eugenux: Problem in North America is that most trails are still off-limits to eMTBs. So using it to self-shuttle is really the best use-case. I have a couple ski-slopes within an hour of me that have MTB trails, but no up-lift and I suspect there are other places that are similar. This bike's geo is a bit too much for how I like to ride, but I can see the appeal.
  • 1 3
 Ok guys, noted.

I still do believe that a 24-25-xx-28 kgs misses the "target" of what a bike should be..while a 16-18 kgs electric isn't(my old big enduro was 16.5 kgs so, for me, it seems like a no brainer. Plus, kinematics are progressive, geometry even more so..., it's a win-win IMO)
  • 3 6
 guess e trail bikes are for people who cannot ride up hills - either due to fitness or age.. which is fine as it opens up the sport for a bigger audience, which introduces more money into the scene.. As long i don't have to buy one myself, good to see the bikes advance and get better...
  • 2 0
 @saladdodger: why do you say that?, I could make the same course on a sub 10 kgs xc full susp..but, where would the fun be in that?, so, 16-18 kgs on eco...aka, sub 10 kgs xc full susp with a light tail wind but with the extra 40-50mm of travel and a much better geometry looks like a win for me. Why should I drag my big ass enduro bike and arrive at the final 10 miles "sky to bottom" part of the trail, after 7 hours of mountain traversing, when I could very easily do it in 4 or 5 and have plenty of energy for the full down part?

I almost laugh when I think I have arrived at the point where I start to defend a/one type of electrics. Dios Mio, the world must be ending! ahahahaha
  • 1 0
 I've thought this about ebikes for a while. I live right by a place that runs a shuttle on lots of weekends to access some real DH terrain (Bootleg Canyon in NV). To get to the top, you either shuttle or grind up a long, loose, steepish dirt road. It's the perfect situation for an e-bike.

And I'd totally consider one if I wasn't too old and too much of a hack to lap the DH trails from the top of the hill. ha
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: Not the case in BC. You guys down south have much more red tape and restrictions around EMTB than we do here in BC.
  • 1 0
 @eugenux: disagree, the big boys are actually a different experience, not really akin to normal MTBs.
The light ones are very similar.
To a degree it will what ones mates ride, that will dictate choice !!
  • 6 0
 @criscokid25: Bro BC is the promised land, it's not even f*cking fair.
  • 1 0
 @Murfdog: this is exactly what I said. The big electrics do not behave like mtbs. I tried a 28 kgs one once. I hate it from the bottom of my heart; yeah, on turbo was fun..in the same way I find some fun in riding scooters or atvs..but the feeling on a mtb is different and I am glad for that. That is why I find the new Orbea Rise very appealing - the problem is that currently the delivery time(and that could change/increase) is August 2021 -, as it still feels like a mtb.

But, you are correct..., of the guys have all turbo kenevos and sight vlts, sc bullits, etc-etc...a light-ish one would be the odd choice.

