21 Cool New Bike Tools For 2022

Nov 4, 2021
by Dave Rome  
Here s one from the roadie world. Silca recently made a large investment into in-house 3D printing metal capabilities. The first production part to roll out of the machines was the high-priced Mensola titanium computer mount and that was quickly followed by an equally expensive hammer a cassette lockring tool and a chain whip all printed in titanium. And now Silca is offering these hand tools with Cerakote finishes a highly durable ceramic coating in addition to the original raw titanium finish. Currently Silca offers this Cerakote in a choice of black pictured or a limited edition copper colour. These are intended for race mechanics who often travel with their tools and home mechanics who like to have the tools of race mechanics .

As bikes continue to change (and sometimes progress) so do the tools that make those bikes easier and more efficient to work on. It’s this effort to continuously improve a manual task that I find so intriguing about the world of new tools. With that, here’s a collection of freshly announced cycling tools. Some are priced for the home user while others will likely remain an interesting look at what the pros spend their money on.

Almost all steerer tube cutting guides work in a similar way by inserting the steerer tube through the O-shaped tool and then clamping it down. The new Abbey Saw Guide US 100 takes a somewhat unique approach with its U-shape and the ability to be split in two.
Almost all steerer tube cutting guides work in a similar way – by inserting the steerer tube through the O-shaped tool and then clamping it down. The new Abbey Saw Guide (US$100) takes a somewhat unique approach with its U-shape and the ability to be split in two.

This new tool is designed to assist mechanics in cutting the steerers on certain new aero-styled road and gravel bikes that have cables or hoses running through the carbon steerer. It presents a huge time-saving option for bikes that require the steerer to be trimmed in order to lower the stem. The new steerer cutter also works on regular fork steerer tubes and can be used with the fork in a bike or it can be mounted in a vise. However in an effort to keep the cuts precisely straight Abbey did make a few sizing concessions in that it only fits between 1 to 1 1 8 tubes. Meaning the tool can t be used to trim 22.2 mm handlebar ends. Certainly professional workshops looking to buy this tool will want to hold onto their existing saw guides likely the Park Tool Oversized saw guide too.
This new tool is designed to assist mechanics in cutting the steerers on certain new aero-styled road and gravel bikes that have cables or hoses running through the carbon steerer. It presents a huge time-saving option for bikes that require the steerer to be trimmed in order to lower the stem. The new steerer cutter also works on regular fork steerer tubes, and can be used with the fork in a bike or it can be mounted in a vise. However, in an effort to keep the cuts precisely straight, Abbey did make a few sizing concessions in that it only fits between 1″ to 1 1/8″ tubes. Meaning the tool can’t be used to trim 22.2 mm handlebar ends. Certainly, professional workshops looking to buy this tool will want to hold onto their existing saw guides (likely the Park Tool Oversized saw guide), too.

While not a unique feature the Abbey Saw Guide offers a slot for regular hacksaw blades for cutting metal steerers and a thicker slot to fit abrasive blades better suited to trimming carbon.
While not a unique feature, the Abbey Saw Guide offers a slot for regular hacksaw blades for cutting metal steerers and a thicker slot to fit abrasive blades better suited to trimming carbon.

Truly a why didn t I think of that idea the Lever Setter tool US 35 simply takes the place of the headset topcap found on most bikes and then provides a thread to accept a derailleur hanger alignment gauge. From there the derailleur hanger alignment gauge can help ensure that your brake levers are at the ideal height to each other or matched between bikes too .
Truly a “why didn’t I think of that” idea, the Lever Setter tool (US$35) simply takes the place of the headset top cap found on most bikes and then provides a thread to accept a derailleur hanger alignment gauge. From there, the derailleur hanger alignment gauge can help ensure that your brake levers are at the ideal height to each other (or matched between bikes, too).

More complicated bulkier and more expensive lever setting tools already exist in the market and are commonly found in the team trucks of road WorldTour teams to aid in perfectly setting up multiple bikes for each respective rider. While this tool can t be used with every type of steerer tube or stem design it will work across most bikes. It s a simple and affordable tool that I ve been quietly using and loving for a couple of years and I m excited to see it finally hit the market. Personally I find this one more useful for dialling in road gravel bike fits but each to their own.
More complicated, bulkier, and more expensive lever setting tools already exist in the market and are commonly found in the team trucks of road WorldTour teams to aid in perfectly setting up multiple bikes for each respective rider. While this tool can’t be used with every type of steerer tube or stem design, it will work across most bikes. It’s a simple and affordable tool that I’ve been quietly using and loving for a couple of years and I’m excited to see it finally hit the market. Personally, I find this one more useful for dialling in road/gravel bike fits, but each to their own.

Here s a tool that surprising doesn t already exist. It s a simple four-pin socket tool to fit the self-extracting caps found on SRAM DUB cranks both road and MTB . Most users will never need to remove these threaded caps but they have been known to work loose and will also need to be removed in order to change out the sometimes problematic aluminium crank bolts.
Here’s a tool that surprising doesn’t already exist. It’s a simple four-pin socket tool to fit the self-extracting caps found on SRAM DUB cranks (both road and MTB). Most users will never need to remove these threaded caps, but they have been known to work loose and will also need to be removed in order to change out the sometimes problematic aluminium crank bolts.

The DUB Crank Dust Cap tool US 30 features both external wrench flats and a 3 8 square socket drive. These caps are typically removed and installed with a simple pin spanner but getting a secure fit and enough leverage with such a thing can be tricky especially if the caps have been secured with thread locker a good idea .
The DUB Crank Dust Cap tool (US$30) features both external wrench flats and a 3/8″ square socket drive. These caps are typically removed and installed with a simple pin spanner, but getting a secure fit and enough leverage with such a thing can be tricky, especially if the caps have been secured with thread locker (a good idea).

I like the neat touch of the laser-engraved directional arrow that reminds you the puller cap is reverse threaded.
I like the neat touch of the laser-engraved directional arrow that reminds you the puller cap is reverse threaded.

