6D ATB-1T Helmet - Review

Mar 17, 2016
by Mike Levy  
6D ATB-1A


Riders are going faster and bigger than ever on mid-travel bikes that are also more capable than ever, all of which can sometimes make for heavy crashes when things don't go as planned. And while a broken bone or deep gash is certainly unpleasant, a head injury is scary in an entirely different kind of way.

6D is aiming to lessen the chances of that happening by taking their dual-shell, Omni-Directional Suspension design that they've used in their motocross helmets and scaling it down to work for mountain bikers. They debuted their ATB-1 Carbon full face back in 2014, and now they're offering the $269.95 USD ATB-1T helmet that employs the same ODS technology in a package that's intended for trail riders and enduro racers who might not want the coverage of downhill lid but are still looking for any sort of advantage when it comes to avoiding a concussion.



6D ATB-1A
The $269.95 ATB-1T weighs 501 grams due to its clever Omni-Directional Suspension system.
6D ATB-1A
Fifteen vents and channels between the helmet's two shells provide cooling.


The new helmet's name stands for "Advanced Technology Bike" and the "T" is for trail, although the lid's intentions are pretty obvious thanks to the extra coverage at the sides and back of the rider's head. It's also not as vented as a more cross-country oriented helmet, with fifteen openings that let air enter and exit and a far less airy appearance, although 6D does claim that air moves well between the helmet's inner and outer EPS shells.

Continuing with that same all-mountain theme, the helmet's polycarbonate shell is thicker than what you'd find on a lighter duty lid, something that no doubt adds some grams but also helps the ATB-1T to brush off daily abuse easier, and the front of the shell is shaped to mate well with goggles.

ATB-1T Details

• Intended use: trail riding
• Omni-Directional Suspension (ODS)
• Thick polycarbonate shell
• Replaceable inner EPS shell
• Fidlock magnetic buckle
• Goggle compatible
• Exceeds CPSC 16 CFR 1203 and EN 1078 standards
• Fifteen vents
• Sizes: XS/S (51-55cm), M/L (55-59cm), L/XL (59-63cm)
• Weight: 501 grams (actual, M/L)
• MSRP: $269.95 USD


6D ATB-1A
The retention band offers four centimeters of adjustment in each of the three shell sizes.
6D ATB-1A
Four different height positions for the retention band allow for a very wide range of adjustment.


Flipping the ATB-1T upside down reveals a basic but effective adjustable retention system that supplies four centimeters of range in each of the three shell sizes that 6D offers, as well as being height-adjustable in four increments. A single dial provides the action, and although the detents are a bit softer than I'd prefer, it is easy to tinker with while on the move.

The chin strap is interesting in that rather than use a standard buckle, 6D has gone with a clasp from the German company, Fidlock. It uses a magnetic insert that encourages the two halves to slide together, and it's so well thought out that you can even manage close it with just one hand.


What is Omni-Directional Suspension?

In very simple terms, ODS is basically two separate helmet shells, one inside the other, that are joined by twenty-seven rubber dampers that allow the outer shell to move independently of the inner shell. 6D says that the design allows for three-dimensional displacement of the inner shell upon an impact, which ''uncouples the impact force at the outer shell from the riders head.'' In other words, 6D is saying that you're less likely to suffer a head injury when wearing one of their helmets compared to a more traditional design.


6D
  This demo shoes how the inner and outer EPS shells can shear in relation to one another due to the rubber dampers that connect them.


It isn't just straight-on impacts that present a danger to riders, as angular acceleration - think impacts from a shallow angle like when you're sliding along the ground or have a low-side crash - can play a major role when it comes to head injuries. These type of impacts are when the ODS system comes into play by allowing the two helmet shells to shear in relation to each other, an action the 6D says, ''increases ‘Time-to-Peak’ values by roughly double.'' In plain-speak, this means that it lessens the severity of the impact.

The rubber dampers also supply progressive absorption for more direct, high-velocity impacts, and 6D explained that the specific hourglass shape of their rubber dampers, which are actually different than what's used in their full face, produce a ''rapidly escalating spring rate under compressive load'' that further helps to protect the rider's head. Want to know more? 6D has a number of videos on their website that do a good job of explaining how the ODS system works.


6D ATB-1A
  The yellow portion is the outer shell while the grey portion is the inner shell, and the red colored dampers that connect the two shells are just visible between them.


The helmet's inner EPS shell is actually made with softer density foam to be more compliant and forgiving against the rider's head, and 6D is even exploring the option of offering replacement inner shells in the event that a helmet has done its job and is compromised but can be still be saved from being a total write-off.

