The Mountain Bike Technology Wishlist - Opinion

Oct 12, 2017
by Mike Kazimer  
Spinning Circles column Mike Kazimer


Mountain bike technology has progressed at a breakneck pace over the last ten years, and while that's led to entirely warrented frustration and confusion due to rapidly changing standards, that progression has also resulted in bikes that are better than ever. Dropper posts have become ubiquitous, front derailleurs have gone the way of the Dodo, and open dropouts with quick release skewers are nowhere to be seen. But that doesn't mean there isn't any room for improvement, and while the next advancements to come down the line may not be as drastic as the introduction of suspension, or disc brakes, they'll still have an impact on how a bike performs out on the trail.

If it were up to me, there are a few changes would come sooner than later. But don't worry, I'm not proposing any new hub spacing standards or wheel sizes...



Magura Vyron eLECT seatpost - 2016

Dropper Posts That Drop at the Push of a Button

Remember the days of trying to decide whether or not a steep descent was worth getting off your bike and lowering your seat for? Me too, and I don't miss them for a minute. Sure, it's possible to get down some pretty nasty stuff with your seat post raised sky high, but it's not nearly as fun (or safe), which is why dropper posts have become so popular.

But what if it was possible to drop your seat down at the push of a button, rather than needing to lower it with your body weight? Think about it – you shouldn't be seated when you're descending, but that's exactly what's necessary to get that seat out of the way before dropping in.

I'm not the first to suggest this idea, and I'm sure I won't be the last, but I'd love to see it come to fruition. Imagine if there was a small toggle switch mounted next to your left grip – push it in one direction the seat rises up, push it the other way and it lowers. Of course, that's easier imagined than executed, but I'd love to see someone give it a try. Oh, and bonus points go to the magician who can figure out how to accomplish this without any electronics or batteries.



Flat pedals for life and another World Championship for a legendary racer.


Better Flat Pedal Shoes

I split my time between riding flats and clipping in, but I'll admit that I don't ride flat pedals quite as much these days. It's not that I think one style of pedal is superior to the other; it's just that there are so many nice clipless shoes out there, well constructed options with BOA dials, velcro or ratchet straps to fine tune the fit, while most flat pedal shoes still stick to the same model – they're basically slightly stiffer skate shoes with a sticky rubber sole.

Of course, flat pedal shoes need to have a more flexible sole than clipless shoes, but there's no reason why all of the other bells and whistles can't be carried over for all the flat pedal fans out there. Maybe the fact that Sam Hill took home the EWS champion on flat pedals will give a little more weight to what some would consider a trivial request.



SRAM Eagle


Short Cage, Wide Range?

I spent over a decade wrenching on bikes as a full-time mechanic, and an unhealthy number of hours were spent wrestling with temperamental front derailleurs that never seemed to work quite right. The arrival of wide-range 1x drivetrains has been a welcome one, except for one thing – long cage rear derailleurs are back again. It's a tradeoff that's necessary, at least with the current designs, in order to allow the derailleur to extend all the way up to those extra-easy gears, but I wish it didn't come at the cost of reduced ground clearance – that lower pulley wheel is just begging to get snagged on a branch or a rock. Luckily, most derailleurs can take a fair bit of punishment before bending or braking, but wouldn't it be nice if it was tucked even farther out of the line of fire?

I stumbled upon a photo of a bike I used to own the other day, one that I'd equipped with a single ring, 10-speed drivetrain and a short cage Shimano Zee derailleur. Of course, that setup didn't have nearly the range of SRAM's 10-50 tooth cassette, a range that I regularly take advantage of in order to ease the pain of ascending the steep climbs near my home, but still, I'd love to have a short cage derailleur and a wide range drivetrain. I know, that's easier said than done, but I feel like there has to be some garage tinkerer out there with a solution that doesn't involve bolting on a heavy gearbox.



Kona Process 111


More Slack, Short Travel Trail Rippers

The enduro craze is still in full swing, and there's no shortage of long, low, and slack bikes on the market with 150 – 170mm of travel. But what if those same geometry principles were applied to shorter travel machines? Kona was on the right path with their Process 111 back in 2013 – that bike's still one of my all-time favorites – but there still aren't nearly enough options in that category for my liking.

I'm not into the whole 'more travel is always better' argument, and for all-around trail riding I tend to gravitate towards shorter travel rigs. I like the precision that's demanded by the reduced amount of travel, but I also don't like feeling like a bike's geometry is holding me back. Transition's new Smuggler with its 29" wheels, 120mm of rear travel, a 140mm fork, and a 66-degree head angle is on the right track, but I'd like to see even more companies follow suit. Trail bikes make sense for the vast majority of riders - not everyone is lucky enough to have terrain that warrants 160mm of travel, but with a few geometry tweaks the next generation of trail bikes can be more capable than ever, no matter if the trail is as steep as Champery or as flat as Kansas.




What would be on your wishlist? 20mm thru-axles? The return of 26" wheels? More inverted forks? Hoverbikes? Gaze into that crystal ball and then lay out your ideas for the future below.

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320 Comments

  • + 331
 long lasting unified standards would be nice.
  • + 15
 I feel like in a lot of cases this is surely an impossible pipe dream, how can it happen in a competitive marketplace of designers who don't want 100s of constraints?

Although i would really like to see a standard design of direct mount chainring interface! What is there, RF cinch, Hope, Sram, E Thirteen, FSA, Cannondale etc etc Literally no need for them to be different!
  • + 5
 im not saying they should be everlasting just long lasting and yeah that means designers will be constrained to follow them. But at the same times the jumps between standards will mean they are worthy no one thinks boost didnt had benefits but is just that we all know it was too little and the standard is bound to change.
  • + 11
 unified standards......how dare you even suggest the bike companies play nice with each other.
  • + 13
 @JoeRSB: A standard chainring mount interface?! Of all the things...

"Just got a new frame! Only had to get new wheels, dropper post, seat clamp, headset, bottom bracket, and cranks, but goddammit my $35 chainring fit those new cranks!"

If truly standardized dimensions are to happen, make them the ones that allow swapping components between frames.
  • + 6
 Why can't I switch my Chevy wheels to my Ford?? Find the standard that works for you and build around it. Marketing is telling you that you NEED Boost 148s on the ass end, not your riding. Allow the industry to innovate as they see fit, don't want for unified standards that will only end up putting the brains behind everything into a box.
  • + 39
 Waiting for wireless flat pedals.
  • + 6
 I need WiFi hotspot pedals and an espresso machine bar mount then we'll talk.
  • + 48
 @chyu: Clipless pedals that turn into flats when the dropper goes down!
  • + 6
 There is a unified standard in the bike industry. It's milking the absolute most amount of money out of every person that buys a modern-day bicycle product. It's called greed
  • + 7
 Jesus, dropper posts where you don't need to use something as simple as using your own weight?? We gotta draw the line somewhere, guys.
  • + 2
 @bogey: That is the most brilliant thing I've heard in awhile. Seriously. Very difficult but could be worth it.
  • + 2
 @properp: I think the main problem with money is how say a pro athlete probably has 3 million plus dollars at a given time, and the most money I ever had was 5000 dollars which I promptly spent on my first car. The discrepancy is too high, to some people a bike costing 500 dollars, or 5000 dollars doesn't really matter because it's a fraction of 1% of their wealth either way, whereas others it's everything they've ever saved. I think people need to be more reasonable salary wise, "is this guy really worth 600x more than the next guy?". That doesn't even sound feasible, it's a joke.
  • + 18
 Better handlebar streamers in moar colours.
  • + 13
 But lets chuck those stupid derailleurs completely and get lightweight gearboxes instead. Thats a change I'd sell my bike for.
  • + 0
 @JoeRSB: how could the lack of need for them to be be different be non-literal or even metaphorical?

There is literally no need for that word to be there.
  • + 2
 @bogey: I'm buying my next set of paddles off of you.
  • + 9
 @Kramz: my issue is going to be the argument I've heard on here millions of times. I can go to my Honda shop and pick up last year's 450 less than price of a modern-day mountain bike. If you set down and break down the amount of parts that goes into a motorized dirt bike compared to a mountain bike it is phenomenally higher. Yet I can purchase this dirt bike cheaper than what the modern-day mountain bike cost. You will never make me believe that the cost to produce a modern-day mountain bike is represented in the price tag. It only represents Greed from the industry. We as consumers only can speak with our wallets. If we continue to purchase these overpriced bikes they will continue raising prices and selling them to us.
  • + 1
 @properp: I too have thought that. But then again, there are economies of scale in play, that bicycle makers can only dream of approaching - scales that motorcycle manufacturers rely on to sell their bikes at reasonable cost for 'toys' - honda makes thousands of CRF450/250's. Sure, a $11,000 top range spesh is offensively ridiculous, but for the 250 copies they hope to sell a year, it's a wonder they don't charge more.....don't even get me started on plastic, oops - carbon wheels..............
  • + 6
 @properp: so what you're looking for is all MTB's to be single pivot, coil rear shocks and fork adjustments to be when only when the fork is completely torn down?

when you go buy a Santa Cruz V10 and you spend $8000 getting the top of the line build, that's the same thing Minnar is riding. when you go and buy that Kawisaki 450 off the showroom floor for $8000, do you think its the same thing that Eli Tomac runs? Hell no!!! double or triple that price and you'll then start to get into the ballpark of Tomacs ride. Dirtbikes run a ton of old technology.
  • + 6
 No, no no, there's a small but bright light in this dark world of obnoxious variation.
We have many standards left to celebrate!

