The 3 Best Steerer Tube Tools Ridden & Rated - OneUp EDC vs Specialized SWAT vs Bontrager BITS

Aug 27, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  



More and more riders are leaving the backpack or hip pack at home, and over the last several years there has been an influx of on-the-bike tool storage systems. We've seen tools mounted on the frame, below the bottle cage, in axles, handlebars, integrated into seats, and strapped just about anywhere else you could imagine. We're partial to tools stashed for quick access is in the steerer tube. Specialized, OneUp, and Bontrager each have their own take on stashing tools there, so let's see how each of these three similar-but-different systems stack up.





OneUp EDC tool test review

OneUp EDC

OneUp may have been the first to the game with their EDC (Every Day Carry) system. In order to stash it in a steerer tube, riders are required to ditch the star nut and thread the inside of the fork steerer in order for the tool to sit in OneUp's cradle. The tool then slides into the top of the steerer tube and clicks into place.

Last year, OneUp introduced their EDC stem which works as a complex compression fitting, eliminating the need to thread the inside of the fork. Riders can also opt to stash the EDC tool in OneUp's pump on the frame.

OneUp EDC Details
• Compatible with most forks
• Replaces star nut
• Threading of steerer tube required
• Chain/Quick link breaker, quick link storage
• 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8mm Alen keys, T25, Tire Lever
• Flathead, spoke keys, valve core tool, chainring bolt, quick-link storage, storage capsule/CO2
• Weight: 116 grams (tool, top cap, plug)
• Price: $59 USD
www.oneupcomponents.com


OneUp
The tool threads into the steerer tube or uses OneUp's compression stem.
OneUp EDC tool test review
A stash cartridge can keep essentials or be traded for a CO2.

bigquotesOneUp's EDC system was one of the first options for this style of tool, and their system is hands down the most versatile. Being able to store the tool in a pump or the steerer tube is helpful and the extra stash compartment/ability to hold a CO2 is great. That said, having to thread the steerer tube does add an extra step, and the assembly that houses the tool is a little awkward to deal with, especially when you are trailside dealing with a broken bike.Daniel Sapp


Pros

+ Lightest and least expensive of these 3 options
+ Versatile - tool works in steerer tube or pump
+ Spare storage compartment/CO2 holder
Cons

- You have to thread your steerer tube
- Chain breaker and quick link breaker are finicky
- Accessing and storing tool isn't overly easy






Specialized SWAT Conceal Carry MTB

Another spin on steerer tube storage comes in the form of Specialized's SWAT Conceal Carry MTB tool. The Specialized tool also does away with the antiquated star nut, and instead uses a fitting that cinches from the bottom of the fork and ties into the tool up top via a long threaded bolt. The tool comes with various lengths of bolts to accommodate most standard tapered steerer tubes.

The tool sits on a spring and is held in place by a cap that pivots out of the way to allow the tool to spring out. Taking the assembly apart requires a 5mm Allen key on the bottom of the assembly. Apart, there is storage for a master link and then an integrated chain tool as well. The chain tool uses the same bolt that holds the top and bottom of the assembly together as part of a chain pin, and then the chain sits in a cradle carved into the body of the upper part of the assembly.

Specialized SWAT CCMTB Details
• Bolted compression system
• Replaces star nut
• Multiple bolts included for a range of fitment
• Chain breaker, quick link storage
• 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm Allen keys and a T25 Torx
• Compatible with threadless MTB headsets and non-carbon steerer tubes
• Weight: 125 grams
• Price: $85 USD
www.specialized.com


The cap on top pivots out of the way for the spring-loaded tool to eject.
When closed, the cap clicks into place.

bigquotesThe Concealed Carry MTB tool is functional and easy to use. The spring-loaded feature makes it one of the easiest and quickest to deploy however, although I have had the spring get hung up a few times, which can make it tricky to remove that snug-fitting multi-tool.Daniel Sapp


Pros

+ Easy to install, no need to thread steerer
+ Spring loaded tool is easy to access
+ Fairly light
Cons

- Missing features like 2 and 2.5 Allen keys
- Spring/tool can jam at times
- Chainbreaker is a bit finicky - true emergency use only






Bontrager BITS MTB

Bontrager's BITS (Bontrager Integrated Tool System) is a newcomer to the steerer tube party. The tool uses a bolted compression fitting and replaces the traditional star nut. Between the ends of the compression fitting lies a multi-tool and carrier. The tool includes commonly used hex bits, a screwdriver, chain breaker, and storage space for a quick link.

There are two bolt lengths and spacers included to accommodate a range of head tube sizes and steerer tube lengths. The tool isn't compatible with carbon steerer tubes or bikes with threaded headsets.

The tool uses a ring that flips up and allows users to pull the sled containing the tool out in order to access it.



BITS Details
• Bolted compression system
• Replaces star nut
• Two different bolt lengths/spacers supplied for a range of fitment
• Chain breaker, quick link storage
• 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm hex along with T25 and flat-head screwdriver, valve tool
• Compatible with threadless MTB headsets and non-carbon steerer tubes
• Weight: 158 grams
• Price: $89.99 USD
www.trekbikes.com


A range of Allen keys along with a chain tool offer whatever you may need for most trailside repairs.
The tool closes flush against the top and clicks into place, replacing the need for a top cap or star nut.

bigquotesBontrager's BITS system has a wide range of hex keys and a well-made chain breaker. The tool is simple to install and requires no special tools. Using the tool is easy, but the tab to pop the tool out can be challenging to pull, and the tool is a little tricky to fit into its cradle at times.Daniel Sapp


Pros

+ Wide range of Allen keys
+ Quality construction
+ Easy to install, no need to thread steerer
Cons

- Hard to remove tool from steerer tube
- Cradle is finicky
- Heaviest and most expensive out of these 3 options








How Do They Compare?

The OneUp is the most full-featured, lightest, and least expensive out of the three, with a wide assortment of Allen keys, a tire lever, chainring bolt, and the ability to adapt it to hold a spare CO2 or whatever you can fit in the tiny storage container. You do have to thread your steerer tube, though, which is a dealbreaker for some riders. OneUp was one of the first to the game, and their tool works great, but it would be nice to see a version that doesn't require a special stem or threaded steerer.

The Specialized SWAT tool has the fewest Allen keys and features, but it's the easiest to install and by far the easiest to use. Plus it's fairly light and you don't have to thread your steerer.

Bontrager's new BITS comes is fairly easy to use as well, and has a wider range of Allen keys than the SWAT tool, which are useful on certain dropper levers, pinch bolts, and other fasteners that seem to always rattle loose at the most inconvenient time. It is 42g heavier and $30 more expensive than the EDC tool, but install is simple and doesn't require threading your steerer.

Personally I don't want to thread the steerer on the test bikes I ride, so I most often use the Specialized SWAT tool, but the number of times I've missed having a couple of the Allen keys I need on it is starting to add up. If the Bontrager BITS tool was as slick to deploy as the Specialized it would be my go-to.


