5 Original 3D Printed MTB Accessories

Sep 12, 2022
by Brian Park  


My role at Pinkbike/Outside is mostly spreadsheets, meetings, cat-herding Levy, and the occasional salty comment. But every winter I try to learn something, and in 2021 I got a MatterHackers Pulse XE and spent a bit of time learning about 3D printing. Additive manufacturing on an industrial scale has huge potential for brands like Atherton Bikes (check out our podcast with them for more additive nerding), but I’ve been even more interested in the accessories and gadget-level stuff. It’s just neat.

Through my very slow learning process I’ve made spacers, pedals, pump mounts, cable guides, bottle cages, and more. I’m constantly blown away at how easy it is for someone with zero engineering experience to think of something, model it on a computer, press a button, and then it just… exists?

I thought it’d be interesting to highlight a few things I’ve been messing around with, and hopefully encourage you to get out and make your own stuff. I've included STL files for a few of the designs below so anyone with a 3D printer can pull down the file and try printing them. Let me know below what you think I could improve with these designs, or what you think needs to get made!






3d printed schrader to presta adapter

Presta Valve to Schrader Rim Adapter

I’ve been off the mountain bike with some injuries for a while now, so I’ve gotten a bit weird with a cargo-bike build that’s based on an Omnium Minimax. I ordered carbon rims from Light Bicycle drilled for Schrader, but forgot to order Schrader tubeless valves. I’ll eventually put some Stan's Schrader tubeless valves on, (to be honest, I might secretly be pro-Schrader valve now that wide rims are more common) but in the meantime I wanted to run these excellent 76 Projects Hi Flow tubeless valves.

The top of these valves is big enough to seal against the Schrader-sized 8mm hole in the rim, but on the spoke side there was nothing to keep the ~6mm valve centred. There’s no sealing required at the spoke side since it’s all done at the rim tape, so basically an adapter just has to centre the valve by taking up the space between valve and rim.

This was everything that home 3D printing is good for. 5 minutes with callipers and a tiny bit of basic 3D modelling, and I had an adapter printing. The only real challenge was matching the curve of the rim. I got lucky, the first one was almost right, then I chamfered a couple of edges, adjusted the radius to make it sit a little more flush, and the second try was good to go.

It cost about $0.06 to print, and saved me $30+ and a week’s wait. Even if Schrader makes sense on this bike, I’m very happy with this in the meantime.
3d printed schrader to presta adapter
Cobbled together in Fusion360.

STL download here. The design of the 76 Projects valve is a little thicker than others, so this should adapt most tubeless Presta valves to most Schrader rims. You do need to double check that your Presta valve is capable of sealing against the rim at the rim tape side, but if it doesn’t work you’re only out a couple of cents.





3D printed OneUp pump holder

OneUp Pump Inline Mount

I started working on this OneUp pump mount for a frame builder who’s doing a very cool build for her entry to a handmade show later this year. We wanted a light, low profile pump holder that would sit in-line with the frame. I don’t know why, but mounts that stick out off the side of my bike bother me for no good reason. A long time ago I did a design that was similar to the excellent Jank Components one, but wanted something a little more minimal and with two sides further apart for more stability.

Initially, I struggled to make my design actually hold the pump firmly. If I made it too tight or wrap too far around, it was hard to get into and the pump still spun in the holder—while if I made it looser or with less wrap, it popped out too easily. I’m sure the engineers here are rolling their eyes at this, but the breakthrough for me was understanding that “everything is a spring.” Once I made the holder elliptical rather than round, it held the pump firmly and wasn’t too hard to get into. Now it’s solid enough that I think I will run it without any retention on my gravel and XC bikes, but I gave it an option to run a bombproof Voilé Nano strap as well.

3D printed OneUp pump holder
I'm sure there was an easier way to model this design.

The wings have 45° angles so it could easily be printed on a standard FDM (fused deposition modeling) printer. I could have dropped the whole thing lower to the frame, but that would require ultra-low, hard-to-find bolts. I decided to stick with a sensibly low 3.5mm bolt-height, and am happy with that. I think it looks decent and it’s fairly low profile.

This setup apparently mounts nicely to the back of the King Cage Side Loader. I have to check fitment because I'm not sure it'll clear on larger downtubes, but for bikes with limited space in the front triangle this could be a great way to keep the cage and pump tighter to the frame.

Details:
• 12g (a lot lighter than stock)
• Printed with NylonX filament on a MatterHackers Pulse XE FDM printer
• Fits OneUp pumps
• 64mm mount point eyelet spacing
• Integrates compactly with King Cage Side Loader
• Optional Voilé Nano strap retention

3d printed OneUp pump holder
Really happy with how this one prints.

No STL download. This design isn’t quite finished and I might eventually try to sell a few of them. Here's the STL for the old original pump mount I made that works nicely on tubes with rounder profiles. Or if you want to buy an inline OneUp mount right now, check out the one from Jank Components.





3d printed drink holder

Master of Fun Drink Holder

I’m guessing most of us have stuffed a beer into a bottle cage and had it flop out at some point. There are good can-specific cages out there, but I wanted something that could fit everything from Red Bull cans to wobbly pops.

Overall this was a simple design. Again I used an ellipse to give it some clamping force around each can/bottle size, but I made the drinks drop in from the top so that they couldn’t wiggle out the front.

3d printed master of fun drink holder
Section view

The hardest part was dialling in the design for printing efficiently. I generally use an unnecessarily low 0.1mm layer height so it builds up from the build plate (Z-axis) very slowly, but the finish looks nice and smooth. In the XY axes the nozzle I use is 0.4mm wide, which, after a bunch of frustration on my part, turns out prints 0.45mm lines of filament. You can adjust this in your slicing programs, but I don’t think any slicers adjust it dynamically during your prints. What that means is my wall thickness needed to use multiples of 0.45mm to make it print cleanly rather than struggling to fill gaps. I settled on 2.25mm walls, so 5x passes of the nozzle printing a little 0.45mm snausage of plastic.

The design really only works holding your cans vertically, so it’s mostly for putting on your town bike’s bars. Even with extra clamp force I think bottles would shake out if you just ran it on your downtube, but I figured it was still worth sharing. Or maybe you have an idea to make it work on a mountain bike too?

