5 Tips For Flying With Bicycles

Sep 29, 2015
by Matt Wragg  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
While flying around the globe to ride your bicycle may sound exciting there is inevitably one hitch in this dream of perfection: getting your bike there. Anybody who has spent enough time flying with them will have horror stories to share. Whether it's lost bikes, damaged bikes or credit card-melting charges, there are more than enough things that can go wrong, and the odds are that sooner or later they will happen to you. While your bike may be your pride and joy, to the airlines it's big, heavy and awkward to fit in the cargo hold and to the baggage handlers it's just an exceptionally heavy item among the hundreds that need to be hauled onto the plane in time. So here's our top tips for making flying with your bike as painless as possible.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA


1. Book your bike onto the flight


This may sound obvious, but it's not quite as simple as it sounds. Because bikes are so big there are only limited space for them in the cargo hold for them, so you need to make sure the airline has space for them. If you are booking your flight directly you can probably add it onto your booking at the same time and it is no stress. However, if you are using a third party site like Lastminute, Opodo or any of the other cheap flight sites out there, then the chances are you cannot add a bike as you book. If this is the case you need to call the airline directly and reserve a space for your bike. It's a pain in the ass as you inevitably have to navigate the obtuse menu system and pray that the person on the other end of the phone speaks something approaching your own language. It is always worth doing though, as nothing ruins a biking trip faster than arriving at the airport to leave and being told there is no room on the flight for your bike...


2. Pack your bike well


Your bike is your pride and joy, right? Well the person who will be handling your bike once it is checked it doesn't care - it's just a big, heavy piece of luggage that needs moving and not every luggage handler is going to pay attention to those fragile notices and treat it with the same finesse you do. Fortunately these days there are some great options to protect your bike, but, inevitably, good protection costs money. Arguably the best bike bag out there is still the Evoc bike bag, which has been round for a good few years now and is the choice of a good proportion of professional riders and the media who travel frequently with bikes. It makes packing your bike easier with convenient attachments for the handlebars, separate wheel compartments and an aluminium skeleton for protection. These kind of bike bags are also good for the inevitable security inspections your bike will go through once you have checked it in. In the USA you are pretty much guaranteed that the TSA will open your bike, and they are far less careful than you are at putting it all back in - with a dedicated bag they are far more likely to put it all back somewhere close to how you left it. There are some good, newer options too, like the Bikind bags. However, they are not cheap - if you fly regularly they are a worthwhile investment, but if you are only going to fly once or twice a year then it might seem like a big cost. If that is the case don't scrimp and buy a cheaper bike bag - you get what you pay for and there are a whole raft of really bad bike bags out there that will do little to keep your bike safe. Instead, if you don't want to fork out the money the next best option is getting your hands on a cardboard bike box. Usually waving some beers at a local bike shop will be all it costs, then you just have to take the time to figure out how best to fit and secure your bike in there.


3. Arrive early at the airport


Don't you hate it when you have 32 things to do and then someone drops a dirty, great problem onto your desk in the middle of it all? Well that's pretty much how it feels for the check-in staff when you are trying to check your bike in, in the middle of the rush to get several hundred people processed and onto the flight in time. If you arrive at the airport a good couple of hours ahead of your flight they should be less busy, so have time to deal with you. It also means that when there are the inevitable complications you have time to sort them out before the doors close.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA


4. You are going to have to pay


How much it costs to fly with a bike changes from airline to airline. If you have taken the time to call the airline to book your bike onto the flight they should have told you how much it is going to cost. Here is a quick list of the current prices for a few airlines. These can and will change, for instance Air New Zealand used to take bikes free of charge back in 2009, then started charging in 2011 or so. Some of these airlines publish clear, simple costs and flying guidelines which makes life easier, yet some (hello BA, Emirates and Quantas!) make it very difficult to get a clear quote, so be careful. If in doubt, it is always best to call the airline and check.


AIRLINEWEIGHT LIMITCOST
American Airlines32kg$150
Delta32kg$150
Lufthansa32kg$70 continental, $150 intercontinental
United23kg/32kgIf under 23kg qualifies as checked baggage, if over $150/$200 depending on destination
Air France23kg (32kg if flying business/first class)$100 + overweight fee of $150 if over 23kg
KLM23kg150 Euros
British Airways23kgIf bike is over 23kg but below 32kg there may be a baggage fee but no precise details on their website - have been told that if check-in staff are friendly fee waived.
Iberia23kg/32kg$75
Emirates32kg$50 if second bag (two bags already in allowance, so pay for 9kg excess weight)
Qantas23/32kgDepends on destination, US - Aus is $123AUD per piece, between other destinations it is $122-$280AUD per 5kg over 23kg. Base allowance for economy is 30kg, so if taking a checked 23kg bag, a 32kg bike would be 25kg additional.
Ryannair32kg£60 if booked with flight, £70 if booked after
Easyjet32kg (but main bag cannot exceed 20kg)$50 if booked with flight, $60 if booked after
Southwest32kg-
Air New Zealand23/32kg$150
Cathay Pacific32kg$150
Aer Lingus32kg50 Euros


To put these allowances in context - a lightweight, carbon all-mountain bike with no excess equipment in an Evoc bike bag will just scrape through a 23kg limit. However, that limit is basically designed with road bikes in mind and you're going to struggle to get a burlier bike through. For a mountain biker, 32kg is a good weight - it is enough for a bike, a helmet, shoes, a backpack and maybe even a few spares. As a general rule most airlines seem to limit all baggage to 32kg and anything over that is going to need to be shipped cargo. Cargo is expensive. Several thousand dollars to get a bike there and back kinda expensive. You also need to be very careful with any airline that does not charge baggage at a piece rate - paying per kilo can also become cripplingly expensive very quickly. We have also heard reports that Emirates confusing policy can mean you have to pay multiple fees for your bike if you pas through several of their designated zones. Also, avoid Air France - aside from the strikes and the fact that French baggage handlers have one of the worst track records for getting your baggage to your destination with you, their baggage policy is ridiculous. A 32kg bag costs $150, a 23kg bike costs $100. However, a 32kg bike costs $250 - go figure...

