3D Printed Randoms - Pond Beaver 2021

Apr 13, 2021
by Brian Park  
Titanum MyTi Ultra Pedals
Titanum's 3D printed pedal is crazy light, and works better than expected.

Ever since I started messing around with 3D printing, I see it everywhere. It's either Baader-Meinhof, or the algorithm just knows me really well at this point.

An industry friend of mine has been giving me a hard time with all the weird 3D printed stuff I've been checking out, suggesting that we're so spoiled for good, normal products these days. That's probably true, we've gotten used to the smooth taste of traditional manufacturing and engineering, and it sometimes takes depraved, sketchy stuff to pique my interest.

So yes, while some of the promises of additive manufacturing are a long ways from viability, there are a lot of cool things being experimented with right now. Here are a few of them.





Gamux 3D printed parts.
Would you ride a 3D printed direct mount stem?

GAMUX'S SPECIAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

The hybrid design house/manufacturer/distributor from Switzerland has been busy. They have been dialling up selling their line of 3D printed tools, accessories, and small parts while putting in a lot of work bringing some bigger additive projects to market.

They're jumping right into the deep end, working on making a direct mount stem, brake levers, and more. For these products they use selective laser melting to achieve much higher strength than traditional "sausage print" consumer FDM setups.

Gamux 3D printed parts.
Garmin mount, stem spacer, & dork disk. I don't know much about their plastic parts, but the surface finishes are really, really good.

Gamux 3D printed parts.
Making a direct mount stem using additive manufacturing is a daunting task.
Gamux 3D printed parts.
Several iterations of brake lever prototypes.

On top of the projects they're working on, Gamux also now offers custom component design. While this is mostly aimed at the B2B side, the ability for additive manufacturing to scale means that even small companies with basic napkin sketches can access it.

More info at gamuxbikes.com.





Titanum MyTi Ultra Pedals

TITANUM'S ULTRALIGHT 3D PRINTED TITANIUM CLIP-IN PEDALS

We covered Titanum's ultralight, 3D printed 'MyTi Ultra' pedals back in March, but I have a prototype set in my hands now. Titanum's design uses a leaf spring rather than a traditional clip-in mechanism, with the idea being that with fewer parts means fewer failure points and less weight. On my scale the pedals are a mindblowingly light 102g for the pair, and the cleats are lighter than standard SPD cleats as well at just 46g for the pair. Combined that's over 70g lighter than the most anemic road pedals out there. Wild.

The pedal bodies are 3D printed using Cold Metal Fusion (CMF). I'm sure someone smart will find one hundred ways I'm explaining this wrong, but as I understand it, cold metal fusion takes a bunch of titanium powder, and integrates it into a plastic "binding" material; the part gets printed into shape with lasers being shot through the powder bed at lower temperatures that only melt the plastic, and then the whole part gets sintered/heat treated to finish it. The advantage being there's only one high-heat process, and the tolerances are quite good. And it's titanium.

These pedals are still in the prototype stage and I haven't logged any real rides on them yet, but my first impressions after a few laps up and down the alley are that they feel less weird than I expected. There's not a lot of progression in the float, they feel pretty "on ice," like old Speedplays (to be fair, I haven't tried a Speedplay pedal in about 15 years). Clipping in feels confident and intuitive, and clipping out works just as you'd expect. Definitely a little harder to clip out of than a typical SPD, but not scary.

I was disappointed to see a lot of "pffff my SPDs are proven" comments in the original story about these pedals. I think that misses the point. There were lots of "my v-brakes are proven" comments too back when disc brakes made their way onto mountain bikes. And to be clear, this system almost certainly isn't an SPD-killer, but it's also not intended to be. It's a boutique, ultralight system that's early in its design. With additive manufacturing they'll be able to iterate much more quickly than traditional manufacturing methods, and I'm excited to see what Titanum can achieve with this project.

More info at titanum.bike.

Titanum MyTi Ultra Pedals
Little fellas.
Titanum MyTi Ultra Pedals
Their super-low stack height means some shoes require trimming.





Photo 76 Projects
Photos: 76 Projects.
Photo 76 Projects
Still cheaper than toner cartridges.

76 PROJECTS' NEW PRINTER

76 Projects make mounts for pretty much every possible combination of Garmin, GoPro, lights, etc. on almost any bike. They're all designed and 3D printed in the UK, and in my experience they do excellent work. I use one of their toptube mounts on my hardtail and it's been great.

