7mesh Revelation Jacket V2 - Review

Nov 9, 2017
by Vernon Felton  
7mesh Revelation Jacket Vernon Felton


Let’s just get this over. $475. That’s a metric shit ton to spend on a jacket. The odds are good that plenty of readers will write the Revelation off after reading the sixth word in this review. I understand. There are, after all, very good cycling rain jackets selling for half this much.

I’m not here to convince anyone that $475 constitutes a “good deal” or that anyone should buy anything. That’s not my job as a reviewer. My job is to determine whether or not a product performs well. To that end, does this jacket take a beating and keep you dry during long rides in crappy weather? The answer is an unqualified "Yes."
7mesh Revelation V2 Details
• Gore-Tex 3L Pro - 40d nylon plain weave / RGR backer
• Watertight front zip
• DR-Snap removable under-helmet hood
• Zippered pockets, side and forearm vents
• Soft-brushed collar and chin guard
• Adjustable Velcro cuffs
• 8-mm seam tape
• Weight 299 grams
• MSRP: $475 USD
www.7meshinc.com

In fact, it does all those things better than most jackets. Whether or not you can afford the Revelation is between you and your checking account. Let’s get on with the review.


7mesh Revelation Jacket Vernon Felton

The original Revelation debuted in late 2014 and was 7mesh's first jacket. The company, in case the name isn't ringing any bells with you, was founded by a few outdoor industry veterans who previously made their mark at brands such as Arc’teryx. 7mesh is based out of Squamish, British Columbia—as good a place as any to design, prototype and test wet-weather apparel. Kazimer tested the original Revelation jacket for Pinkbike. I tested it for Bike Magazine and Adventure Journal. Our impressions of that jacket were similar—the waterproofing was top notch, breathability was good and the jacket was surprisingly rugged for something so lightweight. Probably my biggest gripe with the original was its cut, which was aggressively athletic and a bit short in the back.

This second-generation Revelation maintains everything that was good about the original and adds a few new touches, though there is still room for improvement.


7mesh Revelation Jacket Vernon Felton
7mesh Revelation Jacket Vernon Felton
All pockets feature sealed zippers. The jacket sports large side vents. For the record, I prefer pit zips on this kind of jacket.

On Trail

Here are the basics: The Revelation is constructed from Gore-Tex 3L Pro and features water-tight, sealed zippers and fully-taped seams throughout. The material is lightweight, amazingly good at keeping the drippy stuff on the outside of your jacket and surprisingly rugged. The Revelation also features a hood, designed to be worn under your helmet, that is both adjustable (via a small drawstring) and detachable (via three small, plastic snaps). 7mesh added a small brim to the hood this time round. The company also incorporated reflective material to the cuffs and tail of the jacket—always a plus for commuters or anyone logging road time to the trail head. The tail of the jacket, thankfully, has grown a bit longer—which is a very good thing as no one enjoys getting their ass crack spackled with wet mud whilst descending.

The biggest improvement, however, is the Revelation's overall fit.

I am not a particularly big guy, but the old Revelation, in a size Large, fit me like a sausage casing around the chest and arms. Riders of a skinnier persuasion (such as Kaz) still felt the same squeeze. The new Revelation has a more relaxed fit around the chest and upper arms, which makes it worlds more comfortable when you are hunched over the bars. The jacket still has a trimmer overall cut than most rain jackets on the market, but it feels good on the bike. "Tailored to the riding position" is one way to describe it. It makes some other rain jackets out there feel like floppy sails.


7mesh Revelation Jacket Vernon Felton
7mesh Revelation Jacket Vernon Felton
Velcro cuffs--good. Reflective trim--good. Minimalist hood snaps? Not so good.

Rain jackets have a lot to live up to—they need to keep the wet out without steaming you to death when your heart is racing. The Revelation is outstanding on the waterproof front. Gore Tex Pro is a three-layer material consisting of a Gore-Tex membrane sandwiched between a tough outer material and a "specially developed" inner lining. There is a whole lot of "special" and "proprietary" language on Gore's site (it can be a bit tedious), but the takeaway here is that the jacket has a waterproof rating of around 20,000 mm, meaning it can withstand hour after hour in the snow and pounding rain without leaking.