22.2 handlebar control diameter,
9/16"x20 pedal threads, (except for ashtabula cranks, which nobody here cares about)
left-hand threads on the left pedals,
44mm saddle rail spacing (with a couple of oddball exceptions that almost nobody cares about,)
2.2x56 spoke and nipple threads
28.6 steerer tubes are pretty well settled out now (nice try OD2)
4mm shifter housing diameter,
10mm x 1mm thread for derailleur hangers.
1/2" chain pitch!
8 x .75 chainring bolt threads...

Sure, they don't all make sense and there are wacky exceptions to most of these as well but they're fairly solid
Who can expand on this list of positivity?
  • + 0
 @biker245: never once did I say what one on Sunday is available on the showroom floor on Monday in the MX world. I simply stating the amount of Parts resources cost of shipping shipping containers things like that for a dirt bike compared to the few parts and the cardboard box of the mountain bike industry the industry is truly consumed by greed
  • + 0
 @properp: Try to name one comparable industry where greed isn't a motivation? it's about making money, after all, and you all are sopping it up, one dollar at a time......
  • + 3
 @jokermtb: I suport bikers. I buy used stuff. I get new stuff its gifts, race winnings, or clearance deals. Iv had a total of 3 new bikes in 42 years.
  • + 1
 @properp: this is what you're not understanding.

you compared the price of last years stock dirtbike to a "modern day" mountain bike. you can't just look at parts counts. the fact is, an MTB has a much more advanced suspension design.that costs more money the putting together a single pivot MX rear end.

Cost of shipping is nothing. go price out a container shipped form Asia. it is a MINIMAL cost.

"I can go to my Honda shop and pick up last year's 450 less than price of a modern-day mountain bike."

you show me where i can pick up last years 450 MX for $4000 and i'll go buy one. you can get a non-race spec downhill bike for $4000 brand new.
  • - 1
 @biker245: keep drinking that Kool-Aid
  • + 1
 @nohit45: I hate the car analogy it's not the fuc*ing same cars cost a lot more and people think that they are an absolute need. Also car wheels last a lot longer you don't buy a car assuming your going to blow out a wheel in a rock garden two years down the line therefore Chevy doesn't have to worry about compatability issues with ford there customers aren't concerned with parts breaking down in five years
  • + 3
 @properp: ya I hear ya, you're 100% right, people keep mentioning the better suspension of mountain bikes ( which would never work on a dirt bike) and nobody mentions the fact that a dirt bike has an engine that's been changed and tweaked to get more efficient and more powerful for 30 years. Anyone arguing with you as you said can " keep drinking the koolaid"
  • + 1
 @properp: dirtbikes have remained almost exactly the same for the past 10 years with the exception of electronic fuel injection being introduced. your paying so much for research and development when it comes to mountain bikes, think of how much bikes have improved in even the last 5 years.
  • + 1
 @nohit45: My old 26' DH bike is157mm in the rear (150+ adaptors) - boost is 148mm. And what is the point of having boost if what people are doing is putting spacers on their hubs? the wheels will be no stronger if they are actually not wider!
  • + 2
 @sjunker: Oh crap, don't give them any new ideas. Totally forgot about Ashtabula cranks. Went 3-piece on my BMX, rounded them out, then went back to Ashtabula. Wasted that paper route money.
  • + 2
 Every bicycle in history has had two wheels, that a pretty long lasting standard
  • + 1
 @brunse: grate point! You win.
  • + 1
 @brunse: every year there is a guy at eurobike with some non 2 wheeled monstrosity claiming to be the future of cycling
  • + 88
 More Slack, Short Travel Trail Rippers -yes please!
  • + 15
 I was disappointed that Kona sort of abandoned the category. Love my 111 (set up with a 140mm fork - even at 220#, I don't really need much if any more rear travel). The new Smuggler (140F/120R), the Following - those are all great bikes. I'm sure the new 29er Process is a wonderful bike, but that's a lot of squish for a 29er, much more monster trucky than I'm looking for. Perhaps there's a new shorter travel 29er Process in the works - I sure hope so, because the Hei Hei is a nice bike, but not nearly burly enough to fit this niche, and when it's time to replace my 111, I'd be going elsewhere.
  • + 2
 @g-42: Agreed, I test rode a Hei Hei and had the same feeling, didn't give me the feels my Megatrail or even my honzo give me..
  • + 7
 @g-42:

Same boat.. love my 111.

LBS says there is a replacement in the works, possibly under the Satori name rather than Process.
  • + 3
 100% agree. Aggressive 120-140mm travel trail bikes are the way to go for the majority of my riding. Having a DH bike also helps to cover the local bike parks.
  • + 2
 Tested the Nicolai g13 few months ago, I was amazed of how it feels fast stable a funny is the same time. Slack short travel bikes for president!
  • + 1
 Check my for sale! After riding this week and seeing this article I'm thinking of keeping it though... Let's make a forum for 111 owners. I'm thinking of rawing my front triangle and doing new pivots and a sus tune... Could rip for years.
  • + 1
 @g-42: take a look at the pivot mach 6 c. I believe it is pretty close.
  • + 4
 @g-42: go ride a new fuel. I had a 111 it was awesome and really got me on the 29er bandwagon... Then I picked up a new Trek Fuel, it's the beast I wanted and oh baby does it rip.
  • + 3
 Transition scout, 5010??
  • + 2
 Giant Trance?
  • + 2
 @jamesdippy: The Scout is on my very short list of bikes when I replace my Remedy. Throw a coil rear shock on there and I’m good to go.
  • + 2
 @nyhc00: you will not be disappointed!! The amount of stuff you can get away with !
  • + 1
 Blur TRc was awesome. Just wore it out. Slack geometry in a shorter travel bike.
  • + 1
 @amrskipro: agreed. Loved my blur lt2 till it got stolen!
  • + 3
 I'd say the Commencal Meta TR v4.2 fits squarely into this category.

27.5, 140/130 travel, 66.5 degree HA. To put it in perspective, it has 10mm longer reach, 5mm more BB drop, 11mm longer chainstays, and a half degree slacker HA than a Santa Cruz 5010.
  • + 1
 @rezrov: Banshee have two short travel 29ers, the Phantom is 115mm travel (I think) and the Prime is 135mm, I haven't ridden either but I've owned a Spitfire and a Rune and both were (and still is) mega fun! The Spitfire was without a doubt the funnest bike I've ever owned, 140mm travel paired with a 160 fork brought the head angle to around 64.5°. It was perfect for the tight mellow downhill trails around here
  • + 61
 The major thing holding back bikes is tires and tire and rim design. Drivetrain is a distant 2nd
We're all trained to ride within our tires capability. Good moto riders get on MTB and tear the tires off. Most of the time mtbers are riding with the thought of how do I keep the tires on and air in them. The thought is always there whether you realize it or not. Tires and/or rims are the biggest restraint
  • + 6
 I seriously doubt if world's best moto riders are capable of tearing tyres off MTB rims, unless you mean that they slide with locked wheel a lot. Now if you told me that about a skilled BMX racer I could find that probable since these guys can squeeze the last bits of grip out of a tyre and can push the bike into a berm with brutal force. I see nothing in MX riders skillset over an average MTBer that could destroy an MTB tyre. It's not like you can just ride straight into a rock garden at 20MPH and not die, just because you can send 60 footers at double that speed. Just because you compete in Super Cross doesn't give you much weapons for tackling a DH track. There's simply as much translation between moto and MTB skills as between Golf and Baseball Hell yeah you could make stronger tyres and they would probably weigh 5 pounds each, good luck with that. You may want to start taking steroids or mount a motor and battery on it. Biking is always a compromise with weight because it is a human powering it, and that human spends lots of time to earn money on that thing, so he doesn't exercise as much. Just because Jared Graves can spend a weekend climbing 10 vertical feet on DH tyres with inserts and stay sharp by the end of it, doesn't mean that average Joey won't be done after 3 stages. And in Downhill, yeah try those heavy tyres and rims on most of current world cup tracks. The issue is complex and subject to weight saving which is a necessity. Perhaps we will see more inserts or 2,5 ply tyres, but I personally would never ride a tyre heavier than 3 pounds for anything.
  • + 17
 Funny, I don't spend much time at all worrying about keeping my tires on the rim. I've never had an issue with it, TBH. Used to get pinch flats and thorn flats a lot, but casings are better these days and that isn't much of an issue either. But maybe I'm crazy running tubes at 30PSI to keep my carcass firm under the bike...
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: I think you missed my point. I used moto riders as an example only because they aren't used to the the constraints of MTB tire/rim combos. How about if I said skilled MTB rider vs skilled rider with no MTB specific experience?
Also I was not advocating heavy tires or rims but rather advAncements in design/tech. Maybe beadlock with tires with integrated inserts and a rim sidewall protector inserted before the beadlock is cinched combined with new materials for tires. Tire materials are antiquated. 400g carbon rim with beadlock and wide sidewall edge with a wild rockr2 that has the casing strength and stiffness of a intense tire wc at the 1050g weight as a one piece cushcore and a dual density rim washer sidewall strip that snaps on
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: so you're compromising?
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: Agree entirely. I used to, and I mean 10 years ago, charge into root gardens and feel a bit nervous hoping I wouldn't pinch out. I haven't had that feeling in at least the last 4 years. Tire casings have become so much better than they used to be. I am sure that they could be improved, but I am doubtful if adapting heavy off-road tech such as beadlocks will improve the riding experience.
  • + 5
 I have to agree that tires are one thing that could be improved. Not so much for punters like me but when you see pros flatting pretty often and ruining a race I think, can't something work better? Same in road cycling. They still glue their tires on! I would say the tires on bicycles don't have the same level of reliability as other components. Or the same level of set and forget not that other parts are all reliable too. Like dropper posts. Part of the issue is that a bicycle needs to light enough for human power and that's a big constraint.
  • - 2
 @VwHarman: I guess you haven't watched a dh, enduro or xc race. Flats are probably the biggest deciding factor. Tire tech hasn't changed. I use tubeless systems but they're far from perfect. A single wall tire is still the same single wall tire that they where 30 years ago. The dbl wall dh tire is the same . There's options in between now but it's the same material/tech apart from the less than perfect tubeless systems. I'd bet if you could run lower psi and have the same durability, flat protection and similar sidewall support at the same weight you would
  • + 3
 @won-sean-animal-chin:
No. Compromising would imply that I had a desirable tire set up previous to running my tubes at 30ish psi but had to give it up in order to keep things where they belong, which I didn't. Unless by compromising you mean that I've given up getting pinch flats and thorn flats by running modern tires and keeping a decent psi in my tubes. Smile