207 Comments

  • 160 40
 Here's a free idea for fork manufacturers: thread your steerers from the factory, pop a dummy grub screw down into it to chase threads after cutting to length, and ship with a OneUp top cap. It would save 20-30g on the star nut/bolt assembly, give manufacturers a nice bullet point feature for the sales sheet, and everyone could use that space effectively. EDC tool? Sure. Route the front brake through in case you ever decide to learn barspins? No prob. Win win win win win.

Bonus: this makes it harder to introduce new steerer standards.
  • 64 25
 "thread your steerers from the factory"

And in turn whack another £50 on top of the cost of the fork for the extra manufacturing cost/time?

No thank you.
  • 15 1
 If we're wishing for stuff straight out the factory then the second set of bottle cage bolts seems like a really good option to me. Strapping stuff on means it gets full of mud, plus you cant strap little things like chain links on. A little bag you can bolt to the frame to hold a tube, tool and other little bits seems like the best option to me
  • 43 1
 thats alot of thread in an uncut steerer though right?
  • 18 12
 @jlawie: Sure thing, additional 50 bucks on a $1200 fork means your smart investment turns into an overpriced garbage.
  • 20 2
 @YanDoroshenko: Because we're all spending $1200 right?
  • 7 2
 The one up top cap doesn't get threaded very deep. It would add significant stress concentrations between the stem and top headset bearing. Sharp corners = stress riser, such as from a thread.
  • 21 1
 Every BMX fork worth buying for the last 10 years has come threaded with a top cap. I wonder why MTB hasn't caught on yet? Maybe it's steel vs alloy steerer?
  • 6 0
 @therudd: I think it would lead to a bunch of new standards if they went down the same route as BMX forks. It'd give manufacturers another thing to change every couple of years/months/minutes and if it rounds out, you'll be going to a shop and hoping that they have the right one, as opposed to the star nut which is universal. Granted, it's not something youd be replacing all the time unless you have hands like feet.
If you've ever tried to find a compression bolt for a BMX fork that is more than a year or two old, you'll know it's a bit of a minefield, and a lot of companies dont sell them aftermarket, and brands arent always cross compatible. Fitbikeco for example used (last I checked) a smaller alloy bolt (like an M10 thread) whereas other brands would use a bolt that was the size of the internal diameter of the forks. There wasnt much consistency, and if you give that freedom to MTB manufacturers, you could have fork compression bolt standards that look kinda like the insane amount of rear axle sizes, ones that only cater to certain tools... etc.
I could be wrong, but it has that potential, surely?
  • 5 2
 And make the tread long enough so its not instantly cut off when making the steerer the correct length for your bike
  • 7 0
 Sounds like a recipe for a cracked steerer tube, no thanks!
  • 12 3
 first we were back to bum bags/fanny packs, then dangling sh*t off your bike, and now its threaded steerer tubes!
Great Scott Marty! it'll be triple chain rings next.
  • 6 0
 Brilliant, the thing that this review failed to mention is that the EDC system without the tool installed is way lighter than the regular nut and bolt system, 38 grams to be exact.
  • 7 1
 My multi tool weighs 58g and has all of the allen keys (2.5,3,4,5,6) and a t25 torx plus a useless flathead. I would rather ride with that in my hip pack then 100g+ more in my steerer tube.
  • 1 0
 And if you use a quick link, you can carry a small thin nylon shoelace or piece of paracord. Thread it around link and pull. Also to anyone who is curious my multi tool is a MTC-10 that I customized that actually has a (2.5,3,4,5,8 ) t25 and flathead. Thought the 8 was a 6 but the only 6mm I have on my bike are pivot and shock bolts which I have never had to adjust on the trail. 8 is for pedals.
  • 3 0
 @bicycleconnor: It could be different in MTB though because you really only have a handful of fork manufacturers, with 80% (or more) of the market controlled by Fox and Rockshox. If those two settled on a standard, then it could work.

In BMX, almost every brand has a fork and their product life cycle is sporadic, so it's not surprising there are a ton of different sizes/types.
  • 11 12
 Tools so easily accessible sounds like an excellent idea, right?
That is like that, until we place some rational thinking into the situation.
1- How many times will you use on the trail?
2- Is it ok to place weight so high and close to the front axle?
3- Why do we thought about placing it on the steer tube?

The only thing I can imagine stanching something in the steer tube, it would be food, due to ease of access.
Tools?... yeah, I do use it “occasionally” on the trail… like… rarely/or never.

Today’s trend is to ditch backpacks in favor of whip bags, and frame/secret spots “bags”.
I’m not a millennial! I use bottle cage and nothing more on short rides. Yes, I can get a flat… a technical problem… etc… but thing is, short rides are bellow 2hours, so why I would carry all the stuff, if I can walk back home / car?
In so many years ridding, in this short rides, flats are present, but normally (like +95,7%), it doesn’t occur! And you are so close to the car/home, that you can walk/run back, no problem!

When I go out for long rides, I take my backpack! Because I need +1 liter of water, because I need food, because I need 1st aid kit, because I need tools and spare tubes and spare hangar, because I need to carry extra clothes. And if doesn’t go into a backpack, I question myself if that is really needed.

Back to topic…..

Tapped Steer tubes???????
Mini/Micro Tools inside a OD 1 1/8 tube?????

I can say, just track when you use the tools…
If you, like me use rarely any tools on the trails:
1-Leave it at home
2-Do your maintenance regularly
3-Don't ride with extra weight!
4-Don't spend extra dosh on something that won't be use regularly!
  • 1 0
 @therudd:I think it comes down to variation in length of steer tube that MTB fork manufacturers need to provide.
1) It would add another step and possibly another work center.
2) internal threading of something that long is difficult without a specialized tool/machine.
3) It would make the steer tube weaker if the thread extended below the stem.
  • 3 1
 @TDMAN: taking tools on the bike comes from enduro competition if you have any trouble during the stages you're f*cked if you have nothing and riding with a backpack just to have few tools and a tube.. Some proriders don't even wear a back protection so.. haha

Then, when you are at bikeparks, like big ones, you're happy to be able to handle a technical problem without reaching the bottom on foot (can be loooong). And wearing a backpack with back/chest protector (like the Fox proframe) is really unconfortable trust me !

