7 Interesting Retro Bikes For Sale on the Pinkbike Buy&Sell - Hidden Treasures

Mar 24, 2021
by Henry Quinney  
Art by Taj Mihelich


What do we want? Used bikes! When do we want them? I'm not too sure, is the price negotiable?

The Pinkbike Buy&Sell section is full of many-a-treasure, and this week I'll be delving into the Vintage section. I've always found retro bikes to be a curious proposition. Maybe it's misty-eyed optimism or it could be a hark back to some personal glory days, but I've not always understood why old bikes seemed to often be viewed with universal favourability. It's something that can defy logic. Today, of the bikes we ride in 2021, it would be fair to say there is no parity in terms of performance or desirability, however, in retro bikes, things are sometimes viewed positively solely on the account that they're old, not on the fact whether they're actually any good or not. Think about it a bit like a royal family - they were probably a bit crap 500 hundred years ago, and they are probably a bit crap now, but the very fact they were crap during the 16th century makes them somewhat relevant today and somehow a bit less crap. It's kind of perplexing, but it's the same logic that drives people towards retro bikes with unified rear triangles.

As previously stated, a bike should either be interesting, sensible or a mixture of both. So here is my selection of old bikes that are currently for sale in North America. Lots of them will be given the verdict of interesting but will any of them be sensible? As always, like Jeff Bezos going hard in the pick-and-mix, the price may well be noted, but for this article it isn't really taken into account.

Ladies and gentlemen, please start your engines.


For Sale: 2010 Slingshot Farmboy 29er
Price: $475 CAD
Size: M
Location: Acton, Canada
View Buy&Sell Listing


If your boss has their eye on potentially buying a frame, is it a bad idea to include it in sales round-up, and subsequently drastically increase its exposure? Yes. Is it also a funny thing to do? Again, yes. Brian Park sent me this along with strong indications that he intended to make an offer. I only hope this doesn't push up the price... Sorry.

The story goes that while riding a motorbike with a broken frame, the designer noticed that the movement enabled some flex that actually increased performance, or so it was claimed. They took this to a mountain bike platform and the rest is history. There was also the tale that the cable-downtube was initially an on-trail repair, where they used the ratcheting effect of the shifter to be a thoroughly effective sticking plaster when a downtube failed, and subsequently enjoyed the riding characteristic. I probably find the first one a bit more believable, if only because I know how feeble old shifter internals were. Either way, the Slingshot is one of the most recognisable silhouettes ever, even if I'd find it very hard to describe as sensible.

Verdict - Interesting




For Sale: 1992 Rocky Mountain Experience
Price: $1500 CAD
Size: 19.5"
Location: Vancouver, Canada
View Buy&Sell Listing


The offerings of 1992 were a mixed bag. The official end of the Cold War, the year I was born, Smells Like Teen Spirit, Bill Clinton and this bike. It's safe to say that there was something there for everyone. This shiny, triple triangle wonder was similar to another bike in Rocky's range, the Cirrus. The main difference between the two was the extra short (I'm talking shorter than John McEnroe's temper short) chainstays. The idea was this was a kind of a mountain-cum-trials bike and had super short geometry to complement that style of riding.

Apparently, this bike was something of a North American special. There was an initial shipment of 200 bikes to Europe but, after the importer opened the container to find the first couple of frames misaligned, the whole batch was rejected and sent back to Canada. After hearing about this on the grapevine, and knowing the Rocky Mountain was going to be stuck with a few hundred fully built bikes they couldn't sell, a local dealer decided to offer a flat rate of $200 dollars per bike and decided to sell them far short of their $1400 RRP. 198 bikes (the original European bound 200 minus the two inspected) was released into the wild in Ottawa. The full story, and lots of other details on the bike, can be found in this forum post from 2005.

How much money you want to spend on a bike to be a cafe cruiser is not for me to say, but this would surely be a definitive, if not overtly luxurious example of a pub bike.

Verdict - Interesting




For Sale: 1994 Specialized S-Works M2
Price: $1500 CAD
Size: Unknown
Location: Vancouver, Canada
View Buy&Sell Listing


Is $1500 Canadian quite a lot for a bicycle that you'll rarely ride? Yes. Is $1500 a lot for a gravel bike that you'll rarely ride? Apparently not. Get it while it's hot folks, beat the rush for flat bar gravel bikes.