I get the idea of more traction by less psi and running tubeless, etc, but for my riding, the traction is sufficient and I let the suspension of the bike handle keeping the tires on the trail. When I get my new whip next year, it will be tubeless ready, but TBH, I'm not sure I want the hassle. All I ever hear about tubeless setups is how problematic they can be. And you still have to carry a spare tube, 'just in case'. Might as well just run a tube, take a little more weight and ride more...
  • + 1
 @Poulsbojohnny: fair enough. You've set them where they work. I probably run a touch heavier tire with a huck Norris in the rear. 29psi rear at 25 front works but I can see the benefit in having a bit more sidewall support to accomodate a couple psi less and not burp a tire or ding a rim. It's possible at the same weight. Tire companies just sell us tread patterns it seems while components , frames and suspension step up their game year in and year out. I can see a company like wtb possibly doing something. They seem like they want to progress with their tires and rims
  • + 6
 @Poulsbojohnny: I'm in the same boat as you. I'm heavy, so I run closer to 35psi with tubes, but I haven't had a single flat this 1000km or so season.

I'm also in poor shape, so I find riding at 20-25psi too much work fighting friction anyway.
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: If your new setup is tubeless ready, it won't be problematic at all. Just being able to run a few psi lower, plus the lower weight, and lower rolling resistance of tubeless really make it worthwhile. I think you'll like it. Definitely give it a shot once you get the new ride. Droppers and tubeless are the two biggest advances to positively improve the riding experience in the past decade. It's droppers that are enabling the current revolution in bike geometry we're seeing. No one would want to ride a bike with a 75deg seat angle without being able to drop the post out of the way, and conversely, it would suck to use a bike with a 66deg head angle as a trail bike with the seat in the raised position, since cornering would be so compromised. It's a good, if expensive, time to be a mountain biker. Enjoy your new whip when you get it.
  • + 3
 @won-sean-animal-chin: This shows that you know nothing about tire design if you think things haven't changed in 30 years. Or you've only been riding for 2 years and have no experience beyond that.

Tires have changed immensely in casing design, materials, bead design, tread design and rubber compound even in the last 10 years.
  • - 1
 @bogey: haha, I've ridden bikes for a couple k's since 82? Or 83?I was generalizing a bit. Kevlar saved some weight and helped durability and butyl sealed them and some better compounds but really the advancement pales in comparison to the rest of bike design. It's an undisputed weak point. The article asks for your wish list . I think it's possible to have better. Buy the way, 10 years ago we had minion lust(ust that's better than current tr exo) and minion dh 40duro. Same sypes, rubber and butyl. First tire I had was a panaracer(pre og ground control). You?
  • + 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: I’ve been riding and racing like a nut since day one of the mtb scene and tried most tires on the market. Even spent a few years field testing and reporting for Maxxis (Maxxis vs Maxxis and Maxxis vs competition).

The LUST tires were heavy and wooden feeling compared to the Maxxis TR tires. I tested them back to back for Maxxis.
  • + 3
 @bogey: maybe for the first few rides. Then tr exo is a flex noodle that gets flats and doesn't seal as well because of the bead. Those tires are a waste. They've reinforced the sidewalls a touch but the casing across the top isn't reinforced. That's where the pinch flats occur. Makes no sense. I found the lust much better in the corners.much more support. Rubber compounds didn't make it on those before they were discontinued , probably a cost saving measure so they didn't have to pay use royalties. Same experience with spesh grid(flex after couple weeks and tread casing pinching). Now I hVe a mix of tires. Minion 2.5 dd is 1170g, Onza citrius 2.4 end/fr casing is 1100g and michelin wild rockr2 2.35(same width as 2.5 maxxis) is 1050g. Michelin seals better(ust) protects the rim better and has more support and grip. Splitting hairs, there all good tires for what's available, but certainly not without issues that could be made better but no comparison to exo tr. I'd call the lust closer to the dd than tr exo. Lots of people are running liners, why can't there be an integrated liner/tire to save weight and offer the same protection. Dual density sidewalls could have a thicker wall near the rim. That could help save a rim and tread casing. An integrated tire liner tire and dual density sidewall could be the same weight as seperate dd, tire liner. Carbon rims could have carbon fixing wedges/screws with a ramped bevel that tightens and snaps in place when turned to secure a dual density bead lock(hard plastic core with softer absorbing outer). Technology is already out there. Especially with tires , there's more than a few materials that are virtually impossible to tear and lighter sealing methods. It's nice to finally have people considering alternatives to the maxxis cartel. Give the rest of the companies and maxxis some incentive to progress. Maxxis has just been the gospel for too long . They could sit back and through out a new tread and let the marketing machine do the rest
  • + 0
 @bogey: by the way I didn't neg prop you. You have your opinion and that's fine
Also lust was 1/4 lb less than dd(actually a touch more thAn 1/4) and 1/4 lb heavier than exo (slightly less) and I found it almost as supportive as a dd(especially after break in). I guess you could cAll a full dh casing more "wooden" but I'd feel more confident in a turn on those than any of them
  • + 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: summary: you like heavy tires more than light tires. Most people don’t except when riding DH. DD or Super Gravity casings are very good in-betweeners.

Yes, there are tougher materials out there but they’re much more expensive and tires are too expensive already since they’re consumable items.

IRC had the PRF (pinch flat resistant) system back in the day. It had a foam layer above the bead to cushion from pinch flats. It worked ok but the casings weren’t very good. What’s old is new again so expect to see this again soon.
  • - 1
 @bogey: fair play. Difference of opinion. It's riding bikes not world peace. IRC was king then. Add in a "the" snakecharmer
  • + 3
 @won-sean-animal-chin: remember onza porcupines, farmer johns , Ritchie race
  • + 0
 @bbbrad: haa sadly yes. Porcs where the best of that bunch but I still bought a lot of Tomes stuff(bell helmets, t bone stem, Nike MTB shoe for toe clips and tioga tires. Ground control was ok except 1.95. First front suspension was Merlin ti bars and the massive fisher fattrax or specialized hardpack(both 2.2 I think) the arthritic years Smile mid 90's was similar tires to now
  • - 1
 @bbbrad: actually that's a good compare. 90's had intense wc/909 and maxxis had monster/og high roller and ghetto tubeless.
Sam Hill in his prime on modern suspension with 90's tire setup would smoke SH on same bike with 90's suspension and modern tires. Same if you compare new geo/bars with 90's tire set up and old geo/narrow bar w new treads. I won't compare brakes because SH probably just taps them. Take the average hacks like us and drop us down Val di sol and I'll take the 6 piston hopes with 220 rotors and 90's tires over a set of Hayes and new treads. A lot of racers still swear by ghetto tubeless. Pros win on a lot of different tires now. One tire or another hasn't made a career but they've effected more than a few negatively because of flats
  • - 1
 @bbbrad: thanks for the negs. Hate the messenger not the message eh. Maybe take some notes atleast. There'll be a quiz next week
  • + 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: "Then tr exo is a flex noodle that gets flats and doesn't seal as well because of the bead" - mate you spew all that with no mention of context what so ever. What kind of bike do you install them one, on what rim? where do you ride them? what trail surface? what speeds? what is your skill level? are you a plow guy or a popping guy? how heavy are you? Which Exo Tr tyres are talking about in the first plac mate?