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA


5. The check-in staff are god (as far as you're concerned)


Regardless of what any airline's baggage policy may or may not say, the reality is that when you arrive at the airport the check-in staff decide if and how that policy is applied. In other words, in terms of getting your bike onto that plane they are god. You need to be nice to them (point three helps here). If they are in a good mood they may wink at you and tell you that "your bike weighs 23kg, right..." despite clearly weighing enough to pull the moon out of orbit, or at the other end, if they are in a bad mood they may completely misunderstand the airlines baggage policy and hit you with hundreds of dollars of excess fees. For example, in their baggage policy British Airways have a pretty bad policy for mountain bikers, but tend to come off well in peoples experiences when they actually fly with them. If you do find yourself in a situation where you feel you are being overcharged your best bet is to suck it up and call the airlines customer services after. There is no point getting angry with the check-in staff, they are applying a policy and know that you don't actually have an alternative (unless you're happy to pay cargo charges or not get on the plane). If the check-in staff have made an error you will get your money refunded to you later.
Must Read This Week
DMR Sled - Review
38724 views

186 Comments

  • + 113
 Rule #5 is the best piece of advice anyone can follow. Be kind and courteous with the check-in staff, throwing compliments their way never hurts. They go through hundreds of blank faces every day and probably don't give a shit about you. Do whatever you can to make both your lives easier and hey, if you brighten their day, maybe a bag fee will be totally dropped (True Story!).
  • + 77
 Good advice in general, don't be a dick. Be nice to everyone. Open doors. Tip. Say please and thank you. No one ever got "perks" by being a cornhole.
  • + 7
 thats very true in america. I travel quite a lot and I dont know why but american check in staff seems to have a lot of power over luggage and seating arrangements. almost always they manage to give me better seats or even quicker connections just by being courteous. rest of the world is just not as common. so yeah americans take note.
  • + 2
 Absolutely. While I've never flown with my bike (yet), I have flown with wakeboard and kiteboard gear. Polite conversation is a big thing. Part ways with that baggage handler like you're a good-standing acquaintance, and you'll be less nervous about seeing your toy (s) disappear through the door.
  • + 4
 I've had good luck going to the outside check in for United and just tipping the guys 20 bucks in advance and they save me 50 in oversized fees. It's a gamble but in my experiences it's worked haha
  • + 1
 I had exactly this experience flying to and from Canada. Between my partner and I we had 3 bikes and ended up paying just 1/3 of the expected cost to fly them to and from. Smiling doesn't cost anything and being friendly (even in the airport, ugh I know) gets you in a good state of mind to holiday.
  • + 2
 Totally agree, once I got a $150 fee completely dropped! But you can run into both ends of the spectrum; another time there was this crazy person who just decided to charge me $100 for being a bike and another $100 for being an oversized box!! I did pay what they asked but deep down I wanted to strangle that person right then and there because I knew they were f..ing wrong! The airline did not give me back my money back afterwards, so I would't count on that.

Other than that, traveling with your bike is the best thing ever and the hassle is worth it! (til now)
  • + 2
 Totally agree about rule 5. Last time I flew with my bike I went out of my way to be kind to the check in last and she ended up charging me standard checked bag fee for my bike ($25).
  • + 1
 keep a firm grip on the handle bars.
  • + 10
 In the words of Bill and Ted, "Be excellent to each other!"
  • + 2
 I´ve paid 75€ for the Flight to Canada and Back. Thats pretty cheap. And British Airways has done a great Job!
  • + 3
 Yep, #3 and #5 are one of the best advices out there. Even if I am flying with the family and something is just a notch over allowance I am taking some time before I get into the queue, to stand near the desks and observe which of the check-in staff is the friendlier and less meticulous person. As soon as I see a dude or woman in bad mood or being very particular with luggage I go to the other line. Also prepare your passport opened, with ticket in, make it easy for them. Off course sometimes it all goes to sht, when you are ordered to go to special baggage pick up point and the person there is going - ammm, this is too big and too heavy, you will have to go back to check-in. But still, INCREASE YOUR CHANCES.
  • + 2
 My wife bought my bike from Australia to Canada to meet me and it cost $700 Aus. On the way back home 12 months later it cost $120.

Don't just pick the cheapest flight online without doing some research on everyone's bike bag policy. And bribing check in staff with chocolate bars can score you free beer for the next 6 hour flight!
  • + 1
 I had given up on figuring out the rules a long time ago, I always fly delta, i have paid to fly within the US or to cross the pond and sometimes I didn't pay anything. so #5 pretty much explains everything, it depends on the context, the mood of the clerks and the situation around.
I have told my buddies that a lot of times but they still haven't got it yet, it is always a journey of hesitation when we are doing the traveling plans.
  • + 1
 JetBlue is also $75 each way up to 100 lbs. Just did a trip flying out SW and returning with JB. $75 each way, no questions asked.

Make sure to have the baggage policy bookmarked on your smartphone. Half the time they don't know their own policy and try and over charge your.

Agree with #5. We had our whole crew get them on free once because we were courteous, organized, and helped load the bikes when they were super busy.

Evoc bag is da bomb. I've got about 16 flights in on mine now. It's battered but still holding strong.
  • + 46
 southwest is $75 each way. just did denver to bellingham with a rendezvous in whistler with a second hand shitbag of a bike case. be nice, ask to watch TSA check your bag, throw sexy eyes at that 47+ yr old smoker voiced, cheap lip stick, sassy mama and when she doesn't understand the concept of a ratchet strap and can't get into the case, you show her how to unravel that bad boy. don't bring yer co2 catridges, that'll get her leopard print thursday britches in a bunch.
  • + 3
 I fly frequently with my bike and I stick with air canada when I can.

/5 bucks is a typical cost one way. sometimes they can hit you with some weird fees, but call customer service afterwards and they will refund money. Takes time, is a pain in the ass but you get it back
  • + 4
 I had a funny one with the CO2 cartridge topic once. When leaving from Austria, they were on the "OK items" list. In Canada they were not... So my buddy and I were bringing our bikes to the excess baggage dropoff, lady there asks us to open one of the bags - whichever we like. Chose mine (because my buddys bag was loaded to the brim with protectors, helmet, shoes, whatever). Showed her the inside, shes like "okay" and yanks it onto the conveyor. Asks my bud about regulated items in the bag - like CO2. Between us we just thought "well, madam, you just checked the bag they were in". No need in telling them after the bag is gone...
Anyway, Lufthansa staff have been excellent on that trip. His bag weighed in just under 32 kg, at the check-in the lady asks how heavy the bag is and he's like "32 kg" - honest as always. Lady types 23. "no, I said 32" - "Oh, it's OK, don't worry about it" Cheers, the excess baggage would've been ridiculously high for 9kg extra.
  • + 2
 It's crazy how much TSA misses... don't want to incriminate myself, but let's just say, a lot. That being said, I got harassed to shit one time over a garden stone my mother in law gave me for Christmas, that they ended up deeming a weapon and confiscated.