This 1994 bike comes with a full Deore XT groupset, S-Works wheels and a titanium stem AND bottle cage. Yes, as a bike of this age it naturally has rim brakes, but is it far cooler than an mid-level drop-bar offroad bike? Abso-*******-lutely. Just imagine rocking up to your favourite cycling cafe in a post covid world. There are moustaches, there are calf tattoos and there are pretentious externally worn bumbags... and then there are the jaws on the floor when your walk-up in denim jorts and an old NOFX t-shirt as you non nonchalantly out hip the hipsters, pay for an espresso in cold hard cash and ride off into the sunset. That experience alone is worth $750. Do it twice and the bike has paid for itself.

This bike is about as sensible as a retro bike can be.

Verdict - Sensible-ish




For Sale: 1999 Foes DHS Tube
Price: $2000 CAD
Size: Unknown
Location: Vancouver, Canada
View Buy&Sell Listing


Some bikes age like unpasteurised milk, whereas others are like a particularly good vintage of claret. The Foes is in the latter category, and could soon be on the way to replacing wine altogether in any such metaphors. Bikes like this were clearly on the right path long before it had been well-trodden and, to look at the Foes now, it seems a lot more refined than other bikes of this era.

Brent Foes, who still enjoys a cult following, came from an automotive background where he specialised in off-road trucks. He decided to turn his hand to mountain bikes in 1992. To give you some context of how far ahead of the times Brent Foes was, in 1993 he released the LTS which offered six inches of rear travel. This was almost double what a lot of other bikes had at the time. In Brent's mind, the main issue was that the rear suspension on his bikes so vastly outperformed the front. So, naturally, he started to make forks too.

On this 1999 DHS, it uses a White Brothers DH3 fork, which is very much sought after in its own right. Please note the piggyback reservoir on the drive side. Running external chambers on forks has been an idea employed over the years to give more options for setup, in either regard to the spring or damper side. It's also be utilised by Olivier Bossard amongst others.

I think retro-Foes bikes will always be cool, and this goes some way to illustrate that point.

Verdict - Interesting




For Sale: 2003 Trek Y-22 Carbon
Price: $600 US
Size: 16.5"
Location: Breckenridge, United States
View Buy&Sell Listing


The Trek Y... it was only a matter of time. This particular one seems to be in excellent condition and the seller as taken out a lot of work to make sure it runs well. It's a model that seems to be very popular with bike collectors and this is a fine example of what one could be - from the XT drivetrain and Avid calipers to the SID fork and era-appropriate Selle Italia, yet also Trek branded no-slip saddle.

So what is a unified rear end? Well, it's a design in which the bottom bracket and the rear axle are on the same swingarm. What this means is that it avoids a lot of the problems associated with rear suspension, for example, chain growth. The issue being, however, is that the suspension only really works when sat down and the bike pedalled best when stood up. So, somewhat counter-intuitive. However, if you view it through the scope of comfort, and not descending performance, then it's a very interesting bike indeed. And, for $600, it would be a great start to a collection.

Verdict - Interesting




For Sale: 1994 Yeti ARC A.S
Price: $3950 US
Size: Unknown
Location: Imperial Valley, United States
View Buy&Sell Listing


The next two bikes are a bit of a job lot. Not because they're similar, they are in fact very different, but because they both ooze cool, have a time-classic and somehow yet to be rehashed paint job, and are so quintessentially early nineties that I felt they both earnt their place on this list.

This Yeti certainly ain't cheap, but when was that ever a concern when buying a Yeti? I suppose there's no reason why a retro one should be any different. It's got the full XTR groupset, including hubs. It's got the poster-on-the-bedroom wall aesthetic. It's got the Chris King headset and the Bomber fork with polished crown and M-shaped brace. Quite frankly, this is very special and I can imagine it sitting happily as a museum piece in a Yeti dealer.

It is very expensive but I think this is one of the truest examples of a genuine collector's piece I came across whilst finding bikes for this article.

Verdict - Interesting




For Sale: 1991 Marin Bear Valley
Price: $475 US
Size: 20.5"
Location: Spring, United States
View Buy&Sell Listing


If you have fallen in love with the Rasta paint job but understandably don't have nearly $4000 burning a hole in your pocket then this could be a worthy foray into retro. It's not totally dissimilar to the Specialized in that it would make a great gravel plugger, although I imagine it's not quite as aggressive.