Then again, we can manage to ride together having different skill-sets and fitness abilities. I think we will be ok.
  • 2 0
 @eugenux: I agree. Not sure if Marin has hit the mark at 55lbs? A bike this heavy will never behave like a regular MTB and feel cumbersome everywhere on the trail. I think more bike companies should try building their EMTB's lighter like the Orbea Rise weighing only 36-38lbs (but better CAD pricing). At this weight you can get a EMTB that almost feels and rides like a regular bike with a bit of assist to get up those steep long mountain climbs. I believe this would really catch on and even most e-bike haters would like one if they actually had a chance and rode a lightweight EMTB. Come on all bike manufacturer's, let's see more lightweight EMTB's...
  • 2 1
 @RowdyAirTime: I am one of those haters of, now classic, e-bikes. But with the ones like the Levo SL and Orbea Rise I have absolutely no problem, in fact, I want one!(especially since I can play with the colors selection of it, as I did with my Oiz; I already discussed with my LBS but the delivery tine for one with MyO program is, as I've said above, August 2021)
  • 6 0
 @RowdyAirTime: I rode DH bikes that were 50lbs. I am in my 40s, but back then...50lbs WAS a regular mountain bike. Furthermore, the HTA and wheelbase on this Marin is MORE aggressive than those 50lb DH bikes I was riding. Marin spec'd this with a coil and fox 38. This isn't meant to be compared to the handling of a 30 pound trail bike. Compare it instead to some freeride beast meant to be ridden hard downhill. That what makes this type of ebike make sense to me. I get the rowdiness of a freeride machine and I don't care about the pedal up. I currently do this on my 34 pound Banshee Titan. I would feel no shame in being about to get two or three more laps in using the ebike to get to the top. Not necessarily because of the legs, but the TIME. Lots of us have time constraints when out. 4 laps in 3 hours vs 7 laps?? That's what I am talking about.
  • 1 1
 @aharvey: time..time is the most of us don't have. As I was saying in my first reply to you, I get your point; but this only applies to ppl who live at the bottom of the mountain.
Most of us don't live there. I live in the flats...for me, it is either gravel or xc in the forrests near my city, where, in 30 miles you don't add up 800-900 ft of elevation. And I still see ppl with big electric Scott, Haibike and Cube bikes.
For me, it does not make sense as, when I go to the bikepark trails, I can use a big bike with the lift assist so I don't need an electric. I have explained, the only place an electric makes sense for me is in overmountain trips, a place where, a 16-to-18 kgs e-bike is more fun than a 25+ kgs monster.

Actually, this is my big problem(and hate reason) with the e-bikes. Ppl who are living in the flats, yet they are using 25+ kgs e-bikes on xc difficulty flat trails.

P.S. I can build a sub 35 lbs freeride bike. I know that because my "trail" bike is build with everything big enduro on it(DDs, 200mm 4pot brakes, hard hitting wheels, etc) but with all the lightweigh stuff that can be added on it(cockpit, carbon drive-train, etc); even if ai cange from a 2.2 kgs lyrik ultimate to a 180 38 or a 180-190 zeb and add a tire insert in the back, it will still be below 35 lbs. In fact, I will do just that as soon as the Nuke Giga will be launched.
  • 2 0
 @aharvey: I hear what you're saying, but have never ridden bikes that heavy. I grew up riding much lighter bikes and still have my older Scott Spark SL weighing under 23lbs, a 2019 Trance Advanced Pro 29 0 weighing under 26.5lbs and even my ebike, a 2018 Focus Jam weighs just over 43lbs.

I live near big steep mountains with long vertical climbs (and no lifts, etc) so I like to have the option of a little pedal assist (EMTB) but still have a bike that almost feels like regular bike on the way down. I like bikes that are light and try and pop off every obstacle on the trail. I'm also only 148lbs, so don't need a big heavy overbuilt downhill bike to plow through everything. Bikes like the Orbea Rise and Specialized Levo SL offer some pedal assist but still are light enough to feel similar to a regular pedal bike. I hope other bike manufacturer's (Giant, Trek, Pivot, Ibis, etc...) will also start offering similar lightweight EMTB's (36-39lbs).

I do understand people wanting a long travel superbuilt ebike though, as an electric motor makes sense to help pedal one of these big machines to the top. I agree time is a huge advantage for ebikes as you can get more laps in definitely. You also ride further and places you may not explore on a regular pedal bike. EMTB's are also good on days when you may not feel like giving it or even riding your regular pedal bike, especially on trails that have big climbs and would like some pedal assist. EMTB's are also great if you have any lower body injuries and you can still get out for ride. The best part is you can choose how much pedal assist you want, depending on where you are riding and how you feel that day.

