7mesh Revelation Jacket - Review

Mar 4, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  


7mesh's design headquarters are located in Squamish, British Columbia, a part of the world that sees more than its fair share of rainy weather, with up to 90 inches of liquid sunshine falling every year. Given that fact, it only makes sense that 7mesh's first entry into the world of cycling apparel would be a high-end rain jacket. Constructed from Gore-Tex's Pro fabric, which was originally developed for mountaineers who wanted a waterpoof and breathable fabric that was capable of surviving the harshest conditions, the Revelation jacket was tailored specifically for cycling, with a unique fit that's unlike anything else on the market.

At 283 grams (actual), the Revelation jacket is quite light, especially considering that 7mesh have managed to include two decent sized zippered side pockets, zippered side and forearm vents, along with a detachable hood. The hood is designed to be worn under, rather than over, a helmet, in order to ensure it stays in place no matter how nasty the weather or the terrain. All of the seams are fully taped, and YKK water resistant zippers are used throughout. Sizes: XS-XL. MSRP: $450 USD. www.7meshinc.com


7Mesh Revelation Jacket
7Mesh Revelation Jacket
The hood is designed to be worn under a helmet, and attaches with three small snaps. 7mesh haven't skimped on the little details, like a fleece lined collar and a zipper garage to protect your neck.


Fit and Function

When I first put the Revelation jacket on, I was struck by just how different the fit was - the fabric was snug around the upper chest, yet loose around my shoulder blades and lats. However, as soon as I hopped on a bike it all made sense. The forward leaning position that's inherent with cycling created room in the upper chest, and decreased the looseness in the shoulders, making the jacket feel like it was tailor made for my body. There was no excess fabric flapping around, and there was plenty of freedom of movement, enough to navigate tight, twisting trails that demanded extra body motion without feeling encumbered. Although I didn't use it that often, preferring to rely on my helmet to block a good portion of the rain, the Revelation's detachable hood does fit well under a helmet without being obtrusive or making it hard to turn your head from side to side.

Mother Nature provided plenty of chances to test the Revelation against every style of precipitation imaginable, with conditions ranging from the ever-present 'light rain mist' to full-on deluges of Biblical proportions. No matter what was falling from the sky, the jacket repelled it without ever becoming soaked through. The Gore-Tex Pro fabric breathes very well, and I was impressed by how dry the inside of the jacket stayed, even during long, strenuous climbs where there wasn't much air circulation. It is possible to overwhelm the fabric's transpiration capabilities, especially on warmer days, which would cause the jacket to feel a bit clammy and saturated, although this was a much less common occurrence than with other rain jackets I've worn, and would dissipate quickly once the amount of airflow increased.

Being able to keep the elements out is all well and good, but durability is also a crucial consideration for mountain biking apparel, and this is where the Revelation shines. In addition to subjecting the jacket to the usual wear and tear that comes from brushing against tree branches and blackberry bushes, I unfortunately also had two large crashes during the testing period, one of which had me skittering and bouncing on my side over a section of frozen roots, and the other involving an off-kilter landing and a subsequent rag-dolling through the rocks and dirt. I didn't quite make it out unscathed, but the jacket did, without the slightest rip to be found, a testament to just how tear and abrasion resistant the fabric is.

7Mesh Revelation Jacket
7Mesh Revelation Jacket
Forearm vents and side vent help with temperature regulation, although the side vents can be tricky to use with a pack on.


Issues

When wearing a hydration pack, access to the side vents is difficult, especially if you're trying to quickly open them to dump some heat while still on the bike. The extra little bit of resistance created by the water resistant zippers doesn't help matters either, making one handed operation tricky. If they were positioned slightly higher this wouldn't be an issue, and I doubt that the there would be a noticeable difference in the amount of ventilation. Also, the wrist opening is on the small side, and isn't elasticized in any way, which can make it challenging to take off the jacket with gloves on, even with the velcro closure fully undone. A small detail, but for those times when you start getting that feeling of overheating accompanied by a twinge of claustrophobia, a clear signal that shedding a layer quickly is crucial, it'd be nice to be able to keep your gloves on while doing so.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIt may sound strange, but it seems as if 7mesh have made the Revelation jacket a bit too cycling-specific. The way that the Revelation is tailored makes the fit less than ideal for anything other than actually riding, since the tightness around the shoulders feels awkward when you're off the bike. If it were more multi-purpose, a shell that could be used for other sports like skiing, backpacking, or even just making a run to the grocery store on a rainy day, it'd be slightly easier to justify the asking price, although any way you look at it, $450 is a hefty sum for a rain jacket that's made in China. However, that doesn't mean the Revelation should be completely written off - the durability and actual construction are top notch, which could make this a worthy option for someone who's tired of going through a jacket (or two) every single season. If you're continually finding yourself staring at scraps of shredded nylon, purchasing something that's more expensive, but also more durable, could be the way to go. - Mike Kazimer