It is amazing how polite and efficient security in most (the ones I've been to) countries are when the TSA is probably the most incompetent and inefficient organization in the history of mankind.
  • + 1
 United pulled 5 of us back from the gate when TSA pulled our bikes out of boxes to tell us we each needed to pay extra 150$ to the airline. We clearly told them what was in bag, 3 of the kids were carrying 20" wheels as carry on. Happened in Cleveland after going to Ray's.
  • + 1
 '...ask to watch TSA check your bag, throw sexy eyes at that 47+ yr old smoker voiced, cheap lip stick, sassy mama and when she doesn't understand the concept of a ratchet strap and can't get into the case, you show her how to unravel that bad boy.'

Hahaha, this had me rollin'. Great tips @rocky-mtn-gman!
  • + 2
 I always fly southwest $75 each way. Yup and I always ask to watch them go through my case which is a huge Tri case that not only carries the bike but all my gear, sea sucker rack, spare parts, and tools. Only once was I asked to place it on the scale (Seattle) I argued them down stating that their policy does not specify a weight for bikes.

Also if someone tells you that you cannot watch TSA go through your bag because it is in a secure area....that's BS you have the right to see them go through your bag. Press them and ask to speak to a supervisor you will get your way.
  • + 1
 Definitely watch when the TSA looks at your bag. Last time I had a layover in LA I followed my (rented) bike hard case and the motherf*ckers gave up on my simple, unlocked push lock and were trying to pry it open with a crowbar. Had to show them how to unlock/relock it while they were giving me a lot of "we act like we know what we're doing even though we clearly showed you we don't." attitude.

Never had a problem with US customs though, even though they usually have way too much "tough guy" attitude.
  • + 1
 I use the canafian hockey bag method and ive never paid extra fees. Lots of padding is key but shoes, helmet, jerseys, camelback etc work pretty well for that. You can also assemble the bike at the airport and squish the empty bag into a locker for the trip home.
  • + 1
 "and squish the empty bag into a locker for the trip home."

Aaaand this is why I might try the hockey bag method next time. Hard cases are a pain in the ass because you have to carry them with you for the remainder of the trip as sometimes its not possible to store them for the trip's duration (like for long roadtrips).
  • + 37
 Disappointed... I was fully expecting Wile E. Coyote sketches, plywood wings and jet packs.
  • + 6
 and acme boxes
  • + 15
 Or live with the best mountain biking in the world accessible within long weekend driving distance.
  • + 22
 you can stay home forever. No need to travel the world...
  • + 9
 how can you say if you have never been any where else?
  • + 43
 FUCK YOU YOU CANADIAN BASTARD... sorry. i'm just super jealous
  • + 2
 Was just there and considering moving...
  • + 1
 Stop making me jelly
  • + 6
 How about you suck a bucket of dicks racerfacer?

I am sorry. I am just super jealous.
  • + 3
 he's from Edmonton... not much going there for riding. West Coast ftw.
  • + 1
 yup. it's as far east and as flat as I can handle, but better than Onterrible!
  • + 11
 Rule #6. Put your foot under the weight scale for cheaper rates. Not kidding!!
  • + 5
 And let everyone you are traveling with know so they don't comment on how light it is.
  • + 2
 Most important tip on here. A toe under the scale (when possible) has saved me thousands!
  • + 6
 What about dismantling the bike (fork / front triangle / rear triangle) and fitting it in regular checked luggage alongside clothes and other stuff? Anybody doing it this way? Do you carry also tyres and tubes? I think they can be easily purchased at the destination in case that any additional weight would be concern.
  • + 1
 I used to do that a lot because i was going back and forth around 10 times a year between Europe and US.
Usual I took of my rear triangle, pulled out the fork and stuffed everything in an north face XL duffel. That way teh frame was also nicly padded by my undies. however I could never fit both wheels into the same bag so i used an extra padded double wheel bag.
I was flying so much (Sky Alliance) i had a second piece of luggage for free anyway so it didn't cost me thing to travel with my bike but specially with US-based airlines where you have to pay for luggage anyway a piece of regular sized luggage extra is still cheaper than a bike ...
  • + 1
 Had a friend that uses duffel bags and takes his frame apart, traveled the world this way. Takes a while to pull it apart and put back together though.
  • + 1
 This works for me because I have an Ibis Tranny 29, but the rear triangle has to go either in a second bag or my carryon.
  • + 3
 S&S Machine out of California makes a 26x26x10 bike hard case that with the front and rear triangle separated you can carefully pack a full suspension trail bike in. You have to really disassemble your bike but for my trip to japan this year I was able to save 400$ in baggage fees flying united. Ill post some pictures on my profile if anyone would like to see how it worked
  • + 1
 It seems like putting a rear triangle in your carry on baggage is a risky game. I could easily see an over zealous TSA person refusing to let it on because it could be used as a weapon. Apparently an 8mm allen key was considered too dangerous when I accidentally left one in my riding pack and it went through an xray machine. It got binned.
  • + 1
 haven't had an issue yet but it's only been maybe 5 or 6 times. the bag has to be bigger than the legal max for a carryon too, so I've been pretty lucky. smiling helps.
  • + 1
 Just did this and it worked like a charm on my recent trip to Wales.

Used a large Easton wheeled hockey bag (40" Long x 18 x 18 I think) and packed the complete well-padded frame (corner to corner) and front wheel in that, then I used a smaller heavy duty duffel bag for the rear wheel and fork - then sprinkled the rest of the parts and my clothes between the bags and brought them carefully up to a few pounds under the maximum weight.

The bike is a Large Specialized Enduro S-Works with... um... 26" wheels (tires removed), and for padding / protection I just stretched a bunch of T shirts around the wheels in alternating directions... maybe 4-5 shirts per wheel.

Used many of the tips above... arrive early, smile and be friendly if not appearing to be a bit of a newby to flying.

Just basically walk up to the counter matter of factly assuming "this is my checked bag - and this is my second checked bag that I paid the extra $80 for when I booked / checked in online..." As we finished check in and bag weighing, she gives me a slightly sideways look and has me wheel the larger bag over to the oversize conveyor.

I made it a point to book the entire trip with one airline (KLM) to avoid different policies and attitudes, and I figured if anyone would be bicycle friendly it would be a Dutch airline.