''We won’t know how entirely plausible this is until we start seeing real world, crashed helmets back in for inspection,'' says 6D's Dominick Vandenberg before going on to explain that it's already a service that they offer to their motocross customers. ''We have the ability to rebuild helmets and put in an all new inner EPS assembly to get the customer back up and running for a fraction of the cost of replacing a brand new helmet.'' And while Vandenberg didn't have an exact price for a new inner EPS replacement at this point in time, the $269.95 ATB-1T is expensive compared to its less complicated and more traditional competition so I can certainly see riders appreciating a reasonable repair cost.
6D
The twenty-seven rubber dampers (shown in red) are connected by a modular carrier system.


All of the above adds up to 501 grams for an ATB-1T in the M/L size reviewed here. For comparison's sake, a Giro Montaro with MIPS comes in at 375 grams, a Troy Lee Designs A1 weighs 344 grams, Lazer's Revolution weighs 424 grams without its odd ear guards, and a much more cross-country focused Giro Xar tips the scales at 338 grams. True, all three of those are traditional helmets that don't feature a dual-shell design, but those numbers give you an idea of the weight penalty that comes with the ODS system.




Performance

Sorry to let everyone down, but I didn't test how effective the ATB-1T's dual-shell ODS system actually is. In fact, I do my best to avoid smashing my head while wearing any helmet, even if it doesn't always look like that's the case, so we'll have to trust 6D when it comes to exactly how beneficial their Omni-Directional Suspension is. Don't get me wrong, I don't doubt that the design is extremely advantageous in protecting a rider's head, but I'd rather take their word for it than perform any real-world testing on myself.


6D ATB-1A
  The ATB-1T offers a lot of protection, especially at the sides and back of the head.


The first thing you're probably going to notice when you put the ATB-1T on is how deep the helmet feels and how much coverage it offers, especially at the sides and back of the head. The coverage feels more in line with Lazer's Revolution helmet than it does with other trail-focused lids, which is a good thing for anyone who's looking for maximum protection. The general shape of the shell also feels quite comfortable, without any hard spots or pressure points that arise, even when using a hand to push the shell down onto your head.

Not surprisingly, goggles work well with the ATB-1T, but I did find that the arms of my glasses made contact with the bottom of the helmet shell close to my ears. This pushed the glasses down on top of my ears, which didn't feel great after awhile, but it's also a fitment note that others might not find to be an issue. I'd recommend bringing the glasses that you use while riding with you when trying on the 6D helmet.


6D ATB-1A
The helmet's large outer dimension, which is a byproduct of the dual-shell design, looks a bit odd compared to a traditional lid.
6D ATB-1A
There are more exhaust ports at the back of the ATB-1T than there are entry vents at the front.


The height of the ATB-1T's four-position retention band can be adjusted to sit quite low on the back of the head, lower than the setup Giro uses, and low enough that it actually tilted the helmet forward when I moved my head to look upwards. It pays to take a minute to make sure this is set up correctly, which turned out to be a bit higher for the shape of my head, to keep this from happening. I also found that the adjustment dial, which doesn't have very defined detents, tended to back off by a few clicks after snugging it up rather than holding its position. This let the helmet move around on my head a bit while riding. Even so, it proved to be comfortable once everything was adjusted correctly.


Issues

There's no getting around the fact that the ODS design requires more material, both EPS foam for the two-shell design and the twenty-seven rubber dampers, which means that it's noticeably heavier than an A1 or Montaro, and not just in your hands but especially when it's on your head. This will be amplified if you're going from a standard cross-country helmet to the ATB-1T, and I'd say that the extra heft feels a bit like you've attached a riding light to your normal helmet. I found this to be noticeable even after weeks of wearing the ATB-1T, and particularly when on the kind of trails that rattle you around - strap a extra quarter of a pound to your head and then give it a shake to see what I mean.
6D ATB-1A
The 501 gram weight of the ATB-1T is quite noticeable, even if the increased safety is of utmost important to you.

Is the extra heft worth the protection? That's going to depend on what you're looking for in a helmet, but I can certainly see riders who have had to deal with one or more concussions in the past easily justifying the increased weight. And who could blame them?

Also, the ATB-1T doesn't breath quite as freely as a more traditional lid, something that was noticeable even in the cooler temps in southwestern British Columbia right now. Then again, it seems like those who prefer trail helmets with additional coverage are fine with a bit of extra warmth.



Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesThe sheer size and weight of the ATB-1T are hard to ignore, as is its $269.95 USD price tag, but those three points of contention will probably seem awfully insignificant if the 6D helmet works as advertised. Does the ATB-1T get a free pass just because it's possibly safer than a traditional helmet? I believe that it does if you've already dealt with a head injury and know how serious they can be, or if you'd rather just be safe than sorry, but it still won't be for everyone. - Mike Levy



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127 Comments

  • 56 8
 I wish better protection wasn't so expensive. I get why that helmet costs more and I am not even arguing with it, it is just a bummer that people with less money (i.e. broke students(i.e. me)) can't protect our heads as well. Like when people say "my head is worth $400" that's true, I think my head is worth that too but that doesn't mean I have the money to buy 4 of those helmets a season, not yet at least!! But great full that even $60 lids are as good as they are though!
  • 35 50
flag dh-bomber (Mar 16, 2016 at 21:34) (Below Threshold)
 you can afford a Carbon bike but you can afford a $400 helmet right ? .......
  • 8 13
flag dropoffsticks (Mar 16, 2016 at 21:34) (Below Threshold)
 yeah but you can still get really high quality lids for half the price of a D3. Price (carbon) doesn't necessarily mean more safety, it might just be about the comfort
  • 36 18
 my bad i meant to say. ''you can afford a Carbon bike but you CAN'T afford a $400 helmet right ? .......'' because buddy has a carbon norco range and a carbon Evil but he complains about a $400 Top Of The Line Helmet form one of THE best names in Motocross and Mountainbiking products ....
  • 75 6
 why do you need 4 helmets a season? maybe you should invest in some brakes
  • 15 8
 Only the Spartan is my bike. The others belong to my local shop and I ride them a lot. And they say you're supposed to replace helmets after one hard hit. I ride a lot and crash a lot haha.
  • 15 7
 And besides I save up and pro deal a bike once a year and get new gear, but then I only make enough money being a full time student and part time worker to barely cover monthly living costs, I run deore groups because it's all I can buy, let alone multiple helmets that are more than $60. Buddy. @dh-bomber
  • 11 52
flag dh-bomber (Mar 16, 2016 at 22:13) (Below Threshold)
 fair enough i hear that , but that way you posted bikes on your profile like the yellow carbon Evil insurgent and a black carbon Evil,Carbon Norco sight, DiamondBack Mission 2, Santa Cruz heckler, kinda makes it look like they are all your bikes because you don't state in any photos that they aren't yours except the Devinci Spartan... kinda poser move to do . but anyway they way you made all the bikes look like yours i thought what the hell ? this guy can't Afford a $400 Helmet ? .... but i see from your comment above you only own the Devinci Spartan and you're a student and so on .
  • 29 4
 Still cheaper than a trip to the ER
  • 6 4
 Found a deal on Bell Stoker helmet for $40, and I'm wondering if this helmet is $230 better than the Bell helmet?
  • 22 6
 Take out an extra student loan and spend money on a good Lids. It sounds crazy but think about how much money you are spending on your brain. You could lose 60,000 in education In one crash. It's worth the money.
  • 25 2
 "It's worth the money." or it's a rip off.
We need crash data comparing this helmet against other helmets that are significantly cheaper.
  • 8 5
 Having any nice bike one has no argument in not investing in a top notch helmet. Should be part of the package, still a low percentage of the expense in the end. and if you can't afford it, crash less. ignoring reality is reckless. Real talk. Now neg prop...
  • 6 1
 @abzillah Absolutely agree! I know most of these companies making high end helmets are considered reputable and trustworthy, but without some kind of metrics to back up the claims I'm still a little skeptical. Seems like with all the money they're making they could spend a little of it to do some testing and publish results, that is unless their products actually aren't that much better and they don't want you to know. I would think posting results of crash data would boost sales if your helmet was actually better than all the rest...
  • 10 2
 Praise the UK NHS
  • 2 3
 Unfortunately, we all know what Really drives sales around here. The catwalk.
  • 2 1
 Are helmets VAT free? I can't remember
  • 2 1
 Don't know for the north american, but in europe all the helmet (even the cheaper ones) should respect a standard about the protection. So all helmets should protect your head, what changes is that more expensive helmets are built with the finest materials such as Kevlar which allow it to be more solid and allow him not explode on impact .
  • 1 1
 Assuming that this helmet is magical.
  • 3 1
 Don't forget that all of this assumes that you're crashing "the right way" because any face-first crash with a helmet like this won't matter how much R&D and $$$ you dropped into the helmet.
  • 5 2
 The "is your brain not worth 260 US clams?" argument is built on the false assumption that this is the price required to protect your brain. There are offerings for closer to $100 that do a very good job of protecting your brain. The question then is "does this helmet offer $160 us clams more value than those lids?" I'd argue that I'm happy with the level of protection offered by my $100 lid.
  • 5 1
 I'd like to hear why this lid isn't ASTM F1952 certified, but the $40 Fox Transition is???
  • 2 0
 For those looking for crash data... take a look at their site for proof of how much safer their technology is. I've had an tab-1 since they came out a few weeks ago and absolutely love it. Fit is solid as can be, it doesn't bounce around on my head at all. I've ridden in mid eighties temps and it's breathed really well. Still wondering if it's safe? check out Zack Bells dallas crash on youtube. He got up with no concussion and raced the next race that night.
  • 4 0
 So no real data
  • 2 0
 @ridenflow: Thank god that's a free trip in Canada..
  • 20 0
 Everyone do a "test" put your helmet on. Then have a buddy put their hands on top and shake it around. Tell me if it doesn't ALREADY include this awesome high tech modular shear force compensator built right in!!! Smile

Seriously though, I just cant believe the majority of mountain bikes wear their helmet SO TIGHT that there isn't already a LOT of MIPS/ODS="PLAY" already inherent with a NORMAL comfortable helmet fit, your skin, your hair. etc. (not my idea, read it somewhere) I get that there are some people who do 30 foot gaps who for some reason don't want to wear a full face and might really NEED this helmet. But it can't be that many...