I think there's lot of fashion things around that, but it can be very useful !
  • 18 2
 @TDMAN: 1 - In the 3 months I've had my OneUp EDC tool, I've used it 3 times for myself (including once for plugging a hole in my tire so I didn't have to walk home) and a few times to help friends and once to help a stranger.
2. My bike weighs 33lbs, I weigh 180 lbs. I do not notice the 100 grams in my steerer
3. I ride totally bag-less, steerer is a great hidden spot and gives your bike a nice clean look.
4. I didn't need to tap my steerer because I use their stem. But I'd have no issue tapping it
5. Tool may be mini, but it works great and it's only meant for quick trailside maintenance
6. I could leave my tools at home, but if I did there would have been a total of 6 rides ruined (mine and others)... I only get to ride once a week usually, that's a month and half of rides ruined, no thanks.
7. I do very regular maintenance... it doesn't matter, shit still happens.
8. I consider it money spent very wisely as it's saved 6 rides already.
9. Usually I'd be racing enduro through the summer, the EDC is a great low cost, low weight easy to handle multitool/plug jabber that will help me stay in the race when shit happens.
10. You don't have to like it, use it or want it... doesn't mean other won't like it, use it want it... to each their own bud!
  • 2 4
 @TDMAN: fully agree, i carry mini tool in my pocket and chain link tube and co2;

From the observation, typically poor maintained bikes have issues on the trails;


The only value of those tools i see for the race day!
  • 2 1
 @TDMAN: its not that i use it for my bike, but the other riders im with that get flats, crash and need to turn their bars, other things similar to that. i use my tools maybe every other ride because of other peoples issues, not my own! im sure other people are similar
  • 2 1
 @islandforlife: You pretty much nailed it, regular maintenance won't prevent every single problem. I have no problem walking back if I have to, but there's nothing wrong with being prepared! I use my tools for friends as much as myself and I'm usually glad it's there.
  • 7 1
 @nickmalysh: "From the observation, typically poor maintained bikes have issues on the trails;" or people who like to ride at the limit.

I wrecked hard on a rock garden last week. My bike flew down the trail (steep DH) tumbling along for another 20 or so. I could barely walk. Used the built in tools in my steerer to straighten my bars, and adjust the derailleur limit screws to help me pedal back out.

Not the first time my bike has flown down a trail, not the last.
  • 1 1
 @JSTootell: all of this could be address with tool like this, or similar: content.backcountry.com/images/items/900/YNS/YNS1WUT/BLA.jpg
I'm not saying EDC is bad, or good there are multiple solutions to the problem;

Crash suppose to shift or rotate some of the bike parts to avoid catastrophic failure, so I would not ride without mini multitool;
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: I never ever used spoke key trailside at all for example, for last 10 years whether it is bike park, street riding or enduro epic rides
  • 4 0
 So you want to make it harder to introduce new standards, by introducing a new standard?

How far down the steer tube are they going to have to thread it? What if I dont want an EDC tool in my steer tube? Id imagine threads interfere with me using a starnut if I dont want an EDC tool. Added cost and complexity where it isnt warranted. I would have to disagree with this being any kind of a win win win win idea.
  • 2 0
 @nickmalysh: I have used the spoke tool multiple times trail side. Almost always at the bike park. But I bash through a rear wheel about every 6 months.

And the tool you posted doesn't include a chain breaker, which I usually end up needing. Little less so now since I put on a bash guard. But still end up breaking links.

One of my more "enduro epic rides" is a 50 miles, 8000' loop in the desert. There is no cell signal for most of it, only way for me to get help is to either help myself, or call for help on my Garmin inReach. I don't like to carry a pack at all, only using bib pockets for a second/third bottle and some food.

My bike came with the SWAT tool, and the SWAT box is loaded with spares and tools. Saved me a few times now without having to carry a pack, which I absolutely hate.
  • 1 0
 As has been said by others, my toolkit is mainly for crashes. I stay on top of my maintenance pretty well. Occassionally crap happens though. I take a lot of fast 1 hour rides because of my work schedule. I have basically just enough extra time to maybe fix a flat or a chain or something- I don't have time to walk out and I wouldn't want to if I have a choice. I'm always going to carry some basic tools.

Also- does anyone know if a stan's dart fit in the one up pump? Stan's darts have won over my heart vs bacon strips. So slick and fast.

I looked at the EDC steerer tube setup, but I still want to carry a dart and a park tire boot so I'd need a bag of some sort anyway.
  • 1 0
 @Bobadeebob: or every frame manufacturer has a swat box style compartment in the frame to keep stuff in
  • 1 0
 @loris-brthlt: I get your point, and it's a good one.
As I wrote before, I'd prefer to have the tools closer to the BB, not in the Headset. Neverthless we're talking about a minitool! And on bike park, O would simply place it in my pocket!

I don't race Enduro, and I do also think Racing has nothing to have with Trail riding! Even more, when trails can have other persons on it (dog walkers/trail runner/others...)
  • 2 0
 @islandforlife: Now Imagine what you could do, with a backpack!
Your sacrafice could save so many rides/riders!
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: on dh wheel-set? I barely could imagine using spoke wrench on something like dt 471 during 2 weeks of daly riding in morzine like bike park;

Having said tho i never destroyed wheels, comparing to frames and forks, so I believe it depends
  • 1 0
 @bicycleconnor: most bmx forks have settled onto the 1 size now - m24, though a few forks are still using m25, which might be the same as the one up cap, but that size isn't great for bmx as the threads cut into the wall thickness so the steerer is more prone to snapping. The size Fit used was the same as an oversized star fangle nut (not sure if they've since changed)
  • 2 0
 @TDMAN: As an instructor/guide I use the EDC tool and it gets brought out on around 50% of the times I coach, quick links inside and tubeless plugs underneath it too. I also carry a decent sized hand pump, a tube, electrical tape and tyre levers on my bike.
Sure, I'm not your average rider, but there's definitely a market for the convenience this thing offers.
  • 2 0
 @ICKYBOD: 100% you can fit the dart inside the pump - the pump hollow is long enough to fit the whole EDC tool setup, which is much longer. I'd fill the bottom with some low-weight foam to stop it rattling and throw the dart in it with a folded tyre boot to really keep it all solid. EDC tool in the steerer, that's you covered! (and a CO2 under the tool I guess)
  • 2 0
 @therudd: steer tube length variances are smaller in BMX. I think this is part of it
  • 1 0
 @TDMAN: used to ride with a backpack... and still do for much bigger epic style rides. But I find it annoying and hot. Loving being able to go backless because of my EDC tool and not have rides ruined by something simple or a flat. Money well spent!!
  • 2 2
 @islandforlife: on hot days backpack is something annoying, to say the least.
But on long rides I carry watet (up to 3l if I don't know the area/there aren't enough fontains/Food/clothes/1st aid/2cell phones (full 1 day rides)/tools/2 spare tubes...etc...

On my Sunday Monrning (around 4 to 5 hours), i carry the above backpack, but with only 1 liter, 1 cell phone and 1 spare tube. All the rest just sits inside.

On short rides, bellow 2 to 2.5hours, i just carry water, or no water if there are plenty of fountains/water points, and I can drink between them (depends on weather)

From all comments, I conclud that what you carry, is to give you also peece of mind. Like protections. No one uses protection to fall!
Protection is "just on case", and people tend to wear what makes them "confident/confortable".

Normally I wear gloves+Knee pads... but also like to ride my bike, wearing only my helmet. And sometimes full armour (ocasionally).

So tools like body protections, are used depending on our confidence/"feeling lucky".