STL download here. I’d call this a work in progress still, so let me know how it works if you print one. There’s enough height for each of the sizes to hold a full bottle fairly well, but I would love for it to be even more secure. I am also not sure if this is one worth printing commercially—it costs ~$6 to print with good filament on my MatterHackers FDM system at home, but because it takes up so much build volume, doing it on a local HP system would probably cost closer to $30. Too much to sell at a reasonable price if you want a healthy margin. Maybe this would be a good candidate for injection moulding—something to learn for next winter?
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3d printed tube strap bracket with airtag holder

AirTag Tube Strap Bracket

A simple tube strap bracket was one of the first things I made when I got a 3D printer, because Kaz was lamenting that there weren’t many good options at the time. I’m also a huge fan of Project 4AGZE's 3D printed AirTag holder, and have them on most of my bikes. It’s not a foolproof bike tracking system, but for a smash and grab it’s a nice bit of extra security. It’s also helpful when the airline loses your bike for weeks on end.

I wanted something that didn’t look like an AirTag holder, and I wanted to keep a tube strap bracket on my bikes that only had one spare set of bottle mounts. So I smushed the two concepts together and landed on a two-piece design with a channel for a Voilé Nano strap to hold your tube. I designed it to look as invisible and understated as possible, and if you use security Torx bolts on it, I think it’s a reasonable way to slow down a would-be thief.

3d printed tube strap bracket with airtag holder
Ended up being fairly low key on the bike.
3d printed tube strap bracket with airtag holder
I had Tempus3D make a few with their multi-jet fusion HP machine. Love this finish.

Most of the design was fairly simple. I used a little labyrinth “seal” to resist water and I gave it a tiny draft angle to make the two sides fit together snugly. I experimented with some bigger, more symmetrical designs, but decided on keeping it as small as possible. It does work with standard 29” tubes, but works best with Schwalbe Aerothan or other ultralight tubes.

3d printed airtag holder tube strap bracket
Added small cutouts to save weight and for smuggling emergency things, because apparently that's my niche now.

The toughest part for me was nailing the fit of the AirTag into the top half of the mount. I wanted it to snap into place solidly and had a design that consistently did that on my own MatterHackers setup, but I ended up liking the design enough that I sent it off to Tempus3D in Trail BC to get printed on their industrial HP setup. On that industrial printer I found there were tiny tolerance variations that made the fit inconsistent. Nobody thinks much about manufacturing variations when buying bike stuff, but we should. It’s been a big lesson for me that design manufacturability is as important as whether or not the unit we happen to be testing is perfect.

It wasn’t the HP printer’s fault that I couldn’t get a good fit, it was that my pretendgineered design required unrealistic tolerances. I put this problem out on Instagram, and got a flood of actual engineers generously sharing ideas with me. Again the solution was that “everything is a spring.” I tightened it up, gave it a reverse draft angle (there’s probably a better word?), and used fewer contact points. Now it’s perfect every time.

Details:
• 34g (with 9” Voilé Nano strap and AirTag, or 23g without AirTag)
• Bracket + AirTag + Aerothan tube is ~130g, which is ~110g lighter than a traditional bracket + AirTag + regular 29er tube. It’s safer and cheaper to save weight on accessories and mounts than tires and rims.
• Fits an Apple AirTag to keep track of your bike
• Works best with Aerothan and Tubolito style ultralight tubes


No STL download. I kind of want to do a small run of these too, but I haven't figured that out yet. They’re not cheap to have printed commercially and I’d probably need to sell them for ~$45 with the Voilé strap, which feels a bit high. On the other hand, that’s about the same as buying a separate AirTag holder and tube strap bracket.

For a more modular solution you could try Project 4AGZE’s 3D printed AirTag holder and see if it works under a traditional tube strap bracket. I really like 76 Projects's Micro Piggy, it’s a lot more low profile than most. And if you like, you can download my original tube strap bracket STL here.
3d printed tube strap bracket with airtag holder





3D printed Climb Switch High Performance System

Climb Switch High Performance System

This was originally a gift for Mike Levy that I spent way, way too much time on, and then enough people bugged me about getting one that I did a small production run of them. It stows a Mini BIC, one hitter, and material inside your steerer tube or pump via OneUp’s EDC standard. Of course I strongly condemn any impaired riding. This is for transport of legal things only, and if anyone asks, it’s officially a fire safety kit.

3D printed Climb Switch High Performance System

The hardest part about the design was finding a way to stuff a 22.2mm OD Mini BIC into a steerer tube. Even with the threaded OneUp system, there’s almost no space. Once I figured out how to package the lighter next to the one hitter and to have it pop out the back, I had to find a way for the lighter to snap into place. I used the sparkwheel at the top as a pivot and spring to add tension. It’s not 100% intuitive, but after the first time you do it it’s easy and satisfying. The screw-on compartment for material at the bottom was also super easy, especially once Cedric from Lal Bikes made some suggestions about chamfering the start of the threads.

3D printed Climb Switch High Performance System
I think these turned out pretty well.
3D printed Climb Switch High Performance System
Low key.

It took an embarrassing amount of trial and error to dial in the design, but once I nailed it I had Tempus3D do a small run of them with MJF and they turned out great. Since I was already doing the carriers in BC, I figured I should do the one hitters here too. Brian from Autmog makes very fancy pens on his lathe here in Vancouver. Their claim to fame is no post-processing or polishing, their stuff just comes fresh off his machines. I’m not much of a weedologist (weedographer?), so I actually had to get some user testing done before Autmog did a small run, but apparently they’re very good.

3D printed Climb Switch High Performance System
Also fits into a OneUp pump.


Production costs for the carrier, one hitter, O-rings, and shipping box ended up being slightly under $30 each to my door. I put them up for $69 USD + shipping on April 20th, and sold all 40 of them in a day and a half. Wild. Netting out ~$1500 profit was cool, but I definitely spent several hundred hours on this dumb thing because I don't know what I'm doing, so I made about half the Canadian minimum wage on it. Not about to quit my day job!

I'm sure I could get costs down significantly if I went overseas, especially if I did huge volume production, but that kind of kills the point of all this iterative, small-run stuff for me. I’m not sure I’ll ever do another run, but if I do I’ll probably do it the same way as this first one.