They just announced on Instagram that they've bought a new HP Multijet Fusion printer. They must sell a boatload of 3D printed accessories, because those machines go for upwards of a quarter-million dollars. It'll be exciting to see the possibilities it opens up for 76 Projects.

In other news, they recently started shot-peening their 3D printed products, improving surface toughness and making them look better. They've also secured Canadian distribution through Mountain Exposure.

More info at 76projects.com.

76 Projects Enduro Garmin Mount
A Garmin on a Cotic seems blasphemous, but it's my XC bike.





my dumb 3D prints
Here are the world's lightest full-size platform pedals. Are they sketchy? Yes. Have they broken after four reasonably punishing rides? Shockingly, no.

MY OWN SKETCHY EXPERIMENTS

My interest in additive tech kicked off over the winter when I got a Matterhackers Pulse XE 3D printer and started trying to make things. Some of them even work.

my dumb 3D prints
95mm wide by 120mm long.
my dumb 3D prints
Turns out you can make things really light when you don't have to achieve any safety standards.

my dumb 3D prints
I've increased their strength by printing them flat (see left above), but the first set hasn't broken yet so we'll see...

I designed these platform pedals using aluminum M3 hardware for pins (5mm sticking through on the outside pins, 4mm on the inside ones), and some titanium Nukeproof Sam Hill axles. The platform is 95mm wide by 120mm long, a decent amount longer than normal pedals. I offset the two sides slightly, built in a little ramp for rock strikes, and placed the pins roughly where you'd expect.

I'm sure someone with actual engineering skill could optimize them a lot, but they're literally the grippiest pedal I've ever used already. Honestly maybe too grippy. And I'm pretty sure that at 195g they're the lightest full size platform pedals in the world. Dangerholm, if you're willing to sign ten pages of waivers...

my dumb 3D prints
Being able to match the radius of my downtube was pretty satisfying.

On a less sketchy note, I'm really happy with this inline pump holder.

Pump holders that mount under your bottle cage make perfect sense and work well, but something about them being offset and on the side of the frame bothers me for no good reason. My Cotic SolarisMAX has about a hundred extra bottle mounts on the downtube, so I put two of them to good use and mounted my OneUp pump/tool inline. The way the pump snaps into place is super satisfying.

The ability for someone with zero formal engineering or CAD experience to be making functional parts after just a few late nights of figuring it out is one of the most exciting things about the technology. We won't living in a world where anyone can download and 3D print their own titanium pedals in the garage anytime soon, but we're already in a world where designing and producing your own spacers and mounts is way easier than you might think.





Alright, that's it for this round of additive manufacturing oddities. Since I'm dorking out super hard these days it probably won't be the last one of these. Sorry in advance!


149 Comments

  • 201 1
 Dangerholm would sand the pedals down to shave another 3 grams.
  • 143 0
 I'm sure you don't need the full threaded length going into the crank
  • 4 0
 Lmao
  • 9 0
 @L0rdTom: Nah, who needs pins? Pins are for joeys.
  • 4 0
 @tacklingdummy: Pin-less pedals, could catch on.
  • 4 0
 Why not integrating pins directly into the axle and saving the whole main pedal? model "mace"
  • 1 0
 @imbiker: velcro
  • 53 0
 somewhat related, is there a PB forum for "things I've printed for bikes", either forum or photos? Id love to connect with a community that does this. 2020 gave me expensive hobbies.
  • 5 0
 Commenting to keep updated on this thread. I just got a 3d printer and am keen to make mounting brackets for everything!
  • 4 1
 3D Printing sub reddit is really great!
  • 2 0
 I've printed stuff using Shapeways. It's expensive, but it means you don't have to commit to a 3d printer of your own.
  • 1 0
 @axelerate: 3D hubs is another good one to use. I ended up finding a local company who I got to know pretty well.