Sure I felt without protection, and having them hanging on my garage.
Like I did walk home with a puncture/mechanical problem...
But those rides are like 1 in more than 100 rides

The only thing that I really block on doing, is to leave my mobile home!
I miss that feeling of: completly "alone" on the woods.
  • 1 0
 @2d-cutout: Yes, I understand! But you Sir, you are 0.01% of the MTB population.
Cheers!

Wink
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: Broke the original carbon hoop on my E29 in the first couple of months of riding. Just trashed my third Flow since then. I bought the bike last spring. Have a DT hoop I am going to lace tonight. Looking at buying some Reserve, Zipp, We Are One, etc wheels with the no questions asked warranty and keeping my current wheels as backups.
  • 94 0
 EDC tool in the pump is the best option. You can swap between bikes plus you get a pump.
  • 7 0
 Yup, installation is VERY simple - just put holder under bottle cage and you're done - no threading and other star nut magic needed + you get storage place in 100ml variant for zip ties, some cash and patchkit inside pump too.
  • 2 1
 How does that option cope in the typical British summer with mud and spray? Does it get gunked up or does the pump still remain fine for pumping?
  • 6 0
 @Rickos: it is completely sealed for the tool side and the pump it self. No worries even if you want to go down the stream...
  • 13 0
 @Rickos: OneUp pump seems better sealed than any other pump I've owned, I think it would do fine.
  • 5 0
 @Rickos: I've ridden with mine in very wet conditions for days and never had even traces of water ingress. It is really well made.
  • 7 0
 @Rickos: Been riding mine in the UK for 2 winters. No issues. Great pump.
  • 4 5
 @onyxss: That is like saying carry a multi tool in your pocket and you dont need to fit the tool or your pump to every bike is the best solution.

Imagine there was a top you could wear with pockets in the back specifically for this purpose... imaging that.

Roadies are decades ahead of MTB in terms of development and found the solution so many years ago.

Their tight fitting clothes also reduce drag and are not as bad when wet, as well as taking up less space in your drawers at home.

hahah, baggies, a t-shirt and a tool in my pocket please as I am mostly a short walk from the car or house.
  • 4 0
 @betsie: I have other things in my pockets and need a pump anyway so why not take a big volume high quality pump anyway?
  • 6 0
 Side pockets yes put a few bits in there.. but only so much you can get in there whithout it jiggling about. Rear pockets on Jerseys as an mtber. For food maybe. But metal stuff like a pump, multitool or CO2, directly pressing against your spine is in no way a good idea as an MTBer.
  • 3 0
 I agree the pump is the best. On my oldest bike I still have the threaded steerer but since grabbing the pump I decided that it wasn't worth it on the new bike. The pump with EDC tool is what I swap between bikes. 100cc is the pump size to get it is awesome.
  • 11 0
 @betsie: you have never fallen off and landed in your pocket full of crap have you. Trust me, carrying any hard objects on your person whilst riding mtb is not only uncomfortable but also dangerous. I landed on my car key once. Hospital. Some guy at work tripped and fell with keys in his pocket and severed his femoral artery. Not riding I realise.
I want absolutely nothing solid in my pockets when I ride. Not least because it’s uncomfortable and bounces. Even on my ride bike in lycra. Uncomfy and unsymmetrical. No thanks.
  • 5 0
 @ilovedust: I like phones though, every hard impact and my phone did eat up that sharp stone.
  • 4 0
 @betsie: Nope - its like carrying multitool + pump + zipties+ some cash - try putting all that in your pockets, then simulate fall onto those objects. Been there - quite painful at least....
And we are not all riding "short walk" from car/house.
  • 5 0
 @Rickos: It's so far coped well with a year of wet North Welsh riding. The pump is well sealed with O-rings and it can cope with being hosed down after rides without water ingress. Depending on how often you use the tool it's worth an occasional re-grease of the O-ring to keep things smooth. All in all it takes much less maintenance than any other part of the bike, but more than just sticking it in a pocket.
  • 2 0
 Do you guys use the 70cc or 100cc one ?

Wonder which one I should pick...
  • 5 0
 The EDC is the highest quality, best-sealed pump I've ever seen. The tool has all of the hard bits that I would want to carry in a pack. I even sprung for the plug and plier kit. The pliers have already been used twice this season on friends' chains. Super easy. There's still room for a 20 and (maybe) a short zip tie. Keep the o-ring lightly greased for ease of use.
  • 1 2
 EDC is the winner hands down unless you are a tester like @danielsapp and don't want to deal with OneUp's stem. The threading effort is simple and causes no issues. I've employed it for the last several years on a few different forks/bikes. I currently have it in their pump attached to my bottle cage inside the frame (won't work in the fork I have on that bike, meh.) which is okay except that the pump gets slathered in yr sweat whatever you ride through and must be kept lubed to keep from getting the whole thing stuck in it and/or the minitool seizing up.
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: I have never needed a high big pump, I only run 2.5" tyres though, even on a fat bike my diddy, tiny, amazingly high quality pump would still do the job, its a pump after all, size is just a choice, the smaller the better for me.
Having lost a pump off my bike previously in the mountains and having to walk over 10 miles home, my pump stays firmly in my pocket along with my diddy little multi tool, some patches, and a spare tube.
  • 1 1
 @ilovedust: My pockets are in the rear of my jersey, I have never flipped over the bars and landed on that kit, if I did, that water bag thing and my tube along with my bag of nuts might protect me.
  • 1 0
 @betsie: If you have many flats in a row you want a big volume, the big volume here is also useful because more storage. I had pumps who get so hot that the seals worn to fast out. If you lose your EDC pump you should also lose your wheel or something. This thing is so good secured it is unreal.

I have my phone and something to eat in my pockets. I don't have a backpack for local trail rides even for 3h, I don't need something on my back.
I have more then just a multitool on a ride. Tubless strips, tube, knife-plier combo, derailleur hangar and some zipties and ofc my stupid key.
  • 1 2
 @Serpentras: Its about what you need not what you want.
You want a big pump, but only need a small pump.
Many punctures... pump your tyres up, ride smoother, set up your suspension better or ride more robust tyres!
Its personal preference I suppose.
I just take what is needed not what is more comfortable if you puncture (extralight tube for mountain rides then ride at 99% and not 100%).
I have had to use my mini pump (its tiny, very tiny but works a treat) in the heat in Spain on vacation after flatting a Dh rear tire and putting in my light tube to get me home (then fit a normal tube again). We all know that get me home and pointing the bike downhill means flat out still!