So on the way there, I only got charged the regular (online discount) $80 for the extra checked bag, and on the way back it was about the same.
  • + 1
 Thats the nice thing about the S&S Case it is 62 Linear inches exactly and therefore it is not oversized as long as it weighs less that 50 lbs
My bag weighed 49LBs with tools
  • + 5
 A good tip we learned...get whoever is taking you to the airport to hold onto your helmet, pads, shoes etc. Once the airline check-in people have weighed your bike and checked it in they will tell you to take it to the oversize conveyer belt. So, on the way there, zip it open and chuck in your helmet/shoes/pads that your friend was holding Smile
  • + 4
 Careful with this one, this is not the same at all airports so you can't rely on it. Does not work that way in Denver, but did have to wheel bag over to oversized check-in area in Seattle. Can sometimes work, but they don't often allow you to handle your luggage after it's been checked in regardless of size.
  • + 10
 Great Article PB !
  • + 3
 I recently flew with QANTAS from regional Aus to Vancouver and the cost for my bike in my huge Dakine bike bag was $70. My return flights were operated on behalf of QANTAS by Westjet, they didn't charge. Let them know your taking a bike before the day, helps a shit load!
  • + 1
 Good tip... I'll be flying Qantas from Darwin to Mexico, so comes handy. I will book/notify Qantas in advance that I'll be flying with a bike. Thanks!
  • + 1
 Same here, except it was a Domestic flight. If you can fit it all within the one bag and keep it under the weight you're good to go. If not, it was $30 for overweight up to the 32kgs. Otherwise you can buy a 2nd bag for $40 or so. Was a bit easier being a BMX though to be able to keep the weight down for the 1 bag.
  • + 3
 In case you don't want to pay for a bike bag, or extra luggage fees...
Depending on the airline (some allow 2 checked bags) put the wheels in one box, and put your bike in the other. Customize the boxes into odd, absolute minimum shapes. Later, you will beg the check-in desk to go easy on you for the dimensions due to "financial hardship." Pad everything, re-insert rear axle. Protect your hubs with layers of cardboard. Add personal items packed around the bike parts like Angusprox said. Make full use of your carry-on.
Extra tips: bring a roll of blue tape, and packing tape. "It's not a bike; its some bike parts." Cannondale boxes seem to be the best. You can use your bike box as a hitchhiking sign. Cut your own handles in the box. Bundle all small items together so nothing falls out.

I have done this in various countries, and rarely, if ever, invested any money in flying with bikes.
  • + 1
 @Zeeman similar and since I travel a lot I got a bike with S & S couplers. It's a very manageable case size, overall weight and size fits inside most airline requirements. The limitations are it can only really be done to a round tubed non suspension frames, they are kinda a pain to pack with a geared bike, and more common with NABHS builders so less relevant to PB. Still it's always nice to have your own bike, not deal with extra fees and case that fit truck of just about any car.

www.sandsmachine.com
  • + 3
 Do yourself a favor and get a Evoc Bike Bag for traveling. It's expensive for sure, but there's something to be said for the ease of use. Look at it as an investment if you'll travel with your bike every now and then. Even better, it fits your Camelback, helmet, any pads you can think of, other gear, and has pockets for tools and small parts. Only takes one bag for it all. Some people will never want one because of the cost and I get that, but if you have the means it's worth the dough. Also, the agent who checks your bags is always right. Trust me, being a pleasant traveler can earn some sympathy every now and then and may result in you flying with some more money in your pocket that you thought you'd have to spend to fly with your bike.
  • + 0
 Amen, me and the missus each got the evoc bag before our whistler trip and it was a breeze partially because of the travel bag. We were able to load our do bikes with all our biking gear minus our helmets (we took those as carry-on) we weighed them before we even got t the airport to make sure we were under 50lbs, which we were! We flew Air Canada, I think it was only $50 extra each way for the bikes.
  • + 1
 Cost I don't mind, it is the weight that turned me off. The airline I flew with had a maximum weight limit of 20kg per bag. If I used the evoc bag I'd only get half my bike in. As it was with a Vaude foam padded bag I still had to put all my kit and even the forks in my suitcase to make it under the limit. Trap for small players.
  • + 0
 The ChainReaction Cycles Pro bag is also awesome! Pretty much a copy of the EVOC bag and costs nearly half! Works great and would recommend it, specially if you're on a budget.
  • + 1
 I have an EVOC bag, and it is definitely the shit, travelled all over the world multiple times and never had an issue. Although one important point is weight, the EVOC like any other good bike bag is not light and I have found that sometimes, to avoid paying fees I just pack my bike in a cardboard box which is far lighter and use clothes in plastic bags to protect the frame. Thos option has also worked really well, particulary when travelling wit downhill bikes (for my trailbike EVOC all the way) but you don't want to have to walk too far when you arrive as bike boxes are annoying to carry, so good if you have a hire car or somebody picking you up
  • + 2
 I've been using a PRO softcase this year, similar to the EVOC bag but with some small differences that are worth looking into. Lighter weight overall so packing an AM 29'er with 2.5" tires with tools, hydration bag, helmet and some clothes still came in at 50lbs. Easy to pack/unpack and well padded. Either bag is good, and beats using a clam shell case like the Trico I used to use or a cardboard box with tons of zip ties and foam pipe wrap.
  • + 2
 I own the Dakine bag and I've also used a Tricon travel case. The Dakine bag is 1000x better all around. It's way easier to pack, for you AND for TSA. It's impossible for TSA to close up a hard case correctly, and I have yet to find a place where they were even remotely interested in letting me help. Usually they take it away and all the mischief happens behind closed doors. Oh, and if you're remotely worried about the weight, you can bet that a plastic case will be a problem. Those bastards are heavy. It's not a road bike, it doesn't need to be in a pansy boy super box.

Meanwhile, I find that people put WAAAAAAYYYY too little emphasis on how they're going to deal with the bikes and cases while on vacation. I've rented station wagons that would hold two bikes, and arranged shuttle vans with assurance that the back would be available for bikes. But those took a good amount of extra phone time to get guarantees that I wouldn't be left ......... holding the bag. These options cost a bit more than basic transport too. Then, where will you be keeping the case while you enjoy your bike? It's a big big piece of empty luggage. Hope there's a garage where you're staying.
  • + 1
 Great points. It's the same way with skis or a board bag. They are huge, constantly in the way, and if you don't have the right rental car or bus or cab, your screwed. Planning ahead for the ground transportation makes a huge difference.
  • + 1
 Oh god, so this. I have gotten to New Zealand with 173cm long snowboards in a 188cm rolling bag, and the rental car company is like "We don't have the station wagon you booked, here's a Toyota Corolla". Long and hard "negotiations" finished with me in a brand new Rav4 and no upgrade charges ... but now I always call ahead to make sure that they know I'm bringing boards or bikes, and the wagon is non-negotiable.
  • + 3
 British Air will count the bike as a checked in bag as long as it meets the weight limit. I flew with my AM bike to Nice in June for $75 each way, because I had two checked in bags.
  • + 2
 I use Air Transat when I fly between the UK and Canada. I highly recommend them, as the fares are well priced and taking a bicycle is only CAD$30! Also, there is no limit to bicycles per person, just 10 bicycles per plane unless a previous arrangement has been made. Check them out: www.airtransat.com
  • + 1
 Yep ! Used Air Transat twice to fly from Toulouse to Montreal and I was really pleased with the low cost for taking my bike with me 3
  • + 1
 Awesome to know, thanks! Often with cheap fares they stiff you on the extras.
  • + 2
 @Matt Wragg

Matt, great article, one correction:

>>> Lufthansa's limit is 23kg for the bike.