Topeak has long offered digital torque wrenches similar to those now sold by Pro and Unior but obviously missing from the range was a more affordable adjustable option for workshop use. The Torq Stick 4-20 Nm US 140 fills that gap.
Topeak has long offered digital torque wrenches (similar to those now sold by Pro and Unior) but obviously missing from the range was a more affordable adjustable option for workshop use. The Torq Stick 4-20 Nm (US$140) fills that gap.

This click-type torque wrench ranges from 4-20 Nm in .5 Nm increments and offers an impressively compact ratcheting head. The tool includes nine common size 1 4 tool bits. Adjusting the torque is done with the locking handle at the base.
This click-type torque wrench ranges from 4-20 Nm (in .5 Nm increments) and offers an impressively compact ratcheting head. The tool includes nine common size 1/4″ tool bits. Adjusting the torque is done with the locking handle at the base.

Few torque wrenches on the market offer a ratcheting head as compact as this.
Few torque wrenches on the market offer a ratcheting head as compact as this.

Early impressions are mostly positive but this tool does suffer from one of the things I dislike about many of the click-type torque wrenches taking a full rotation of the adjustment dial to initiate a single Nm change in set torque. Similarly the automatic sprung design has a tendency to pull the adjuster handle into its locked position while you re trying to turn it.
Early impressions are mostly positive but this tool does suffer from one of the things I dislike about many of the click-type torque wrenches: taking a full rotation of the adjustment dial to initiate a single Nm change in set torque. Similarly, the automatic sprung design has a tendency to pull the adjuster handle into its locked position while you’re trying to turn it.

Topeak s original SmartGauge D2 digital pressure gauge right is a popular pick for those seeking consistent and accurate pressure measurement without breaking the bank. The new SmartGauge D2X left is a higher-end version that offers a sleeker design and a 360 rotating head.
Topeak’s original SmartGauge D2 digital pressure gauge (right) is a popular pick for those seeking consistent and accurate pressure measurement without breaking the bank. The new SmartGauge D2X (left) is a higher-end version that offers a sleeker design and a 360º rotating head.

Like the original SmartGauge D2 this new model works with both Presta and Schrader valves with the simple flick of a switch.
Like the original SmartGauge D2 this new model works with both Presta and Schrader valves with the simple flick of a switch.

This new model also offers the live air pressure adjust mode that lets you read the pressure in real time while bleeding air from the tyre or suspension. This new gauge sells for US 58.
This new model also offers the live air pressure adjust mode that lets you read the pressure in real-time while bleeding air from the tyre or suspension. This new gauge sells for US$58.

Claimed to be the world s first lift-assisted foldable work stand the Topeak Prepstand eUp features a foot-pedal-operated gas lift cartridge. It s intended to provide 17 kg 37 lb of lifting and lowering assistance for when working with e-bikes and other heavy things. In a sense you can think of it as a massive dropper seatpost that instead of holding a saddle holds a bike. The stand itself is said to weigh 12 kg and has a maximum listed load rating of 35 kg 77 lb . Don t want to lift your own bike This stand will provide that privilege for US 950.
Claimed to be the world’s first lift-assisted foldable work stand, the Topeak Prepstand eUp features a foot-pedal-operated gas lift cartridge. It’s intended to provide 17 kg (37 lb) of lifting and lowering assistance for when working with e-bikes and other heavy things. In a sense, you can think of it as a massive dropper seatpost that, instead of holding a saddle, holds a bike. The stand itself is said to weigh 12 kg and has a maximum listed load rating of 35 kg (77 lb). Don’t want to lift your own bike? This stand will provide that privilege for US$950.

The TubiHead is a pump head designed specifically to aid with the inflation of stubborn tubeless tyres. It s a product I recently reviewed along with the new Joeblow Tubi 2Stage floor pump over at CyclingTips.
The TubiHead is a pump head designed specifically to aid with the inflation of stubborn tubeless tyres. It’s a product I recently reviewed along with the new Joeblow Tubi 2Stage floor pump over at CyclingTips.

Spoke pliers are a common sight in professional workshops for assistance with preventing spoke twist on lighter builds or to simply make it possible to work with round-shaped straight-pull spokes. For a long time Roval had its name on the prized spoke-holding tool and more recently Unior made such a thing accessible and affordable. Now Park Tool has combined the best elements of the Roval and Unior tools into one with its CSH-1 Clamping Spoke Holder.
Spoke pliers are a common sight in professional workshops for assistance with preventing spoke twist on lighter builds or to simply make it possible to work with round-shaped straight-pull spokes. For a long time Roval had its name on the prized spoke-holding tool, and more recently Unior made such a thing accessible and affordable. Now Park Tool has combined the best elements of the Roval and Unior tools into one with its CSH-1 Clamping Spoke Holder.

The parallel clamping jaws mean this spoke-holding plier should work with round and bladed spokes. Expect to pay US 33 for this forged steel tool.
The parallel clamping jaws mean this spoke-holding plier should work with round and bladed spokes. Expect to pay US$33 for this forged steel tool.

Prior to offering click-type torque wrenches Park Tool had its name on a couple of basic beam-style torque tools. This style of tool worked in both clockwise and anti-clockwise directions didn t require calibration and had an affordable price to reflect the basic construction. Now Park Tool has brought back those classics.
Prior to offering click-type torque wrenches, Park Tool had its name on a couple of basic beam-style torque tools. This style of tool worked in both clockwise and anti-clockwise directions, didn’t require calibration, and had an affordable price to reflect the basic construction. Now Park Tool has brought back those classics.

The TW-1.2 US 39 offers a torque range of 0-14 Nm while the TW-2.2 US 43 goes from 0-60 Nm. Both tools feature a 3 8 square drive the same size as the socket sets Park Tool has its name on .
The TW-1.2 (US$39) offers a torque range of 0-14 Nm, while the TW-2.2 (US$43) goes from 0-60 Nm. Both tools feature a 3/8″ square drive (the same size as the socket sets Park Tool has its name on).