If you live near big steep mountains with long vertical climbs, a EMTB totally makes sense to have in the stable, I believe most ebike haters have never tried a good EMTB or live in more flat rolling terrain where a ebike does not make much sense and all they see is older people riding cheap heavy ebikes.
  • 9 0
 So get the lower end and just swap the fork? Might be the best ebike deal out there
  • 4 0
 The Alpine Trail E1 has the E7000 motor, which has 60Nm of power. I have a eMTB with the E7000 motor, it's a good motor, but you are not going to fly up the hills with it. Alpine Trail E1 for under $5K looks like a great buy for someone who want to give eMTBiking a try or a backup eMTB and doesn't want to spend $6k.
  • 1 0
 @mr-epic-3: I haven't spent enough time on ebikes to really know how much power is enough for climbs. I guess I'll take your word for it
  • 1 0
 @mr-epic-3: I was thinking about getting the entry level Vitus E-Sommet (it's at an amazing price). I was hoping the e7000 motor was gonna be ok
  • 1 0
 The $4999 price point literally makes no sense for what you get for an additional $1000, Better fork, shock, drive train, better motor, bigger battery the list goes on!
  • 1 0
 @Smokey79: The Vitus e-Sommet looks like a great buy and if you are on a budget that would be the bike to get. The E7000 is a good motor it will will get you out there and back, but you are not going to PR any climbs on the E7000.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Climbing up a fire road Nm power is a good thing, but if it's a techy climb (eMTB or aMTB) it's all about techniqueSmile
  • 1 0
 @mr-epic-3: Cheers dude, decisions decisions
  • 1 0
 @rednova: It's $1500 different, but yes I agree the $6k version has it all. But not everyone wants or has $6k to spend on a eMTB or aMTB big boy toy.
I wish Marin would have offered a version in the middle that cost like $5200, with a RS Pike fork, but maybe next year.
  • 1 0
 @mr-epic-3: pike in 170mm 29?
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Pike or Lyrik in a 160mm 29er and EP8 motor just a couple of upgrades from the E1 spec for around the $5200 - $5300 price range.
  • 6 0
 If I was in the market for an ebike this would be it. Not everyone want barge-like handling long chainstays. And this also has decent reach and a steep seat angle. Marin are on fire again!
  • 9 1
 Ironically there isn't one trail in "Marin" that you can ride this on...
  • 10 1
 Legally Wink
  • 1 0
 @rednova: you got $400 for a BS ticket?
  • 1 0
 Why is Marin in quotes. You know it’s a real place right?
I’ve ridden this bike while in development on all our best DH tracks. Said tracks don’t technically “exist”
  • 1 0
 @metalmike: Yes I know, I live in the bay area. In quotes to differentiate the brand from the geographic location, which is notoriously not mtb friendly and even less for ebikes. You really can't see the irony in that???
  • 3 0
 @OldScratchJohnson: I saw the irony 20years ago but it’s never stopped us from poaching whatever we want.