And then the other thing, without 3rd party comparative testing for all you know your riding around with a double foam and bitty baby bumpers between them for maybe no reason at all...???
  • 3 1
 hahah thats a pretty good point! And i wear my helmets tight...
  • 5 2
 Their motocross helmets have be around for awhile and proven ! Bitty baby bumpers? ? ?
  • 7 1
 Rubber baby buggy bumpers
  • 1 1
 Well that's really not the same thing as the force of falling on your head at speed but yea- if you have some hair on your head that should do the trick. My new helmet has MIPS, didn't seek it out but I purchased a Bell Super on sale and it looks pretty legit. Hope I don't have to test it out but we will see!
  • 6 2
 These kinds of products are so hard to judge. On one hand you're like why not, more protection, it has to be better. The thing is crashes are so much based on luck and exact details of the event, that testing this kind of thing is seemingly pointless. Sure it may save you in one instance, and maybe it will kill you in another. Maybe the extra weight and decoupling caused your head to twist a certain way that breaks your neck, or maybe not, no one will ever know, thus my stance is it's probably not worth the time or money dealing with this. Unless there are irrefutable 3rd party tests showing it is better over a very wide range of events, there is no reason to buy it. I would love it if it were actually better, and I would totally buy it, but until they can PROVE it is better, it is only sunshine and rainbows they are advertising.
  • 3 2
 Best helmet tech comment I have ever read... well done.
  • 2 1
 Being the "helmet guy" what's your take on the ASTM F1952 standard?
  • 6 3
 Rasterman - if you can get your head ariund vectors of forces it gets pretty obvious that this helmet does a thing or two that a standard helmet doesn't. Every milimeter of force deflection diminishes the amount of stress being applied to your brain. For extreme comparison, hit yourself with your hand directly onto top of your head and then hit yourself with similar force by swinging your palm more horisontally. Tangents and sht.
  • 4 3
 Just hit myself on the head two times, they both hurt. What was the lesson to learn there? Both hurt, not like one was dibilitating and the other was soft like a babies butt...?

I don't doubt that the helmet does something different. But I don't know "how" different it is. Or how benificial that difference is.

Am I say 4% less likely to get a concussion crashing with this helmet? Probably not worth the cost.

40% less concussion risk? Starting to make sense. 80%, we have a winner...

But without 3rd party consistant testing it could be little to no statistical difference for all we know...
  • 4 2
 Stiingya - you will never know. There's plenty of people getting concussions because their head was 1cm too close to a tree. There's plenty of people dying in car accidents because their head bounced back 2cm too far back. I will still do my best to maximize my chances. Nobody tells us to spend so much money on this helmet, it's not your or my mom talking safety out of her arse, as moms and dads tend to do. You are ok if you don't want that helmet. Really. We all need to die one day.
  • 1 1
 Fantastic observation. Also, not a ton of helmets out there with Jordan soles on the outside falling onto a basketball court while spinning a 720.
  • 2 2
 That's not the point. Example; You can slip and fall in the shower later today and be dead, shit happens.

So, that's why most people buy a little rubber mat, or their shower is plastic and has a non slip surface. Cool, no guarantee you'll NEVER slip. But it's safer and you've done your due diligence.

But if some company comes along and advertises that their shower mat with double foam and little baby bumpers will make your shower WAY more safe. But it costs WAY more than the rest of the rubber mats. WE as consumers should hold that rubber baby bumper mat to the standard they are advertising.

"IF" it ends up that their super expensive bath Mat really does a better job keeping u safe. Great! But that takes more than just the marketing department saying so and some cool 3D graphics...

Would u just advocate buying WAY more expensive bath mats just because you want to maximize your chances of maybe avoiding a bath slip? People slip and die all the time! Or would you want to check and see if you really needed to spend a lot of extra money on something you already have, or can buy top of the line fir half the cost?

If somebody sells brake pads that say they stop 25% quicker every magazine out there would go double check and make sure. With these helmets it's not that easy to check the claims. (Other than pink bike staffers throwing themselves off cliffs which I'm not an advocate of) And not all of them are even making specific claims to check...

3rd party comparitive testing... yes. I'm a broken record on this.

And yeah, I know mountain biking is more risky than taking a shower. But that's why I specifically dislike that enharent risk "possibly" being exploited as a marketing ploy.