I would say this - if the seller's claims of limited use are true, then $475 dollars for a bike that will put a smile on your face every time you ride it on a sunny weekend morning isn't such a bad deal, especially in this current climate. I'm not saying to ride it on anything near technical but a combination of a bike like this, some vitamin D and roll down a tow-path to get some ice cream could well be something to savour.

Verdict - Potentially Sensible





What'd I miss? Who's found a hidden gem? Can a vintage bike truly be sensible?


156 Comments

  • 186 4
 Nice Price or No Dice?

Come on, Pinkbike, open up the voting options for us to decide.
  • 41 0
 Jalopnik's Nice Price, or Crack Pipe is one of my favorite features.
  • 12 5
 Crack Pipe, RIP to the PC police.
  • 15 0
 Nice Bike or Take a Hike?
  • 3 0
 I think they left a “0” off the price of that S-Works.
  • 2 2
 @fruitsd79: That's Jalop for you. Pioneers of the PC world
  • 9 1
 @fruitsd79: So insensitive to crack users.
  • 2 0
 @btustison: We need a Pinkbike version for sure. That will get some clicks! Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I hope they don't disregard this comment, it's a great idea. I remember the specialized M2 bikes as great xc bikes. I never did throw down for the Judy-yellow Y bike of my 1998ish dreams and although characteristically ugly, that Easton yeti is a great of example of high-end aluminum from its era.
  • 72 0
 Verdict - Interesting
  • 19 0
 This comment is about as sensible-ish as they come. One of the most genuine PB posts that I've come across in this whole thread. Reply while it's hot.
  • 4 1
 But how could they not point out those beautiful Cook Bros cranks on the yeti!!??
  • 1 0
 @landscapeben: Came here to ask if those were Cook Bros cranks.
  • 2 0
 @Doogster: defo mate. I used to have a pair in gunmetal grey with anodised purple chainring bolts, mated to a royce titanium square taper bb they were incredibly stiff and light, never felt any flex in them so power transfer was phenomenal. The only cranks that compare for me these days are the Cane Creek EE Wings.
  • 29 0
 I cruise the vintage bikes regularly. You missed the Ritchey filet-brazed tandem, the Haro extreme titaniium, and a (rare) uncracked Manitou full suspension bike. Easily three of the rarest and most retro eye-catchers available.
  • 6 0
 Those Manitous are the best.
  • 1 0
 I do too! Found (and purchased) an early 90’s Yeti FRO with Accutrax fork when they first created the section.
  • 2 0
 Sadly I'd kill for a 1997 airborne ti frame. Preferably with xtr, sid and mavic x217
  • 2 0
 @makripper: I saw one on craigslist (without the mavics) for $300 usd.
  • 1 0
 @makripper: I built up a mystery ti frame with a pair of sunset anodized 217s I’d been saving for 20yrs! It’s a fun retro bike but sadly my broken ass doesn’t handle much distance on the Hard tail!
  • 1 0
 @Honda750: man that sounds amazing!
  • 28 1
 I did a local XC race on a Rocky Experience once in the early nineties. My steel hardtail dedicated XC bike had been stolen just a week before the race, and so I borrowed my brother’s Experience. 6lb straight gauge aluminum tubing frame. 1st gen Manitou elastomer fork. Super wide and knobby (for that time) tires. Canti brakes. I really did not have high expectations for doing well that day.

Boy was I wrong. That bike had exceptionally short chainstays, and combined with the meatier tires than what I was used to, it just climbed like a mountain goat. When I finally got to the top and pointed the thing downhill, I had more energy left available to me by that point than I did the year before on my old XC bike (which in hindsight was probably due to my running much too skinny tires for the course thanks to my obsession with gram counting). Going into the downhill singletrack, I did reasonably well... the bike handled super sharp switchbacks with relative ease.

In the end, I ran a much faster time than I did the year before on the same course. And I definitely had much more fun doing it.

That bike was meant more as a pseudo trials bike... I read more than one review in the magazines at the time, and it sounded like it was meant to hop and climb and claw its way around rough terrain, big rocks, and fallen logs. I remember my brother spending endless hours literally hopping around town, looking for all sorts of urban terrain to do his best Hans Rey impressions on.