I assure you that tyre like Agressor in Exo TR is an excellent tyre for a 120 bike in a hilly area. I personally use Minion DHF Exo on front on my hills on my 160 bike. I have Double down on the back. However i won't go anywhere near a bike park without full on DH tyres. I even did all day rides on DH tyres because I don't trust SG, DD, Grid and that stuff in proper mountains.
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns: weight and skill level has nothing to do with it. Apples to apples bro. I could run a minion exo at the park on jump trails because I'd have 40lbs in the tire(until I put a rock thru the tread casing because it's not as thick as the sidewall). I could run that tires on my xc trails at 30lbs until I hit that one root or rock and then chase a leak or get a new tire. I however much prefer a thicker tire with more support to run a touch lower psi on rock faces or same pressure if I pedal up the dh trails and not have a flimsy exo roll and burp air. One bike is a transition scout(125mm/150mm) with the michelines and the other is a rune(160mm/180mm) w miniondd/citrius en/fr. both rears have huck Norris and 28-30mm internal rims. Enduro/trail is mountain biking for most people. No one uses exo in enduro anymore and most will go between dd and dh casings regularly. Just stating a facts bro. Nothing groundbreaking. No rocks or roots where you're at bro? What's up?
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: not even sure why this is a discussion. It's no secret that exp's don't cut it on an enduro bike or capable trail bike on many/most trails
  • - 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: you are just trying to come out as a bad ass. It's unnecessary. This no rocks where you live bro, I personally stopped having these kind of intimitading strategies when I was 21-22.

Weight and skill have a lot to do with it, because if you are a fat dude who just plows through sht, you will get plenty of punctures on exo and even 1,5ply style tyres. A skilled rider generates way more force on tyres in berms than a noob.

Nobody rides exo for enduro? Hahah, Yeah, well, I assure you that people do and those tyres stand for vast majority of tyres on Endur comps because people are too weak to pedal up heavier tyres.

So keep living in your bubble.
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I haven't said anything about my skill level. You were the one calling me out for spewing crap. I'm 165lbs and I prefer to pop than plow. I don't break stuff generally other than shitty tires and recently dinging Easton/rf rims but better tires and huck Norris has protected those.
Are flats not a problem at EWS?
  • + 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: I'm personally with you on using stiffer tyres, but you have to accept the fact that very few people want that. My former boss had First gen Crossmarks on his 150 bike. Then by my advice he got Hans Dampfs (I didn't give him minions because I knew he won't be able to utilize big knobs anwyays) and said he hasn't noticed the difference. He thinks he sees no use in a dropper post. I can give you many examples like that. If you want a life changing experience go visit Lake Garda. You will see what 80% of Mountain Bikers all over the world really look like and what they stand for, and if you want to have a discussion you are on the lost side of the argument immediately. I know, that on Pinkbike almost everyone shreds hard nd don't compete in DH WC and EWS series ONLY because they don't want to but... at the end of the day there is no condom that fits all.
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns: your friend and the others just don't know any better. Ignorance is bliss. If anything he could probably use the better tire than you to atleast save his baco. It's like when friends tell he bought new bikes for him and the wife and he says he got a dh bike and got the wife a freeride bike because she's not much of a downhiller. Makes no sense. They'll both have a better day if she's on the dh and he's on the freeride bike. We can all use a good side knob to save our bacon. Just because the general public has shit tires doesn't mean they're the best choice. It's ok to have the exo casing for intermediate riders that won't be riding downhills much or be concerned with optimum air pressure on steeper trails. They can ride higher pressures where they're riding and remain blissfully ignorant of any advantage a better tire with less psi will do. We are talking tech though and this is my wish list . Ride whatever you want. I want better tires. Please remind me why we're having this discussion. You know better
  • + 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: you are an idiot. Not only you haven't read that i run pretty much exactly same setup as you do, then you fail to recognize the fact that different people chose different tyres for various reasons depending on a huge portion of variables (like some people don't get good at biking/ they don't get fit because they have other priorities in life than riding, or they simple don't know any better because they have no luck finding good info). So if I was to be as arrogant as you, I would tell you to learn to ride if you keep destroying tyres with DH casings. Oh nobody seems to get your point - all of us are obviously idiots. Yes there is no discussion with you.

Have a nice day Champ
  • + 2
 Everyone lo
  • + 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: Ya, that's probably the case. I don't agree with you, therefore, I must be completely unaware of the situation, and totally oblivious to the sport that we are talking about. Not like the 10 year old carcasses of old Kenda Tomac Sig Series tires are hanging on the wall in my garage or anything to remind me of mow awful they were not that long ago. Did I say they were perfect? Nope. However, to claim that the tech in tires hasn't changed at all in the last 30 years is just ignorant. Of course it can be better, but at the same time, it is way better than it was.
  • - 2
 @WAKIdesigns: wow you scanners sure are a sensitive bunch. Lay off the abba bro. Here's a tissue. You said you run exo's. No big deal. Hopefully they wear out before you pinch flat them and then you can get proper tires or maybe you don't need them.
  • - 2
 @VwHarman: ya you sound a tad clueless if you bought kendas in the last ten years. Check out my Sam Hill/equipment comparison. Tires hAvent kept the pace. Tires are a problem. It's not rocket biology bud. I'm a start charging for splainin shit to you bums
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: "oh nobody seems to get your point"
I wish there was a way to tell who's point has the most agreement. Hmmm, oh wait.....oh never mind. That bubble isn't pinch flatted as ez as exo
  • - 1
 @bogey: you sound like a shill for maxxis. A shill that doesn't know much about tire feel and durability and your reading comprehension is just as bad. It's too short sighted to just say "most people prefer light tires". Tires need to have support in the turns and they need not pinch flat. Any xc racer would gladly take the support and durability of a dh tire at xc weight. Learn how to read and understand what's being said. Your wasting everyone's time , to summarize your summary. Also I never said I liked heavy tires. I like light tires but there's a limit when you factor in durability. That's the reason I said we need better designs and a better rim/tire system. Once again , FLATS ARE A PROBLEM. Are you denying that? Take away all the flats this year in EWS and WC dh and you have a much different series. It affects races disproportionately compared to other mechanicals. That's a fact. In EWS most of the flats were cst tires(maxxis,specialized, bontrAger). Michelin racers had far less despite dd's being heavier Michelin wild rockr2 and those same racers that flatted also used and flatted 2 ply dh tires on those cst brands. Flats could and should be reduced by 80-90% with existing technology and design
  • + 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: I know a guy who runsfairly high level enduro moto races and they have as many tire/rim/flat issues as we do in mountain biking.

NW
  • + 0
 @NealWood: interesting. No experience with moto. Still think they're simple design improvements that are possible in MTB tires . Manufacturing a new tire/rim standard is the issue. Tire companies I suspect are the problem. If a small bike company could manufacture tires we'd see steady improvement probably
  • + 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: maybe, just maybe, you have so many problems with tires because they can sense how angry you are against life and they just want to get away from you! Hmmmmmm.
  • + 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: I run exo on front on my local trials which rarely involve speeds higher than 25km/h. If I go anywhere near a lift or any higher mountain I put on DH tyres. I have no clue under what kind of stone do you live but you do fit a moto dude stereotype.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: hey look, I only elevated my shit talk and started trolling in response to anyone that jumped in with that tone. Look thru this convo. Everyone jumped in all offended so I thought I'd have some fun. My first couple responses to you were respectful until you started criticizing me personally. You like exo's and I don't . You running it on the front just reminded me that Damien Oton , at finale, ran dd rear and full dh front. You need less durability in the front, generally, but you need more edge support. In the rear you need the durability but you want more compliance to not ping around through the rough. I've even ran exo at the park on the jump trails pumped super hard for support and rolling speed but it's only a matter of time before a rock goes thru the tread casing. Also when I said tires coming off the rim, more often then not it's just the sidewall flexing so much that it pops the bead from the rim lip and looses air and screws the seal, not so much ripping the tire completely off the rim. I've had better luck with stiffer sidewalls and the isn't standard Michelin staying seated. Unfortunately the weigh more. With all that being said, my original comment was my wish list that there be more of a push for rim/tire systems as it's proven to be a weakness. The original comment wasn't aimed at exo/grid but rather used it for an example. If the exo is working for you up front on your trails at the psi you have it at, giver. The fact of the matter is in the overall scheme of things there is engineering/design solutions that could be beneficial. I ride both my bikes everywhere. I like capable tires on my little bike that aren't going to flat, I can lower the psi a touch if need be, and are wide enough for traction. Half the time I pedal the little bike up to the steeper dh trails or to other trails that are steeper rock faces where traction is crucial and high psi to prevent flaring is not an option. No one in this conversations mentioned any of my possible solutions just critized my bluster after tgey came in here all offended based on my one comment mentioning tires coming off of rims. Let me guess, y'all have tiny hands?
  • + 2
 @won-sean-animal-chin: my hands are relatively big and my ring finger is much longer than my pointing finger
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: interesting that's the only thing you comment on. I sense a theme. And that theme isn't restricted to you throughout this whole convo. None will have the balks to admit it though. I think I'm the only one to accept that anyone here is fine with their choices if it works for them . Looking through the whole thread on the article. Comments on better tire/rim/tubeless were in the lead at 6 original comments, followed by drivetrain/derailleur and aggressive trail bikes. Pretty much as I had suggested. Just sayin/Trillin/shittalking/fact
  • + 4
 @won-sean-animal-chin: @WAKIdesigns