Faster, better, plusher are relative. Safer should be held accountable. (Wow, wish I'd have thought of that instead of typing all the reat of that crap) Smile
  • 1 1
 @MX298 And by proven you mean from a marketing perspective
  • 1 1
 @gdnorm Yea, they are pretty small players though. Used their MX helmets for years and from what I have seen they help reduce concussions, nothing scientific here though! its your head.
  • 1 2
 Waki, saying "vectors of forces" says you havent gotten your head around them. Vectors have magnitude (force) and direction.
  • 2 1
 English is my second language. I meant that direction changes the value of force acting on your brain.
  • 10 4
 Maybe I don't know something, but I don't understand why helmets are so expensive. I mean I know that there is a lot of technology that goes into keeping peoples noggins safe, but they must be profiting a hell of a lot off these things. The only materials they use are like plastic, foam and maybe a metal frame- How does that add up to almost $300??? It's kinda lame that people need to spend so much money just to get proper protection.
  • 6 2
 its not like they just sticky tape them together. Theres a lot of tech in putting them together, then testing them. Cheap helmets are a dime a dozen - with no testing and little or no tech in construction. You can always buy one of them. Kmart probably sells them for $10
  • 7 1
 There's a lot more to making products than on the production line. The amount of R&D that is needed for these helmets is huge
  • 3 2
 At least it's hard to make and fake one. Unlike a chainguide, which should not cost more than 20 Euro, as I can perfectly fabricate one for 10 Euro in a couple of hours. Smile
  • 5 1
 I remember reading a quite a while back that helmets have a very low markup from the manufacturers. The molds for producing these lids are extremely expensive, the research is extremely expensive, and the certifications are far from cheap. The EPS and plastic and buckles and straps are of course pennies in comparison.

At least these guys are doing something very different, with new research and new ideas, rather than just charging an absolute ton for a helmet that is designed to protect you exactly the same way as a $30 one, except look nicer. I take more issue with that.
I think this concept has a ton of merit and potential. If it truly can protect from a much wider range of impact velocities as well as rotational forces then that is a true achievement.
Really liking what KALI and these folks are doing.
  • 3 1
 Tooling, cycle times, multiple parts - all factor into the price of high-end lids. Back in the days of early Giro/Bell bucket lids they could mold these parts in a simple process but with added ventilation you need all these other actions to make the holes. R&D and engineering time and other overhead is also a factor in pricing the helmet. (ha ha 'overhead')
  • 6 2
 Yep - Most people really would benefit from working in the industry (manufacturer not retailer side) to understand the costs involved. The cost of manufacturing is only one piece of the puzzle. To bring a helmet to market, you're looking at significant costs in: (1) Design - engineers, CAD modeling, etc; (2) Modeling - building test products to test the design; (3) Testing - both for internal purposes and to meet certification standards; (4) Final production molds (never cheap!); and (5) Marketing - Its a competitive market and you have to get people to know about your product in order to sell it. Then, because of the retail model, you're going to have to factor in how much the manufacturer actually is going to receive for each helmet. Just guessing here, but assuming a 35-45% margin at each level, a $269 retail helmet is going to be sold to a retailer from the manufacturer for $150-$175 (if there's a distributor like QBP, then the manufacture is probably selling it to the distributor for $110-$125), and (unless they own their factory or manufacture in house) the manufacturer is going to have to purchase it from the actual manufacturing factory in asia, so the manufacturer is going to pay about $60-$80 for the helmet from the factory, and the factory is looking for its own profit, so for $269 your probably getting a helmet that actually cost $40-60 to make under the current model. Now, the manufacturer that designed the helmet needs to recoup its costs before it can profit, at the rate of $40-60 per unit. That's going to take a LOT of sales before you recoup your investment. Its a reasonable question, most people asking about prices would be surprised at how difficult it is to actually make money in the outdoor industry.
  • 10 4
 Great looking helmet. Weight wouldn't bother me for what seems like a great protection. I paid similar money for my Bell Super 2R with uncertified , exploding chin piece. Well... I wish it came out one year earlier, so I'd buy it instead of Bell
  • 6 1
 Your next concussion might keep you from the comments section and we don't want that! Check them out WAKI !
  • 2 1
 tell me more about that chin piece. thinking of buying one
  • 2 3
 @Donpinpon29 - apparently the "Pinkbike's Panel of Ultimately Responsible, Experienced and Knowledgeable Riders" decided that since Super 2R lacks certificate for chin piece, it is an extremely dangerous helmet. Unlike Met Parachute. I personally (as a daredevil ready to risk my life or at least beatiful face) find it quite solid. I still would not recommend it or any other helmet of such kind for any high speed riding, be it FR, park or Enduro racing. For that I use a legit TLD D2 helmet.
  • 2 1
 I concussed myself pretty good wearing a Bell Super 2R hitting the chin guard. While I think it helped keep my face in order, I probably should have been wearing a normal full face on the jumps I was hitting. The chin guard will help protect scrapes on a normal crash, but if you really slam, its not gonna do much good. I'm all in on the 6D technology, if they come out with a removable chin guard, its a done deal. Concussions Suck!!
  • 2 1
 @dionlight, i knocked myself out in D2 by hitying the ground with my chin. Now the Chin piece in Super 2R is obviously protecting against abbrasion only, no one ever said anything different. Nonetheless it is the same case for Met parachute AND with cheap flexy fullfaces. Nobody should use those helmets for harder riding. Many Enduro pros use D3 kind of helmets. I remember when we were riding certain trails on DH bikes and with full body armor. These days people ride them with bare knees and XClids. It got me thinking once or twice... When clock ticks and heart is pumping at 190 BPM I like my head inside a legit fullface. When I ride rough stuff for pleasure I take Super 2R
  • 1 1
 @WAKIdesigns Respect for calling the 2R as it really is
  • 1 1
 It's still a good helmet. Abbrasion also means a torn out lip and bleeding like a pig. I had my share of crashes in Switchblade. I have no clue why people expect it to be as good as regular Fullfaces, haters in particular seem to set the expectation bar high. I am just not buying the argument that it is any worse than Met.
  • 6 1
 I'll buy thoses kind of helmet when i'll see independant study showing their efficiency, if someone can show me something not written by the owner of MIPS, i'm more than keen to read !