Not done anything too extravagant, just things like cassette spacers, 10 - 7 speed converter and a chain guide.
  • 2 0
 Closest thing I can think of is the 'Homemade Parts!' forum on here. Not exclusively 3D printed stuff, although I've seen a couple projects that involved 3D printing.
  • 7 0
 Folks like myself post 3d printed parts on the 'homemade parts' thread here on pinkbike.
www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=30987&pagenum=660

I'm an engineer specializing in 3D printing metal. Sometimes I print bike parts...
  • 1 1
 Was planning on modeling and printing a really clean, low-profile mount for my expandable baton - I mean flashlight. I like how Brian formed the pump holder to the frame section.
  • 2 0
 printed a bash guard for myself out of PET-G, seems to be holding up after several hard hits
  • 1 0
 I designed and 3D printed a custom dropper lever out of the stock fox transfer lever (which is terrible). PETG for the body and 910 nylon for the actual lever mechanism, works light years better! Metal has limited application because it is just not as strong as forged, heat treated, and machined alloys.
  • 1 0
 @axelerate: how expensive? Very capable 3D printers are not expensive. For instance, I paid £130 for my Creality Ender 3, and once set up it has worked like a dream.
  • 5 0
 @rybrentd: Metal printed parts CAN be as 'strong' as billet. I work with a lot of nickel super alloys, stainless, and titanium. I make parts that meet the same exact specs as 'traditional' metals and are flying on commercial aircraft. You may have flown on a plane with printed Ti or Nickel parts in critical applications already.

Powder Bed Fusion produces material on-par with forged/billet/cast standard materials. Depending on the alloy heat treatment is required, but this is true of 'standard' processes as well. I.e. heat treatment is not unique to the printed material.

Please do not confuse powder bed fusion with Bnder Jet, FFF, ect. those processes have a lot more trouble producing material comparable to 'billet'.

Metal printing (Additive manufacturing) is new and scary to alot of companies. It is sometimes more expensive, sometimes cheaper- it just depends. Adoption is increasing every day.
  • 2 0
 @Fabris: just tell me how to convert my Ender 3 to print Powder Bed Fusion parts already. I promise I won't tell anyone else and I'll design and make you all the pretty new parts you want for life Smile
  • 2 0
 @Fabris: I guess you have to define strong (tensile/yield strength, fatigue life, thermal cycling effects, etc) but I was actually unaware that you could achieve similar 'strength' vs normal techniques (given the materials are the same), so that is pretty eye opening. If you ask a vendor for plate, sheet, or bar stock inconel, stainless, titanium, etc. they won't have anything 3D printed hence why I said limited application. It is nice from a design standpoint that you can free yourself from traditional machining/manufacturing techniques using 3D printing so I would imagine that would be extremely valuable for aerospace. I used to work in aluminum manufacturing and sometimes you had to "think inside the box" so to speak when it came to design philosophy.

I'm aware of the different techniques though and I do FFF but know a local jeweler who has a DLP printer for when I can't get the details I want. The DLP printer has little functional strength (in and of itself) unless you do an investment cast but is insanely accurate (20 micron layer heights).

I honestly hope to see more of it in the future, so much potential!
  • 1 0
 @Fabris: Yes I mean if you can print high pressure turbine blades, pretty much everything else is peanuts. It's so awesome how many new possibilties arise with additive manufacturing
  • 2 0
 @Warburrito: I know youre being sarcastic but I hope you're aware that's like comparing a Nokia to a supercomputer lol Smile
  • 2 0
 @Warburrito: Check this stuff out, www.matterhackers.com/store/l/basf-ultrafuse-316l-metal-composite-3d-printing-filament-175mm/sk/MRDKJRRS you need to post process it (ship it to a kiln and have it sintered) but you can print this filament on an Ender 3! If you go this route I would be super interested to hear how it goes.
  • 1 0
 @rdrdtheta: interesting stuff, but wow...that is expensive. Currently in the market for a smallish CNC lathe and mill. I'm guessing that will be cheaper in the long term and more precise for the metal parts I want to make than 3D printing them using that material.

Did you notice the 120%ish upscaling necessary? Thats a lot of shrinkage to factor in. I can't imagine how many parts will turn out bad before you get the scaling right.
  • 45 4
 "Would you ride a 3D printed direct mount stem?"

That's the wrong question. Shouldn't matter how it's made, should matter if it can handle the job. The right question is:

"Do current additive manufacturing techniques yield the same strength (for whatever type of "strength" applies for that type of product) as existing manufacturing techniques?"