If WAKI spent even half as much time riding as on the forums he would be qualifying for EWS or WC's. The amount of time and energy he spends on these posts is unreal!!!
  • + 0
 @birdman2447: haaa ya he's harmless. Keener I guess. Was a nice rest day time killer after 5 days of riding
  • + 1
 @bogey: oh sick burn bud. You win the tech talk award. Not just an awesome racer and highly sought after tire tester but a champion wordsmith. Do you ever do autograph signings? Let me guess, no comment, like your lil "hole in one" buddy BaBaBrad. Maybe he's still patting himself on the back for listing tires from the 80's
  • + 1
 @bogey: just another comment to break the 300 comment barrier. Just got a pm from a west coast bud too. Said you're a major hack wanna be. I figured as much. I no longer want your autograph.

Exo=slow rider special
  • + 2
 @won-sean-animal-chin:

Are you on amphetamines? Lot of typing aye..
  • + 0
 @spiderrider01: race to the bottom bud. You want in? You seem clueless enough. Bet you could do well
  • + 1
 @won-sean-animal-chin: Going by your vid, wont really be a race pal.
  • + 38
 26 inch wheels would be lighter and corner faster than 27.5.
Can some one invent such a size?
  • + 11
 26.5 is the future
  • + 1
 Word!
  • - 2
 Lighter sure but corner faster? Not likely seeing as they provide less grip Wink
  • + 34
 Use your stupid technology to find a way to lower the price of frames. Why is a frame $2-3K and a "low end" complete with the same frame $3,300? Riddle me that batman.
  • + 5
 Because they know that people buying a frame only will pay up, while people looking for a low end build will be stingy
  • + 3
 Manufacturers subsidise the cost of the frame on a complete, making almost all of their profit from selling the components that they can buy very, very cheaply from companies like Shimano and Sram. With a frame only sale, there is no margin for them to sell it so cheaply.
  • + 2
 it's called last years model, often half price for mostly. A different paint job. Another plus is a years worth of old standards so more of your current parts will fit Smile
  • + 1
 A new Kellys Swag frame costs 800€ in Germany. Cheap enough?
  • + 23
 The most revolutionary thing would be some breakthrough new tyre compound material that would be durable like DH tyre and weight like a xc race tyre. i believe its not impossible in my lifetime! If we get 500g tyres the bikes will accelerate rocket fast. gamechanger
  • + 1
 would u be willin to pay 160-200 a tire for single ply weight with dh casing stability?

that's getting excessive even for the dentist
  • + 25
 what you mean return of 26", mine are still running great...
  • + 7
 Well yeah, I've got 20" on the BMX and 24x3 on the mountain unicycle, but mountainbikes are 26", right?

(I do enjoy living under that rock, indeed.)
  • + 11
 Forks that lubricate better! Feels great after a fresh service, but with only 5-15cc of oil in the lowers the oil gets contaminated and stops working way too fast in my either wet and muddy or extremely dusty climate. I’d love to go more than a couple months without servicing!
  • + 3
 Get an MRP.
  • + 5
 Inverted forks address both those issues. The oil is always in the right place to lube the stanchions, and since the seals are upside down its much harder for dirt and moisture to enter the system.
  • + 4
 So what you are saying is that the recent trend to make forks lighter by running less and less oil is completely stupid? And I thought I was alone in thinking that was retarded...
  • + 0
 @SintraFreeride: it makes sense if you're racing and the fork will be rebuilt after the weekend
  • + 1
 @hamncheez: So selling a product to the masses made for racers is a good thing? The masses want reliability! They want something simple, set and forget. The masses don't have personal mechanics to rebuild their forks nor their bikes after every ride! You don't see hub manufacturers selling their hubs with oil instead of grease with no seals so the hubs spins with less friction because it is better for racing do you? I find it ridiculous! I'd rather have a 2.5kg single crown fork which I don't have to open up every 2 weeks rather than the current 1.8kg dry "wonder" forks from Fox/Rockshox!
  • + 12
 I want the industry to rebirth the sh*tbike. And for cool hard tails and affordable DJs to be a thing again. My 2014 chameleon was one of my favorite bikes of all time. Wish I never stripped and sold it.
  • + 5
 "And for cool hard tails and affordable DJs to be a thing again". So much this. The only technological advancement that would meaningfully improve mountain biking is for it to be possible to build a fun slack trail hardtail with decent forks and brakes that costs £400. £2000 "entry-level" bikes that are out of date in 2 years just feels like the sport is walking towards an elitist ghost-town where no kids can afford to start riding.
  • + 11
 Flat pedal shoes, my 510's are perfect! As a lifetime skier (started skiing in sixty eight) who has seen boots (very similar to some of the techy clipless shoes out there) evolve from my mothers leather lace up boots, to moulded monsters with every imaginable attachment. The only people that need that much adjustment in footwear are top level racers, just give me comfortable shoes I can walk around in and rip a trail up later!
  • + 10
 Yes my 510 are great too. That said, it would be nice to have more options with lace covers, as well as some better materials for water resistance without them being so heavy. When it comes to PNW riding and racing 510 has NOT got flat pedal riders coverd, nor does any other brand for that matter.
  • + 1
 @H3RESQ: Yea I agree with you there on some better water-proofing.
Be nice to have some waterproof flats paired with some over-shoe/gaiters so you can ride for more than an hour in PNW winter without freezing your tootsies off.
Also I dunno about you guys but I could see lacing to the toe like approach/climbing shoes tend to have to better adjust zones of the shoe to a comfort spot being beneficial
  • + 5
 I just want Boa freeriders.
  • + 1
 I love the grip of 5/10s but they are worn out after 2 seasons. All my other bike gear lasts way longer
  • + 0
 @src248: Don't you guys get mid foot pains in Freeriders? If I case a jump in a shoe without a stiff platform (like Impact) it hurts me as hell.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Nope, never had that problem. You just have weak feet ;P
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: just put a piece of wood under your inner soles
  • - 2
 @colincolin: I ain't putting my wood between a pedal and a shoe
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: how do you normally get rid of your wood?
  • + 1
 The Adidas Terrex Approach shoe is the ticket for a good replacement to 5.10s. Same sticky stealth soles, but has many of the features he is asking for.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I don't ride on my toes, so no. Midfoot is supported.
  • + 1
 @colincolin: u mean clip less shoes? that had direct metal to metal contact and don't require rubber to metal contacts.

of course 5.10s last less. they also are half the price of clip bit anyways
  • + 10
 Tyres! Surely that's where big improvements can be made?

For the derailleurs, couldn't you use a sort cage mech, like super short and the same type of tensioning system used on gear box bikes like the zerode? The cages are long to take up the chain slack, nothing more than that. I know it's just a patch, but it's one we could do today.
  • + 2
 Thats actually a really good idea!
  • + 2
 The 2 would have to be designed to work together. Something like having the spring in the tensioner weaker than the one in the mech so that when you reached the larger sprockets the tensioner is at full reach so the mech cage would start to rotate forward lowering the top jockey wheel so it doesn't clash with the cassette.
  • + 10
 New strains of antibiotics effective against super bugs please. Future of MTB is a whole lot less appealing when any currently treatable cut or injury I might get in the future could carry the risk of an untreatable infection, amputation, and death.
  • + 1
 MRSA are big fun. Thanks Animal Agriculture!
  • + 3
 New strains of antibiotics is not the answer since they can not evolve with those superbacteria. Bacteriophages are the future.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phage_therapy
  • + 2
 Go to the drug store and get one of those spray bottles of sterile saline so you can properly irrigate wounds before you bandage them.
  • + 7
 I see the "dropper you don't need to sit on to lower" pop up occasionally and I really don't see the need. Your ass is already on the seat, what's wrong with letting gravity do the work? People need to lower the seat when they're standing already? Possible I guess... I just don't get it.
  • + 1
 I don't really get it either. Whenever I approach an "unknown" section or a known steep section, I just slow down a little bit and as you said, most of the time I'm hovering over or sitting on the saddle anyway so it's not much of a big deal to lower it with my body weight. Unless it's a long climb, the saddle is usually already halfway down.
  • + 5
 It would be super handy feature. It bugs be when I have to constantly drop my whole body down to set the post in the lower position, and then stand. Instead I want to go straight from seated in the high position to standing with the post out of the way.
  • + 5
 I'm still playing with the idea of on the fly adjustable (effective) crank length. Long cranks for climbing, short for descending/pumping. I've got two concepts in my head. One is mechanical (with a four bar linkage and a concentric bb axle), the other is hydraulic. Both could work in theory, but of course it is never going to be the lightest option.
  • + 30
 please keep this to yourself.That would be a nightmare.
  • + 18
 Please, for my amusement if nothing else, ignore @nug12182 and keep that wonderful crazy brain of yours working!! I want to see a prototype within 18 months.
  • + 1
 @willpoole: Allright then, I'll try to upload some drawings within the next few days. It is not going to be WAKI quality, mind you Wink . The creation of a prototype (that is, a working model I could ride with) would take too much away from my riding time.