Due to the different scales on these tools those wanting accurate torque control below 10 Nm really should use the smaller TW-1.2.
Due to the different scales on these tools, those wanting accurate torque control below 10 Nm really should use the smaller TW-1.2.

The large TW-2.2 is designed for things like cassettes bottom brackets cranks and other higher-torque items. Click-type torque wrenches still have benefits related to the ratcheting heads compact shape and tactile feedback but these beam-type tools should suffice nicely for most casual users.
The large TW-2.2 is designed for things like cassettes, bottom brackets, cranks, and other higher-torque items. Click-type torque wrenches still have benefits related to the ratcheting heads, compact shape, and tactile feedback, but these beam-type tools should suffice nicely for most casual users.

Here s one from the roadie world. Silca recently made a large investment into in-house 3D printing metal capabilities. The first production part to roll out of the machines was the high-priced Mensola titanium computer mount and that was quickly followed by an equally expensive hammer a cassette lockring tool and a chain whip all printed in titanium. And now Silca is offering these hand tools with Cerakote finishes a highly durable ceramic coating in addition to the original raw titanium finish. Currently Silca offers this Cerakote in a choice of black pictured or a limited edition copper colour. These are intended for race mechanics who often travel with their tools and home mechanics who like to have the tools of race mechanics .
Here's one from the roadie world. Silca recently made a large investment into in-house 3D printing metal capabilities. The first production part to roll out of the machines was the high-priced Mensola titanium computer mount, and that was quickly followed by an equally expensive hammer, a cassette lockring tool, and a chain whip – all printed in titanium. And now Silca is offering these hand tools with Cerakote finishes (a highly durable ceramic coating) in addition to the original raw titanium finish. Currently Silca offers this Cerakote in a choice of black (pictured) or a limited edition copper colour. These are intended for race mechanics who often travel with their tools (and home mechanics who like to have the tools of race mechanics).

Abbey Bike Tools was arguably the first cycling tool brand to make products directly aimed at the travelling race mechanic and the brand s tools have commonly been considered the best for a balance between portability and practicality. Silca s new tools look to take the portability element to another level and are pitched at those who want the lightest tools to travel with.
Abbey Bike Tools was arguably the first cycling tool brand to make products directly aimed at the travelling race mechanic and the brand’s tools have commonly been considered the best for a balance between portability and practicality. Silca’s new tools look to take the portability element to another level and are pitched at those who want the lightest tools to travel with.

The dual-sided cassette lockring tool works across Shimano SRAM and Campagnolo for the roadies components and weighs just 50 grams versus the 144-gram Abbey Crombie tool made of steel it s clearly inspired by. Such weight savings inevitably do carry compromise and the tools are quite short in length and lack leverage compared to those found in many professional workshops. And then there are questions over the durability and strength of such tools if used on over-tightened or stuck parts.
The dual-sided cassette lockring tool works across Shimano, SRAM, and Campagnolo (for the roadies) components and weighs just 50 grams versus the 144-gram Abbey Crombie tool (made of steel) it’s clearly inspired by. Such weight savings inevitably do carry compromise and the tools are quite short in length and lack leverage compared to those found in many professional workshops. And then there are questions over the durability and strength of such tools if used on over-tightened or stuck parts.

Like the Crombie the Silca tool is hollow to fit over long axle end caps and quick-release skewers if that applies .
Like the Crombie, the Silca tool is hollow to fit over long axle end caps (and quick-release skewers, if that applies).

The matching chain whip which replaces the top span of chain with a 3D printed section weighs just 89 grams. Compare that to the Abbey steel chain whip at 256 grams. However unlike the Abbey cassette tools the Silca tools cannot be stored within each other.
The matching chain whip, which replaces the top span of chain with a 3D printed section, weighs just 89 grams. Compare that to the Abbey steel chain whip at 256 grams. However, unlike the Abbey cassette tools, the Silca tools cannot be stored within each other.

And then there s the 125-gram dead blow hammer compare to Abbey s TI hammer at 237 g that features free floating tungsten and stainless grit within the hammer head for additional weight and rebound reduction. A lightweight hammer is obviously an extremely niche product and isn t the sort of thing you want for dealing with a rusted beater bike. Starting from US 165 a piece these Silca tools are of course far more of a want item versus need.
And then there’s the 125-gram dead blow hammer (compare to Abbey’s TI hammer at 237 g) that features free floating tungsten and stainless grit within the hammer head for additional weight and rebound reduction. A lightweight hammer is obviously an extremely niche product and isn’t the sort of thing you want for dealing with a rusted beater bike. Starting from US$165 a piece, these Silca tools are of course far more of a ‘want’ item versus ‘need.’

Pedro s new Pro Bit Drivers are modular bit-based screwdrivers designed with limit screws and other fiddly things in mind.
Pedros' new Pro Bit Drivers are modular bit-based screwdrivers designed with limit screws and other fiddly things in mind.

Pedro s offers two versions of this tool. One comes with JIS-compatabile 1 and 2 crosshead bits and a 5 mm flat head. The other version comes with a T25 Torx and 2 and 2.5 mm hex bits. Expect to pay US 42 AU 65 for one of these.
Pedros' offers two versions of this tool. One comes with JIS-compatible #1 and #2 crosshead bits and a 5 mm flat head. The other version comes with a T25 Torx, and 2 and 2.5 mm hex bits. Expect to pay US$42 / AU$65 for one of these.

These feature a magnetic bit holder on one end and store two extra 1 4 bits inside its handle. The end cap for those spare bits spins on a bearing for comfortable screw driving. Meanwhile the slim aluminium body of the tool is knurled for easy grip.
These feature a magnetic bit holder on one end and store two extra 1/4″ bits inside its handle. The end cap for those spare bits spins on a bearing for comfortable screw driving. Meanwhile, the slim aluminium body of the tool is knurled for easy grip.

And for those wondering JIS is a defunct Japanese variant of the Phillips head standard and is found on many older Shimano components. Newer ISO standards for cross-head screwdrivers includes cross-compatibility with JIS screws. Either way a JIS-compatible bit can make a huge difference with certain screws.
And for those wondering, JIS is a defunct Japanese variant of the Phillips head standard and is found on many older Shimano components. Newer ISO standards for cross-head screwdrivers includes cross-compatibility with JIS screws. Either way, a JIS-compatible bit can make a huge difference with certain screws.