www.bhsi.org/bicyclingmag1305.htm
  • 6 1
 I have owned Troy Lee A1's, Smith Forefront, Bell Super w/ MIPS, and I am now riding the 6D. All I can say at the moment is that the 6D feels more solid and well built then any of the others mentioned above by a long shot in my opinion. When I raced Moto I was the guy who would buy ARAI Moto helmets because they offered the best fit and protection that you could buy and not to mention the most expensive as well, fast forward a few years and we now have 6D which I believe to be the best helmets for mountain bikers and Moto guys at the moment. sure they are more expensive then most, weigh more then most, and is bigger then most but if it keeps my grey matter where God designed it to be I'm all in. With all this talk about CTE and concussions in the news these days I want all of the protection that I can get.
  • 2 1
 Cdsdad3@ well said. Like I have said they are well provin in motocross, we have confirmed it a few times too. . . . . Quality wise on par with shoei, arai just better technology!
  • 8 4
 I really appreciate innovations in the helmet industry. I think helmet R&D is moving in the right direction.

With that said...that price tag stings. I also don't care about the weight so much, but if a helmet can't breathe...I'm out.
  • 1 1
 Meh. I can't find anything on PubMed or Google Scholar regarding rotational sheer injury protection is a real problem in current mountain biking helmets. It's more advertising and trending at this point.
  • 9 2
 If you truly need that level of protection, wear a damn downhill helmet.
  • 7 1
 Is it just me or does it look like a shaped watermelon
  • 4 2
 I dig the innovation. It’s new to MTB - of course it’s heavy and pricey. Isn’t just about every worthwhile innovation that’s come down the pipe?
Rockshox Judy - ‘it’s heavy and expensive. Suspension is for moto!’
Carbon frames - ‘they’re brittle and expensive. Titanium is the future!’
Disk Brakes - ‘they’re heavy, expensive and I’ll need a new wheelset and frame.’