Ah, nostalgia really is a potent drug. I really remember that bike very fondly, and if I had the space and the $1500 to spare, I’d pick up that Rocky Experience in a heartbeat. It probably wouldn’t be quite as good as I remembered, but neither am I.
  • 6 0
 Last sentence nailed it.
  • 20 0
 Lol some of those prices tho
  • 2 0
 sentimental value makes the price go up....
  • 20 9
 If you're gonna commit Plagiarism in writing an article... its best NOT to do it on a website the original author reads...

"Apparently, this bike was something of a North American special. There was an initial shipment of 200 bikes to Europe but, after the importer opened the container to find the first couple of frames misaligned, the whole batch was rejected and sent back to Canada. After hearing about this on the grapevine, and knowing the Rocky Mountain was going to be stuck with a few hundred fully built bikes they couldn't sell, a local dealer decided to offer a flat rate of $200 dollars per bike and decided to sell them far short of their $1400 RRP. 198 bikes (the original European bound 200 minus the two inspected) was released into the wild in Ottawa."

is what you wrote... and given that that's basically word for word ripped off from one of my earlier write-ups about the experience model... on another web forum... I'm a touch pissed off seeing my work being passed off by someone else... who undoubtedly got paid for it.
  • 23 5
 Hi, I think word for word would be an exaggeration but I do re-tell the story. I kind of figured it was just that - a relaying of events - but you're right, I did paraphrase some of what you wrote in that forum post. I didn't know whether to include credit or not as I felt it consituted news, even if the events happened 30 years ago and the post was nearly 20. I'm sorry for any frustration caused, because to be fair it would be frustrating, and I've added a credit to the article. I hope that's okay and apologies again. Thanks.
  • 5 1
 Lighten up francis - Plagiarized from Stripes
  • 1 0
 I definitely appreciate your insight, as the original author of that history. I think I saw this bike a few weeks ago on Main - it sparked a search for more old RMs for sale - but this history adds way more fun context.
  • 4 1
 Also from your 2005 post signature ... "I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread", but when it comes to sharing a cool history tidbit with fellow enthusiasts THAT'S where I deserve credit and draw the line.
  • 3 0
 @skierdud89: Classic comedy film. Can't make 'em like that anymore
  • 11 1
 I remember those Trek Carbon bikes, they also double as a pogo stick!
  • 1 0
 Yeah-suspension firming up as you stand up.........might be okay for road/gravel. Sucked on the dirt.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: The other issue with URT is the constantly variable saddle height technology.
  • 8 0
 Damn only a little over 4k usd. Thats a good deal
  • 2 0
 @hmstuna: yeah i just checked that... why tf is it only $4k USD when the fork alone is $2K and sitting on a sub 35lb dh bike
  • 2 0
 @bhuck12: literally almost bought it. I'm still tempted.
  • 1 0
 Wow, don't need DH bike but I actually do now, sick deal for such build
  • 3 0
 Pardon my s wedish but doesit come with optimized Shorts to save weight on the trail?
  • 1 0
 seems he got it sold. You'll find it again on pinkbike retro bikes 25 years from now!
  • 1 0
 @Jolinwood: yes sadly. I had messaged him but it appears I was too slow.
  • 12 6
 Those carbon Y bikes were HORRIBLE bikes. First time I road one was the last time I road a carbon bike until like 2-3 years ago. Scared the hell out of me. Could hear every rock and root through the frame.
  • 9 3
 I guess the y-bike wimps are all out and butthurt. Standing up firmed up the suspension. It was garbage engineering but a futuristic looking design.
  • 7 6
 @wyorider: I like what they were trying to do. At the time carbon was still really really new. Especially done the way they did it. And the proflex was still a thing. LOL! But for me... that bike sucks. LOL! Scared the hell out of me. Between that and a handful of early full suspension bikes I swore off full suspension until I bought my remedy a few years ago. That's how much I disliked them... and that y bike. LOL!

I compare it to when I played baseball and they told me composite bats where the wave of the future. I believed them until one blew up on impact. LOL!

Now that Yeti... that's a thing of throwback beauty. LOL!

People can downvote all they want. I'm pretty sure a few people out there throw downvotes at me because it's me. I get them regardless of solid post or crappy posts... and I've had a few idiotic posts over the years. LOL!
  • 4 0
 I remember approaching a guy on a Y during a race. I couldn't see him ahead of me but I could sure hear him. What is that racket?!