Here s a test to do at home does your screwdriver hold itself into an old and worn limit screw
Here’s a test to do at home: does your screwdriver hold itself into an old and worn limit screw?

Unior has also updated its BB30 PF30 bearing removal tool to work with SRAM DUB 28.99 mm bottom brackets. The tool simply features a plate that sits behind the bearing while a cup presses against the outside of the frame to pull the bearing or bottom bracket cup out. As with many tools of this type my experience is that while it works with many DUB 30 mm press fit bottom brackets and frames on the market it won t work with all.
Unior has also updated its BB30/PF30 bearing removal tool to work with SRAM DUB (28.99 mm) bottom brackets. The tool simply features a plate that sits behind the bearing, while a cup presses against the outside of the frame to pull the bearing (or bottom bracket cup) out. As with many tools of this type, my experience is that while it works with many DUB/30 mm press fit bottom brackets and frames on the market, it won’t work with all.

Unior has updated its Disc Brake Piston Spreader with a 30 bend that should make it easier to access a wider variety of mountain disc brake calipers. The tool is designed to simply slide between the brake pads and assist with pushing the pistons back into the caliper. Do take care when using a tool like this as it is possible to damage the brake with too much force.
Unior has updated its Disc Brake Piston Spreader with a 30º bend that should make it easier to access a wider variety of mountain disc brake calipers. The tool is designed to simply slide between the brake pads and assist with pushing the pistons back into the caliper. Do take care when using a tool like this as it is possible to damage the brake with too much force.

German hand tool company Wera often has new tools to show off and it has steadily been growing its dedicated cycling range. One fresh addition is the Kraftform Kompakt Stubby magazine a ratcheting screwdriver that stores six 1 4 bits within its handle. The company offers a few variants of this tool with differing included bits.
German hand tool company Wera often has new tools to show off and it has steadily been growing its dedicated cycling range. One fresh addition is the Kraftform Kompakt Stubby magazine, a ratcheting screwdriver that stores six 1/4″ bits within its handle. The company offers a few variants of this tool with differing included bits.

Wheels Manufacturing has long offered a range of well-priced headset bottom bracket and bearing presses. Now the company is offering a time-saving upgrade for any of its larger presses that use a 1 2 threaded rod. The new Adjustable Press Stop is a small cube that features a large steel button that lets you quickly slide and lock the press tool into its desired length without having to wind and unwind a handle along the threaded rod.
Wheels Manufacturing has long offered a range of well-priced headsets, bottom brackets, and bearing presses. Now the company is offering a time-saving upgrade for any of its larger presses that use a 1/2″ threaded rod. The new Adjustable Press Stop is a small cube that features a large steel button that lets you quickly slide and lock the press tool into its desired length without having to wind and unwind a handle along the threaded rod.

The Adjustable Press Stop will retail for US 58 excluding the press and is designed as a direct fit for the company s Press-7 Press-7-Pro Press-8 and Press-9 Pro.
The Adjustable Press Stop will retail for US$58 (excluding the press) and is designed as a direct fit for the company’s Press-7, Press-7-Pro, Press-8, and Press-9 Pro.

The German Pliers specialists have their name on a number of tools found in professional workshops around the world perhaps the most obvious example being the Pliers Wrench. Previously a patented design of Knipex s the Pliers Wrench is effectively an adjustable wrench that grips like a pair of pliers. Knipex recently released the smallest version of the Pliers Wrench yet and perhaps the most useful element of this is the jaw width that s just slightly over 2 mm wide. This new Pliers Wrench XS certainly has a helpful width for many finer applications around bicycles.
The German Pliers specialists have their name on a number of tools found in professional workshops around the world – perhaps the most obvious example being the Pliers Wrench. Previously a patented design of Knipex’s, the Pliers Wrench is effectively an adjustable wrench that grips like a pair of pliers. Knipex recently released the smallest version of the Pliers Wrench yet, and perhaps the most useful element of this is the jaw width that’s just slightly over 2 mm wide. This new Pliers Wrench XS certainly has a helpful width for many finer applications around bicycles.

The Knipex TwinGrip Slip Joint plier is a tool designed specifically for removing stripped screws and bolts. The jaws which fit bolts from 4-22 mm in head diameter are shaped to bite around an exposed screw head and allow you to turn it out. Personally I ve long used the original Japanese-made Engineer PZ-58 pliers also sold as Vampires for this task something the Knipex are clearly inspired by given the original patent has likely ended. The original Engineer pliers are about half the price while the newer Knipex offers a design that generates more force for less effort.
The Knipex TwinGrip Slip Joint plier is a tool designed specifically for removing stripped screws and bolts. The jaws (which fit bolts from 4-22 mm in head diameter) are shaped to bite around an exposed screw head and allow you to turn it out. Personally, I’ve long used the original Japanese-made Engineer PZ-58 pliers (also sold as Vampires) for this task, something the Knipex are clearly inspired by given the original patent has likely ended. The original Engineer pliers are about half the price, while the newer Knipex offers a design that generates more force for less effort.

Wolf Tooth has been steadily growing its range of portable and ride-friendly tools and its latest is a multi-tool that builds on the clever eight-bit pack plier concept. The 17-function 8-Bit Pack Pliers Multitool remains unchanged but it can now be used as a slice of bread in Wolf Tooth s new adventure tool sandwich.
Wolf Tooth has been steadily growing its range of portable and ride-friendly tools, and its latest is a multi-tool that builds on the clever eight-bit pack plier concept. The 17-function 8-Bit Pack Pliers Multitool remains unchanged, but it can now be used as a slice of bread in Wolf Tooth’s new adventure tool sandwich.

The other piece of bread is the new 8-Bit Chainbreaker Utility Knife which plays host to the two tools in its name.
The other piece of bread is the new 8-Bit Chainbreaker + Utility Knife which plays host to the two tools in its name.