Yah it’s heavy and expensive and I’m not saying not to call it what it is. But the fact that helmets have only been variations on a theme (foam) for this many years is amazing. About time for some out of the box thinking like this and MIPS. Keep innovating! I’m waiting for the neatly tucked away, super lightweight, full-body air-bag-suit-cushion that deploys a split-second before an impending and particularly nasty crash! You’d immediately be surrounded by this inflatable ball that rolls down the hill. (Patent pending.)
  • 6 1
 hard to judge without testing data... PB needs to hire an engineer to review helmets and devise their own testing methods...
  • 2 2
 The data is out there. Their motocross helmets are well proven.
  • 3 2
 No, the data is not out there. Also, the different systems are better at protecting against different types of crashes.
  • 2 3
 The current testing done on a mt. Bike helmet is that it protects the skull, not the brain. Read ASTM F-1952 testing! 6d has extensive testing but you are right there is no standard to meet but being around MX forever I have seen the benefits. It's your head!
  • 5 1
 All helmets moto or bike are built to protect your skull from fracture, that is what all of the standards are built around. No one knows how well these new systems work in the real world. There are to many factors at play, there are impacts they probably help with and some they don't. There is also a group of folks who think the extra weight they add make some impacts worse, and I'm not just talking about 6d systems. The best way I've heard it put from a bio-engineer was "pick how your going to crash, and I'll tell you what helmet to buy". Also, we have no idea if MIPS is better or worse, for all we know a $150 MIPS helmet might be better.....or the Leatt/Kali system, since the test are not designed to test for other impacts and hell even the base impact data isn't available for most helmets it's all just a guess at best.
  • 1 1
 @zutroy truedat
  • 3 2
 I recently had a really bad concussion in my TLD A1. I was going to get a 6d, but the xs/s helmets have not arrived. I will still be getting one because they are a great helmet, but just have to wait a little while. I'm really disappointed that TLD hasn't come out with a technology like 6d or MIPS. Love my A1, but won't be using it due to my accident and put a huge dent in the side. If TLD comes out with something like that I'd be all over it.
  • 1 0
 For those looking for crash data... take a look at their site for proof of how much safer their technology is. I've had an tab-1 since they came out a few weeks ago and absolutely love it. Fit is solid as can be, it doesn't bounce around on my head at all. I haven't noticed that it was heavier on my head. I've ridden in mid eighties temps and it's breathed really well. Still wondering if it's safe? check out Zack Bells dallas crash on youtube. He got up with no concussion and raced the next race that night.
  • 1 0
 So this is the first concussion proof helmet in history?! Come on. One crash doesn't prove a thing. No helmet prevents concussion. You may get lucky depending on impact angle, etc, but don't fool yourself. Not crashing prevents concussion.
  • 1 0
 So if there is
"no getting around the fact that the ODS design requires more material, both EPS foam for the two-shell design and the twenty-seven rubber dampers, which means that it's noticeably heavier" and "larger out dimension", does
a.) the additional leverage created by the bigger size increase rotational forces more than it diminishes them?
b.) especially if you factor in an extra 100(ish+/-)g of force behind any impact?
Is MIPs also making helmets bigger/ heavier?
Show me the data - not the sales pitch please.
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised Pinkbike didn't mention who founded 6d: Robert Reisinger – Founder / Director of Engineering

This will sound familiar to anyone who started riding in the 90's. Robert was the founder of Mountain Cycles. Arguably the most brilliant full suspension bike that turned the industry upside down back then.

Please don't mistake the MC that went out of business in Oregon for the same company. Yes, it was the same company, but when Robert was at the helm, they made INCREDIBLE stuff way ahead of the curve. All it takes to see this is to compare the original San Andreas to anything else at the time.

My point being, Robert knows engineering. So although 3rd party test results would be fantastic, until that happens it's good to know this company had a solid engineering background.
  • 10 5
 I'm gonna go with....no
  • 3 2
 This tech is legit, I ride moto and have crashed in 6Dhelmets and Troy lee, fox, shoei and there is a HUGE difference that is instantly noticeable on a hard impact. Unbelievably awesome in my opinion and worth every penny!
  • 1 1
 It sounds backwards, but the riders who should be considering a helmet like this are ones who have NOT had a concussion before. If you've had a concussion already, then the impact threshold for getting another is much lower -- no helmet will be very effective at preventing re-concussion, not even this one. So the rational time to spend the extra money on a safer helmet is before you've had a concussion, not after.
  • 1 1
 guys i think your opinions are all valid ones! I guess 6D will mature this technology in the coming years for lighter weight and better prices. For now 269 bucks is not for most of us little money, I think it will be more expensive to go to ER and a, Gods forbid, have a head injury, than to have this helmet on and save a lot more than its cost or even your life. Look at the value that 6D or even other brands offer us in their products. Cheers guys!!!
  • 1 1
 Believe me, the most expensive helmet is WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY cheaper than even a modest head injury that requires hospitalization. I'm not in the market for a new helmet quite yet, but my next one will have MIPS or something like this.
  • 2 1
 Current MTB helmet certification (as I understand it) is just dropping a weight on top of it! That will have to be vastly improved upon if we want to depend on certification for evaluating / comparing helmet protection...
  • 2 2
 Helmets don't prevent concussion. Helmets minimize external damage. Go ask the NFL. I am very skeptical that "decoupling" can produce the necessary deceleration required to prevent concussion. This is one big marketing ad IMHO. Plus, that helmet is huge and heavy. The price doesn't bother me, but the science and weight sure do.
  • 4 1
 With all of the advancements in science, why are helmets still using Styrofoam? Isn't there a better material yet?
  • 1 1
 I know the technology works, I have been using their motocross helmets since they first started prototyping. They work and do what they are designed to do. Price is price, but as has been said many times...what's your head worth??
  • 1 1
 I prefer to wear an ugly helmet, so other riders will assume I have a low skill set. Then they'll be surprised that helmet from dumb and dumber got down the hill so fast. Its always better to surprise someone, than it is to dissapoint. On another note...am I the only one scared to take a shower tomorrow?
  • 4 3
 Kali viva @ 50 bucks... "the best helmet no one will give a shit about". My 30 dollar " rideit" hoody keeps me warm as your 75 dollar TLD hoody. Shop smart!
  • 3 0
 Not sure I can trust this review given it was carried out by a manchild
  • 2 3
 MIPS.