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76 Comments

  • + 28
 who in their right mind would spend 450 on a jacket you will probably end up shredding open in a crash after a few rides
  • + 2
 People having enough money to buy a new one after the said crash. That's why my rain jacket costed about 150 €.
  • + 2
 And that's not like if there were no alternatives for less than 200 € / $.
Race Face the Chute for example, but there are many others which are constructed the same way and specific to cycling.
450... are they mad ? It was already hard to spend that much for my TLD D3, so for a jacket...
  • + 18
 The review says that it went through a couple of large crashes without any marks. I guess you didn't read it.
  • + 2
 and i guess they didnt read this www.pinkbike.com/news/ask-pinkbike-dec-23.html
  • - 1
 @ Patrick9-32 : I didn't missed it, and my Race Face jacket went through several big crashes too Wink
  • + 8
 this is basically the rolls royce of jackets, a raceface chute or marmot precip are toyotas. Not for everybody, but definitely not in the same league. And look at it this way, if you're riding in rain, which will you notice more; that shiny new carbon bit or a jacket that keeps you warm and dry?
  • + 1
 Erm in getting that from royal rain jacket and correct layering thanks
  • + 3
 hahaha that's the american car of jkts
  • + 3
 My dhb jacket cost 60quid, it also has zips, fleece collar etc.
  • + 6
 I didn't know Rolls Royce was made in China, oh wait they aren't
  • + 1
 Good lord, is the biking industry turning into the hiking/walking business? $450 for a jacket that is going to get covered in mud & be subject to trail torture?? Why not have JCrew or LLBean get in on the action. Best bike jacket I've owned so far is an OR soft shell that I got at Winners for $60. I even use it for spring or warmer days of skiing.
  • + 1
 At $450 I don't think this is a 'journeyman' level jacket, but more something to compete with the likes of Acre Supply or Rapha. Ie: only those with cash to burn need apply. It would be great if this company company gets off the ground and eventually makes a quality product for people with a much lower snack bracket, like me. Smile
  • + 3
 winners is awesome
  • + 3
 If you wear $350 Kitsbow shorts and a $200 shirt, then folks, here is your jacket.
  • + 13
 I think a riding specific jacket is a great thing, I have plenty of other jackets for my other activities. That said, I could never shell out $450 for a jacket I am 100% likely to rip an arm off in a crash. That's why I've never bothered with any of the Arc'teryx Gore-Tex range for biking - though none of theirs are riding specific - and instead opted for their much lower priced (but aptly named in this case) Squamish hoodie. No it's not fully waterproof, it's a rain shower jacket and wind cutter. For that, it works superbly and only costs ~$150 retail. If 7mesh made something similar in a better riding fit, they'd have me sold.
  • + 2
 I agree, the Arc'teryx Squamish Hoodie is my most worn piece of riding clothing (next to my shoes). And it is well worth the $115 that you'll spend on it. I have also crashed with it, many times, and it has held up brilliantly.
  • + 2
 Go to an outdoor gear consignment shop and take your pick at something second hand. I got a killer Patagonia Super Alpine Gore-Tex Pro jacket for $200, in perfect condition. Retail is like $500+ for that jacket, and not a chance I am going to spend that much on a jacket like that, no matter how much I love it.
Gore-Tex anything is super expensive, but the stuff works and can last a very, very, very long time when you take the time to wash it properly. It's a very worthwhile investment if you can find a good AND versatile gore-tex shell that works with your budget.
  • + 4
 GoreTex win - has lifetime warranty if you keep the original product receipt
  • + 4
 Clearly this isn't the jacket for everyone given the price tag. I have arc'teryx shells worth that but personally wouldn't be shell out that kind of cash for something so specific when dialing back the fit back a bit (based on the review and not personal use) would allow it to be used for more than one application (Like my Alpha shell). This was my same concern with the early arc'teryx Beta shells that fit amazing when harnessed in on a climb and reaching but made you look likea pirate off the rock. That said, there will always be a crowd with the financial flexibility to make this jacket their go to on the bike and if it works for you than congrats and enjoy. Good gear that lasts a long time is always a good investment in my books and I like the idea of more companys making well thought out gear.... but gear doesn't make the rider. Shout out to the kids killin it in flannel and huge smiles in the mud over the cranky gear guru misapropriating the strava line.
  • + 3
 I think 7mesh also makes the Resistance jkt, which is comparable to your Squamish windshell. I've used a ton of expensive Gore jkts over the years and never shredded one in a crash.
  • + 1
 Don't forget to look at Sugoi!
  • + 12
 For $450 you can take off my pants and jacket
  • + 4
 Lots of man-made fabrics break down when you machine wash them (when you use detergents or wash warm enough to actually remove all dirt) and some 'worse quality' gortex will only last 1 or 2 washes before it becomes a sieve. That's 3 or so rides through the winter here in the UK. I normally go for wind-proof over rainproof as a rainproof leaves you sweating like hell underneath if it works anyway (yes I have read the section about it's good breath-ability, but I doubt it's $450 good). In short - I think we all know deep down that when we ride in the rain/wet, we ARE going to get wet regardless of how fancy your kit is.
  • + 3
 You should never use detergent to wash waterproof breathables, for that very reason. There are technical washes like Nikwax that are non-detergent cleaners specifically for this. You can also retreat the surface fabric with DWR sprays or washes too if it's really old.
  • + 2