We arrived at YVR last year for a flight to Munich (Alpcrossing trip). Evoc bag and Carbon Covert plus helmet and gear all packed in my bag. Just under 32kg.
Booked through Air Canada and received confirmation from Air Canada that 32kg is ok. I'm a bit OCD and wanted to make sure I won't have to deal with any issues, so I've checked the Air Canada website and even called them to confirm. When we arrived, the actual flight was with Star Alliance partner Lufthansa who has a 23kg limit. This was Crankworx weekend and a number of German and Austrian Enduro riders were booked on the same flight to Munich. So the fun began... we all scrambled to re-pack our gear trying to get the Evoc bags down to 23kg. Still paid a hefty additional fee as now all our regular luggage was overweight. NOT IMPRESSED! This was total bs, especially since I inquired beforehand. Talked to service desk supervisor and submitted written complaint, but no positive response. Again, there was a number of pro-riders affected as well and they all were super surprised.
  • + 1
 I went with Air Transat from Frankfurt to YVR and back last year. Frankfurt was no issue. They didn't even weight our bikes (they were around 29kg i think). On the way home we got told our bikes were to heavy and you are not allowed to have any other things, such as gear, in the bike bag. The bags were at around the same weight as on the trip to Vanc. We needed to repack our stuff too. That was the only cons. The fees were great tho, 25 Euros per flight for the bikes.
  • + 2
 Just FYI - your bike only counts as a regular checked bag on United IF you meet BOTH the weight (50lb) and size limitations (62"). While you can eek in under the weight limit, It's impossible to hit the size restriction with a complete Mtn bike - so you're stuck with the $150 bike charge.
  • + 1
 United staff will sometimes let you through if under weight but over size. See rule #5 above.
  • + 1
 United status helps on this. Was Platinum last year, didn't pay at Premium Check In for two bikes, one for me the other for a buddy I had booked on my itinerary to get him an Econ+ seat. Lady just said it was OK as long as they were under 70lbs, which they were. Couple of friends on same flight, regular check-in 100 yards away in got dinged the $150 each. We split the cost four ways since it didn't seem fair that United looked the other way just for a couple of us.
  • + 5
 I thought this might have been an article for sending it super hard on your bike
  • + 2
 Do some research on your destination country's leniency towards hazards to their ecosystem. New Zealand for example, is very strict on sporting equipment being free of things such as leaves, dirt, rocks when being brought into the country. I knew this in advance and had my bike and gear cleaned spotless before I packed them, and breezed right through customs while there were other people waiting in line to get their hiking boots cleaned.
  • + 1
 i packed my bike everytime i went on vacay on a bike box and so far its included to my check in bags which they usually allow 2 check in bag for 23kg each, so for me i have no problem bringing my bike somewhere else. and no other damage once i get to my destination which is good.
  • + 1
 So glad I invested in an Evoc,super stable to drag along and saves loads of time when packing/unpacking at either end.I always find it annoying that most airlines have rules about the size and weight of baggage but not the same rules about passengers,especially when you find you're seated next to someone who's spilling over into that seat you paid for.
  • + 1
 I've NOT checked the bag in when I check my person in and have just dealt with it at the airport and had good luck getting the bike fee waived or reduced. Doesn't always work and a bit of a gamble. Curbside check in gives you a little bit of latitude as well.
  • + 1
 Many Asian airlines will fly your bike for free. I travel heaps with my bikes, mostly with Singapore Airlines and they will carry your bike free of charge as long as your total weight doesn't exceed 30 kgs. Many airlines in Thailand will also fly your bike for free, you can even roll up to the airport with your bike and just check the bike in as it is if you fly with Thai Airways.
  • + 1
 Sadly not with most HK airline, no money, no bikey
  • + 1
 If you're in the U.S. look into sending your bike to your destination via Amtrak. $62 or so, they wheel it onto the train, they wheel it off of the train. No TSA, no baggage handlers tossing it around. They won't give you an exact date of arrival and it takes a bit of planning but I know my bike is being treated well and will be ready to go when I pick it up. This of course doesn't work if Amtrak doesn't have a station with baggage services where you're headed.
  • + 1
 2 things: EasyJet weight limit is 32kg not 20kg. They did try to reduce it to 20kg about a year ago but that nonsense only lasted a brief period before they reverted to 32kg however, they do say that there should only be a bike in there, not assorted other luggage so I do not push my luck stuffing other gear in there apart from pads(to help pad the bike) and helmet - and the helmet is largely screened from the X-ray scan by the way I pack the brake rotors above and below it. Anyway, I want to make the bike box as light as possible in order to minimize any handling damage.

2nd point: Partly because I live a good distance away from the airport, plus a ferry journey, I always try and book an early flight and stay overnight prior at a budget hotel near the airport. For the early flights EasyJet allow you to check in your luggage the prior evening, when the airport can be far from busy, so bag drop has been swift, and more importantly that saves a lot of hassle going through the bag drop on the morning of the flight when the airport is always insanely busy.
  • + 1
 Have flown a few times in Europe and gone straight from the self check in to excess baggage. Print off a baggage label at self check in, whack it on the bag (that mates are looking after nearby...) and excess baggage thinks you have already declared or paid. Works great if the rest of your gear is carry on. We did this in late June going to the Alps so a bit out of high season and we took a chance by not informing the airline in advance, but it worked a treat for several years.
  • + 1
 This past summer I got my 120L Patagonia bag stolen at the Seattle Int baggage carousel had all my bike gear in it. Lucky they did not take my Evoc bag which had my bike. I file a police report and the cop said over 298 bags were stolen from the baggage claim this past July. I know a few airlines only pay up to 3500 in stolen goods. So make sure you buy extra insurance or put a tracking device on your bike.
  • + 1
 Make sure not to fly through Shanghai, as you have to pick up your luggage and then check it in again = You have to pay all extra luggage/overweight/bike-luggage fees one more time...
Stockholm - Shanghai - Auckland, twice as expensive as Auckland - Hongkong - Stockholm
  • + 1
 I gotta say add Alaska for those traveling to and around the west coast, especially the Pacific Northwest. The wink/nod/god rule works well, and their baggage handlers deal with a lot of stuff in Alaska and Seattle so that when they see a bike, it can be a relief. Orange County, Fairbanks, Anchorage, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, etc., and I've ended up paying the fee only about 25% of the time...especially if the total package is less than 50 lbs (22.7 kg)...which is doable with the EVOC or Biknd pack. Pack smart and save some $$.
  • + 1
 Had my bike shipped from northern Washington to central California for $25, the guy delivering the luggage left my box just sitting there, I saw him drop it off and walk away, make sure you arrive to the baggage claim early as said.
  • + 1
 A lot left unsaid here. The airline is everything. Emirates will fly your bike for free if it's under 30kgs and the only piece of check in. That is HUGE. So I would say choose your riding destination and airline simultaneously. Then yes, arrive at the airport early, but that's just common sense. Critically, you need to allow 1 day after you arrive, because airlines often bounce the bike if there's a lot of luggage - they put it on the next flight. Dismantling and packing is the second everything.
  • + 1
 I fitted my bike in my suitcase, took everything apart (the frame on two) and the only tricky part was that I could fit only one of the rims and I had to shape the suitcase for that, the other I gave to the person traveling with me. The flight was NYC-Bulgaria and didn't pay anything for the bike.
  • + 1
 What do you guys do when travelling with two bikes? Additional (overweight) bags are quite expensive...