The 8-Bit Chainbreaker Utility Knife stores a tubeless tyre plug kit in the handle along with offering room for spare plugs a spare valve core and an extra knife blade.
The 8-Bit Chainbreaker + Utility Knife stores a tubeless tyre plug kit in the handle, along with offering room for spare plugs, a spare valve core, and an extra knife blade.

The tyre plug tool doubles as a driver for the chain breaker.
The tyre plug tool doubles as a driver for the chain breaker.

The knife is there to cut off exposed tyre plugs and for peeling Kiwi fruit mid-ride.
The knife is there to cut off exposed tyre plugs and for peeling Kiwi fruit mid-ride.

The plug insertion fork gains comfortable leverage from the handle
The plug insertion fork gains comfortable leverage from the handle.

Finally the meat in the sandwich offers a large plastic tyre lever and a rim dent remover tool for fixing squashed alloy rims. That rim dent removal tool is based on the original and long-unavailable Morningstar Rim Rench and is sure to find purpose in workshops too. This one is just US 20. Wolf Tooth sells the tools separately or as a set for US 140.
Finally, the meat in the sandwich offers a large plastic tyre lever and a rim dent remover tool for fixing squashed alloy rims. That rim dent removal tool is based on the original and long-unavailable Morningstar Rim ‘Rench and is sure to find purpose in workshops, too. This one is just US$20. Wolf Tooth sells the tools separately or as a set for US$140.


Editor's note: A version of this article originally appeared on CyclingTips.


130 Comments

  • 133 11
 I want to get into the overpriced gimmick industry. Seems like a lucrative market
  • 35 0
 That digital tire gauge seems gimmicky, but I find it really useful. Tire pressure makes a big difference and this gauge makes it super quick and easy to get consistently accurate readings.
  • 32 1
 @BenTheSwabian: The SmartGauge D2 is precise, but by no means accurate. I have 3 of them, and they give 3 different pressure readings. If you want an accurate pressure reading, buy a 30psi Accu-Gage.
  • 37 2
 @DaneL: but as long as one gauge gives an accurate reading every time isn't that what you should be concerned about?
  • 16 0
 @tbubier: I think you meant precise (consistent). Yeah, if you only use one gauge, then that's most important. It's really only a problem when you have one in your garage, one in your car, and one in your pack like I do... I just have a sticker on each that says "+2psi" or "-1psi" so I can account for the inaccuracy of each one.
  • 13 0
 I should probably mention that +/- 3 psi (what I've seen, not sure if they specify an accuracy) is actually really good for a gauge that has a max pressure of 250 psi. The real issue is that you shouldn't be using it for such low pressures. Ideally, they'd sell a 40psi version for MTBs.
  • 5 3
 @DaneL: If it's consistently precise at measuring an inaccuracy, then it doesn't matter, right? If the deviation is a constant, it would appear to me that it effectively cancels itself out. But I get what you're saying. If you've got multiple gauges and all are reading differently inaccurate values, that would be really annoying no matter how precise they are.
  • 14 3
 I'm more and more inclined to believe how Park Tools, Pedro's and Unior are the one pushing for 57 different bb standards, boost, super boost, ultra boost and ultra super boost hub designs. Not to mention imperial AND metric standards on the same bike.. Bike and components companies are just pawns in this game!
  • 5 0
 @BenTheSwabian: Mark my words, soon the antiquated C02 cartridge will be replaced by a device exactly like this bulky tire gauge except it will have a tiny air compressor inside powered by a rechargeable battery that will also tell you the exact amount of PSI in your tire.
  • 4 0
 @devinkalt: Or just carry a one up mini pump with all the tools you need inside of it? I honestly do not understand the purpose of single use C02 canisters when the one up combo exists. What if you need just a little air? What if you have a slow leak and are out for hours requiring occasional top ups? Sure it might take a while to pump up from nothing, but these are trail side repairs, none of it is going to be easy.
  • 2 0
 All you gotta do is throw an MTB tag on it and you can charge triple+ the price
  • 2 0
 @BenTheSwabian: have had the older version of the topeak gauge for a few years now. Solid investment and haven't even had to change the battery. 10/10
  • 3 3
 When I saw the name "Abbey" or that green anodizing, I knew right away no of the tools advertized here are not gonna be cheap. Yeah, sure, Abbey and Park Tool are quality tools but way too overpriced for what they are. SuperB tools produced in Taiwan that's kind of similar to Park Tool used to be cheap but when you see American made tools selling for 10-200 times the price with the same quality, it pretty much raises the bar for everyone to mark up their prices for to the same amount. The real bad thing is, North American markets shut out overseas market due to what they call unfair competition when local pricing f*cks locals with the extreme ridiculous high markup for profits. Sad thing is, some or most of the parts that American companies that make their tools with are made overseas.
  • 3 1
 @devinkalt: www.fumpapumps.com
I have bee using one for a few years and don't miss CO2 at all.
  • 1 2
 @DaneL: I bought the 30pso Accu-Gage. Have never owned a handheld pressure gage.
It's useless, but only because I should have pumped my tires up anyway.

All it does is tell me what I already knew...that yes, my tires lost air overnight or the past couple days.
It stays in the bag now since I gotta hook my pump up every time to fill my tires for every single ride. Beer
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: Race situations, setting up tubeless trail-side, and convenience.
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: I've yet to get a CO2 cartridge to correctly save the day for me. And I have the really nice Lezyne with adjustable release valve.

I carry one in hopes that it will bail me out at some point, but I've misfired the damn things 3 different times now.
Once I puked all the guts of the head in the dirt even. Like a monkey and vat of Crisco I am...

But my Lezyne mini-pump has bailed me out an oncountable number of times.