 Also, 2-ply and 2.5-ply fabrics don't last nearly as long as 3-ply fabrics.
  • + 3
 Liquid detergent is fine for Goretex but it strips the DWR so that needs to be reapplied after washing. Otherwise the face fabric wets out and you lose breathability. It'll still be waterproof but more sweat will condense inside.
  • + 2
 I've looked into Nikwax but it's such a faff if you need to use it every single time you ride (over winter).
  • + 1
 You don't need to use it every time you ride. I wash mine maybe 2-3 times a winter? And each time you just use a capful. Usually a wipe down with a wet cloth is enough to get surface dirt off.
  • + 2
 Ah, good old British winter slopfest. It's wet and muddy from late september till may. Plenty more washes than just three needed in that time In my experience.
  • + 2
 PB - I'm tired of these hi-tech product intros. It seems like 90% are top end product that a median income person will never be able to afford while being responsible. I would rather see products that feature trickle down technology at affordable prices make up 90% of product intros/reviews. Instead of reviewing the top end product, how about you feature best selling products?
  • + 2
 Why on earth would a company send a mid/low tier to a pack of hyenas? It would get shredded by the critics. They send their high end stuff in the hopes to get the best review. If anything it's the companies fault for making sub par mid level gear yet sending their top of the line for critique.
  • + 4
 It's worth checking out their Windstopper jacket, the Recon, which runs about half the price of the Revelation. 7mesh stuff is expensive, but the fit, build, and materials are WAY nicer than the budget options. Think Kitsbow, but built for living in a coastal rainforest. Whether it's worth the asking price is between you and your wallet...
  • + 4
 @ Gnarbar, Arcteryx is ok, but very overpriced. I own one of their backpacks. They do make nice stuff but they are the Santa Cruz of outdoor clothing. Overpriced.
  • + 2
 I bought 2 rain jackets this year. First an EMS Helix for about $250Cdn which is a fantastic jacket for the price. Polartec Neoshell, fits well, waterproof, breathes better than just about any hard shell. Wore mtbing once but decided it was too nice to abuse so I picked up a Royal Racing Matrix for $103Cdn. It's waterroof, doesn't breath as well, but is a great jacket per $. I don't feel bad beating it up. I normally don't wear a jacket to climb as I just overheat. I'll carry a spare Merino top, and the jacket in my pack and change at the top. Seems to work the best around here.
  • + 2
 Looks like alot of jelous haters out there. I have one and LOVE it. Support your bike community. It is small time guys like this that make big change. 7Mesh is a few guys who love the sport. They are making the best stuff available. Go ahead enjoy your garbage bag @treesmoker. I will be out there enjoying myself hours in jacket! Tell me how your garbage bag holds up.
  • + 2
 Goretex Pro is a dumb idea for a riding jacket. Add that thick a thick membrane to a face fabric heavy enough to survive a few rides and you have yourself one very expensive garbage bag. There's a very good reason I only wear my similarly designed ski touring shell on the descents.
  • + 1
 How about featuring some products that the majority of people reading this site can actually afford? $450 for a jacket that will likely get shredded in less than a season is for the people that are riding $10,000 bikes. And we know that those people exist but are few and far between. How about featuring a mid range jacket that isn't as alienating yet is durable, looks good and well designed yet affordable to the unclean masses? Does that exist?
  • + 0
 The RaceFace Chute jacket is less than half the price, and probably does the job just as well.
  • + 1
 agreed
  • + 5
 the chute is a good price-point jkt but, no, it won't do the job as well
  • + 2
 If it ain't Goretex it won't "do the job aswell".
  • + 1
 Marmot Artemis Jacket. Got mine for 120 bucks and its highly breathable, pitzips, a nice hood and made from stretchable material. You can also pack it up super small and put it in your backpack when not needed.
  • + 1
 @jclnv; Try eVent, after the 2 ski shells & a pair of ski pants I would be hard pressed to go back to Goretex. Breathes waaayyyy better.
  • + 1
 Cool. I'll try it next time.
  • + 4
 lol at the price. pb gonna pb
  • + 3
 because I abasolutely ALWAYS spend $450 on a yellow cycling jacket to ride in spring mud and muck
  • + 3
 Does the vent zipper really stop at the elbow? Ouch, that would hurt!
  • + 1
 The price is pretty standard for a quality gore-tex pro jacket. I would be willing to try one out if I did not already pick up a similar jacket at MEC that was on sale.
  • + 2
 I just bought a helly hansen rain coat 65$. That will do the trick ! 450$ ? Nooooo
  • + 7
 I bought a trash bag and poked holes in it for my arms and head. 50 for $10, and it provides 90% of this jacket's function.
  • + 1
 Lol
  • + 2
 You say "water resistant zippers are used throughout", but that main front zip doesn't look it... Is it?
  • + 3
 If they name it Pike or Lyrik, might worth the money.
  • + 1
 For $450 it should be custom made to my measurements. I don't care where it's manufactured as long as the quality is good.
  • + 1
 I recently bought a sombrio jacket in the January sales for 30.. That's 15 sombrio jackets... For the cost of this
  • + 3
 You've only got one body, why would you need 15 jackets?
  • + 1
 I got my mavic stratos H2O storm jacket for $200 ; it is bike taylored, waterproof, surprisingly tough !
  • + 1
 Has anybody tried gore bike wear? They seem to have well priced stuff that's bike specific. .
  • + 0
 Was hoping for better from this company. Outrageous price, looks like a wonky fit and overall a bit ugly.
  • + 2
 Cool logo!
  • - 3
 It's one thing when there is a product that has some overwhelmingly awesome new/innovative functions that warrant attention and expenditure... But it's a jacket.
A Jacket.