Details:
• System weight is ~35g (including carrier, one hitter, and Mini BIC)
• Fits a standard Mini BIC lighter, custom one hitter, and material
• Nylon carrier is 3D printed using HP's multi-jet fusion tech
• 6061 one hitter is machined with no coatings or chemicals, and has fine holes
• Uses the OneUp EDC threaded top cap system only. *no affiliation with OneUp Components, but I did bring them some
• Inconspicuous and durable


I originally held a couple Climb Switches back in case I needed to replace any, but nobody’s had any issues so I may as well sell them. If you want to buy one I put the rest up on Etsy, just to try the platform. [UPDATE: they're all gone. If you want to get on a list of people to message if I ever make more, send me a DM on Pinkbike or Instagram with your email address.] For the record, Etsy sucks. They end up taking almost $15 for each sale, and I don’t think the platform brought me a single direct sale. I’ll probably sell through the ones I put on Etsy, and then if I ever do another run I’ll find a different system. Suggestions?

No STL download in case I ever make more. I should also mention there’s a cool Iozzo steerer tube one hitter thing worth checking out. It doesn’t need a OneUp threaded steerer and it’s a slick project.
Views: 2,800    Faves: 3    Comments: 2






3d printed ribbon cage for nalgene bottles.
Views: 2,758    Faves: 1    Comments: 2

I did this Ribbon Cage Nalgene side loader as a way to hold a boatload of water in a small front triangle. It was fun to learn about surface modelling but I'm not totally happy with it yet. It needs to be a little more rigid, and it'd be nice to bring the cost down. It's super annoying to print with so many supports on my home machine, and crazy expensive to print with MJF. Anyone have any suggestions?

Downloads for some other things I've made:
• Original Nano tube strap bracket
• Raaw Madonna cable guide
• Tern GSD Strider bike rack





Final thoughts

One thing I’ve noticed is that engineers and makers are all incredibly generous with their time and ideas. Every time I post something up on my Instagram, people like Cedric from Lal Bikes, Brian from Autmog, Emory from Farside Components, the 5Dev crew, David from Matterhackers, North Shore Billet, Ben from OneUp, Em from WZRD, Ivan from Bjorn, OutsideBrendan, Trickstuff, and lots more have hit me up with ideas, suggestions, and encouragement. This whole community of people who make things is really welcoming and supportive of each other. That’s so damn cool.

Now you tell me, what should I make next? What would you improve on the next iterations of these designs? Should I do another of these stories sometime or are you altogether over my dorking out on additive manufacturing?


200 Comments

  • 172 16
 As an early adopter of the climb switch, I can testify that the thing works and looks flawless and the reaction from people on the trail head when I pull it out of the steerer tube and rip a fatty is priceless. Can also assure it does increase performance.
  • 173 178
flag jeffrocx (Sep 12, 2022 at 9:43) (Below Threshold)
 If you smoke weed after your bike ride, please don't drive home. Otherwise I don't care, go nuts with it.
  • 209 63
 @jeffrocx: man that's super great that you don't care, we we're all wondering when you'd speak up
  • 44 48
flag m47h13u (Sep 12, 2022 at 9:57) (Below Threshold)
 @jeffrocx: you a fan of after ride beers?
  • 50 19
 @jeffrocx: How long would you like me to wait? I'll just chill here, wait for a reply, to make sure it's OK.
  • 25 10
 @jeffrocx: yup dont need anymore slow drivers out there.
  • 58 14
 @m47h13u:
Yeah most people will see weed as a big/bad evil but same people will down 2-3 beers after a ride
  • 150 5
 @jrocksdh: this stop sign is taking forever to turn green
  • 37 1
 @jabblede: he's got a point... you always want to make sure you drive to a fine burrito establishment before driving directly home.
  • 11 0
 @scallywagg: Now if @brianpark could make a thermal burrito holder, I'm onboard.
  • 9 0
 Climb switch is really cool, I would add a sort piece of a spoke in the package for maintenance.
  • 12 0
 @RelapsedMandalorian: I feel like mounting a boot warmer inside a SWAT box for mobile burrito warming is right up @brendancarberry 's alley.
  • 6 0
 @scallywagg: not all heroes wear capes.
  • 1 0
 @robway: I have a toothpick that I can put behind the bat but also have resorted to using twigs….
  • 7 7
 @jeffrocx: I’ll make sure to relay the message to the boys shotgunning beers between runs. Oh don’t worry about the weed you should be worried about me driving bonked after a ride.
  • 1 0
 @robway: pine needles ftw
  • 9 9
 Yeah, not digging it when someone starts smoking weed next to my kiddo or on trail…
  • 9 2
 @michibretz: How is this any different than someone having a beer, smoking a cigarette or vaping? I share with my kids that when they are old enough to make informed choices about such things so be it. Hiding such things, prohibition or pretending they don't exist has long been proven to be more detrimental.
  • 1 0
 @mousetrapz: piece of cable
  • 1 0
 @michibretz: I would never spark up around your kid with out asking if he wants in...... I'm not that sadistic..

jk im would never do that infront of a child.
  • 1 2
 @hellbelly:
Not different at all. I don’t think its cool, appropriate or legal in the US to do either of theses things in most places that are not your home.
Not speaking of the fire danger…
  • 44 1
 @brianpark Maybe you should start a PB Group in Thingiverse and so people could use an maybe modify/customize those.Fusion 360 is pretty straightforward to learn, probably the least steep learning curve for any serious 3D, for the most part its crazy simple to modify/tweak with the original file. Still, the best I did was a insert "port" for a dropper post on a frame that didnt have cable routing (drilling required).
  • 4 0
 Really good idea.