So many options these days with helmets that have MIPS technology.

Doesn't GIRO make a $100 helmet now with MIPS? So yeah, buy 2 MIPS helmet and still come out cheaper than getting one 6D helmet.

As for comparing which technology is better, I dunno but I will say that a lot of racers and pro athletes do wear MIPS and they are not just paid to wear them. So if it's good enough for them it's probably good enough for me.
  • 1 1
 I like how everybody likes to put price tag on everything. So how much is worth your brain? your life? It is absolutely ridiculous way to overprice piece of bad looking plastic. Stick your helmet up in your a$$ if it fits.
  • 2 1
 "Sorry to let everyone down, but I didn't test how effective the ATB-1T's dual-shell ODS system actually is. " Mike, thats what Interns are for.
Nice review.
  • 2 2
 tld has to bring this to the court ... they fckin copied the a1!!! and seriously who will buy this ?? A1's are the best helmets on the market and are findable at 99$ once or twice a year on CRC
  • 2 2
 Size and shape are totally different, TLD doesn't have a protection system, and sadly I don't know why they don't apply something like this to their helmets considering how big of a name they are and how many people run their A1, D2, D3, and moto helmets. 6D has the right idea!
  • 5 5
 I would like to see the design implemented in a cheaper fashion but still, $270 isn't much considering this thing could save your life.
  • 3 3
 Gotta start somewhere, $269 today, $169 tomorrow, $69 next week and eventually the technology will be available from Walmart for $15.

Helmets are one thing I'm happy to spend the bucks to be an early adopter on. I've crashed in MIPS equipped helmet, and felt literally nothing. No thump, no headache, nothing. Won't be going back to a pure foam helmet, I'm sold. The 6d seems to have some issues, but their Moro helmets are great, can't imagine they won't get their MTB line dialed in
  • 8 6
 A 25 dollar helmet can save your life also.
  • 6 3
 Lost me at $270 USD
  • 2 4
 I also don't need the extra protection, but I can see it being popular with better (and richer) riders than I.
  • 3 1
 Fox Flux is all you need!
  • 2 1
 Is the new one released yet? ...any day now
  • 1 0
 Really I did not know they were releasing a new one. It looks like the Stryker is no longer listed on their site.
  • 3 1
 Full suspension helmet)))
  • 1 1
 I'm looking to replace my TLD A1 after a big crash. Considering the 7 iDP M2 (similar to this 6D?) or another A1. Any thoughts or comments?
  • 3 2
 Same thing happened to me recently. BIG CONCUSSION. See ya later A1!
  • 2 1
 Check out the Bell Super 2 Mips.
  • 2 1
 Does anyone know if wearing a mount for a camera on lights would mess up the ODS (or MIPS) system on the helmet?
  • 1 1
 I ride with a MIPS Bell Super 2 and have no issues with my helmet mounted light. Its a pain to put the mount on between the liner and the helmet but its doable.
  • 1 3
 @CGalbreath Dude, you have two $5500+ bikes. If you are complaining about ~$270 to protect the thing that makes life possible, your priorities are all sorts of screwed up. The helmet might not get you scene points at the trail but that is not the point.
  • 2 1
 Again, only the Spartan is my bike. And I had to pro deal it and save up for a while to afford it.
  • 1 1
 So, save up and buy a helmet? It is one of the most important, yet overlooked, piece of biking equipment.
  • 1 1
 I like the helmet myself, but im also a huge fan boy of the specialized ambush helmet.... that being said i did pick up the 6D & I cant complain about it one bit.
  • 1 1
 just make it $500 USD... it doesn't matter because only richies will be buying this helmet. Get a grip on reality MTB industry. Pathetic
  • 4 4
 I like how he wears it nice and loose to accentuate the "omni directional" qualities
  • 1 1
 3 different shells, in order to offer a REAL XS/S size? Only for that it worth the extra weight!
  • 1 1
 Prefer my Alpina King Carapax 480g in my scale size 57 62cm with chinguard.
  • 3 1
 Waaaay too heavy.
  • 3 1
 Rode around for 2 weeks with a gopro last month and I had headaches from the excess weight. The thought of the plus size + quarter pounder on my head makes it a deal breaker
  • 1 1
 Only 269.95! Who is gonna be the first to pick one up? Big Grin
  • 3 3
 I'll stick to MIPS. Or rather, lack of.
  • 1 1
 Haha I read that as " Google compatible. " woops
  • 3 5
 Cool helmet. Nice write-up.
  • 1 3
 Darn, was hoping a MIPS competitor would make it cheaper. Hopefully soon.
  • 1 1
 Even though in most brands it's around a 40 dollar add on to the standard version. For what it is 40 bucks in nothing
  • 3 4
 MIPS is the new Booster
  • 2 4
 very good looking helmet
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