I will do so next year; I think I will pre-register two bikes and bring two cardboard boxes (2x 32kg, all clothes stuffed in them), a carry-on and no other baggage. I expect to pay for two bikes, but no additional baggage fee (intercontinental flights usually allow 2 checked bags).
  • + 1
 Always flew British airways and the bike is part of your luggage allowance. Honestly from Nice to vancouver and back, I checked at the counter and because it's too big and it's a bike they never weighed it and I just needed to go the oversize luggage check in to drop my bike bag. never weighed neither. So event if I was a little bit over 23 Kgs, I never paid any extra.

back in 2006 British Airways was just so good. You could bring 2 regular 32 Kgs luggage + a sport equipement (32 Kgs) + a cabin suitcase and a laptop size suitcase..... With no extra charge!
Now it's just one luggage or sport equipement and 2 cabin luggage.
  • + 1
 I used to fly frequently to ride in Turkey. I tried different air companies here from Europe to this wonderful country. Here, a bike is considered like a sport luggage and they are always under fixed price : you pay a fix price (it's the same for golf, surf, diving equipment). Generaly bike luggage fees are around 40+40 € went & return. Normaly i fill my bike bag with all my bike equipement and the bike of course. But last time, they made me empty all my bike bag because it's was to heavy, aroung 40 kg and up to the airport rules, it wasn't anymore a traveler bag but a cargo bag!!!! I packed it so well, opening it and dispatching all content to catch the weight limit was horrible, in the middle of the airport !!! So be carefull people !!! :-)
  • + 1
 I didn't paid extra fees
  • + 1
 In general good advises, however some airlines offers free sport equipment baggage, ski or bike depending on the season
Also you can save space in luggage and bring helmet as a headdress;
Last Time:
Use nylon bag for $40 + straps + bubble protection from local store for $5 bucks (all weight less than 3 kg)
All bike with equipment, tools, shoes and spares weight less than 23 kg. Paid nothing to airlines

And yepp we have 23 kg limit.
  • + 1
 If you are flying to or through Asia, Korean Air's policy crushes any other I've seen! Plus they are just plain pleasant to fly with. Check their policy on their website: www.koreanair.com/global/en/traveling/baggage-services/allowed-to-bring-unrestricted/bicycles.html
  • + 1
 A good tip for any Scottish people out there, fly from Aberdeen! I flew from Aberdeen to Vancouver (via London). They weighed my normal case, but the scales are too small to weigh your bike bag so they just slap it with a heavy sticker and send you on your way!
  • + 1
 I fly about twice a year sometimes more with my bikes, the best bike bag you can get is a cardboard bike box reinforced with gaffatape, you can leave the rear wheel on so you don't have to worry about your back end getting crushed. If you have a few connections make sure you have at least 1hr or more between the flights so your bikes will make it, one year BA left both my bikes in london as they did not have time to load them on the flight to Vancouver, I got them back 2 days later.
  • + 1
 I just flew from WA up to AK this month to see my family and race. I really did not plan it very well and though that packing my DH bike into a box would be easy. I did not realize that Delta had such a strict policy regarding traveling with bikes, $150 each way!! Luckily I was able to get a XS frame box from my LBS (Streamline Bike Supply) and disassemble my wilson to fit in the box along with a lot of foam and packaging materials. It came in just under 50lbs and the baggage attendants were nice enough to waive the fee on the trip up and on the way back I had to persuade them to not classify it as a "bike" and got the fee waived again. Overall It was not worth the 10hrs I had into assembly/disassembly of the bike for the whole trip. Next time I fly I am going to just buy a bag and get my ticket on an airline that has a good bike bag policy.
  • + 1
 Great article. The rate table is nice. There are typically differences between international and domestic charges, right? Like international flights typically allow more baggage... Anyone have beta on international v. domestic differences?
  • + 3
 For all the stateside folks, Southwest only charges 75, unless you do the hockey bag trick. As far as I know that's the cheapest you can get stateside.
  • + 3
 In the US, Jet Blue, Virgin, and Frontier are all only $50 each way! I've found myself paying more just to fly with them since it'll come out cheaper versus the $150 fee on the other airlines.
  • + 1
 Good to know. A lot of times Frontier is super cheap.
  • + 2
 When flying within the continental united States I found it best to UPS my bike to my destination. Of course this is only ideel if you have family, a good friend, or a trust worthy hotel or other to accept the package
  • + 1
 I was actually going to inquire about this, or sending from bike shop/ to bike shop.
  • + 1
 It's worth noting with Emirates that the fee for that extra 9-10 kilo is going to cost you at the rate of $55 per kilo. Unless your flight connects through N. America (which has slightly better baggage policies) I would advise never traveling on Emirates with a bike as they do not charge per bag weight but total weight. You get 30k total regardless of # of bags, everything over that is $55 per/K. Of course on their website they site theirs as one of the most generous baggage allowances in the industry.... right.
  • + 1
 But be weary of their rules about physical size of bags as well.
  • + 1
 Anyone have tips for avoiding TSA search? Out of SFO you can't "watch while they search" and they always mess up the repack. The bad job putting it together has caused damages to my bike case.
  • + 1
 Bikes are free if you fly with Virgin Atlantic.
Be careful if you fly to the States though as usually the internal flight on the way back will be with a carrier (normally Delta) who will charge you $150 for baggage.
  • + 1
 Or you could just get a Ruster Sports henhouse and not pay any bike related fees. I have used mine over 10 times, works flawlessly every time. rustersports.com/product/armored-hen-house
  • + 2
 Amazing how many ppl try to cheat weight going onto a plane...there is a reason why every pound or kg is counted, bad game to play
  • + 1
 Another thing to consider is that you may be storing your bike bag or box at the airport. The fee's for bike storage vary and you can really take a hit, if you are requiring storage for a long period of time.
  • + 1
 If you have several connecting flights or transfers, ask the check in person if they can get your baggage in for the whole journey, that way you can avoid paying a domestic charge on top of an international one.
  • + 0
 Don't know where Matt Wragg got his facts from in regards to fees - Air NZ $150????? I fly Air NZ (domestic & international) and couldn't be more pleased with them. Bike in box is treated just as a normal bag if it's under 23kg. The most I've ever paid is NZ$30 each way for my bike as an additional bag to the standard baggage allowance on my fare. Refer here for the details - www.airnewzealand.co.nz/oversized-items
  • + 4
 Tip 6: wrap the box in a f*uck load of ''fragile'' packing tape
  • + 2
 I've heard that doing something like that only encourages the baggage handlers to treat your cargo worse...
  • + 4
 It's sporting equipment, I don't even bike BRO!
  • + 2
 This is great timing for me. Anyone have an average price for Air Canada or Westjet before I start booking my trip? Flying domestic
  • + 1
 my bike was free with WestJet
  • + 1
 Specific pricing is on a case basis if you don't fall under the criteria listed below.