In between all of the pinging, squeaking and thunking, the Y sure made an impression.
  • 24 0
 @onemanarmy: So you’re saying you like to laugh out loud?
  • 6 0
 @onemanarmy: Well, to offer a point in your favor, OMA, you do LOL quite a few times in your comments. This proves that you have a good sense of humor and are probably a very jocular fellow. LOL.
  • 6 0
 @RayDolor: what fun is life if you can’t laugh at yourself.
  • 1 0
 Its part of the hollow nature of that frame..its basically a big speaker box that amplifies every little noise... think very expensive Acoustic guitar that happens to have wheels attached to it. The construction of the frame itself was top notch and the frames lasted well, helped by having a single oversized pivot point for the swing arm.
  • 1 0
 @gdharries: That's nothing compared to the rhythmic humming noise a tioga tension disc wheel bike makes when its in motion. People who've ridden with John Tomac in a race always knew when they were about to be passed by him.
  • 8 0
 This is prime! I'd love to try that Foes!
  • 4 0
 I’m surprised inverted forks haven’t become mainstream in mtb. Yes there’s engineering hurdles but if a reputable company could make an inverted fork competitively spec’d to a conventional fork I would speculate it would sell like hot cakes. (Imagine a fox 38 inverted version). Just saying...
  • 5 0
 Manitou has been doing this for years. Dorados rock!
HSC/LSC adjustment, 3 chamber air spring, hydraulic bottom out. They are not lacking any features.
There's a new revision on the way this year too.....
  • 1 0
 @JamesR2026: Dorado + Slayer = ultimate big mountain trail slayer? tempted
  • 1 0
 Vorsprung has a video on it. They have been around mtb for such a long time but never properly caught on there must be a reason for it. Also ohlins started out with a usd dh fork a few years ago but pretty quickly went to regular type.
  • 3 0
 The problem with them in mountain bikes vs Moto is in Moto they can be much heavier so you can mitigate the flex more. In mountain bikes, they need to be much lighter which creates stiffness problems. Also you would be surprised how unpopular they could be. Yes there are many people who are vocal about them but most people want what they already know.
  • 3 0
 Avalanche, Risse, White Bros, Intend, DVO, MRP, Bos, Foes, RST, Cannondale, Manitou, Marzocchi, X-Fusion... have all released USD forks at some point, mostly dual crowns but a few single crowns too. Those are off the top of my head, there’ll be other companies too..
Fox played with an inverted design a few years back, never made production. The Ohlins version seemed to disappear early on.
No doubt there’s a USD Boxxer hidden away somewhere... (I’m sure RS must have had a play around too at some stage?)

I’ve got a Shivver DC on a retro DH bike and love it, feels great. It’s probably fair to say that quite a few brands have had a decent punt at USD forks, but for whatever reasons the design seems to have not found a steady mainstream hold in performance MTB.
  • 2 0
 @Corinthian: Rockshox have the weird XC one
  • 2 0
 @T4THH: Good point, forgot about that one!
  • 2 0
 @Corinthian:

You left off Rockshox), DNM, Wren for current manufacturers of inverted forks and Halson would be an unique example brand from the 90s in that they used slotted upper legs and an external fork brace in an otherwise inverted fork (the patent for which has now expired).
  • 1 0
 @deeeight: Yup... Maverick, Mountain Cycle, Kowa, Ultra and German A also came to mind afterward too... you're a knowledgeable chap, care to help me fill out the list? Who else needs to be added?
  • 1 0
 @Corinthian: I didn't notice you'd left M.C. off the list (I owned a set), or Maverick (currently own one of their frames, but not the matching fork). The Foes fork was an inverted design. Hanebrink had an inverted version of their forks as well. Risse Racing had one, as did RST. I think Noleen was one of the few suspension makers that didn't even prototype an inverted fork, though they did produce a limited run of double-crown DH forks that were super adjustable and all CNC machined.
  • 3 0
 I owned one of those white brothers forks. Very promising given the construction and price of replacement parts (literally cents), but rebuilding it every two or three days was a bit much. The piston in that external reservoir would lock up rendering the fork useless. Rebuilt it in the lobby of a hotel in Tremblant standing over a garbage can while a buddy in North Van talked me through it over the phone. Ahh the memories.....
  • 1 0
 Early Manitou elastomer forks required an after every ride disassembly and regrease, as did both ends of the 1994-95 ProFlex. The Manitous at least were quick. I think early RockShox failed pretty regularly too. But a white brothers fork would have been cooler.
  • 2 0
 That fork was shit. I could get two runs out of it and that plastic piston would jam up. While you were rebuilding yours in the lobby I was upstairs pouring the motor oil down the sink doing the same thing. Junk.
  • 1 0
 @Intense4life: ???? brothers!
  • 1 0
 @WayneParsons: Jgreen. How you doing old friend? Definitely a contributor to all those crashes lol
  • 1 0
 @Intense4life: hey buddy long time! You were a sender that’s for sure!
  • 1 0
 @WayneParsons: say hi to Dustin for me. Imma try come up for some laps this summer. Maybe see you around. Stay safe brother.
  • 3 0
 “ Just imagine rocking up to your favourite cycling cafe in a post covid world. There are moustaches, there are calf tattoos and there are pretentious externally worn bumbags... and then there are the jaws on the floor when your walk-up in denim jorts and an old NOFX t-shirt as you non nonchalantly out hip the hipsters, pay for an espresso in cold hard cash and ride off into the sunset.”