I have no need for a knife, more chance of my mech breaking than my hanger and I aint carrying a mech with me. I ride tubes as tubeless just kept failing. Tubeless seems to fail for so many out on our local trails. I live in the middle of nowhere so the car key can live wherever, in the heather somewhere, under a rock wherever. Crime isnt an issue in the Highlands. They would probably leave me a donation to sort out my car or tidy if for me if they broke into it.
  • 3 0
 The oneup stuff is beautifully made too - a bit of joy in its green aluminium loveliness. I think the pump also has a CO2 chuck for races. It has everything you'll need, I can't see why you'd have stuff rattling around in your pockets waiting to injure a critical organ when stuff like this exists.
  • 2 0
 @danp63 I second this. I first threaded my steerer, later found out, pump is much better. 70cc Pump + EDC tool + tire plug + good rims that seal easily is the ultimate combo in my opinion.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Yes ... the head of the pump. Unscrew it and screw in a co2. Works pretty well. It is a use the whole co2 at one time type of use. Also use glove or something to deal with the head and cartridge body as they will freeze and you have direct contact with them. That said the one time I needed to reseat a tire on a trail it worked great.
  • 1 0
 Totally .. Easiest way to swap between bikes. Plus I already carry a pump makes it easy to deal with both. 100cc pump is great, not too big but plenty of air for 2.5 tires. I never had issues with water getting in mine and its been plenty or mud and streem croosings. Usually hose it off on the bike too.
  • 2 0
 @betsie: I used to carry stuff in my pockets for xc. Problem is, when the descent starts to get rowdy, if your jersey isn't super tight fitting and stiff, your stuff will start to bounce everywhere, which is very distracting. It also sucks having a 2.5 mm allen key embed itself all the way into your side when you crash.
  • 1 0
 @rowdypatty: Do you use the plugs from oneup in their setup, or do you store them in your bars for example ?
I'm about to purchase the pump, so every bit helps Wink
  • 1 0
 @betsie: roadies were stagnant in terms of development for decades with the exception of frame materials. mtb's, cross, and gravel are dragging roadies along now. Jersey pockets are not optimized for rock gardens.
  • 2 0
 @evildos: Yes, if you go to the plug kit product page, it says the 70cc pump can fit the jabber and EDC tool. Hope this helps!
  • 2 0
 @evildos: Go 100cc if you want space for the Storage Capsule or CO2 canister...the 70cc only fits the top part of the tool.
  • 1 0
 Can confirm.

I also tapped my steerer since a buddy had the tool and I liked the fancy "top ring"
  • 2 0
 @Darwin66: Did you forget to wrap yourself in duct tape?
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: how you carry your phone?
  • 1 0
 @betsie: like I said I need this if I want less frustrating experience or at least inflated tires. I ride my 30mm rim with 58-62 wide tires on 27,5" with max of 35 psi if it is rough for 190lbs ride ready, that is high enough.
I run DH casings on my enduro, 200ml of sealant for each tire. Better line choise? Sure but that won't make me faster, slow down? Nah that is what makes it fun to me.
Well I didn't talked about the car key , the key for the house. Where I live I don't need a car or why would you do that if you have two different mountains each 5 min away with the bike?

Well I guess you could also let other stuff lying around before they get stolen in the Highlands.
Next time I will take my bike with me when I visit Scotland. Maybe do a extended bothy tour.
  • 1 0
 @Darwin66: I have a gilet with zip pockets and my little multi tool bits sit in the tool. So these issues are not something that I encounter.
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: I remember tubs on road bikes, roadies had a bottle cage and still do, the new Nukeproof boast at having a bottle cage!!! hardly behind then.
The TDF riders with a good minimum wage are light years ahead of MTB. We have to accept that we are miles behind the curve and love reinventing the wheel and claiming it as new. But things will mostly come back to what has worked for many many years for those who cycle toured in the mountains on dirt tracks long before america invented mountain biking Wink

Thanks for the negative props in advance.

I might come from a cycling family, my dad ran the RAF cycling team and expedition team for many years.
  • 1 0
 @betsie: no negative props, IMHO you just aren't looking at the big picture if you think that constitutes advancement. MTBs have had bottle cages for years, then they started experimenting with angles on the way to modern angles and they had a tough time fitting cages. Now they've cracked some formulas and can fit water bottles back on. Just the things that are just recently showing up on roadbikes that mtbs have had for years and even decades: disc brakes, wider wheels and tires, a real debate on 1x drivetrains, real debates on steeper seat tube angles because road bike ergos suck. Roadies are an atavistic bunch and the UCI tends to enforce traditionalism instead of advancement. And it's cool that your dad ran a road team, but I'm watching how enduro is driving MTBs, even the trail and xc/dc categories with better more capable bikes AND places for tools.
  • 1 0
 @ICKYBOD: Enduro has done a great job at finally catching up with Dh in terms of head angles.
The seat angles are going back to where they were many years ago.
As for the mech eng not managing to fit in a bottle cage, I would hope that any good mech eng could fit one in, it comes down to marketing and "requirements" for what engineers do on things rather than what is technically possible. If the head of marketing doesnt want it there is no budget, if he want a budgie cage on the handlebars there will be $5M to pay for it. The engineers will just sit there frustrated and have to put a public face on!!! (not that I am an Engineer, just a guess, I am a paper pusher who is frustrated that marketing have no money for real progress).
  • 1 0
 @betsie: hmm what do you mean, the seat angles are not a new thing?
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: I take it you are being sarcastic Smile

I used to run a Thomson layback backwards on my Vp free when I rode it for the mountains to steepen up the seat angle as it was slack. Looked funky.

From a 2012 paper.

uknowledge.uky.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1000&context=khp_etds


One of the strategies that has been implemented by triathletes to lessen the
effects of cycling on their running performance is changing the bike frame geometry.
Specifically, triathletes use steep seat post angles that are more vertical (typically near
80°) than that of conventional road-racing bikes (between 70 to 74°, traditionally 72°)
[19]. Seat post angle affects the seat’s relative position to the crank axis. The more
vertical seat post seen in triathlon-specific bike frame places its rider more directly above
the crank axis. This riding posture results in a more extended hip position [20] that has
been proposed to facilitate pre-stretch of the gluteus maximus muscle that improves the
action of the muscle [4, 21]. A few studies that have examined electromyography (EMG)
of the leg muscles during cycling in the conventional and steep seat post conditions
revealed an altered pattern of leg muscle use. Brown [22] indicated that a more
extended hip position enabled cyclists to generate greater hip torque while biceps
femoris activation was reduced. This finding is supported by a study that revealed 72°
and 82° seat post angles conditions during a Wingate (anaerobic cycling) test resulted in
comparable power outputs while significantly less muscle activation was required when
cyclists rode on a bike with steeper seat post angle [23]. The biceps femoris serves to
bring the hip into extension during the late stance (near toe-off) and to decelerate the
forward moving leg at the knee during the terminal swing during moderate speed running
(3.51 m/s) [2]. Therefore, preserving biceps femoris during the preceding cycling
segment may improve running performance by possibly preventing fatigue in this
muscle. A steeper seat post angle was also reported to improve power output during a
15-second all-out cycling bout [20].
  • 18 0
 so the Granite tool looks better than the best three?
  • 1 0
 +1 on the Granite tool. Why wasn't it featured, its half the price!
  • 1 0
 Maybe I could find the answer online somewhere but I’ve been running this and if there is a solution for it coming loose and creating play in the headset I’d love to know. To fix this I’d have to carry a full length Allen key and another for the bottom. Park days I’m nipping it up 4 to 5 times during the day.
Happy to hear the solution before I ditch it for good.
  • 1 0
 Granite tool looks great, but misses vital (in my mind) 8mm hex. My perfect search goes on...
  • 2 0
 @Ryanfitz81:
Loctite?
  • 9 2
 The Granite tool is pretty slick, especially if you cherry pick the bits you need. BUT, it's missing an 8mm, doesn't fit into your steerer alone, weighs 210g combined, and costs $100 combined.