I've got a home printer and have done loads of design work for models, etc- would be very happy to have a crack at anything people think would be useful?
  • 5 0
 Great idea just swap thingiverse for printables (better support)
  • 1 0
 Could start a thread in the PB forum to keep it moving
  • 1 0
 @haen: +1, I'd be interested in this for sure! I've also got a printer and a good amount of CAD and engineering experience, would love to contribute to a project or two
  • 31 0
 @brianpark Do you have that plan for the 170cm x 70kg tech-editor? I'm looking to stand up my new speciality bike mag for long, permanently annoyed furry critters, Minkbike, so it would save me a bit of money if I could just run off a couple of editors.
  • 69 1
 You wouldn't download a car. Downloading pirated Mike Kazimers is stealing. Piracy, it's a crime.
  • 21 3
 @brianpark: Maybe you could 3D print a new Beta magazine. Pretty shitty of Outside to cancel it a couple weeks after running a promo for Trailforks subscribers and then going radio silence on every support email I send.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: I prefer to think of it more as an occupation...
  • 29 1
 This is why I love pinkbike hahaha. Thanks for the shoutouts Brian. I reckon we need to do a pinkbike podcast with the whole 3d printed meme crew.
  • 10 0
 100% we do.
  • 6 0
 I’m in! And thanks for the shoutout Brian. Love watching you make stuff.
  • 17 0
 A side loading bottle cage with integrated One-up pump clip please ?
  • 2 0
 I should look into this. TBH I think other than Z-Cage, the best side loader is that King side loader, and it matches up really nicely to my OneUp pump holder. I have to check to see if it still fits on wider downtubes, but it looks like it should. Super compact and clean.
  • 12 0
 I put my can of beer inside a coozie before putting it in the bottle cage. It makes a perfect fit in the cage and keeps my drink cold on the ride.
  • 23 0
 Pro tip: put the cookie on upside down while riding to keep the dirt off of the opening.
  • 1 0
 @DirtBagTim:@DirtBagTim: get some of these, open tinnies on the trail for halfway top ups!
amzn.eu/d/dLXxPXV
  • 5 0
 @DirtBagTim: this is the life advice I needed today
  • 2 0
 @JonnyNorthshore: it's better advice for koozies than for cookies Cool
  • 10 0
 Your AirTag/tube holder is very slick - I'd definitely like to try that one.

Your mini BIC holder is genius. Now, if it wasn't made of plastic then the carrier could be modified to double as a one-hitter I think. That'd be cool too.

Great work!
  • 5 0
 Air tag in a fork volume spacer?
  • 1 0
 @handsomedan: metal blocks the signal, unfortunately
  • 14 0
 Can someone please design a one up edc Pez dispenser? Big Grin
  • 8 0
 here's my variation on the oneup inline mount: www.thingiverse.com/thing:5447998

mine is focused on mounting under the top tube. it optionally supports a velcro strap for extra security, and offsets the pump backward in the frame so it won't interfere with a tall bottle

and source files are included, not just the STL
  • 5 0
 That's awesome. I like how yours holds the handle as well as the body of the pump.
  • 3 0
 Nice work! I like how it holds the handle as well as the pump body. I made www.thingiverse.com/thing:4964719, stoked to read it inspired you!
  • 1 0
 @ThunderBear: HA, awesome running into you here. this print is like half the reason I got a printer in the first place. now my bike is covered with little bits Smile
  • 12 1
 This story made my morning.
  • 6 0
 THis is great. I'm an industrial designer but I mostly get to work on other people's designs so it's great to see you getting it done yourself. It's also great to hear that you're getting great feedback. I've worked with engineers before on parts and the subtleties on mfg requirements can make or break a part. I think a 3D printer could be a great tool for van projects or garage shop projects; tool holders, jigs, spacers,

DISC BRAKE SPACERS!!!. Every time I take off my front wheel I worry about hitting the lever and then having to reset my pistons. I could probably get some free from a junk bin at a shop, but maybe there's potential there for extra features.
  • 1 0
 BMX engineers or just engineers , theres a massive difference
  • 9 0
 I used a ripped piece of a cheez-it box as a spacer when I removed my wheel yesterday
  • 5 0
 But then you'd get all stressed trying to remember where you left that darn spacer... Much easier to rip a corner off a component box (Shimano are perfect thickness) fold in half and wedge between the pads. If you put the non printed side out, it even cleans the pad surface at the same time ;-)
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: exactly why you have a tool wall. it will change your life.
  • 1 0
 Disc brake spacers that live on the bike would be great. Maybe a cutout in the tube strap bracket for them.
  • 6 0
 Would love to see some options for carrying a full-face on the uphill ride. I don't wear a backpack, and don't like the helmet clanking around on handlebar. Bonus points if the gadget has the option of securely holding just the chin-bar on a convertible helmet.
  • 3 0
 The Haf Clip might be something for you to look at. thehafclip.com they use the same commercial MJF printing outfit I used.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Thanks Brian!

I can see that design working in Aluminium, but I'd be a bit worried if that was printed in regular 3d-print filament, looks thin in places and no radii in high stress areas. Do you think a beefed-up version would work on a regular home 3D printer? I'm not familiar with MJF, will have to look that one up.
  • 2 0
 @MuddyBrit: multi-jet fusion is cool, it builds the nylon part up in a powder bed and you end up with a very clean, strong part. 76Projects have the same HP machine and use it for all kinds of mounts and things.

Agree the Haf Clip design isn't that home printer friendly, I'd probably look at something with more support from below if I were printing it myself. But the MJF sample of theirs I have seems plenty strong.
  • 1 0
 @MuddyBrit: 3D printers have loads of good applications and I've used them a bunch. This halfclip thing is definitely a design that makes way more sense to manufacture with a different method than 3D printing though. You could get the same design laser cut out of aluminum sheet and it would be a tonne stronger and a better than a 3D printed one. Get like 20 or so of them laser cut by a firm and then send them to another firm who can clean them up and anodise them. They'd work out a decent price each
  • 5 0
 @brianpark: Could you try making some calliper shields they look cool and they would help stop mud and other contaminates from getting on the pads. I just remember seeing them on DH Tech Randoms article a while ago.
  • 2 0
 That's a great idea.
  • 6 0
 These are great, thanks for sharing.

Hope Tech shared 3D prints for some brake spacers and service tools on their website.

www.hopetech.com/open-source-tools
  • 1 0
 That seal service tool will save me about 1000 cable ties!!
  • 5 0
 I printed my own travel indicator m.pinkbike.com/photo/21766624 and derailleur hanger cover m.pinkbike.com/photo/16653865
  • 3 0
 @brianpark - I'm a long term schradder user and wouldn't go back to Presta. If they clog up you remove the valve and clean out. I run aluminium rims so am quite happy to drill them to 8mm.