Henry, you win
  • 2 0
 I’ve considered the Rocky and the Stumpy for my camping bike. Either would be cool but the price is too steep (for me, not saying they aren’t worth the ask).
Will probably have to wait until I can score a garage sale special where the person may not know the current market value of their vintage bike.
  • 5 0
 I'd buy that mint '94 S-works M2. Verrry classic mtb
  • 3 0
 I put 30,000+ miles on my 93 M2. Loved that bike. Raced XC, DS and DH with it. It was a great bike for the time. It's still hanging in the garage, well the frame, fork, stem and carbon Scott flat bar.
  • 1 0
 I owned one. It was one sexy bike, and it ride very well in its time.
  • 1 0
 Iiehott Agree. the S-works is beautiful and will get more so with each passing year, the Helen Mirren of mountain bikes.
  • 1 0
 That 94 Stumpjumper was the first year Specialized specked a suspension form standard. I know this because I really wanted one in 94, but could only afford a 93 leftover with a rigid fork. That M4 metal rode really nice. The Y bikes were almost as terrifying to ride as the Klein's with a unified rear triangle. Nothing like geometry that puts you over the front of the bike and then putting a spring on the back trying to throw you over the bars. After test riding one I always stayed away from people riding them for fear of having to pick up the pieces after they crashed, and they always crashed. Slingshots ride amazingly well. Easily the oddest bike I have ever ridden, it was way too small but very fun to ride, I think my buddy still has his and still rides it fairly regularly.
  • 2 0
 Ah the '93 M4 stumpy... and from that day forward you were a rigid junkie.
  • 2 0
 I wanted one of those M2s so badly as a kid and I finally bought one in like.... 2006 for around $50 from a second hand sports store and loved it for a decade or so. Frame is just seemingly indestructible, and rode so well. Donated it to a bike shop a few years ago and I see it around town now and then, chained up with a basket on it, which makes my day every time.
  • 2 0
 I remember back around 1980ish - pre MTB craze- Slingshot was a bmx racing frame specifically designed to help you get the hole shot by preloading on the gate. Not sure how that translates to a broken motorcycle frame....
  • 5 0
 smells like teen spirit was 91 just sayin
  • 4 0
 @trailbicyclesbc: I much preferred Bleach anyways
  • 1 0
 As someone who did trials in the early 90's I can report that the Rocky Mountain Experience was fairly terrible as a trials bike, or for some reason none of the Vancouver, Sea to Sky or Island riders who rode them managed to get very good at trials. At the 1994 Squamish Test of Metal trials competition at the Squamish logger sports grounds, there was a section with logs across the pond used for logger sports competitions. I recall you had to ride about halfway across and then transition to another log at an angle and ride off, though possibly the beginner and sport riders just had to do a straight shot across the one log.. Anyway, the riders who fell into the pond, and there were about four of them, were all riding Rocky Experiences so it was quite an amusing business at the time. The bike did have the short chain stays but I think it also had a pretty short front end even compared to bikes of the time. It was also tall so didn't give you much room. Not a great success and they all disappeared pretty fast.
  • 1 0
 I concede that my knowledge of real trials riding is definitely lacking. But I was pretty new to mountain biking in general at the time, and that bike felt really good to me then. Coming from what I was used to, it was just so much fun and interesting.
  • 2 0
 @MB3 I just read your earlier post and yes, there's a lot to understand here. First of all, without going into a lot more nostalgic detail, my note above that it may have been that all the Experience owning trials riders in this province were particularly untalented may actually have been true. But at the time those of us who did both trials and XC did think that the superior back wheel hopping ability you got with short chain stays also translated into better technical climbing ability. Without going into other mid 90's detail, we did experiment with custom frames with short chain stays and longer front ends in the mid 90's and it seemed to be true although we screwed it up by going to higher bottom brackets which was a definite dead end. The thing is, modern big all mountain bikes full suspension bikes with wheel bases that are like 200mm longer than those 90's bikes seem much much better at climbing and incomparably better at descending. So I'm actively trying to understand how front end length and rear end length interact to make these different performance areas work. I actually think this would be a really interesting project for Pinkbike. They could commission the construction of a series of hardtails with geometries that range from the Experience to a modern 29er enduro. and really understand how the evolution of geometry as changed things.
  • 1 0
 @The-Foiling-Optimist: neat idea! Hmmm... I wonder if you could use some sort of lug and tube system to play around with different tube lengths and geometries without having to weld an infinite number of frames up. That way you could have a bunch of tubes of different lengths, a bunch of old school style lugs with different angles, and then be able to set it a configuration, braze everything together, then take it for a few rides. Then when you’ve learned what you can, would it be possible to reheat / melt the brazing, pull everything apart, and repeat with a different set of tubes and lugs in a different configuration?