From the Air Canada website.

Bicycles are accepted on a space available basis only and should be pre-registered at time of booking. Each bicycle counts as one piece of baggage towards the maximum number of checked bags allowed by your fare type.

Weight and size limits:

Maximum weight: 32kg (70lb)
Maximum linear dimensions (length + width + height): 292cm (115 in)
Air Canada Cargo handles the shipment of bicycles that exceed these limits.

Waivers

No overweight or oversize charges apply to bicycles, provided they are within the maximum weight and size limits indicated above.

Charges

If your baggage count (bicycle + number of bags to be checked) exceeds the maximum number of items allowed by your fare type, additional checked baggage charges will apply, in addition to a fixed handling charge.

Handling charge
In addition to any applicable additional checked baggage charges, bicycles are subject to a handling charge of $50 CAD/USD (plus applicable taxes) for carriage on Air Canada and Air Canada rouge flights, as well as on Air Canada Express flights operated by Jazz, Sky Regional, Air Georgian and Exploits Valley Air.

The handling charge applies to one-way flights and for each way of travel on round-trip and multi-segment flights.
A single fixed handling charge is waived:
When you purchase a Latitude or Business Class fare for travel within Canada, and between Canada and the U.S.
If you are an Altitude member, provided your baggage count (bicycle + number of bags to be checked) does not exceed the maximum number of items allowed by your Altitude status.
Packing instructions

The bicycle must be placed - with handlebars fixed sideways and pedals removed - in a rigid and/or hard shell container specifically designed for shipping or in a bicycle suitcase (in the case of collapsible bicycles). Tires must be partially deflated.

If otherwise packaged, the bicycle may be refused for carriage. Air Canada is not liable if and to the extent that any damage results from the inherent defect, quality or vice of the baggage.
  • + 1
 From Westjet:
A maximum of one bicycle and one helmet are allowed per guest.
All applicable oversized, overweight and extra piece fees apply. For example, if a bicycle is more than 115 inches in combined dimensions both overweight and oversize fees will be charged.
WestJet may refuse carriage of improperly packaged bicycles. Before flying with your bike, please:
Remove pedals.
Partially deflate your tires.
Fix handlebars sideways.
Pack the bicycle in a box or bag to protect your bike and prevent leakage from bicycles containing hydraulic fluid.
  • + 1
 I think air canada was $50 each way coming from the states to Vancouver.
  • + 1
 I packed my bike up in a bikebox (cardboard) and did all the necessary requirements... And when flying with sunwing a bike counts as sports equipment and is only an additional $30... Hope that helps
  • + 0
 I paid nothing on Air Canada on my last flight with an AM bike in a Trico Iron Case.
  • + 1
 Use a hockey bag and really take everything apart...."sports equipment" is free even if it's over the weight and size restrictions. Even if you buy a new hockey bag every single flight you're still saving money. I flew two mountain bikes across the country, using Air Canada, and all I paid was a $20 second bag fee.
  • + 1
 If I were to travel with my bike I'd probably take a flight on a less crowded day so I'm not getting stuck in line and getting really anxious about it. I'd also probably want to bubble rap the hell out of everything.
  • + 0
 Is there anyone here whos flown jetstar with a bike australia to new zealand? I payed about $30 extra each way for 40kg checked baggage, hopefully theres no catch. They did say that it wasnt limited to one bag too.
  • + 1
 have only used jetstar internally - have had no issues just paying for the additional weight. No fuss.
  • + 1
 They are usually fine with as many bags as you want, even if over size, as long as they are underweight combined.
  • + 1
 Yea that's what I thought. First time flying with a bike, hopefully no problems
  • + 2
 BTDub, for all you non-metric users out there, 32 kgs = 70 lbs, 23 kgs = 50 lbs.
  • + 1
 Every time in the past 6yrs (most recently in April 2015) that I've flown with air Nz there had been no additional charge for my bike
  • + 1
 It's 2015, TRACK your luggage with any numerous live tracking gizmos on market.
Many airlines now offer this, some luggage (no bike bags I'm aware of tho) have built in gps.
  • + 1
 You should really put Air Transat on that list! If you take a bike from Canada to Europe for example, it only costs 30 CAD. I did it in 2013 and it worked out flawless.
  • + 3
 If you have a few days in advance I always ship my bike.
  • + 2
 Internationally? I'm interested in hearing how much you paid. Quotes I got to Spain were astronomical! Could have bought a semi-decent bike when I got there instead of shipping one.
  • + 1
 I can't say I have never traveled internationally.
  • + 2
 Wink and a nod saved me $75 via Air Alaska on my way to Whistler in August.
  • + 2
 Thanks for having Canadian airlines and Westjet on the list. Douches. 90% of your articles take place in Canada.
  • + 1
 Seriously. ..not having air Canada on there is quite bizarre.
My fee has always been $50...pretty sure some personable dialogue/friendly banter helped.
  • + 3
 Really "QUANTAS"? How can that even look right?
  • + 1
 Beat me to it! QANTAS is an acronym. All capitals. Get it together PB
  • + 1
 Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services
  • + 2
 Lol, I live by an old Qantas Empire hangar...
  • + 1
 Get some photos of your bike in the bag, before you set off. So if you do get some damage, you can prove the bike had no damage before the flight and it was packed properly.
  • + 1
 Tip #6: Try to schedule your flights with at least 2 hours transfer time, there if much bigger chance losing your bike with shorter transfer times.
  • + 0
 Last year we rode Thailand on rental bikes, that honestly sucked. End of 2016 is a Japan/Thailand trip and I am still debating if I am going to bring a bike and if I do will it be the SB66 or the Jedi. All these decisions...
  • + 1
 Fly with AirNorth and you only pay $25 one way for your bike bag. Best day Ever!!! Ohh and your first bag is free.
  • + 2
 I thought this was gonna give me tips on hitting big gaps
  • + 1
 Check out this nightmare story on NSMB