I'm eager to see someone trailside do the CO2 thing the right way so I know how it's done.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: most pump pressure gauges suck, most of us have pumps hat go up to 150 psi+ and those gauges are hard to read and not precise...although I have seen some digital pumps that seem to be pretty good.
  • 1 0
 @devinkalt: one already exists and it’s $200. Lol
  • 1 0
 @devinkalt: they just need to make an inflator that uses CO2 canisters that have a pre-set 'blow-off' valve....set it to the pressure you want with a simple dial (if that can be done simply), when tire is at proper pressure it blows off additional CO2 and stops inflating tire....
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: I got the digital schwalbe one years ago. They are pretty bad ass to decide you want 23.2 psi for a trail
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: if you're isn't accurate could be doing it wrong. My schwalbe one give a whack reading if I don't hold it just right also they need to be cleaned
  • 1 0
 @tbubier: this, in the measurement world, is called repeatability. It’s a good thing to pursue when designing consumer tools imho.
  • 1 0
 Lever Setter tool WTF?! The one thing that hasn't been missing from my life.
  • 37 0
 "sometimes problematic aluminium crank bolts" You mean the hand crushing, breaker bar destroying dub crank bolts? I have never met one that was simple to remove.
  • 8 0
 I'm about to do mine and have only heard horror stories. I'll put a swear jar out to see how much money i can fill it with
  • 15 0
 @HankHank: better to just get the pneumatic impact out depending on how long it’s been on. Not even joking. I had a pair on for about a year that took a 3 foot breaker on the crank and a 3 foot pipe on the opposing crank arm with two people to break loose. It had previously been torqued to spec with a calibrated torque wrench.
  • 6 0
 @topherdagopher: I second that. I'm quite sure these manufacturers use air tools and a torque bar to throw them together in a jiffy. The last Eagle crankset i removed I also had to throw on a 2' pipe extension on to my breaker bar and have my brother sit on the bike and push down with all his might while i broke the bolt loose.
  • 9 0
 I switched to the cheaper steel bolt after reading this, 100% worth it.

cyclingtips.com/2021/02/sram-aluminum-crank-bolts-seize-stuck-fix
  • 3 0
 @HankHank: LOL… I will send you a five to help you recover
  • 2 0
 I just went through this on my new road bike when trying to take off the Force eTap AXS crankset to install a power meter spider. I had to use a 2-foot breaker bar with my 70-lb kid standing on the non-drive pedal to get the crank bolt to budge. 50 N m is no joke.
  • 2 0
 @richdigital: You're a life saver, I had no idea these existed! I honestly didn't even know the seized bolts were a common problem until reading this thread - just thought I was doing something wrong.
  • 17 0
 I've found the easiest way to remove a dub crank bolt is to just wait until your crank randomly falls off
  • 4 0
 @BetweenTheCircles: well 50Nm isn’t really that much. It’s the equivalent of ~37 lb-ft. That’s putting a 37 lb weight on the end of a 1-foot wrench. Cranking on a 2-3 foot bar is way more than that. A bit of chemical welding, self tightening, and poor design is to blame IMO.
  • 3 0
 I had E13 crank bolts that were the worst. Even if they were tightened a quarter turn past finger tight they would need a breaker bar to remove. It must've been something with the surface treatment.
  • 2 0
 @HankHank: I have a really easy way. Zap strap crank arm to chainstay and a breaker bar. Quick and painless
  • 15 1
 So about $220 to make sure your levers are even...whoa...I'll continue with my trusty eye-crometer...but Abbey tools are pretty and I like most of them that I have...If their customer service responded to emails it would be slightly easier to spend more money with them.
  • 4 0
 You can use the angle finder in your smartphone. Rest one end on the grip and one end on the lever.
  • 6 0
 Any derailleur hanger gauge can be used with the lever setting tool.
  • 1 0
 @DaveRome: I was kind wondering this. I may have to get the Abbey tool thing then since I already have a Park Tools derailleur hanger guage.
  • 1 0
 @GBeard: that doesn't ensure that they're the same distance from the ends of the bars, though.

Presumably this could also be useful for ensuring that bars are completely centered as well. While that's easy to do for bars that have markings near the clamp area, some don't have that and it's even more difficult to center bars that have been cut and may be a hair longer on one side than the other.
  • 14 1
 Hey I just read this article somewhere else... The comments were overwhelmingly positive over there. Let's see how this goes.
  • 11 0
 So excited to then find out it is exactly the same article as is on that other website. The one that has just announced it's paywall.
  • 12 1
 I can't recommend that Topeak digital tire pressure gauge enough. Even small changes in tire pressure can alter bike behaviour and this tool makes it super eays to get quick and accurate readings. I might be imagining things, but I feel like experimenting with tire pressures and adjusting it to the right pressure before each ride really progressed my riding. If nothing else, it should at least make your bike act more consistent and feel more predictable.
  • 1 2
 How small changes? on topeak Joeblow mountain I would claim you can see if you are closer to 25 or 25,5 psi. are you saying that quarter psi s make a noticeable difference, or do you compare the digital gauge to something (analog) with less accurate reading?
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: Wow, no definitley not THAT small. I meant like +/- 5 PSI or something like that. The scale on the floor pump I currently have are nowhere nere as precise enough to get down to like 1-2 PSI accuracy.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. I have 2 Topeak Smart Gauges, (one that is about 5 years old that has lived in my hip pack during rides, and one that is brand new and sits on my work bench) they read the exact same pressure still, so I can attest to durability and accuracy. Don't fix what isn't broken though. I see no need for an update! I hope they continue to sell the old model forever.
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: I think you can control the release of air better with a digital gauge. With a pump with a locking head, you inevitably lose pressure taking it off, so the pump reading isn't as accurate. I have a topeak pump with an analogue gauge, and it is decent, but I always check with the digital gauge.