Or simply:

"Does it pass the same tests?"
  • 21 0
 DIS ^^^ Pretty sure if the technology that is being used in fighter jet engines and space rockets it is good enough for MTB. Metal SLS 3D printing aint the prints you're getting from Staples or the local maker space.
  • 8 2
 Titanium 3d printed direct mount stem will be fore sure stronger than aluminium machined one (with the same geometry).
  • 8 3
 @NorCalNomad: Yeah, and that kind of silly thinking literally holds the industry back.

"Would you ever choose to use this thing that's minorly different but provably does the job just as well or better?" is always a f*cking stupid question.

People are still scared of carbon frames _just because they're carbon_, despite modern CFRP being demonstrably strong enough in impact testing (if not stronger than similar weight thin-walled alloy tubing), because in the past people spent a lot of time asking the stupid question of "Would you ever ride a plastic bike?"

Modern materials-science & manufacturing-techniques are simply amazing and often results in noticeably better products, but the media likes to use the simple fact that it's "different" to stoke "conversation" (which is really just clicks which is really just advert sales) about whether its good enough, ignoring the long term effects of continually implying that something is not as good just because its different.
  • 4 0
 @justinfoil: lol I'm definitely in favour of trying new things, and have no issues riding structural 3D printed parts. No conspiracy to sell ads or hold the industry back. Smile
  • 8 0
 @Chnoux: Don't be so sure. Forged and machined alu has consistent and small grain structure. This technology was known to people and was improved since human beings started using metal.

3d printed is not so consistent and predictable. And how long is with us? 15years? I know it is similar to welding but weld will be always risky part of constructions due to imperfections.

More expensive material is not always solution for everything.
  • 3 0
 On the consumer end, what great improvements need to be made to stems? They hold your bars to your steerer. Where the pruning is cool would be the possibility of unique features like a Garmin mount or some sort of new feature you can now add because of the revolutionary manufacturing tech.

I guess if you think 3d printing is so cool you want to buy products made that way, all power to you, but I look at stems like I look at my cleats, I just need them to work.
  • 2 0
 @ClaytonMarkin: there’s always the ability to control stock and potential to decentralize your products. Maybe not today, but if Gamux can find a North American print outfit that’s good enough they can avoid shipping consumer goods around the world. Less wasteful as well since there’s no energy being used to recycle the aluminum chips from CNCing. And they can control stock and avoid clear outs much more easily if they can just print on demand to replace sold stock.
  • 4 0
 @justinfoil
Whether that is the wrong question depends entirely upon which department you work in....

As you rightly point out, it shouldn’t matter how it’s made....

Ask the head of the Focus Group Project Team in Marketing though, and, well.....they may well say it’s THE most important question of them all (unfortunately) ...
  • 1 3
 @brianpark: then why put that caption? It implies that someone does have issues with riding printed parts, and that pinkbike thinks that issue is big enough to mention directly.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: recycling aluminum not really super energy hungry, compared to other metal processing. Doesn't the creation of the very specific metal powders take energy? The laser and or heat& pressure to melt\sinter the powder into a part, doesn't that need energy? I agree additive manufacturing is great and full of potential, but you got any facts to back up those claims that it's "less wasteful" on its own? of course the localization will save, but that applies to anything: if they can find a shop in the states that does 3d metal printing to their standards, why couldn't they find a cnc shop to do the same?
  • 4 0
 @justinfoil: because being skeptical of trendy new tech is generally a good idea, and yes, many people are concerned about riding 3D printed parts. That’s fine. Some of those parts are sketchy. Just like some early carbon and some early aluminum bikes too. Public perception matters to adoption of new tech.

As for aluminum recycling, I’m far from an expert, and not necessarily an environmental additive evangelist, but the potential for much lower energy impacts with additive are well documented. Is that all marketing spin? Honest question, it just seems reasonable from what I can see. You’re not shipping big billets and chips all over, you use all the material you receive. And the energy to run most additive setups is (from my limited understanding) as low or lower than traditional subtractive methods.

I can’t tell if you’re frustrated I’m a proponent of additive or mad I’m holding additive back. Either way, this stuff is cool and I’m always curious to see what people think. Smile
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: I’ve been dreaming about additive manufacturing for surfboards for the better part of 10yrs. Shipping those things around the globe is gnarly, and getting reproducible performance when from CNC cut boards that need to be hand finished by random different folks is spotty at best. As soon as there’s an additive material with the right properties it’s game on.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: I hadn't thought about it like that. As a brand you could have a few printers around the globe and then print on demand. Rather than just offering stems with one rise and lengths set at 10mm difference you could let the customer choose their own length and rise down to single degrees and millimetres.