I’m obviously no bike builder / engineer, so I have no idea if any of that would work (damn my Liberal Arts education!), but there’s got to be a way to achieve what you were proposing, without having to make a ton of one-off frames.
  • 1 0
 Oh my gosh I can't believe that the specialized M2 super was worth so much. I just happen to have one, and I knew it was special, but I didn't think it would sell for that much. Mine has full XTR components. It is just sitting in my garage. If anyone is seriously interested in it, I would consider selling it for the right price.
  • 1 0
 Came here to be excited. Leaving realizing I bought all the good retro deals on PB ????

If you want a really good article, I’ll send you pics of all the custom titanium parts and handmade frames I’ve snagged here since I joined.
  • 4 0
 Foes is a definitely nice and should be ridable toy even
  • 3 3
 Anodizing Inc. made Specialized frames were garbage. Cool looking but super high breakage rates.

The Slingshot actually rode pretty well, and since the frame could be split at the top tube and down cable(?), these folded up small for easy travel.

Everything else on the list........meh.
  • 4 0
 Verdict - interestingly sensible
  • 3 0
 Excited to look back on the bikes that are current today in 25 years and seeing them in the same way we see these bikes!
  • 3 0
 Don't hold your breath. These bikes all come from the beginnings of the evolution of mountain bikes, where folks were trying all kinds of new designs. Look at todays' bikes. They are almost all very similar. They won't look much different from each other in 20 years.
  • 2 0
 One of my greatest bike regrets was not buying a Slingshot CX bike back in the day. I would recovered financially soon enough but the bike would have lasted forever.
  • 3 0
 It’s the year for clearing out the garage and making a killing on bikes you would normally not be able to give away.
  • 3 0
 Put the Yeti in the kitchen and hide the pots
  • 2 0
 Rocky mountain was called a Cirrus. I recently bought an etsx because I wanted a full suspension version of the Cirrus.
  • 3 0
 It's insane to me to think that Trek was still making Y bikes in 2003.
  • 2 0
 its not a 2003 its a 1996 btw
  • 1 0
 @recardo: He’s right; Trek (unfortunately) continued with Y bikes for a while, offering alloy versions of them as a entry level alternative to the more intricate (and better performing) Fuel’s.
The original Y-11/22/33’s were cool in their own way (and for the era), but the basic design got pulled into later years too.

archive.trekbikes.com/us/en/2004/trek/y26#/us/en/2004/trek/y26/details
  • 1 1
 @Corinthian: The bike you linked to doesn't seem to be URT. Completely different design. I think the last year of the classic URT Y-series was 2000. Only the alu Y-3 that year, no carbon ones; but that Y-3 was still a higher end bike than the Y-26 in your link (Alivio/LX drivetrain, RS Jett fork, wheels made of slightly harder cheese Wink ).
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: Umm, it is indeed a URT... It ran for several years with the same frame, representing a cheap entry full sus in Trek's line up.