Not sure about the nightmare. I ride a mountain unicycle (MUni) where short cranks are common (115mm to 150mm at most) but of course on a steep climb (these typically give you a 1:1 ratio unless you have a fancy Schlumpf geared hub) a bit more leverage would have been nice. But I feel the same could work for mountainbiking. I ride mostly standing but for climbing I stand taller (hence also have a bigger range for my legs to move) than when tucking and/or sprinting. Of course the downside is that on a tight flat corner short cranks mean that even when you have the inboard pedal high, it is still going to be lower than if you'd have had longer cranks.

Anyway, this was the out-of-the-box topic, right? You can't be critical in a brainstorm Smile .
  • + 1
 I think we should do the same with wheel/tire size. Would eliminate a lot of contention.
  • + 2
 @NRogers27: That'll be next on the list. I'll source a more flexy rim, work out the spoke lengths and build you an oval rim between 24" and 29". That'll teach people moaning about wheel sizes.
  • + 1
 @vinay: This is going to be amazing. Ever considered concentric squares though?
  • + 6
 I would love everybody would pause the time a little bit and enjoy riding ! Every 6 to 12 months there's some new thing done better. STOP ! Make something good and let it rip !
  • + 8
 everything is new every 12 months. it isn't just bikes. people here just pay too much attention to bikes.
  • + 4
 Still running 26s. That isn't new. Smile
  • + 4
 Shorter travel bikes are on the way back. Just bought a 2018 Giant Anthem Advanced 1 with 110/130 travel when most of th people in Malaysia are riding Nomads for XC trails. I love my Nomad for travelling as you can hit up the North Shore Whistler and still pedal mellow XC loops on it. But was looking for a change and the shorter travel bikes I think will be coming back. If you can get it set up right you'll never notice the difference except shedding weight and feeling a hell of a lot faster. The old version of this bike was classed by Giant as XC and this year it's XC Trail which I think is a great name for shorter travel capable bikes.
  • + 1
 Good low and slack hardtails have seen a constant evolution but I think BTR has been one of the rare few (if not the only one) to combine a short travel hardtail (Ranger with 120mm forks) with slack and long geometry and a long headtube (to provide sufficient stack height).
  • + 5
 Slack, 120-130 mm travel, on a 26x2.8 wheel. 20x110 front through axle and 15x145 rear through axle.

And more gearbox bikes/ standardized gearbox frame mounts.
  • + 3
 I just built a short travel 130R/140F trail ripper from commencal, and I just switched from clips to some oneup flats and 5.10 free rider pro shoes. Can honestly say I'm having more fun riding now then I have in the past 5 years. I think the market and sport in general is heading in a great direction and I can't wait to see what the next few the years, maybe months? brings!!! :]
  • + 1
 Same. Nukerproof mega 160 to transition scout 140F 125r. So much more fun !!
  • + 3
 Short travel trail rippers with slack angles are great fun, but I'm not about to give up my full blow 160mm travel bike or my lightweight 24lbs XC machine for one. I'd rather lighten up my big bike or slacken out my XC machine to achieve that same goal. Personally IMO, if a bike is going to be short travel, it needs to shed some weight in the process. Pun: if the Process 111 or Transition Smuggler were 6.5lbs frames with shock, they'd make a lot more sense. 32lbs and 120mm of travel? Eh...
  • + 2
 My P111 comes in at 29lbs.
  • + 2
 @ATXZJ: I guess I still don't find that all that light for an ENVE equipped bike with lots of light parts. If you put your parts on any other bike with that much travel you'd probably shed 2lbs in frame weight.
  • + 1
 @PHeller:

Never said it was light, but it's not 32lbs. Agree that I'd lose another pound going to a carbon frame such as a following.
  • + 3
 Comeback of dualcrown forks for 140-170mm category. Enduro racing should benefit this significantly, no more twisting bars back and wasting precious seconds, when you crash! Also suspension would get better, because there would be more room in stanctions to make better damping than any singlecrown fork. @SramMedia Make this happen!
  • + 1
 I think you can setup a Fox40 performance fork with less than 203mm of travel by removing the spring spacers (black discs). 191mm = 2 spacers, 178mm=1 spacer and 165mm=0 spacer.
  • + 7
 Derailleur issues are solved with a Pinion box...
  • + 6
 Weight and frame compatibility.
  • + 5
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: what could have helped that is, E-bike drive units and gearboxes using the same mounting points, and if the batteries were still attached to bottle cage bosses, so you could sell a bike as an E-bike or with a gearbox, without having to design and manufacture 2 different frames. as that would have doubled the market size and probably would have more manufacturers adopting gearboxes.
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: weight low and centered, less weight in the rear wheel, less problems. It makes sense but there is no big components brand doing gearboxes to supply big bike brands production.
  • + 1
 @bastian: Pinion is starting to work with some bike brands. Also Nicolai and Zerode and Ghost already make bikes with Pinion - at least thats a good start
  • + 1
 Waiting for the first big manufacturer to build a Pinion bike so the price war can begin.
  • + 7
 Trail Bikes. Hell yea
  • + 3
 There are certainly a few short travel slack geo trail weapons out there, thinking Whyte T-130 or Bird Aeris 120, or others like the SC 5010, or even a lot of the 'hardcore hardtails' about...
  • + 2
 We need a 26 or 27.5 in 170-180 mm bike that can climb, jump, descend, and do anything you want it to do. If it could be built at about 30 lbs or lower then that would make it even more versatile. This would be the bike that could do anything.
  • + 1
 Pretty sure the 2017 Enduro carbon will do all of that, won't be cheap though. My buddy has the Comp aluminum version and it's a hell of a bike for $3200 retail.
  • + 1
 Also Commencal Supreme sx
  • + 6
 Yes, we need all of this... and a water bottle rack please.
  • + 13
 a standard for water bottle lids would be nice.
  • + 4
 Dropper Posts: Reliability more than your silly push button idea.
Flat Pedal Shoes: If only Five Ten could get the rubber to stay on the shoe..........
  • + 2
 "Maybe the fact that Sam Hill took home the EWS champion on flat pedals will give a little more weight to what some would consider a trivial request. "

Or maybe Sam Hill taking home the hardware just proves that there's no real need for a bunch of bells and whistles on flat pedal shoes? Seems like reasonably supportive construction, comfort, and sticky soles go a long way. I'd love a bit more variety in flat pedal shoes - would be nice if the non-FiveTen crowd could ratchet up the stickiness, and if FiveTen could give people with wide feet a Freerider on a wider last (as it is, I'm stuck with the Impact XVI as the lightest option for trail riding, as that's got a slightly wider toe box). But all that other stuff you need in a clipless shoe seems unnecessary on flats.
  • + 4
 the flat pedal thing is getting out of hand, like its the messias or somethingBlank Stare
love the guy, hate some of the crowd, they look like they have nothing to hold on to.
  • + 1
 @t-stoff: I just had a chance to try out the new Specialized flat pedal shoes, and they are very close to as sticky as my 5 tens.
  • + 1
 How wide are your feet? Mine are like flippers and freeriders are sooo roomey, just half a size up.
Agree there is no need for bells and whistles, but I would appreciate a locking system for the laces though, much like some walking boots or snowboarding boots.
  • + 3
 Short travel, more slack and also more beefy please. One of the reasons I buy longer travel bikes is that they are built for a little more abuse, but I don't necessarily need the extra travel.
  • + 3
 Transition Smuggler.
  • + 1
 Had the Transition Scout and was happy with it and it didn't even break during the year I rode it. Wish there were more companies doing a proper job on short travel aggro bikes.
  • + 6
 Transition needs to make a carbon Smuggler already.
  • + 5
 One thing I'll say about transition is it's nice to be able to buy a top-end build on an aluminum frame.
Rode Giant for a while and seems like the big brands like to push the drivetrain and carbon frame while they skimp on the squishy/stoppy bits that really seem to make the biggest difference in my riding.
  • + 1
 Do mechs need to hang down?? I’m sure someone with imagination can move the mech above the casset or even better hide in behind the chainstay for added protection. I’m looking at my bike right now and I’m sure with the right creativeness and engineering Knowhow it wouldn’t be hard but would mean yet another standard
  • + 4
 If you pedal backwards you could mount the mech on top of the cassette.
  • + 1
 @TucsonDon: didn’t think about that ????????‍♂️ But might still work behind the chain stay
  • + 1
 Way better flat pedal shoes ++ ! 5.10 has this incredibly stupid ( read marketing pricey , and you drank the koolaid) marketing chokehold on a considerable market segment that should demand far better products using current technology resources. Open minded about supporting companies trying to advance the flat pedal tech outside of the "Walmart " model of mountain bike shoe makers - you betcha !
  • + 1
 how is boost 148mm rear revolutionary?
Back in 2012 I had a DH bike with a 150mm rear hub. I am sure there are many still around...
on the logic that 148 is better than 135 because wider is better, surely 150 is better still. It just seemed forgotten
  • + 1
 Long cage solution:
On my 27.5 enduro bike i run a 28 tooth direct mount oval ring with an 11-36 rear and a zee “wide range” derailleur. As a SOLID expert/cat 1 racer it’s enough for the brutal climbs i ride and top end for jumping at big bear etc... NEVER left me wanting more