Custom products, short lead times, massively reduced transportation.
  • 1 0
 "Would you ride a 3D printed direct mount stem?"

I don't ride a DH bike so I'm not the market but... Opinion
My problem with that part/design is not it's 3d printed nature, it is the one piece design. Reminds me of the 90's trying to get my high rise azonics world force riser bars through the stem, screwdriver prising the stem open as much as possible but still scratching the hell out of my brand new bars. I hate anything that goes on the bars that isn't a 2 piece or hinged design.
  • 1 0
 @tyuikm: Two thin parts would be still easier to install than normal mtb stem but i see your point and you have right.
  • 2 0
 Every manufacturing process has it's advantages and disadvantages. The important thing is to design the part to suit them. And then pass the same tests. For some geometry 3D printing is slow, inefficient, weak, needs lost of post processing and has a poor surface finish. But it does let you make shapes that just can't be made any other way.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: Name doesn't check out..
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: Decentralized production... Interesting. Not sure how quality control would work. And warranty and/or liability for defective products could be a sticky issue.
  • 1 4
 @brianpark: "Some of those parts are sketchy." Yeah, no shit, and so are many cheap no-brand CNCed parts. I'm more skeptical of those pieces of junk parts (with typo-based names and terribly translated descriptions), than a part from a seemingly reputable brand no matter the technology used. That's why I said the real question[s] should be "Is it strong enough? Does it pass the same tests? Does it have good QC?"

I think you're holding it back. There is no need for you to ask the wrong question. That only reinforces those who are already asking that wrong question, and might even plant doubt for others. It is cool, but if lots of folks are scared or dismissive of it based on what it is made of, instead of how it performs, it will be less cool as companies might decide not to pursue that path.
  • 4 0
 @justinfoil:

Justin, whether one likes it or not, whether it would be better to do so or not, Brian is doing no more than expressing one of the major tenets in behavioral economics.

Humans are resistant to change.
Human inertia, loss aversion, status quo bias, cognitive dissonance; regardless of the name, when it comes to product development, one would be a fool to ignore its significance.

www.behavioraleconomics.com/resources/mini-encyclopedia-of-be/status-quo-bias

Although it’d arguably be ’better’ if there were no need to ask the question, it still is an essential one.

It is not Brian’s fault that the question needs asking.
  • 1 2
 @orientdave: The question does not _need_ to be asked. It only serves to reinforce the status quo.

Yes, everything you said and quoted and cited is great. But it helps to reinforce what I was saying. If resistance to change is the norm, then why would you want to reinforce that resistance by asking leading questions? Especially if you claim to be a proponent of the the new thing?
  • 4 0
 @justinfoil:
I disagree. I think it needs to be asked for the reasons stated regarding the well established nature of human behavior when it comes to decision making, and furthermore, in this case because, being a journalist, Brian may wish to engage with the audience.

If I were in his position, I would do the same.

You disagree with his decision; fine. Debate is good. I understand why you feel as you do, and actually tend to agree with you that there are advantages to trying to overcome status quo bias, not only in the field of product development, but in the wider world.

The initial reason I started making points here was purely the tone of your words, and I quote “it’s a f&cking stupid question’.

I am on a bit of a personal mission to try and encourage people to be a little more open, and polite. I think online communities could do with that.

I have attempted to show you why, from a different perspective, it may be an essential question when developing a product.

You still seem to suggest there is no other perspective.
In that case, I wish you a good day and we will have to agree to disagree.

Regardless, product development managers working across countless industries worldwide are likely to still be asking the question,

Anyways, I hope your upcoming weekend is a good one☝️
  • 31 0
 When can I get a 3d printed bike?
  • 32 3
 Review coming out tomorrow
  • 29 1
 Looks like a (printing) Session.
  • 16 0
 What Atherton Bikes is doing is a great way to use the technology. We've been chatting to Tom Sturdy of Sturdy Cycles as well, he actually uses Element 22 for his lugs, the same 3D printer as the Titanum pedals.
  • 4 0
 Just found out the other day Atherton bikes use 3d printed lugs. Pretty neat. www.athertonbikes.com/technology
  • 7 1
 @Chnoux: wow those are ugly
  • 2 1
 With current back orders, shipping delays and covid work stoppages, 2028. (Does that sound familiar?)
  • 2 1
 @hamncheez: Ellsworth would like a word.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: are Atherton designing and machine winding their own tubes? (Variable wall thickness?)
Or are they more of a standard item?