Your tapered washers are just what I need for my 511s.
  • 3 0
 Not a 3d printer here myself but last year when I got my EXT Era I was frustrated that while the bolt holes on my RRP ProGuard Bolt on didn't match those on the fork arch the profile of the arch didn't let it sit properly. 5 minutes of googling found me this file: cults3d.com/en/3d-model/tool/rrp-proguard-adapter-for-ext-era and then an email to J - Tech suspension, where i'd seen they were doing some 3d printed bits and they made one of for me for about £10. I did still have to do some fabrication (dremeling) to the back of the fender mount to get everything to fit but I couldn't be happier with the solution.

Now @brianpark how about that update for us BetaMTB subscribers. Even an update of nothing would be better than silence.
  • 2 0
 Anyone ever 3D printed mudguards? I want one for my helm mk ii because it stops raining here though to warrant one and getting able to screw it on and off would be neat. The 'official' one is far too tiny for the amount of muck I usually see so I'd want something more like an RRP proguard. Fairly sure I can remember enough about 3d modelling to make it, I just don't know if you can print it in a suitable material
  • 1 0
 I've printed some that are flat and fold over like most cheap ones you can buy. I found they broke after a while though even made from PETG. Might have some better luck if you print a rigid one that is thicker and hugs the tire.
  • 1 0
 i found that Premium Melamine Board or plastic flexible three ring binders work for cutting mud guards out of. You can search google for various templates and then cut to your liking.
  • 5 0
 Maybe you can take an existing mudguard and only print the angle bracket part connecting it to the fork arch? The plastic parts could be bonded with epoxy and the bracket could have pilot holes for tiny wood screws or rivets to strengthen the joint and hold the parts together while the epoxy cures.
  • 2 0
 @letsgethurt: I did this to mount an RRP Proguard to an EXT fork. Designed the adapter in Fusion 360 and printed with carbon fiber infused polycarbonate filament. Works great and is very strong.
  • 2 0
 I created a fender that bolts into a 36, I think like 3 years back, I still have on my bike www.youtube.com/watch?v=E68srB-XYEE
I added two small m3 bolts to the sides to make it more solid. Prints well witha 0.4 nozzle and I just used PLA +, super cheap
  • 2 0
 @Creechr: I made some from carbon infused nylon and they seem to be indestructible. You can foot jam right on the fender and it’s fine. The absurd print times make it more of a novelty item for a few buddies than a practical solution.

I made a number of attempts from PETG and had limited success. Thin is too weak. Thick becomes brittle after you bend it. Hollow with low infill mostly worked, but always died from shuttling…
  • 1 0
 I've had success printing mudguards in ASA filament. The trick to avoid cracks is to locally thin the design along the fold lines, and to fold the design using a heatgun at the same time to re-flow the material and remove stresses. My designs are at www.cyclesolvers.co.uk
  • 1 0
 @abueno: I cut my fender out of a Silver 5L MOTUL oil jug, got the jug from a friend who's a mechanic. Used a template I found online, didn't like how short the front was, so simply drew it longer when tracing template onto oil jug. Even took advantage of the natural contours of the jug to get some curve in the mudguard, and there was one section of the jug that had ribs, that part was put to the back bottom (ie: behind and below the crown of the fork)

ep1.pinkbike.org/p2pb23374684/p2pb23374684.jpg
  • 6 0
 Now that you've taken the bait you need to get yourself a Bridgeport
  • 6 2
 I've drilled out for Schrader on all my bikes over the last 15 years, I don't regret it a bit. None of those silly french valves around here.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark Nice to see the combination of 3d printing and MTB - a perfect match!

I made a OneUp pump holder with a twist. I rotated the entry slot to the side so it's side entry, and clears my bottle cage easier. I also thickened up the base slightly and have a spare link stored in there under some tape.

I've also made bearing press tools, Reverb IFP tool, bar end plugs, a OneUp cannister to hold my bits, a seat post slot mudcap and various suspension tokens for starters!
  • 3 0
 Sounds cool, maybe a "custom 3d printed stuff from pinkbike readers" story is in order.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: "Readers Prints" - I think that would be great.

While we're down that rabbithole maybe a feature on printers too?

I've got a heavily modified Ender 3 - glass bed, Big Tree Tech silent board, BL Touch, EZR Extruder (for TPE), Raspberry Pi (in a custom case) running OctoPrint and a prototype filament gauge.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: and perhaps we should add a category in the pinkbike classified section, "3D Printed MTB Accessories" where hobbyists can sell their creations and normal people can commission components from the artisans.
  • 1 0
 @coombsd @brianpark : Maybe a forum section for bike specific 3d printing chat, design, parts etc.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Lets do this, Brian!
  • 2 0
 As an engineer myself I absolutely love this! I would love to see the suggestions from all of the folks you mentioned. Are you willing to share more? This was my friendly reminder thatn I need to buy another 3D printer for home. I've been the guy printing all of the prototypes at work for about 40 engineers on an FDM machine. It has been fun and scratched the itch. Now that I have moved up into managing a small team of engineers I miss getting to play hands on with the printer!
  • 2 0
 I worked as an intern last summer and 3d printed everyone’s prototypes (including my own). We had two Prusa’s, which work okay but definitely not commercial grade stuff. Funny to work with all these incredibly talented and experienced senior mechanical engineers and then have everyone depend on the teenager who knows how to work the 3d printer. Had to get my own after that, no regrets.
  • 2 0
 I made this 3d printed Fox float volume spacer about 7 years ago and it worked great. Saved me a few bucks and I think I make about $8 every time someone buys one, which I think has maybe been 3 or 4 times.