The best part is bringing it on rides and being able to accurately adjust on the fly if needed and/or ensuing you actually have enough PSI in a spare tube or a plugged tire if a flat happens.
  • 2 0
 I haven't been impressed with the D2 that I bought a little while ago. It works great for tires, but the main selling point for me was being able to use one gauge for tires, fork, and shock pressure checks & adjustments. The head of it is too wide and stubby to fit between/around the shock linkages on most of the full-squish bikes in my household, and recently it's become useless for forks as well since anything over 40 or 50 PSI will make the gauge read wildly different in back-to-back checks. Even using the tune setting, I can watch the pressures jump up and down 10-20psi
  • 12 0
 Accu-gage gauges are analogue, accurate, inexpensive and look REALLY good. They are also ANSI certified and can be sent back and be re-certified. I have 3 and they all read the same psi.
  • 1 0
 I've been using them since 2015 and have gone through 3 of them, after a few years they start to get gummed up with sealant and start responding really slowly....one of the only drawbacks I've ever seen with them.....
  • 8 0
 What the world needs is a pair of Knipex parallel jaw pliers with a hole drilled through the side of each jaw which would allow them to sell attachments which are held in place by a pin or bolt. Then other manufacturers could make specialty attachments like spoke holders and soft jaws for suspension rebuilds.
  • 5 0
 Knipex make soft jaws for the Pliers Wrench. Part number 86 09 250.
  • 2 0
 @dougfs: no they need to make their pliers even more smol just cuz
  • 1 0
 A few makers are now producing various magnetic jaws for the Pliers Wrench. I saw some shaft clamp adapters just last week.
  • 6 0
 This is the best tool I own. It’s cheap ($32usd rrp), works with standard magnetic bits (is also available in square drive 1/4” and 3/8”), lets you put lots of torque through it, and isn’t awkwardly big. Everyone who works on bikes, motorcycles, cars, or just repairs stuff in general should own one.
Thank me later.
www.motionpro.com/product/08-0556
  • 8 0
 I'm surprised that the Silca roadie hammer doesn't have a built in power meter.....
  • 5 0
 Knipex pliers do a great job of holding straight-pull spokes while truing, and Pedro's tire levers do a great job spreading brake pistons (and you're less likely to damage your caliper).
  • 6 0
 Again with the 8-bit. 64-bit people!
  • 2 0
 How many did it bite? Someone should put that 64 behind bars.
  • 5 0
 lol @ silca blatantly ripping off Abbey. I expect this out of shady Chinese aliexpress shops.
  • 4 0
 Can someone explain why a cut guide is needed? Why not just use a tube cutter? They're cheap, easy to find, make square cuts, and work really well.
  • 3 0
 carbon tubes
  • 1 1
 @Yerts: Ah...yes...forgot about that. For aluminum a tube cutter is really the best option.
  • 2 0
 cutting guide and a saw make a much better cut with less to clean up. plumbing tube cutters are designed for copper and non-hardened aluminum. they also flare the cut a bit.
  • 2 0
 Some of these might make sense for the Team mechanics who fly a lot and luggage weight is an issue, but for the rest of us, it just seems like a conspiracy to make our wallets lighterSmile .....although I guess I'm only assuming most of them were really expensive, because 90% of the items in the write-up did not mention their price. (WTF?)

And here's a really good Multi-bit screwdriver, I have three of these, one for household, one in my roll cabinet, and one in my DeWalt hand carry toolbox.....

***Shop around! Prices vary widely from vendor to vendor!!

megaprotools.com/products/original-15-in-1-screwdriver

Alternate bit sets:

Automotive: This replacement bit set features

Double-Ended Philips 1-2
Double-Ended Torx 9-40
Double-Ended Torx 10-15
Double-Ended Torx 20-25
Double-Ended Torx 27-30
Flat 5.5 x Valve Stem Bit
1/4” Socket Adaptor
megaprotools.com/products/replacement-bit-load?_pos=1&_sid=cc3d15802&_ss=r

6 REPLACEMENT-NAS - REPLACEMENT BIT SET - NAS BIT LOAD
This replacement bit set features

Double-Ended Square 0-3
Double-Ended Square 1-2
Double-Ended Philips 0-3
Double-Ended Philips 1-2
Double-Ended Flat/Slot 4-6
Double-Ended Torx 10-15
Double-Ended Torx 20-25
megaprotools.com/products/replacement-bit-set-nas-bit-load?_pos=2&_sid=cc3d15802&_ss=r



“A designer knows he has achieved perfection, not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.”
-Antoine De Saint Exupery
  • 2 0
 NOTHING is more annoying than the ever compounding world of proprietary bike tools. The number of "one-time" wrenches and adaptors I've had to buy and rarely use is growing like a tumor. That said, I'm all for better tools and new ideas.
  • 5 0
 You can spend more $ on Abbey Bike Tools then on your own bike. :-D
  • 4 0
 Photo with a Sram FOrce crank: Where is @notoutsideCEO when we need him ???
  • 6 0
 Doing damage control over at CT
  • 17 1
 @sjma: You're telling me...my email hasn't been this busy since we removed that ramp on the Olympic XC course!

Be safe be well,
Incognito Robin
  • 5 0
 About 20% or less of these tools are actually needed
  • 2 0
 Yes. I see one out 5 tools here is a hammer, and everything on my bike looks like a nail right now. We all good.
  • 1 0
 I have this new SmartGauge D2X after I saw it released thinking I should replace my cheap one that I've had for many years and also seeing it could work for checking suspension. I'm pretty disappointed with it because when I check the pressure with on a presta it releases air as I'm pressing it over the valve even when set to the correct valve type with the slider switch. My previous gauge has two heads on opposite ends that are specific to schrader and presta and zero air is loss when connecting to the valve.
  • 5 0
 Who peels kiwi?
  • 2 0
 @HtAdam that was the first thing that crossed my mind reading this as well, ha!
  • 1 0
 Australians?
  • 1 0
 Serious question, you eat the skin or just not peel and eat the inside by squeezing inside out ?
  • 2 0
 @kingbike2: Eat the skin. a little rinse before hand and its fine...
  • 1 0
 @BenTravis: serious response: the kiwis I can buy are covered in little spines that feel,like they can pierce my throat. There was a kiwi fruit promo where they handed out little spoons to scoop out the flesh, perhaps that’s how most people eat them .
  • 1 0
 @kingbike2: I just cut kiwis in half and eat the fruit out of the husk.
  • 1 1
 The topeak pressure gauge isn't that much top. as it dosen't work at lower pressure.than 20PSI.
For FAT bike where presure is rarely higher than 20 PSI it is realy mandatory to have a digital readout