Sturdy are killing it in the looks department!
  • 2 0
 @JosMaple: I actually don't know. Funny, I've got to get back to them—we've been trying to coordinate a call to learn more about their program. I'd actually like to get them on the podcast sometime.

One thing I do know from other people using 3D printed lugs and metal tubes is the advantage of butted tubing is negated somewhat by the lugs, since that's most of the butting would happen where there's now a lug. At least that's my layperson's understanding of it.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: it's not negated just moved. You are moving the thick portion of the butted tube to the lug and can use a thinner tube. Within reason the thin part of the tube isn't the weak spot on a bike, it's the welded joint. When done right you get a lighter, strong, and less expensive tube when you remove the butting.
  • 4 0
 @shirk-007: hah thank you, it’s nice when smart people explain what I’m trying to fumble my way through explaining.
  • 11 0
 I don't think I'll buy them, but I love that those titanium pedals exist. It's such a cool design. I am one of those people that has been running the same pair of xtr SPDs for almost a decade, and I love them, but I also love seeing new entries in this space because Shimano has been dominant for so long.
  • 5 0
 I'm looking at them, and I still can't see the pedal. I can clearly see the spindle, but then there is a strange stone on the end, covering where the pedal would be. Props to Titanum, I ride flats but those things are pretty darn cool.
  • 14 0
 I need that one up pump mount!
  • 3 0
 I would buy a centerline pump mount in a heartbeat.
  • 13 0
 Check out Jank Components: jankcomponents.com
  • 1 0
 @PTyliszczak: Amazing! Thanks for sharing!
  • 1 0
 Editor, please release the CAD file!
  • 11 0
 @noone1223: the Jank one linked above will fit a lot more bikes than mine. Mine matches the downtube radius of my bike perfectly, but wouldn't be compatible with a lot of mountain bikes.

But if you want to try it, here ya go: www.dropbox.com/s/v2ll4uef3gt8opn/Cotic%20SolarisMAX%20-%20OneUp%20Inline%20Pump%20Holder.stl?dl=0
  • 1 0
 I totally forgot, this Lindarets solution should fit a lot more bikes too: lindarets.com/collections/frame-parts-accessories/products/2pc-frame-boss-pump-holder
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: I emailed OneUp after we spoke about the inline pump mount and they said it's on the to-do list but no dates planned. I bought a cheap Decathlon strap-on pump mount and am waiting on some AliExpress special silicone watch straps arriving to rig something up myself pretty much the same as the Linderets mounts - might have just bought those first if I'd seen them.

I read that this Topeak one works OK too: www.bike-discount.de/fr/acheter/topeak-mountain-morph-turbo-morph-g-holder-763047

And these look like a nice solution: www.planetbike.com/micropro-mini-pump-bracket
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Any chance you could share the native model file (non-stl)? I'd like to make some edits Big Grin
  • 3 0
 @PTyliszczak: Another thank you for this. The pump holder and the Druid specific moto foam bracket was exactly what I’ve been looking for.
  • 5 0
 @brianpark I have 3 prints of your accessory mount tube holder made up. Slightly modified a few parameters to try and optimize for strap width etc. Thanks for the design, looking forward to trying them out.
  • 6 0
 Awesome. I should probably update that file to have the option for regular ski straps as well.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: That's exactly what's been done with one of the pieces. I can see it being them most used of the 3.
  • 5 0
 @brianpark: Are you on Thingiverse?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: I'd like this tube holder. Where can I find it?
  • 6 0
 This stuff makes the little figurine of Jesus with a raptor's head I 3d printed a whole lot less interesting Frown
  • 12 1
 ...but how cool would those pedals be with a Jesus-raptor head figurine sticking out the side?
  • 8 1
 @brianpark: I propose a 3d printed headstem with RaptorJesus as a Rolls Royce-esque hood ornament.
  • 3 0
 @LowBuckCanuck: could you perhaps show us the raptor jesus....
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: www.thingiverse.com/thing:2524732