www.shapeways.com/product/FJZKXXATN/fox-float-volume-reducer-large-spacer
  • 4 0
 Thanks for sharing! Of course the one I want to print is the OneUp inline...lol Probably a good sign you are onto something!
  • 1 0
 Fusion 360 is pretty pricey for a hobbyist does anyone have any suggestions for a CAD program that is cheap/free they recommend? I used to like sketchup a lot before they made many of the features only available for premium users now it feels very limited.
  • 7 0
 you can get it free as a hobbyist as can you get solidworks , 99 bucks for students and hobbyists and makers

www.autodesk.co.uk/products/fusion-360/personal

www.solidworks.com/solution/3dexperience-solidworks-makers
  • 3 0
 Pricey? As hobbyist you get Fusion360 for free for 3 years. And having tried several ones is definitely one of the easiest to start with.Sketchup doesn't even come close, Premium or not, trying something curve is a nightmare.
  • 2 1
 OnShape is pretty good, I prefer it to Fusion and SolidWorks.
The document management is way better.
Free version is very powerful, only limitation is your designs are not private. But they’re not exactly public either.
  • 3 0
 +1 for onshape - it's basically solidworks from a few years ago (this is a good thing, SW has gotten really bloated) but free and online
  • 1 0
 Been using Fusion 360 for 3 years and its awesome. Hobbyist licence is free (10 model limit, however). Many features (CAD, CAM) and a HUGE online community. Check out Lars Christensen YT channel. He's the best. SolidWorks, SolidEdge can more powerful, but the online community is not as strong
  • 1 0
 Any of these run on IPad M1 pros?

Was thinking Shap3r which is made for iPadOS but I don’t want to drop $240/yr for negligible use.
  • 1 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: fusion will run native on mac m1 so will the solidworks for makers if you can get windows On there via parallels
  • 2 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: OnShape will run on anything that has a web browser. No limitation. You can edit parts on your phone.
It works great on my Mac Mini M1 in Safari and in Chrome.
  • 1 0
 Hey folks Iam printing my parts on a two hundred dollar printer. Yes I had to do magic to get it to print nylon and it not the best. But I have printed nylon fenders, tpu, and some copolymers with any problems. This is not out of reach. I paid more for the cad software than the printer. Using shaper3d for iPad. Anyone can learn to model on that imo.
  • 1 0
 How do you like shap3r?
  • 1 0
 Thanks for keeping in mind the reprobates among us, Brian. As one who demands a glass tool, I beg for a tiny foam-lined box. Probably minimal challenge compared to your present portfolio, but could have alternate uses. Up-size one to fit an InReach or beacon so I don't have to carry a hard object against my spine? TIA; PayPal ready.
  • 2 0
 Pelican box and then the foam mechanics use for tool box drawers. Cut out a space for your unit, fire stick, grinder, your set.
  • 2 0
 That Iozzo one might be of interest to you. www.iozzio.life

And for an InReach, are you opposed to mounting it on your bike? I'm sure there's a clean way to mount one.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Ceramic, be still, my heart. Thanks, looks buffed! InReach talks to the phone, which has its own mount when needed; no need to look at the IR unless I run low on materials and have to SOS.
  • 3 0
 An empty Nuun tube works really well for the right sized unit. The cap has a plastic springy thing that minimizes movement
  • 3 0
 Hi, Check out the device I made that includes a glass tool and fits in the end of the handlebar. stash-cache.com
It's only $20!

I'm really impressed with Brian's design especially knowing he just learned cad!

I'm a designer/inventor and this is the first thing I made on my own.
  • 1 0
 @lebeau: Bravo for solving the problem of easily switching bikes.
  • 1 0
 One of the lesser seen benefits of 3D printing could be the significant reduction in emissions from supply chain and distribution. If the components are printed locally to where they are used, you only have the raw material (filament) distribution to worry about... No component warehouse and distribution burden, no postage. Also, if you are careful about creating designs with no support material, then no waste plastic in the printing process compared to certain mass production techniques. As such, I'm happy to print designs for MTB locals in South Wales, UK. www.cyclesolvers.co.uk
  • 1 0
 Absolutely. I can see there being a time when you order a custom bike off a website (eg. Atherton or another printed lug brand), and they send it to a certified print shop in your area or country. Less shipping, less waste, etc.

Obviously there's a long way to go for full bikes, but the potential is there now for accessories.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Yeah totally. As you know, there's still a long way to go in terms of automating 3D printer setup and use for every home, but I could imagine a not too distant future where bike shops could have a printer for plastic components/accessories and customers could choose from an online library of parts to print-on-demand...
  • 2 0
 If you want to push the environmental aspect even further, you can buy a plastic recycling machine (www.filabot.com) that shreds any kind of plastic , and then produces filament. Not cheap, however but could be a good avenue as a local/municipal initiative. I'm currently trying to convince my local makerspace to pull the trigger. Crossing my fingers....
  • 3 0
 A friend of mine who works for a well known athletics brand looked into this for the company where basically they had a photo booth checked your foot pressures gait etc and out was supposed to pop a custom fit pair of trainers, no shipping containers of trainers made by small children in sweat shops etc , turns out it wasnt the idea that was the problem but the availability of materials to stand up to the daily use a sports shoe is put through , they (the company) do make 3d printed running shoes now but they still get shipped around the world in containers and boxes and theres none of the promise of tailored running shoe experience iirc the only benefit was actually that instead of a multi step process to produce the sole it was now a homogenous one piece thing that saves labour (this is a good thing for even critical parts in industry as it allows you to do things in one hit without having welds for example= less failure criteria to consider, less skilled labour= you dont need that certified weld....the list goes on) they still cost 180 odd though so sweat shop labour must be as cheap, one area 3d printing is good is that it allows anybody to make something , or at least have a go at making something , in the world which i inhabit in my day job it can often take years due to the nature of the work to qualify it ,if it all , in some cases obsolescance is the culprit , for the average joe in the street it is indeed a much more rapid prototype experience
  • 1 0
 There are several well done and nice 3D printed products out there! I have seen a few and personally purchase the bearing press tool from www.momentumcycletools.com and I have to admit it is beyond my expectations. It worked really well on the bikes I used them on
  • 1 0
 I stopped biking a few years ago because of school and funding my other hobbies (including 3d printing). I'm a mechanical engineering student and engineering nerd in general, I've continued to keep up with new bikes and parts primarily cause of all the cool engineering. This was a fantastic article, really enjoyed how you explained your design process and your designs themselves, I always love to see creative things like this and I'd love to see future articles related to additive manufacturing. It's awesome to see the technology finding a more general audience, it is an extremely powerful and cost effective way to create a wide variety of useful things and is amazing learning tool
  • 1 0
 Not knowing what a one hitter was, the reflection in the climb switch picture makes it look like a line of white powder behind a clear polycarbonate sheet haha. Had to double take and google some things. Thanks for sharing your creativity, this was a good read!
  • 1 0
 @brianpark or anyone with F360 skills - What is the best way to do the slightly raised edge on the perimeter of pump holder? Sweep a profile along the edge OR offset the perimeter inward , then offset a face and sweep a rounded profile edge OR maybe even easier way in F360 ?

thanks
Here is my holder. Functionally it works great, but aesthetically it needs work; Too boxy, need to soften.
www.printables.com/model/251205-bike-pump-holder
  • 1 0
 I did it by making the base shape, then shell, deselect tangent chain, select face, inside thickness: 2.25mm, direction: inside.