-everything is smaller so its lighter
-TONS of clearance (and stronger)
-oval ring efficiency simulates a 42T feel
-CHEAP
  • + 3
 Another long cage solution: get rid of it. 10 speed with 11-40 in the rear and 30 or 32 up front is good enough for 95% of.....everywhere
  • + 1
 @bvd453: I run a 11-40T with a medium cage no problems. Sure a short cage would be better.
  • + 1
 @bvd453: well said!
  • + 1
 legit question, you don't spin out on the faster downs?
  • + 1
 I'm running the same setup, except a round 28T. I find it's perfect for where I live (CT), but we don't have mountains.

I do ride at Kingdom Trails in VT a couple of times a year and I find it's fine for that too.
  • + 1
 @VtVolk: with a 32 up front it's hard to spin out on most single track. In a bike park or descending roads it happens, but I'll take that trade off.
  • + 1
 This is more of a long-term goal, but I'd like to see integrated, electronic, and ideally wireless controls that access all the different components of the bike. Shimano's Di2 is the right idea, but the real potential of electronic controls is in integration. Have one mini computer that connects to shifters, brake levers, dropper post, and suspension. Like Shimano's system, you could change the organization of the controls and buttons to your own personal preferences. But instead of having each system separate, you could, for example, connect your dropper post and shock settings. Or your gearing and suspension. If the cockpit has two brake levers, a shifter, and 2-3 buttons, you could set them up however you want. Programmable to fully manual to fully automatic. I know that some companies are already experimenting with integrated droppers with rear shock settings. But those systems are super clunky and require a ton of cables and wires. If everything could be made wireless, it would open shitloads of opportunities. No more snaking internal cables through the frame. It would be a significant weight reduction just by ditching all the cables. Frame designers wouldn't have to work around the need to connect everything independently. Even if not fully wireless, instead of a bunch of independent cables and lines, a few wires could run front to back, all part of the same system. No redundancy, or need for thick, heavy cables. The obvious issue would be brakes, as modern hydraulic disks require fluid flow between the lever and caliper. For this to truly work, you'd need the entire hydraulic system in the caliper. But that seems like a problem that could be surmounted. I think geared transmissions are also the next step, but integrated controls is the one thing makes a ton of sense that I don't hear many people talking about.
  • + 1
 After having Scott's twinlock, i want a drop in cover that converts forks and other rear shocks to the same principle sans cables. Tie it into Magura's dropper post lever button software and done, shockwiz data meets Scotts twinlock meets Maguras integration.
  • + 2
 Dropper posts and 1X drive trains are great and all, but why hasnt anyone created a handlebar mounted tap for my growler cage? Guess I’ll just keep running a hose up to my helmet like a barbarian.
  • + 1
 I wish companies made 'play' bikes again. Little 100/120mm 26' trail ripper/DJ/4X bikes. Sure there's a few slope bikes out there but they're often too short an made in very limited quantities
As for tech I want a system that calculates my speed and angle an adjusts the suss tune an dropper according to gear selection
  • + 1
 personally i'd like to see a dropper remote that would automatically flip my front and rear shock to wide open when the seat goes down. then flip them back to trail mode when the seat goes back up. might need some electronics to make all that happen with a single remote.
  • + 1
 Nah, go GPS-based so your bike drops the saddle and adjusts your suspension when you ride up to a gnarly section.
  • + 1
 My wish list isn't fancy; I'm content with my shoes and tires.
I want a DW Link 29r trail bike with a carbon front triangle and an Alloy BSA 73 Bottom Bracket, 140mm travel.
A welded Alloy swingarm, no horst links.
A 160mm (DP130mm) Fork with a 6" dropper.
An affordable 1x drivetrain; 32T up front and,
ie: Shimano 10-46 (but Not w a 37 ((41)) 2nd cog)
So come on industry, build me my bike already!
  • + 1
 that's all nice and everything...

Good flat pedals, on the market now, are about as much as one could ask for. Honestly, old school Shimano DX pretty had it nailed. It's been re-invention for the most part, or copying, ever since.

Most droppers out there work well enough. How about make them RELIABLE? Yes, some are, but it's not consistent yet.

Even rear mechs are pretty much nailed down. Tires, not too bad - consistent width would be cool.

What I'm getting at is technology is not where energy needs to be spent. Rather, put that energy/focus in to actual standards that mean something. Then maybe prices could come down again. $800 for a wheelset? you have got to be kidding.

Also, drop the marketing BS. Prime example was/is Giant's chart a couple years about wheel size, then only to rescind all their "research" and contradict it years later. Wtf was that all about? All the money put in to marketing could be nixed and passed on to savings for the end-users...

But, I will say, we are luck y to live in such interesting times, we do indeed have quite a lot to appreciate, and I do, indeed.
  • + 1
 You forgot flat resistant tires!!! Also, a short cage with a wide range wont do it for me, the rear derailleur just needs to more out of the way like a disc brake. Because I am not an engineer, gear box seems to be the only solution but I am TOTAL down for a reinvented rear derailleur. AND Love the idea of an auto dropper. No electronics though!!!!
  • + 1
 One electronic multi remote that I can use to change gears, drop my post and lockout/plastform my suspension. If we can sort out the gearbox while we're at it and make it electronic shifting too... bonus! If the shock lockout/platform changes the geo like a canyon at the same time for climbing that would be nifty too.
  • + 1
 For the dropper post you could use a mechanism similar to that in an auto OTF knife. The downsides would be it would only lock at either end of the travel, it would move quickly (nut slapper), anything blocking its path (nuts for example) would prevent it from locking, and it may not have good long term reliability. Another idea would be using compressed air to lower the saddle and that way it would function very similarly to current posts, but I have no idea if that's feasible.
  • + 5
 Return of 26 inch and 26inch plus tyres.
  • + 1
 they exist. its called surly.
  • + 2
 The 2.8 minions are currently available and are amazing...
  • + 1
 @patrick2cents: I would love to get my hands on some but can't find anywhere that sells them =(
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: I got mine directly from Maxxis... Expensive, but it's the best front tire I've ever ridden. It also doesn't seem to care how rough or loose the trail is, it will find grip.
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: hey I just saw universal cycles has them in stock, $68. I think they should be more available now
  • + 1
 Scrap the mech all together for mtb's. Gear boxes is were its at.