My Raptor Jesus sits on the dash of my truck and protects me from danger.
  • 2 0
 @LowBuckCanuck: Thank you, that's made my week
  • 3 0
 @brianpark I've been meaning to try and print a set of pedals as well on my 3D printer, I've been using to do a lot of diferent things including for racecars (like brackets to hold dash displays and the like) but haven't printed anything bike related as of yet.
May I ask, what material did you use for the pedals for now?
  • 4 0
 I've been using Matterhackers NylonX with some chop fibre carbon. Good luck!
  • 4 4
 @brianpark: I used an alloy of Mercury, Magnesium, Lead, and frozen H2O. lol I have no idea what I'm talking about
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Thanks Brian
  • 2 0
 @brianpark has Titanum done any testing on expected lifespan from normal wear? My biggest concern with this design is that the clear and pedal are the same material, so when they wear, both need to be replaced, rather than an expendable cleat like current systems.
  • 2 0
 I have 3D printed a fender for my ext era. And a ultra light upper chain guide. And now want to print a slimmer one up pump mount to to clean up bottle cage pump mount area. Hey @oneupcompents and all in one pump mount bottle cage side loading would be my product of the year.
  • 1 0
 I'd love to see that EXT Era fender...
  • 2 0
 You know, this tech just cries out to be used to create a catalogue of derailleur hangers. Once you've created the file and tested the part, into the catalogue it goes. Then your website/sales front end is connected to the printer and the only time you need to touch the part is to put it in a bubble wrap envelope, put a label on it and drop it off for shipping.
  • 5 0
 Interesting. Keep the articles coming.
  • 3 0
 Why can't any major company make a version of the pedal above. Flat, all replaceable pins, ti axle, nylon. It literally is that simple
  • 2 0
 Nobody makes a nylon flat pedal with replaceable pins? - I’m sure TI axles are available too for some?

You then missed the unique point about them being longer then usual.....
  • 1 3
 @justanotherusername: pretty sure I added flat. And the word all before the pins bit but carry on bigfoot
  • 2 0
 Check out the DMR V11
  • 1 0
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/20443319

www.pinkbike.com/photo/20443328


here are my parts one you cant buy anywhere so i had to make my own and went with the lightest option on the other because i can will be printing in nylon right now there are in a higher psi petg for prototyping
  • 2 0
 That micro chain guide looks great!
  • 1 0
 3D print stuff is for real! Bought this 3D printed chainring bash guard from this guy on PinkBike classifieds - almost a whole year of rock strikes and it's still blocking......check it out if you're curious: www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2560659
  • 7 5
 HP makes 3d printers? Yikes, if the C size printer at my work is anything to judge by they probably shouldn't be making any type of printer!
  • 1 0
 I made the mistake of buying an HP inkjet printer. It's probably bad enough to stop me from buying anything from HP ever again.
  • 1 0
 Man, I need that pump holder but I don't have any additional bosses on my bike. It would be awesome to have that with the ability to run a strap through it so it can be secured on any tube of the bike.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: nice, thanks!
  • 1 0
 @jpat22: I just have some long velcro straps around my toptube to hold my OneUp pump currently, with some 3M rubber tape between pump and frame for protection and the pump has made an impression on the tape which keeps it from moveing side to side. Works well on the cheap but something like those Zefal ones would work too, or BTwin's "Universal Pump Bracket" for €2.50 from Decathlon.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark, this OneUp holder kept my attention... as I did the same...well, actually, the same idea, a bit more sophisticated as I got a few skills with CAD. I could send you a picture if you wish. Well done ;-)
  • 1 0
 Awesome, send it through!
  • 3 1
 When no one cares about fit and finish or sound engineering because its threeeeeDeeee Printed. its the 90s again.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark Can you sell me a Oneup pump adapter like that? I have a Chromag and think it would also match the radius of my downtube.
  • 8 1
 Is there a print shop locally or do you have a friend with a printer? www.dropbox.com/s/v2ll4uef3gt8opn/Cotic%20SolarisMAX%20-%20OneUp%20Inline%20Pump%20Holder.stl?dl=0
  • 2 0
 Someone neg propped that, but it wasn't me. Thanks for the file. I think I can figure something out.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: wrong thread - edit
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: you're the man! I gotta find a local print shop. That pump adapter is awesome.
  • 1 0
 Turns out my local library has a printer and it's pretty economical. I'm in line so no idea when it will come up as my turn, but have the factory bracket to hold me until then.
  • 3 0
 @husstler: something strange with local libraries having a 3d printer available - mine also has one and is working on low prices. Even offers help and advice with the design for free... O_o
  • 1 0
 Could I please get the file for the flat pedals? And is there a instruction, wgich axles and hardware I should use for it?
Warm regards
  • 2 0
 Hah, once I refine it a little more I'll throw it up on Thingiverse or something. I think we'll do a little video about it at some point. Of course I would never recommend anyone actually try to use these to ride bikes—it's just errr an art piece?