Ironic? 100%, but we still have awesome trails that get ridden constantly. The authorities are fighting a losing battle so F them right in their A’s
  • 1 0
 @metalmike: Cool, typically poaching isn't something you broadcast but still glad to hear that riders are taking back the land a little.
Cheers
  • 1 0
 @OldScratchJohnson: poaching is no secret around these parts. Just don’t Strava
  • 1 0
 @OldScratchJohnson: point is this ATe is sick as f@ck!!!!!!!
  • 5 1
 This is basically the updated Alpine Trail enduro bike which preserves the geometry in the leccy version. To all the people saying that this is the first Marin that looks good, it really just shows that you're ignorant of what they've been doing over the last couple of years.
  • 4 0
 I’ve had the luxury of riding this bike more than a few times over the past year while in development. Hot laps on the local DH tracks that have no lift or shuttle access. It is ultra super mega sick! @factory_cip at Marin Bikes deserves a lot of the credit.
  • 6 0
 This is how you make an aluminum frame eMTB. It's almost odd that it's coming from Marin, out of all brands.
  • 6 0
 So shimano going down motor rattle is magically gone? Did they actually fix this issue?
  • 3 0
 Good question? It would be nice if Shimano fixed the motor rattling noise problem, as it's definitely a big negative when going downhill!
  • 6 0
 Looks like a Norco Range VLT, which is a very good thing. Nice one Marin!
  • 1 0
 OMG existential crisis just hit. I simultaneously want my own ultralight FS EBIKE, and resent the intrusion of others on the same rigs comin round my sacred places. In the old days you went back far nough to avoid the clowns. Now im the clown... But I want to have fun!! Cant beat em. Join em. Sell me some juice.
  • 1 0
 I've always wanted the Marin Mount Vision Pro when it first came out before Marin got sued on their frame designs. After they changed the designs, their FS bikes were never the same. I'm hoping they're not gonna get sued again as I think Marin comes out with pretty exciting stuff. Good work on their first attempt at the e-Bike!
  • 4 0
 Looks like you guys chrashed their website xD
  • 1 0
 Semi-related, but not really. I don't know what James Smurthwaite looks like, so my mind automatically pictures David Arthur while James is talking in the Pinkbike Podcast. The bike also looks dope.
  • 2 0
 Not sure if James will be flattered by that Wink
  • 2 0
 Pretty sure the pine mountain has had an e version since last year. Marin has been killing it on geo and spec these past couple years!
  • 2 0
 Other manufacturers have really caught up and overtaken specialized now. This makes the levo look pretty dated geometry wise.
  • 1 0
 435mm seat tube on the XL? I still wouldn't be able to run a 210mm one up seat post within the minimum insertion height! Even if I could there would be a ridiculous amount of seat post sticking out.
  • 4 0
 #COIL4TheWin
  • 2 0
 A decent, aluminum frame full suspension mtb at a reasonable price.... and its got a motor? Nicely done Marin.
  • 1 9
flag MattP76 (Dec 1, 2020 at 13:57) (Below Threshold)
 Just a shame they cocked up by putting two different wheel sizes on it!
  • 3 0
 The geometry on this bike is so spot on.
  • 1 0
 I know right! Did you see how short those seat tubes are? Every size can probably run a 210mm dropper! Every brand should do the same! I'd have slightly longer chainstays but everything else is awesome!
  • 1 0
 The Canadian builds are even better. Well, they must be. $6000usd converts to $7800cad today. But we get to pay $8200! So it must be better, right???
  • 3 0
 People need to start buying Marin again.
  • 2 0
 Frame looks decent, first Marin I've seen which looks pretty good
  • 1 0
 these modern seat tube angles are not going to be good, long term for our knee's
  • 1 0
 Can someone confirm this December availability?
All I'm getting is a few might show up (in Vancouver) in May 2021. In MAY.
  • 1 0
 Can I ask which shops you were able to contact - you may have saved me the bother if thats the timeline. Am up in Squamish and the E2 ticks all the boxes. Was just about to start calling Vancouver shops to find out availability. Am usually a consumer direct guy with YT/Commencal/Spawn in our fleet and about to 'add to cart' on a 27.5 Commencal Meta Power SX as they have the most important selling point - its in stock!, but would ideally like that mullet 29 up front which they dont do. Marin are spot on with their competitive pricing on this, that will be pretty much in line with what YT will likely release in Jan
  • 1 0
 Was the weight actually measured or is it from the bike with the bigger battery?
  • 1 0
 I thought everyone would see 55lbs and be... Nope. Surprised at the enthusiasm.
  • 1 0
 A Great offering from Marin and not a bad price. My Liteville301 CE Pro costs a bit more but is lighter and hard to beat !
  • 1 0
 Great geo, good looking, Marin? what? 2020 is the strangest year!
  • 1 0
 Next bike... now to try and find one.
  • 1 0
 Love the bike, I fear Marin is becoming a boutique brand?!
  • 1 1
 e bikes are rad! but I hate them.
  • 1 2
 nah
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.017785
Mobile Version of Website