We didn't include it here because their system isn' just a steerer-tube tool, and on its own we don't think the "Stash" steerer tool is as good as the choices above.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: not sure what you mean by in your steer alone? Im talking about the steerer kit only.

@Ryanfitz81 - i havent had that issue, but worth trying loctite or grease?
  • 1 0
 @Ryanfitz81: Not had that issue, either. How hard are you running your forks! Definitely try a dab of threadlock.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: How often do you need an 8mm vs 2/2.5mm allen key on the trail? I need the 2/2.5 way more often for Brake pad change, cannot remember needing an 8mm.
  • 5 0
 @kriesel: Where are you carrying spare brake pads to install out on a ride? If it's in a pack then you've kinda defeated the objective of these tools... ;-)

I had to use an 8mm a few weeks ago when my crank arm came loose. I change brake pads at home.
  • 1 0
 @Rickos: With the tube on the frame
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Isn't the oneup tool also a bit more than what it says here, Don't you need to buy the cap separately for another $25 and then either buy the tapping tool or pay a shop to tap it if you don't have a friend who has one?
  • 1 0
 @Ryanfitz81: Even if it comes loose it shouldn't create play in the headset, it's only there for preload and the pinch bolts on your stem keep the headset tight. Maybe you have some other issue with your headset.
  • 1 0
 @Rickos: why do you need to install spare brake pads on a ride? and in that case how are you resetting your pistons?
  • 1 0
 @shami: that's correct - but with another top cap, you can use it in another bike without getting a second tool. or you just keep it in the one up pump.
  • 1 0
 @kriesel: Yeah but why? Doesn't seem very efficient....
  • 1 0
 @shami: I’ve cranked the pinch bolts way beyond tight and still manage to get play. I guess I’m doing something else wrong. Certainly not riding lightly on light tracks but I thought the pinch would hold too
  • 2 0
 @nullzwo: That is a cool feature and the Oneup would be my first choice of the three but I still think this article is misleading because the true cost of installing the Oneup on your bike is going to be at least $84 for the tool and top cap and probably more like $119 for most people who don't have access to the tap. That actually makes it the most expensive option.
  • 1 0
 @mountaincapitalpartners: I don’t. It was kriesel, not me, that puts new pads in while out on a ride.
  • 11 1
 No Granite stash in the test, quite sad, less expensive, easy to use, really good anodized aluminium finish. Could be a good competitor !

Plus, the EDC with the tools needed to thread the steerer becomes the most expensive ! (add 35$ for the tools and 25$ for the top cap or 110$ for the EDC stem)
  • 1 0
 Yeah but you could use the EDC stem and don't need to do anything. Or you use the pump and just stash it there. Dunno why they didn't mention it at all that the pump Also takes this tool.
  • 4 0
 @Serpentras: so you have to add 60$ for the pump or 110$ for the stem.

With the 59$ EDC tool you can just put it in your pocket haha
  • 7 3
 @Serpentras: Because this was a comparison of steerer tube tools only. Smile
  • 1 0
 @loris-brthlt: Look the EDC pump is the pump with the best quality I ever had. It is sealed three times to prevent damage. It is the pump with the best tollerances so far and I am a QM guy.
If you already have a stem and your happy then you could at least sell it. I am building a new bike so it doesn't matter that much. I will probably stay away from the stem because of its weight.
  • 1 0
 @loris-brthlt: also this pump got a real good volume to get your tire inflated quick. With the big pump you even could carry CO2. I would not need that but we'll maybe the avid Enduro Racer needs it.
  • 2 0
 @Serpentras: I really like One Up, I think for my future bike I'll take the Pump with the EDC tool inside, that was not my main point.