I chose the Nukeproof Sam Hill ti axles and bushings/bearings/seals since they're pretty widely available in both ti and standard steel. I used 10mm aluminum M3 nuts and bolts, but the hardware was insanely expensive. If anyone knows a good place to buy metric aluminum fasteners let me know...
  • 1 0
 @brianpark:
How did you fit the pump adapter to your bike and where did you get that rubber tie for securing the pump
  • 1 0
 @bansaiman: it fits to the extra water bottle mounts, and I used the rubber tie that comes with your stock OneUp pump holder.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark Nice work! Could you let us know which model of 3D printer you’re using? Is there one that you would recommend? Cheers - Jeff
  • 3 0
 I don't know enough about printers to give any sort of informed advise, but the Matterhackers folks are awesome and Dave the main guy there is a mountain biker. I've got the Pulse XE, which lets you print stronger, more abrasive materials like their NylonX with carbon fibre out of the gate. No idea how it compares to others, but it's been really easy to use and I'm blown away at how strong the NylonX prints are for a consumer grade unit.
  • 1 1
 @brianpark: I love when riders think other riders are what you want in design and manufacturing roles. Why we have so many shitty bikes and parts out there.

Back in the 90s every twat with a lathe and or mill in his garage or spare time on a machine thought being a machinist meant they were also a metallurgist, structural and mechanical engineer, test engineer and manufacturing engineer.

Were you around in the 90s when all these f*ckturds thought billet machined was the same as forged engineered parts? Now any mouth breather with a 3D printer thinks he can make bike bike parts. It will be funny watching people eat shit in PB fail videos when their shit 3D parts fail. History repeating itself with a whole new generation of fools failing is why old timers laugh hardest. It could be so easily avoided but no the young and stupid forge ahead history be damned. Big Grin
  • 2 0
 Elegance from function, am I right?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark we 3d print all our prototypes, at 20% fill and in PLA, then go ride them, and they still take a beating.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark What CAD software are you using? Want to do some tinkering but most of the software I see is stupid expensive.
  • 5 0
 Fusion 360. The free version is more than enough for all the 3D printing stuff I've done, but I just got the annoyingly expensive paid version so I can start learning about some CNC stuff.
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: Take a look at Solidworks if you want to see annoyingly expensive Smile
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: I will say I’m really impressed with the amount of development happening on Fusion 360. Seems like things are constantly being added and improved. Takes the sting out of the price.
  • 1 0
 Yeah Fusion is amazing and has brought CAD to so many people, especially with 3D printers. I was a beta tester on it way back. Definitely recommended as a cheap way in.

As MaplePanda says you then step up to Solidworks or Inventor....at £3000ish a year...they make Creative Cloud look like a bargain...
  • 2 0
 How about a printed rod for my femur ?
  • 3 0
 After that can we start working on replacement collar bones?
  • 1 0
 "Would you ride a 3D printed direct mount stem?"
I'm waiting on my bike made with 3D printed headtube!
  • 1 0
 Yo @brianpark. Are you testing a Cotic?
  • 3 0
 Not quite, I bought it to test some geometry theories. It's got a 120mm fork, a -2° angleset, and a few other oddities on there.
  • 1 0
 Longest pedal spindle I've ever seen!
  • 1 0
 It’s just a tiny pedal. The spindle actually isn’t quite long enough for me. My 4E wide feet actually rub a tiny bit on the crankarm.
  • 1 0
 I am once again asking for the stl....
  • 1 0
 Good luck with the pedals. I might make a 3D printed bash guard.
  • 1 1
 Sketchy 3D
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.017866
Mobile Version of Website