+1 on on more low slack short travel machines. Built up a 150mm frame with a shorter shock and some angled head cups. Besides a wonky seat tube angle that cant be used for any serious time in the saddle it became by far the most fun bike I've ever ridden.
  • + 1
 Guess I was partially ahead of the curve on my cheap-ass 2012 GT sensor 29'er 120mm susser and didn't know it...I would my 5.10's to have at least one ratchet clincher at the lace knot area, and have more ventilation......
  • + 1
 How about manufacturing quality of 510's return to pre-Addida days. That would be nice. I miss the old 510 when it seemed they lasted forever. Now it seems that the soles begin to peel within 2 months consistently.
  • + 1
 Depends how you define better. If you like to get jiggy in the park, short travel might be better. If you race dh courses more might be better. Just to be clear more travel isn't always faster either
  • + 3
 Flat pedal shoes for fat biking in Canadian winters i.e. waterproof and insulated
  • + 2
 The short travel ripper has already been here for a while!!! Transition scout!! I regularly ride mine on full on DH tracks. It's an incredible bike.
  • + 2
 Definitely, Smuggler too! I'll ride mine in the chunk where most guys are on DH rigs, and hit drops and jumps with a huge smile on my face all the time! While I may not hit the exact DH bike line, it's still pretty close.
  • + 2
 Water bladders integrated in the frame would be cool. Would allow for more flexibility in shock placement and would probably be able to carry more water
  • + 1
 corrosion is a much larger issue than you would believe...this is a tough one
  • + 2
 I would like a flat pedal shoe that has ankle support, Like a cross between a high top Basketball shoe a work boot and a flat pedal shoe....
  • + 0
 hum ... "that setup didn't have nearly the range of SRAM's 10-50 tooth cassette", really? It is relatively easy to get more than a 500% range with a triple or a double and use a short cage derailleur. My current left over triple has a massive 660% (22-32-44 by 1136) and it uses a medium cage derailleur with no problem whatever ...
  • + 0
 To stop making frames out of Carbon or keep offering alloy alternatives as a frameset. Yes carbon is a bit lighter and technically stronger but one hit with a rock to the frame and it's fit for the bin. Also it's another way for the industry to hike the price of bikes up.
  • + 5
 Better goggle please.
  • + 1
 Smith Squad MTB
  • + 3
 A move from from 26" to 29" wheels gives your derailleur 31.5mm of additional ground clearance.
  • + 1
 great point!
  • + 1
 Everything you mentioned sounds good to me tup dropper posts that drop with the push of a bottom is at the top of my list as well !!!
  • + 3
 Steeper seat angles for bigger sizes.
  • + 1
 YES.
  • + 0
 for a short travel slack ripper, give it 26" wheels for more fun, and quick acceleration, as well as a super short wheelbase, but also around 10ish kilos so it can easily be thrown around.
  • + 1
 Slack, short travel with super short wheelbase and super light? Sounds like a kids bike or a terrible adult bike with no stability!
  • + 1
 Maybe I am missing something, but why has no one tried an inverted derailleur setup? If the swing arm was on top, you could have the BB and cranks as the low point.
  • + 4
 because then you'd have to pedal backwards. the chain has all its tension on top and needs to be a straight line, unless theres a fixed idler
  • + 1
 It would only shift if you pedaled backwards. The derailleur has to shift the chain before it gets to the cassette.
  • + 14
 You're missing a lot.
  • + 7
 Anyone ever tried separating the chain tensioner from the mech? I’m guessing they probably have...but that could create a lot more clearance. An iscg mounted, sprung tensioner that would create more chain wrap with a simplified derailleur just doing the shifting...? Now we don’t have front mechs maybe I can make my millions on it.
  • - 1
 This is not the thread for crackpot theories.
  • + 5
 I wonder if it would be possible to have a tensioned lower chain guide pulley to do (part of) the job the derailleur tension pulley does. Kind of like that Roox design. You probably would still need two pulleys at the rear mech but maybe the lower one could be fixed instead of with a swinging cage. Added advantage is that the bb doesn't move nearly as much as the rear axle does, so a spring loaded cage there doesn't fly around as much as a derailleur cage does. I'm still baffled by the fact that people have come to accept these long cages on bikes these days. Clutch mech or not, on rough terrain the rear cage really flies around a lot which isn't good for silence, chain retention and durability of the system.
  • + 3
 @vinay: exactly what I was thinking. I dunno if a tensioner on the chainring could take up enough slack for those crazy cassettes people are running but it would allow for a smaller cage at the back at very least...?
  • + 3
 @vinay: That configuration seems interesting but the bb moves actually more than the rear axle, as the axle's distance from the ground is always constant and the bb goes closer to the ground as the suspension compresses. You'd be slaming that chain guide pulley a lot. I think that gearboxes are the future but it would need some time so they get lighter and a bit less draggy. They also improve suspension kinematics as there is no chain growth and the chainline is always the same so they can really tune the suspension design to work perfectly 100%.
  • + 1
 @ThomDawson: @vinay: I know that there was a bb mounted tensioner from YESS that was available during the single speed mtb craze a decade ago. That paired with the short cage clutched derailleur was the first thing I thought of. Definitely would work.
  • + 3
 @vid1998: +1 for gearbox. Just looking at my bike's drivetrain, there's so much stuff outside that needs to be cleaned, lubricated and maintained pretty much after every single ride.
  • + 1
 @Extremmist: nobody cleans.......stop fressing
  • + 1
 Also can we have better B SCREWS
  • + 1
 A smarter solution for bleeding brakes would be a serious win in my book too, or at least standardize that system across manufacturers.
  • + 2
 Tubeless DH / Enduro tires that don't burp, flat, or require messy sealants.
  • + 1
 They're only messy if they burp.
  • + 1
 A cage that extends only when you move to the three biggest cogs? Like made of two pieces that slides out but very rigid laterally..
  • + 1
 I want to be able to opgrade my 26 hardtail to a full sus but i cant because of bike fashion. Would love to still have that possibility.
  • + 2
 The eagle RD cage is humongous... managed to chew mine up on it's maiden ride :\
  • + 2
 Kazimer pretty much described a DH bike, Flats, short cage, slacked out HA and dropped (er) seatpost. . . . . .
  • + 1
 Once you reach age 65, a small motor to get up those long steep fire roads that allows you to go slightly faster than you would go going back down.
  • + 2
 Sam Hill doesn't Sam Hill because of Sam Hill. Sam Hill does Sam Hill because Sam Hill is Sam Hill.
  • + 1
 I thought we just had an article on pinion claiming th3 additional weight on their gear box’s is only a very slight forfeit, as in a few grams if I’m not mistaken.
  • + 1
 250mm droppers please. With low stack height. Probably a dropper inside another dropper.
  • + 1
 Got the Vyron with the remote.....McDonald's...parapap pa paaaaa..I'm loving' it!!!!
  • + 1
 +1 for the shorter-travel trail rippers! But haven't we got a load of them already? Norco Optic, Santa Cruz 5010 etc etc
  • + 1
 How about lowering the price of these already ridiculously overpriced bicycles.
  • + 1
 CVT with belt instead of derailleurs and gearboxes would be nice... Preferably an automated one..
  • + 3
 There is Nuvinci. It is pretty heavy and maybe not too efficient. I think Ellsworth had them on some of their bikes.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Thanks man! I know there is also a BB mounted version by Renault somewhere, but only for city bikes. As a xc rider who hates more than 2t jumps on a casette, I really need cvt to be a thing in the mtb world..
  • + 2
 @LaurensVR: vinay is right, but the Nuvinci is seriously heavy - Beach cruiser only heavy.
  • + 1
 @LaurensVR: if you're an XC rider, you won't like the 12% efficiency loss from CVT
  • + 1
 Why does the derailleur cage have to hang down? Why can it not be angled forwards?
  • + 3
 why is a carrot more orange than an orange?
  • + 1
 2pound electronic gearbox with a 500℅ bandwith would be my dream...in a titanium frame.
  • + 2
 Regarding your last point, the Evil Calling fits the bill.
  • + 1
 Technical riding gear that actually works .stuff that is water proof and does actually breathe
  • + 1
 never existed.........
  • + 2
 Fucking ludicrous pricing needs to become realistic
  • + 2
 $250 for a rear cassette is preposterous........I refuse to play.
  • + 1
 I want technology to come up with a robot to do my job so that I have more free time to go out and actually ride.
  • + 1
 9 or 10 speed hub gears WITH a 3 or 5 sprocket cassette, with that invention we should use a really short cage.
  • + 1
 Would it be possible to mount the derailer upside down if the mounts existed therefore addressing ground clearance issues
  • + 1
 Short cage 100%! I'm looking at a new bike for the first time in 6 years and everything has a long cage Frown
  • + 1
 short bus, is what you get
  • + 2
 DH level tires with trail level weights.
  • + 2
 Durability. More riding, less waste.
  • + 1
 Yes. Pretty darn happy with my bikes now but things like bearings and shocks die too fast.
  • + 1
 All I want is to not have a flat on the trail...
  • + 2
 calm down with your crazy wishes here
  • + 1
 EXACTLY! how have they not solved the issue of flat tires yet!?
  • + 1
 Didn't appreciate the subtle jab at gearboxes...
  • - 1
 'Better Flat Pedal Shoes' Buy Vans. The sole is superior, they offer flexibility and they don't look like 'My First Shoes' by Fisher Price.
  • + 2
 the best you have is the best you know.......
  • + 1
 I would love to see vans make a more durable shoe, or bring their canvas shoes back to 40$ dangnabbit!
  • + 1
 How bout more turner bike models for 2018!?!
  • + 1
 30 tooth front, 10 speed 11-40 cassette, short cage zee RULES!!
  • + 0
 all wheel drive bikes! (actually saw where someone came up with a version, not for a very proper bike though)
  • + 5
 Might be faster, but rwd is the most fun!
  • + 1
 The 2wd mountain bike kit was made by Christini. I saw somebody riding one at White Ranch one time, it seemed neat for slow, steep, tech climbing, but added drag, complexity, and weight.
  • + 1
 @m-t-g: Why does a dog lick it's balls? Because it can..........same reason
  • + 0
 High end, coil sprung, inverted DH forks. As in a coil version of my Emerald @DVOSuspension .
  • + 2
 E-shifting gearboxes.
  • + 1
 I didn't see any mention of MTB e-bikes....WTF?
  • + 0
 That, was a properly good read. Nice work Sir.
  • + 0
 I wish people would just shut the hell up.
  • + 2
 STFU!
  • - 2
 Hey Mike Kazimer, thanks a lot for riling up the millennials and starting the longest whine-fest that I've seen on PB in a long time. Go ride your f*#king bikes!
  • + 1
 All excellent points!
  • + 0
 Better Flat Pedal Shoes
  • + 0
 20mm front axle
  • - 3
 ABS
  • + 2
 You spelled SRAM wrong.
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