Seriously.... A $450 jacket.

I know people who are sponsored snowboarders and skiers who don't wear coats that cost half this, and a quality jacket is much more important for them.
  • + 3
 Personally I've never felt the need for top-notch waterproof breathable performance while skiiing, except for the rare occaisions where it's rained. Actual cold temps tend to help with getting overheated and sweaty, plus the snow is nowhere near a drenching as the rain cause it's frozen. I couldn't afford this jacket, and it's warm enough where I live that I couldn't justify buying it even if I could afford it, but $450 for a gore-tex jacket that actually works as advertised to keep the rain off and still breathe is way more justifiable than $100+ for shorts. And for people who live in rainy areas and have money to spend, I guarantee this will improve the riding experience more than spending thousands for the marginal improvements of a carbon wonderbike.
  • + 1
 I stopped reading after seeing the $450! Yikes!!!
  • + 0
 I'd rather go through a couple of cheap jackets in a season than pay that !
  • + 1
 I got to $450 and stopped! Is that not about the price of a D3!
  • + 1
 Any other colors?
  • + 1
 zipper garage LOL
  • + 1
 lol lol
  • - 2
 I live in the rainy PNW. Trust me on this Outdoor Research makes hands down the best outdoor clothing you could ever buy.
  • + 5
 good stuff but Arcteryx, Vaude, and many many others are just as good if not arguably better designed and tailored. brand of choice/preference
  • + 2
 Agreed
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