I've just wanted to point out that the price indicated at 59$ for the EDC tool and saying that it's the least expensive is not true, 'cause you have to add 60$ for the tools to thread the steerer or 110$ to have the stem.
  • 2 0
 @loris-brthlt: well this could be true but my Bikeshop will do it for free if I purchase it there. I already got the pump from them cheaper then I could find it on the internet so it is a no brainer.
  • 2 0
 @loris-brthlt: Ive seen that a few of the bikeshops around me will thread your steerer tube for like $10 and I wouldn't be terribly shocked to see them do it for free if you bought the tool from them as @Serpentras mentioned
  • 10 0
 Would be nice if pinkbike factored in buying the threading tool and top cap or the stem and compression kit which double the price of the EDC
  • 2 0
 ...or at least mention the fact that is the easiest to use with a bike count >1.
  • 10 0
 SWAT BOX IN EVERY BIKE FRAME!
  • 2 0
 One of the reasons I bought my E29. And I won't go back to not having that on a trail bike!
  • 1 0
 Honestly such a nice feature. One of the best innovations of the past 5 years in MTB. Makes hot lap rides soooo much easier!
  • 5 0
 I've seen the word finicky far too many times in this article to think these things are going to make life better. When it's cold and raining and eveythings covered in mud and sand (where did the sand even come from??) the last thing I need is finicky.
  • 5 2
 One Up do a stem with a built in preloader, I have used this and worked first time no issues and not had to adjust it since, stem looks fine, a little plain but I quite like the stealth look, this saves having to thread the steerer
  • 6 0
 I love the idea of the OneUp stem, and others have had some good results, but we struggled to keep preload with it. It's also a hefty 189g and costs $115 USD. I personally just bit the bullet and threaded the steerer on my personal bike.
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: i love to thread my steerer for oneup. Its so satisfying to watch those perfect threads form in my steerer tube. Thats the way we like to tap! (maybe i just spend too much time at work)
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: yep, the preload system is terrible, tightening it a few times a day when on big rides. The idea has potential, but that particular stem and system just doesn't work.
  • 1 0
 Also worth noting that I've had it confirmed that threading your steerer voids a rockshox warranty, so when it starts creaking, you're on your own.
  • 2 0
 The OneUp stem with preload adjustment is the worst stem I’ve ever had. Wouldn’t not stay tight even through 1 ride. Between myself and LBS we’ve made 1/2 dozen or so attempts to get it to work and the same results each time.
  • 2 0
 @nyhc00: Worst $120 I've ever spent on the bike. Such a headache to setup trailside if your have a fall and the bars go crooked, very annoying how it constantly backs off and eventually gets to the point where you have to loosen the whole thing and set it up again. Would not recommend the EDC stem.
  • 1 0
 @pbuser2299: I'm sure that I've read that it voids Fox warranty also, which is what has put me off.
  • 2 1
 @lewiscraik: but does it really? What if i just cut threads off and say its the length of crown i needed.
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: and what did it cost to thread the steerer and get the top cap? Why isn't that included in the listed prices? . The OneUp is not the least expensive because the $60 listed price does not get you a complete product. The Spesh and Bonty only seem more expensive because they're stand-alone and are complete products that do not require further purchases. This is not to say the EDC is worse because it needs other parts, but just that the prices for getting it threaded, getting the tap kit, or getting the stem, need to be included and represented. The first sentence of the conclusion says OneUp is the cheapest, which is just wrong.
  • 2 0
 @lewiscraik: I've warrantied my 36 with threaded steerer because of creaking CSU. Also like @mironfs said, just cut the threads off if it's a concern.
  • 1 0
 @mironfs: My thoughts exactly - What length do you need to thread it? If worried about warranty could you run an extra spacer and then cut off the threaded portion in the event of warranty?
  • 1 0
 @tkrug: about 12 mm.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Yep, I ditched the stem very quickly and went back to the threaded cap. I crashed in a race, twisted my bars and the preload came loose. I had to ride the rest of the stage with a loose headset.
Great concept, crap execution
  • 1 0
 @chrish: Twisting the bars can mess up preload on any stem. If got hit hard enough to slip in rotation, what's to say they didn't also slip up the steerer? Top caps are normally very lightly torqued, so not impossible to have the bars spin and rise and end with a very tight top cap and a loose headset.
  • 2 0
 @just6979: I'm sure he's aware of this..have you ever tried to preload an EDC stem trailside? With a top cap it's pretty straightforward. With an EDC stem it's a nightmare.
  • 3 0
 One Up also do a quick link pliers that work well- I found the method they initially suggested using some of the allen keys to be super challenging. I use the pump so don't have to worry about the threading and can easily swap it between bikes. I'm a fan.
  • 6 1
 Now imagine how much better these would have been if we’d adopted and stuck with 1.5 head tubes instead of pointlessly switching to tapered.
  • 2 0
 Some people talk a out keeping the weight low and freak out when a manufacturer drops a shock down 5mm in a frame. Are these the same people who would happily put one of these tools in their steerer tube?
I like the tool and don't care where the shock fits so all good by me.
  • 2 0
 The Hollow BB axle would make more sense and you could have a long, thin double ended took. I am aware that one exists but no idea if any good
  • 3 1
 I don't understand why everybody is so into threading their steerer tubes or replacing their starnut when you can just get a Syncros Tailorcage which has a nice tool. It is easier to use trailside as it is not so many different pieces and just generally easy to mount and remove for your needs.
  • 2 0
 I can barely fit a water bottle in my frame as it touches the shock. I use the oneup with the pump on the bottom of my frame, no complaints
  • 1 0
 tailorcage doesn't fit my bike
  • 1 0
 Agreed but people like complicated solutions.
  • 2 0
 Downside of oneup is it can come loose and go flying out. I’ve lost one already this year and had my current one come out twice recently. Something to think about if you do a lot of high speed jumps or real technical downhill. Last time mine came flying out and hit me in the nose while coming of a step up
  • 5 0
 The EDC tool isnt the cheapest as to actually use it you need to buy a pump, stem or tool to fit it
  • 3 0
 Just get a Fork Cork, plug your the bottom of the steer and fill the steer tube with whatever tools you like. I do this in combo with the EDC 100cc pump. Easy, clean. Just keep riding.
  • 2 0
 Noticed this thing on ur bike but didn't realize just what was going on. Sweet! Pair it with the Spec Zee cage with tool and you got a lot of room for... stuff.
  • 2 0
 I love the hidden tools. Thought about going EDC, but didn't want to buy the tool, which made it more expensive (and more faff), bought the specialized one and it didn't fit my steerer tube (I have a Pole with a long head tube), put that on my wife's bike and it's great. I imagine using the chain tool will be a pain, but I've only ever broken a chain once. It's there of required. I've recently bought the trek one for my bike, it doesn't look as clean and I really miss the way the spesh one pops out! But, I think it's a better quality tool when I eventually get round to needing it.

It's expensive, but I've forgotten tools before and it means I can just grab the bike and go. Interestingly, I believe Pole are now offering builds with the EDC tool installed from their factory.
  • 1 0
 Swat is much better IMO - the design is a whole lot more cleaner than its counterparts.
  • 2 0
 "The OneUp is the most full-featured, lightest, and least expensive out of the three"

It's not the least expensive, because you left out everything else needed to install the OneUp version.

The tool itself is just "$59" - but for $59 you can't do a thing with it. Then when you go online to actually try to buy it, you find out you have to spend another $35 for a tap kit and another $25 for a top cap set. Both of these costs should be added to the OneUp's total price since they are proprietary items required to install, and not everyone will have a shop that already paid for the tap kit nearby.

Meanwhile the other two just need you to remove the star nut - no special tools, no special top caps.