I've linked a non-drive side photo of one for you.

img.ricardostatic.ch/t_1800x1350/pl/1122757706/0/1

Same bike, previous model year:

archive.trekbikes.com/us/en/2003/trek/y26#/us/en/2003/trek/y26/details

And, from the same model year as the 2004 Y26 I originally linked, heres an example of the more complicated, higher end (linkage driven single pivot) Fuel platform mentioned above, which was available in carbon (pictured) or alloy:

archive.trekbikes.com/us/en/2004/trek/fuel98#/us/en/2004/trek/fuel98/details
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: I do remember the one you mention from 2000 though:

www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/BikeSpecs.aspx?item=89815
  • 1 0
 @Corinthian: sorry my reply was in relation to the article saying the pictured Trek Y22 was a 2003. its a 1996 Y22.
  • 2 0
 It’s nice that included in the shot of the Yeti is the Viking range/oven it will be paying for.
  • 1 0
 With a freaking countertop microwave next to it. Someone's got some weird priorities
  • 1 0
 @drunknride: the white enamel at least explains the color palette choice on the yeti.
  • 1 0
 Vintage MTB Festival this 14-15 August in the Belgian Ardennes vintagemtb.org The MTB Museum of Arnhem will be there as well...
  • 1 0
 The Trek Y was a pos in the 90’s. Can’t imagine what it feels like now. All that oclv sounded like a bongo drum down the trail.
  • 4 1
 Foes DHS for tha winSmile
  • 1 0
 I wonder what I could get for my 06 Turner RFX that’s hanging in my garage if these people are getting those prices.
  • 9 0
 They're asking these prices, that doesn't mean that they're getting these prices.
  • 4 0
 @nouseforaname: hipsters pay $20 for avocado toast buy stuff and Kit and Ace... it'll sell
  • 2 0
 All these bikes are old and gross, ewww
  • 3 0
 I need them all now
  • 3 1
 Rear end on that yeti is probably cracked...
  • 2 0
 Weekly buy&sell round ups please!
  • 2 0
 How about Haro Werks XCS (Specialized and Intense) from 1999?
  • 1 0
 Who remembers the Sling Shot BMX frame? If that thing were a large I'd already have it.
  • 3 2
 What are mountain-cum-trials? Sounds like something that belongs on the other big "P" website
  • 2 0
 @mtbikeaddict: You're 1 of those guys with some schooling, aren't ya? Prolly got yourself a fancy HS diploma and everything. Elitist.

/sarcasm
  • 1 0
 Anybody want an OG Ritchie ultra full xt 7 spd group, ano just starting to wear off the rims.
  • 1 0
 Put a Paul Components rasta mech on the Yeti and....BOOM! 1 million dollars.
  • 1 0
 I could have been interested by the Slingshot if the arrows were included in the package...
  • 1 0
 That Trek Y-bike is not a 2003! It's from 1995-97, they were gorgeous bikes but didn't ride as well as they looked.
  • 1 2
 This is starting to feel like that kind of edgy elitism that video games deal with when people insist some old 8-bit game is the pinnacle of gaming.
  • 2 0
 I need those Yeti grips!
  • 3 0
 CULT bmx Grips Dehart Rasta
  • 1 0
 Yeti missing the Rasta Kimg headset
  • 1 0
 The oven in the background of the yeti.... Verdict - Interesting
  • 1 0
 Just gorgeous isn’t it?
  • 1 0
 we have a bright orange Y22 hanging up in our shed
  • 2 0
 that foes is sick
  • 1 0
 Those prices.. I should be able to get at least $10k for a 2019
  • 1 0
 How much for the stove? that thing looks nice.
  • 1 0
 The foes is the only interesting bike here
  • 1 0
 Forks on the Yeti are too new
  • 1 0
 I'm in love with that Marin
  • 1 0
 ARC AS with that Marzocchi! Noooooooo!
  • 1 0
 No mention of the 400$ Klein Mantra?
  • 1 0
 Maybe James Hetfield could buy the Trek Y-Bike! Metal!!
  • 1 0
 Love the Specialized description - made me want it
  • 1 1
 Foes is the only thing worth even riding but 2k rofl. Smoke more meth.
  • 1 2
 1990 and up ain't my idea of retro . try 1970 and up.
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