I'm sure there are other, simpler ways of doing it too.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Yes, inner and outer bodies. make sense. excellent thanks.
  • 1 0
 3d printing is amazing for low-volume production or for just making spare parts!
two good examples:

If anyone needs a FREE 1.5x Volume spacer for your RockShox fork
here is a Link: www.printables.com/model/276548-rock-shox-compatible-150-volume-token

and if you want to fit your snowboards/ Skis to your Bike Rack
here is another link: wfracks.ca
  • 1 0
 I have made angled rear light shim to prevent my knog blinder just firing at the tire, pretty handy. Next up is a compatibility fixture for a long bolt on mudguard on my DT F535, will see how that goes.
For those without a printer/drawing skills, 76projects have some great 3D printed products, including inline pump holders that include 3M backing too so you don't have to give up precious bottle bosses.
  • 1 0
 Fox transfer post remote direct mount to hope brakes

www.shapeways.com/product/63GWB95NU/hope-tech-3-lever-direct-mount-for-fox-transfer-se?optionId=155274111&li=marketplace

Happy to share the files if anyone is interested but printing at home tends to be not strong enough…
  • 1 0
 Nice, this looks great. Probably works for mounting other dropper remotes as well.
  • 1 0
 This is incredible! I'm a mechanical engineer and these are designed better than some of my colleagues could do! haha. I've been following your progress and you've made a lot of good improvements. This is exactly how design works (in a perfect world) - give the design your best shot, try it out (aka prototype), and iterate until you have a good product. Keep up the good work!
  • 3 0
 Thank you! I suspect my designs take me a lot more iterations than actual engineers, but it's really damn fun.
  • 1 0
 I haven't done any recon (yet), but it just occurred to me, another tool that would be handy to have and is (IMO) a bit spendy is Fork Seal Drivers. I have all the parts here to do my 32mm Fox forks, need to get that done over the winter!

EDIT: I just did a quick google search, and the tool and the print files are readily available, and I don't know if you could find anyone to print it as cheaply as some of the stuff on aliexpress!!

That URL was HUGE! this makes it more manageable.

tinyurl.com/yc8kperr
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Is not using etsy an actual option?

We are 3d-printing kits to built a clock out of old discs. Right now etsy seems the only way to sell them to a non mtb-public.

www.etsy.com/de/listing/1167964326/diy-kit-bremsscheiben-wanduhr-mit?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=uhr+mtb&ref=sr_gallery-1-13&frs=1&organic_search_click=1
  • 1 0
 I ended up moving things over to Shopify's starter plan. $5/mo, super simple, works with Linkpop for social. Basically enough that I don't need to stress about not making things for a few months if I'm busy. I want to keep this a side project. brianparkdesign.myshopify.com
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: When are the pedal STL files coming out? Waaaaay back you had them in an article and your said something about releasing the files in a future article.
  • 13 0
 My pedals are still going strong but I've been convinced that releasing the files for a structural component like that is a bit sketch.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: That makes sense, you could include a disclaimer with the files. Anyways all your other things are super cool!!!
  • 2 2
 @brianpark: if you're not selling them , pretty sure there is no liability. Could even label them as art or decoration, if you were really worried about litigation. And since you're a self-professed non-expert, why wouldn't you want to take advantage of the community to get feedback on the design? Someone else gets a base pedal design, you get to learn something, win-win.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: even if there’s no legal issues, it would suck if someone took the design’s structural integrity at face value, or worse, their cheap and poorly optimized 3d printer’s print quality, and then used the pedals and got hurt. if you’re going to do something dumb and use your own 3d printed pedals, you should at least have the skills to design them yourself from scratch and hopefully have some understanding of solid mechanics principles. i would do it, but that doesn’t make it not dumb Wink .
  • 1 0
 @KeeganPelton: how exactly do you take structural integrity at face value? It's a friggin' plastic pedal coming out of a machine on your counter. That's the "face value" . If you wreck yourself after knowing that, it's 110% not the fault of the person who offered up a 3d model and already said "I have no idea if this is good, use at your own risk"
  • 1 0
 What about 3d printed rear brake vibration damper (to quell frame vibratione etc) that im loosing my freaking mind cause i cant get rid ot it. Tryina Deore 6120 caliper to see if it'll cure it.
  • 4 0
 Oh god so annoying. Have you faced the frame yet?
  • 1 0
 I'm not familiar with this but you could maybe print some TPU shims/washers to put between the caliper and the frame?
  • 4 0
 @brianpark AMAZING WORK. Really good to see ! Keep going !
  • 2 0
 As someone who has lost a climb switch (Fox RP something circa 2010) in the wild, is there a way to have one? Fox does not produce them any longer… Thankk a lot!
  • 1 0
 Maybe a doodad that pinches the steerer above the hs when you have the stem off? I find it really annoying when the stem is off and I'm thinking the hs will hold it for 1 min but it slides out and crashes down.
  • 2 0
 Bikeyoke makes one, it's called the Aimy
  • 2 0
 @kevinjordans: interesting. didnt think of bolting it on. I was thinking along the lines of a plastic version of the spring dumbell clamps.
  • 1 0
 Old stem?
  • 1 0
 I wrap a long gear tie around the fork and frame.