I love OneUp stuff but they are never 100% transparent until you read the fine print... just like their "shortest dropper post length ever" claim with their V1 droppers - that was only true if you ignored the extra actuator length (which they conveniently left out of the specs at the time).
  • 1 0
 Yes, Spesh' swat CC is cool but needs a short steerer tube. My OE Öhlins came with a 16,5 cm steerer tube. When I cut my aftermarket Lyrik I left it at 17,5. However, I still couldn't get the lower piece of the swat CC to hook up to the threads of the upper. In the end I gave up and installed a star nut. Im not cutting my Lyrik any shorter.
  • 3 0
 If you buy one aftermarket the tool comes with several different length threaded chain breaker pins.
  • 1 0
 @husstler: still not long enough for my steerer tube. The trek one works fine though.
  • 1 0
 I’m guessing this is a rare problem, but serious one to watch for with EDC. The hex bolts that sandwich the tool together loosened on mine, enough to make it impossible to remove the tool. With the tool stuck in place I couldn’t access the top cap to loosen with lock ring tool. I ended up wrapping top cap with an old inner tube was able to loosen with channel lock pliers and retrieve tool.
  • 3 0
 I go everywhere with the OneUp tool in the 100cc pump, mounted to my downtube. For extra security I have a Voile strap around it, over the OneUps mount strap. Works great!
  • 1 0
 The main benefit of having a tool close at hand, like these 3 do, is to plug a tire fast and get going again. The trouble is, only EDC has got a tire plug tool option. With a pre-loaded bacon strip, I've seen riders do puncture repairs in a no time and that is the only reason I'd spend the $$ to stuff something into my steering. Dynaplug make a snappy little carrier for their tool,ey so there's other options to have a plug tool at the ready. But back to the point of this article- the EDC wins hands down and plus OnepUP is an awesome company to deal with. I'm using the Switch ring and bash-guide, and both have been flawless, plus they ship super fast.
  • 1 0
 Edc cap system can be used to pass front brake hose so you can quickly do barspins on your Enduro bike :p (you need to remove dropper post and gears levers from your bar) with formula brakes you have a quick dismount. It's 2 minutes operation
  • 1 0
 Another vote for one-up pump-tool - survives UK winter and instant swap between bikes. Gone off carrying tools in jersey pockets since came off one winter with my helmet light stashed in back pocket, roughly where I bruised a kidney leading to night in hospital, luckily nothing worse.
  • 1 0
 I know no one wants to talk about Giant. But their crank tool is at least as useful as Specialized and Treks and doesn’t require threading the steerer tube but keeps it free for the giant CO2 inflator tool. With those two things and the granite bar end plug with bacon strips. I’m fairly confident to leave my backpack in the garage.
  • 1 0
 Hmm... a lukewarm review followed by a rather heated comment section. I have a OneUp EDC, but mainly because it came with a used fork I bought. Haven't used or ridden with it yet. Otherwise, it seems the idea is promising, but none of the 3 options has hit the bullseye yet.
  • 2 0
 Prices are misleading for oneup edc. really it costed me around $120 in order to buy the kit to thread the steerer tube and also have to buy top cap. You're paying $60 for just the tool which is f*cking outrageous.
  • 2 0
 Does anyone use the All In multitool
www.allinmultitool.com/collections/all
Seems like a pretty good option to me but it doesnt get much press.
  • 1 0
 I don't Like the position down there in the gunk. But the other thing is you only can fit it to Shimano cranks or others who have the 24mm axle and are not blocked by some bolts like the raceface crank's.
  • 1 0
 I ran one for a while and really liked it. Never fell out (the magnet is really strong) and works well. Can't comment on the chain tool as I had the original without. The bits rusted almost immediately but they still worked fine and the tool itself stayed immaculate.
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: I think the v3 is DUB compatible. But yeah... I can see how it could end up rusted out.
  • 1 0
 @hhaaiirryy: OTOH the bits on mine were the worst tools I’ve even seen. They were so rounded before any use it was like they’d been specially made to destroy hex heads
  • 1 0
 I use the all in tool and it's great, easy to use and access, big fan here.
  • 1 0
 @hhaaiirryy: does it rattle?
  • 1 0
 I loved mine! But after a quick tumble it was MIA. Never fell out riding even on my hardtail charging through some jank. After that crash though I was separated from it.
  • 1 0
 @AverageAdventurer: are you talking about the aliexpress one?
  • 1 0
 @Narro2: no the actual all in tool, i really did like it. Orange ano if memory serves me right, but yeah solid crash and it was nowhere to be found.
  • 1 0
 @Narro2:, a buddy of mine owns one. It doesn’t rattle and keeps secured. But the tool point bits are always covered in rust
  • 4 0
 I do not need tools, I use my bare hands !
  • 3 0
 An expensive finicky tool down the steerer tube. To me, that sounds more like the answer to a question nobody asked.
  • 2 0
 Exactly. Great idea until you actually need the to use the tools.
  • 3 0
 Actually it is easy to work with. No problems so far
  • 1 0
 Find im having to occasionally tighten my one up tool, gets loose and rattles, one instance wasn't sure if it was coming out of the steerer tube. Still well worth having though, the tire plugs have been very handy.
  • 1 0
 Would of been nice if the newest version of the EDC tool was included in the article, or at least mentioned. Their V2 of it has been out already for a few weeks. Great write up otherwise.
  • 3 0
 Bontrager is already working on a smaller version of this tool, called Lil’ Bits.
  • 2 0
 We need more internal frame storage options like S.W.E.T. and T.I.T.S. Thanks goes to Specialized and Trek for leading the way! Hugs*
  • 1 2
 The problem of all this tools is when I have more than one bike. I have to buy 3 of them. I want to have a minimal tool I can carry independently from my bikes (mtb, road etc.). That's why we started to do our own tool ;-) daysaver.fun
  • 1 0
 if u get the EDC u can move it between bikes easily
  • 1 0
 thats why the top cap unit for the one-up EDC is sold seperately. i use mine on three bikes Wink
  • 1 0
 I've had good results using the EDC and the one up pump mounted to my bottle cage. Pump is more than sufficient, and I can carry plugs, zip ties and $$ as well.
  • 1 2
 the previus version of the EDX Tool wich fits in stems ruined MANY rides, Fast. Maybe more than or equal than broken deraulliers. Im still in awe of WHY could this only happen to me and apparently no one else. Hope Them folks reach out to sort me Wtf went wrong. Heavy investment in installing equipment too.. Big regret. Anyway their Pump is TOP of the line in my experience.
  • 1 0
 What you should do for readers is check-out each companies customer service that is the real picture of a company's quality. And ask readers their experiences with them.
  • 1 0
 I love my EDC tool and all my OneUp components but, having said that, my CSU failed recently... And I believe the EDC is the culprit!
  • 1 0
 One potential strike against the OneUp - if you decide to sell a fork that has been threaded you pretty much have to include at least the cap if not the entire tool.
  • 1 1
 This might be a silly question ...for the ones that have been running tools in their steerer: do you feel those extra 150g when pulling the bike up into manuals, etc?
  • 9 1
 Do you feel the weight of gloves affecting your manuals?
  • 1 1
 You shouldn't be "pulling up into manuals", you should be shifting back and letting your weight moving behind the rear axle do the work. 150g in the steerer compared to 80kg hanging off the back is not an issue.
  • 2 0
 I have a 170mm worth of coil sprung fork on the front of my bike. Hooked up to aluminum wheels wrapped in DD tires. No, I don't feel the tool weight.
  • 1 0
 I thought with the new Oneup stem you didn't have to tap your steerer tube just need to buy preload add on
  • 1 0
 You can always pop the EDC into one of their pumps, no threading necessary.
  • 1 0
 Anyone had the SWAT tools swivel cap get stuck? Mine got stuck and I don’t know what to do.
  • 1 0
 I got OneUp system, it's saved me & others a number of times. decent bit of kit
  • 1 0
 How am I going to put my Reverb lever back together every few rides without a T25?!
  • 1 0
 Real conclusive review there..
  • 1 0
 The EDC tools with the storage or the CO2 don't fit on the new Fox 38!
  • 1 0
 But, the top half of the tool does fit?
  • 1 0
 @AckshunW: yeah top halfs fine
  • 1 0
 @AckshunW: Yes the top fit.. but you need a new place to put you tire blug, cash, c02.... I finally end with a EDC pump to store all product at the same place
  • 2 2
 Bontrager is that kid from school that copied your homework and didn't even change the name.
  • 1 0
 A bit misleading, the OneUp is NOT $59 for the entire setup.
  • 1 0
 Dumb, junk, waste of ????......
  • 1 0
 So... none of the 3.
  • 1 2
 ...

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