nsmb.com/air-canada-destroys-bike
  • + 1
 Are those 32kg limits not only for USA/Canada? All of my non-USA flying has always had 23kg limits.
  • + 3
 It's all 23kgs these days - used to be more going up to the states but seems like they've just made it 23kgs no matter the destination. Even the frikkin train from Seattle to Vancouver had 23kgs weight limits and same with the greyhound bus I took back!! (and they weighed it despite there being 4 people on the bus!)

Also the AirNZ bit not correct. Sporting equipment including bikes you can travel free with, as long as they're under your 23kg bag limit. Otherwise you just have to pay for another 'standard' bag which was $200. You can buy a 'heavy' bag not sure how much that costs.

The 23kg limit is tight. I just brought a road bike back from the states... didn't take my MTB just hired. Nearly got stung $200 bucks for an extra bag (empty bike bag) going up.. just grabbed a rolled of tape out of car and taped my 'normal' bag to bike bag.. was then one item no probs cause under 23kgs.

One trick I used and have used it on internal flights here to Q'town is to take a lot of stuff out of your bike bag.. get someone to hold onto it. Get it checked in at the desk where it's weighed, then you have to take it to oversize baggage to get on plane. As you walk to oversized just fill it back up with all the junk you took out. They don't weigh it again as it's checked and tagged just xray and send it through. Works a treat!
  • + 1
 On United flights it can't be checked as 'standard luggage' unless it fits within the max luggage dimensions, which of course any bike box or bag (Evoc) does not. So basically unless you break down your bike into parts and shove it in a roller suitcase, it will be considered over dimension and the $150/200 fee will apply.

Overall its pure bias, as most airlines allow Golfers to check their heavy awkward cases for the same price as normal checked luggage. That's $50 vs $400 for an international flight!
  • + 1
 Don't forget Air New Zealand is a lot cheaper if you book your extra bags online before flying, depending on the route, from memory, $150 becomes $95 (I.e. NZ - Canada) for international and $50 becomes $30 for domestic.
  • + 2
 Thought this was going to be a DJ article.
  • + 2
 Pipe lagging, bubble wrap and more pipe lagging EVERYWHERE!
  • + 1
 Or use those swimming pool foam tubes (pool noodles), and slice one side.
  • + 1
 Or just wrap your DH pads around your tubes!!
  • + 1
 surely best way is to put ET - Extra Terrestrial in a handlebar mounted basket?
  • + 2
 Rule #6 - Don't fly with Air Canada,
  • + 2
 exactly and I guess the owner of that bike would more then agree

nsmb.com/air-canada-destroys-bike
  • + 1
 I ll travell with the plane with my bike when I will be able to afford 500$ to pay the bag ... evoc f*cks us every second
  • + 1
 My friend used this for our trip to Whistler --> www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174818_-1___[Ljava.lang.String;@492f492f

I used the Dakine bag, and it was pretty nice. A bag with wheels is a plus if transporting a DH bike.
  • + 1
 But the price is way worth! A friend used a road bike hardshell and it was broken after the flight to Vancouver and back. The Evoc back is all good and the bike is in perfect shape.
  • + 1
 Does anyone pull rotors when packing? I travel with an evoc bag, and have never had a problem.....yet!
  • + 1
 I never used to, but my last trip to NZ on Qantas with the Evoc bag had my rotors coming out looking like Pringles chips.
  • + 1
 I remove now, every time, even if I travel wi a hard case (TC1).
  • + 1
 yeah i put mine in a plastic bag so there's no chance for grease to get them
  • + 1
 Has someone made experience concerning Ryanair flying back and forth to the canary islands, taking off from Germany?
  • + 0
 Some of the airline companies request hard cardboard case. They dont allow any kind of soft bags/cases for bikes. So do your research before you buy superexpensive bikebag...
  • + 1
 Thank you for the article ... so helpful ..
  • + 1
 don't pack your shoes with your bike. pro tip number #1.
  • - 1
 ANOTHER IDEA is too just mail it to your hotel or place your staying. or maybe the local bike shop. Bottom line it, mailing is way cheaper then flying
  • + 1
 Hard cases exist- For a reason! Also- Cargo holds are pressurized.
  • + 2
 But you there is a good chance that you will be asked about letting your types down. Also there has been a recent issue in the UK about the shipping of shocks, due their having pressurized air in them. The airline have not come across this yet, but just in case, let the air out of your shocks and forks.
  • + 1
 thought if you have an evoc bike bag you wont pay extra...
  • + 1
 Cathy Pacific has the best service in my opinion
  • + 1
 what was your experience?planning to take my bike to Philippines from newark, new jersey with evoc bag.
  • + 1
 @Paulcoruna: 1 regular size suitcase+ 1 dh bike boxed with cardboard box. They didn't charge me 8 years ago when I come to Canada for school from Hongkong. Brought an am bike back and forth to hongkong for vacation and they began to charge me 100 dollars each ticket 3 years ago. The bike was alright everytime I get off the plane and I am okay with the price. I would suggest you contact them before flying that way you might save that 100 dollars. They say it is free to transport a bike under certain weight on their website.
  • + 1
 @Paulcoruna: and i would not suggest southern china. they bent my deemax rear wheel once and paid me 20 bux for the damage
  • + 1
 Alitalia:
Bikes fly for free, regardless of box size.
  • - 3
 Another one I'd say is bleed your brakes before leaving. I flew bikes with some friends and 4 of us had to replace our shimano saint brakes because there were air bubbles in our lines and the pressure change completely screwed over our brake levers. Not sure if it's just a shimano thing but it sure was a pain
  • + 1
 Zee brakes were fine for me
  • + 7
 @braedonmcnipps

Cargo holds were and always have been pressurized+heated...

Unless you flew your bike on an unpressurized fighter jet...
  • + 1
 Southwest charges $75 for it being oversized.
  • + 1
 important info here!!

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.114894
Mobile Version of Website