www.futurama.co.za/nite-ize-gear-tie-pro-pack-18-6-pack-black
  • 1 0
 @brianpark Could the inline pump bracket be combined with the airtag holder?
Only a suggestion, its no use to me as my frame doesn't have the tool mounts.
(only one bottle cage which I put a bottle in)
  • 1 0
 Hmm, would be nice to have pump + tube + airtag in one thing off a single set of bottle mounts. Not sure it's viable but I'll give it some thought.
  • 3 0
 The Pulse XE looks like a great printer setup for these types of parts. Thanks for sharing.
  • 1 0
 I made a customizable cup holder for keep-cups and other conical things: www.thingiverse.com/thing:3908062
and some brake caliper bleeding spacers: www.thingiverse.com/thing:5511821
  • 1 0
 For those interested in outdoor gear manufacturing and product development, check out this event coming up in BC, Canada. Should be fun... koreoutdoors.org/summit-2022
  • 10 6
 WEEEEEEEEEEEd!!!!!!
  • 1 0
 POOOOOOOOOOt!!!!!!
  • 4 0
 Great article! Love it
  • 2 0
 Don't worry, someone will download these and immediately sell them for a profit without crediting the maker.
  • 3 0
 Now we need a water bottle mount that'll hold a party size bag of Doritos.
  • 2 0
 Master of Fun Drink Holder for that nice e-Bike! Sweet! I wondered what that front rack was for. Now, it has a purpose!
  • 3 0
 So it's official, Levy is a Fire warden.
  • 2 0
 This is a great piece, I've searched thingiverse high 'n low for cool bike ideas
  • 3 0
 PLEASE make another run of the Climb switch.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for sharing your projects and process. I'm really impressed you just started and have done so much cool stuff!
  • 1 0
 @brianpark Do you have any resources you recommend if one was looking to get into 3D printing? Like yourself, I have no engineering experience.
  • 1 0
 Honestly just going down various rabbit-holes on YouTube. My biggest piece of advice is to just do it—especially with 3D printing, chances are you'll be able to make something work.
  • 1 0
 Can you share that Nalgene Side Loader? Curious how that will support a full bottle.
  • 1 0
 I printed them with glass-filled nylon filament, and it wasn't as stiff as I'd like (although it did hold a full bottle down Incline). It definitely wouldn't be stiff enough with normal PLA or PETG. I think I need to add some material or rethink how I do it—but I'm addicted to the single ribbon of material design.
  • 1 0
 Here’s another side load option but @brianpark definitely wins for style points.

cults3d.com/en/3d-model/gadget/nalgene-water-bottle-cage
  • 2 0
 I've always wanted to run one of those huge bottles we had at hockey practice on my bike.
  • 1 0
 Instead of a whole cage for the nalgene bottle, how about just a cradle that accommodates a strap or two to hold it secure? If I brought a 1L bottle along for a long ride I probably wouldn't be drinking from it directly, but rather just using it to refill my Fidlock bottle. Then the hassle of detaching straps wouldn't be a big deal. This only works for bikes with two bottle mounts, of course, but your Slim Donut should be in that club, as is my SodaMAX.
  • 2 0
 @haen: that Nalgene holder is awesome, thanks for the link. I might print that one sometime!

widefoot.com/product/litercage

WideFoot does this super nice steel Nalgene-sized bottle cage, so I think if I was going to make one I want it to be both side-load and light for the bikepacking crowd. The one I did was 51g, but I need to throw some more material at it to stiffen it up. It'd be nice to keep it under ~65g (100g lighter than the WideFoot one).
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: all3dp.com/2/carbon-fiber-filament-explained-and-compared pick a carbon filament and be a dick about it i use this range www.3dxtech.com/products/carbon-fiber-filaments, seriously you wont go back ......other than for nozzles
  • 3 0
 @Compositepro: username checks out. I've been really happy with NylonX from Matterhackers, and will print another Nalgene holder in it when I have a moment to update the model. It's just such a long/expensive print that I want to make sure I'm dialled first.

Would you recommend any of the 3dxtech filaments over NylonX?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: I wouldnt recommend anything if you have got it working for you with the brand you use right now I tried a few and the 3d tech was the one that gave me solid consistent results , I assumed you were just using glass filled if you have carbon filled working stick with it changing recipes is sometimes a disaster
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: I’ve never used that type of filament, please tell me more! What temps are you using? Are you on hardened steel nozzle? How long does a nozzle last?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Brian, just bought some Nylon 66 Carbon filament from Matter 3D (Victoria BC manufacturer). Will let you know how it goes. Cool that we now have a local option in British Columbia....
www.matter3d.com/products/performance-amide-nylon-66-high-temperature-carbon-fiber?variant=41800327463089
  • 1 0
 I did the online oneup pump thing over winter. But printed a matching tpu strap. Like the og version.
  • 1 0
 Nice! How's the TPU holding up? I want to spend some more time printing flexible materials. I made some dorky coffee stuff with some TPU and it worked really well.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: just fine still springs back and holds tight
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: also tpu makes great frame plugs for Axs users
  • 1 0
 @brianpark
Check out linktr.ee/indiesellersguild it could turn out well.
  • 1 0
 @bearclawholster is awesome also. Carry your bear mace and certain pistols too! Made in Whitefish, MT.
  • 1 0
 I like the lighter idea but I cant think of a time where I have wished I had a lighter on a ride before
  • 1 0
 I made my friends 3D printed tire levers with their names on them as novelty gifts (out of carbon fiber pc of course).
  • 1 0
 With Additive Manufacturing, I do this: homemadebicycles.blogspot.com
  • 2 0
 Love this stuff! Keep up the awesome innovative design work!
  • 1 0
 @brianpark Bigcartel webstore. Free to list up to 5 products. No fees and super simple.
  • 2 3
 "Now you tell me, what should I make next? What would you improve on the next iterations of these designs?"

Girlfriend

Sorry
  • 8 0
 lol 100% fair, but I think my wife would be pissed.
  • 1 0
 A textbook example of how you get work to pay for a hobby. Bravo sir
  • 10 0
 You just described every mountain bike media member. Smile
  • 2 0
 Don't stop the nerdery.
  • 1 0
 You missed the opportunity to call it the head-stash, my dude!
  • 2 3
 $1500 profit but hundreds of hours of work, hmmm time to move production offshore….
  • 1 0
 Roll The Bones, eh?
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