The litle blue shwalbee is 100% more efficient and cheaper.
  • 1 0
 Is yours busted? A buddy with a 27.5+ hardtail borrows mine before every ride and runs between 12-15psi, depending on the conditions. It seems perfectly accurate at that range.
  • 2 0
 I still struggle to understand $50-60 digital air gauges when a $15 Accugauge (30psi) exists. More accurate/consistent (Bourdan tube) and won’t run out of batteries.
  • 1 0
 And I wont start a ride with teeny tiny kPa lettering and try to figure out what the hell is happening with my psi.
  • 2 0
 TFW your torque wrench is referred to as a classic (original beam Park). Also I have the Smartgauge (before the D2) still running on the original battery.
  • 1 0
 Throw away your Phillips and get a JIS driver or two, it's better all around. For JIS, look for a dot between the cross on the screw head. Our 2009 Honda car even has JIS fasteners here and there.
  • 1 0
 the knipex pliers xs look cute i guess, but damn, you'd be lucky to get two fingers on that thing, good luck loosening a 22mm nut... I have the 125 pliers wrench but should have got the 150...
  • 3 0
 chain whips excite me Na-na-na come on...
  • 3 0
 Those abbey tools are $$$ but they really are beautifully made
  • 3 0
 The old Topeak pressure gauge also has a live air pressure adjust mode
  • 6 0
 Which should be the default setting when you turn it on! Seriously why?!?
  • 2 0
 It's good that this article is also here, so that it's not behind paywall like at CT. Or is a paywall coming here too?
  • 1 0
 Sure as nuts are nuts it is. Just a matter of when.
  • 2 0
 Getting my coffee down and shocked to read through and not see a mention of nearly a grand for a portable bike stand..
  • 2 0
 E BIKE stand. This will be on the final.
  • 1 0
 AXS dropper post is $800 and all it does is lift your saddle.
  • 2 0
 I probably won't ever buy any of these, but god damn do i enjoy looking at them.
  • 1 0
 Well, now I have the knife to peel the kiwi, I wait for something to put it without it becoming jam before halfway around ...
  • 1 0
 Maybe Silca can 3D print a titanium kiwi holder!
  • 2 1
 "Here’s a tool that surprising doesn’t already exist."

It does, it's called a pin spanner, and even a great one doesn't cost $30.
  • 1 0
 Yep, a pin spanner does the trick most of the time. But some of these DUB caps are in really tight and a pin spanner can slip out. SRAM asked Abbey to produce this tool.
  • 2 0
 Copied article from CT but doesn't yet have a paywall. Well played. What kind of marketing scum thinks this stuff up?
  • 2 0
 Parktool doing the Straumann ratchet thing *denists know*
  • 1 0
 Torquing teeth is the real deal with a $300 titanium torque wrench.
  • 2 0
 Only thing that interest me of all this is the new topeak air gauge.
  • 1 0
 Good luck to the swanky Silca tools. Roadies don't fix their own bikes. Wink
  • 1 0
 Dunno 'bout you guys, but I feel like those Abbey tools are just a massive, unnecessary cash grab.
  • 2 0
 Love a good tool article! I want them all.
  • 1 0
 Lol just use an angle meter app…who would buy a full metal tool that has to be threaded in to check lever angled lmao
  • 4 0
 The major part of that Abbey tool is a derailleur hanger alignment tool, which many home mechanics would already have (and it doesn't matter which brand). This article is advertising the piece that threads into your steerer tube that allows a derailleur hanger alignment tool to also be used for alignment of brake levers. While I won't be buying one, it isn't that unreasonable if you already have a derailleur hanger alignment tool.
  • 2 0
 @ronij: fair!
  • 2 2
 Smartguage D2X is garbage. It doesn't seal well against a variety of presta valves, and mine does NOT live-update the reading when using the bleeder.
  • 1 0
 If you need a saw guide to cut a steerer tube straight, you're not really a mechanic yet.
  • 1 0
 If you're a mechanic who uses the Park Tool guide, you haven't cut a steerer tube straight yet :-) But at least your cuts are consistently 3 degrees off!
  • 2 1
 Saw guide for 100 usd while steerer cutter costs around 25 usd...
  • 12 0
 25 usd is still a lot when it can be easily avoided. This is why I started chewing through my steer tubes and cables.
  • 1 0
 It costs three times what my circular mitre saw cost me. I get perfect cuts in seconds.
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: how do you get a square cut on a tapered steerer? 3/16" spacers under and behind the smaller part? Or just eyeball and close enough?
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: I have some V blocks made out of ply that I sit the steerer in. Perfectly square cuts every time.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: they also give me clearance from the fork legs contacting the fence for shorter steerer cuts.

Make the V blocks on the mitre saw itself. I glued six rectangles of 3/4” ply together. Roughly 2x3” off cuts. Then used the saw to trim them square and cut the V of about 3/4” each leg, into them. Finally I used the saw to cut that block in half so I end up with two identical 2.25” thick blocks to go on either side of the blade. This lays nicely against the mitre saw fence and gives me perfect cuts every time. I don’t bother clamping the steerer anymore but did clamp it the first time I used it.
  • 2 0
 You could also just leave the 4.5” or so block in tact and use it on the retained portion of the steerer. The off cut doesn’t really need support. That way you could make it thinner.
  • 1 0
 How do I get my pressfit cups out?
  • 1 0
 Stout stick and a 2X4
  • 1 0
 Those DanglebOng Tye Cobb pipes are cool!
  • 1 0
 "And this is my new hammer. Please be careful with it."
  • 1 0
 @radrider: more like "And this is my new hammer. Please be careful with it.........and yes, I'll be right here watching the whole time, and YES, there will still be a deposit required." lol
  • 1 0
 some nice tools there but really a brake lever alignment tool!
  • 1 3
 Do people actually use torque wrenches? I have never remotely though I needed one, and I've never had bolts stripping for falling out.

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