Gore Tex Pro is pricey stuff—it's a material generally reserved for high-end backpacking and mountaineering apparel. Gore Pro is meant to not only be crazy-waterproof, but strong as hell. Despite the Revelation's light weight, it has a surprisingly sturdy feel to it. And, yes, the waterproofing is as good as the marketing claims make it out to be. Gore says the stuff is waterproof for life, which sort of sounds like a slogan for a yuppy mountaineering gang, but I can say this: I didn't wash and reapply any waterproofing to my original Revelation for 2.5 years. And I rode in the thing constantly. It looked like King Kong wiped his ass with it before I decided I should probably take better care of it...and it still never leaked. Obviously, I haven't been able to put the new Revelation through that kind of testing cycle (since it's a new version and I lack a decent time machine), but since it's made of the same Gore Pro material, I'm willing to go out on a ledge and predict that it'll share a similar fate as the original.

It's worth noting that the jacket is also fully seam taped—not just taped in critical, high-stress areas. 7mesh keeps the grams to a minimum by employing a particularly svelte tape. It's the kind of little detail that is easily lost in the mix, but it's also the kind of attention to detail that makes the Revelation the jacket it is.


7mesh Revelation Jacket Vernon Felton

What about breathability? Again, Gore's Pro fabric gets good grades on that score. Gore states that their membrane features "...9 billion pores per square inch, with each pore 20,000 times smaller than a water droplet." The idea here is that rain water can't seep into those pores from the outside, but the steam vapor you generate whilst humping yourself up some miserable bastard of a climb can pass through said tiny-ass pores. Since my electron microscope is on backorder, along with that time machine, I can't verify Gore's claim about the 9 billion pores, but the jacket does breathe well. You still, however, will need to make use of the vents. No two ways about it. Accordingly, the jacket features both forearm vents and sizeable side vents. I'm still not a huge fan of those angled side vents. True, they bring air into the jacket, but if you wear a hydration pack, the straps block the vents a bit. Moreover, every jacket I have used with pit zips has channeled air more effectively into the jacket.

The detachable hood is a nice feature, but I don't care for the three minimalist snap closures that attach the hood to the jacket. If you wear the hood beneath our helmet (as designed), it's never going to go flying off into the woods, but I did manage to unintentionally unsnap the hood buttons when out riding. I'm guessing 7mesh goes the snap route because it's lightweight and doesn't create the potential for leaks, but I'd much prefer a zipper here. Speaking of zippers, none of the zippers on the jacket will let in water. Those zippers, however, are fairly small, which means it takes a bit more effort than usual to open and close the things.


Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesPeople will inevitably dog the Revelation, noting that there is no way in hell that they would spend nearly a half grand on a jacket that could tear during their first wreck. Well, I have crashed while wearing the older version on scores of occasions and have yet to tear or even scuff the thing. It's a seriously tough jacket that proves itself over time. Does it also prove itself worthy of the $475 asking price? Debatable. It's a hell of a jacket that'll endure seasons, and it should at this price. Can't stomach the asking price? Consider checking out the Endura MT500, Bontrager Stormshell Evoke or Gore Power Trail Active jackets. Vernon Felton


Must Read This Week

206 Comments

  • + 91
 You know in home decorating magazines where there are 3 purple chairs side by side and the first one is high end $2750 and the next is mid $349 and the last one is from ikea and costs $79. They need that sort of thing on Pinkbike. Feature this jacket, a mid range one and a plastic garbage bag and let users pick which one fits their budget
  • + 85
 I'm in for a garbage bag shootout.
  • + 7
 @nozes: The one's from LIDL are the best Wink
  • - 8
flag psedma (Nov 9, 2017 at 3:24) (Below Threshold)
 @elkefro: yeah! just for 30 bucks you get something what is not waterproof, doesn't breathe at all and tears after first light contact with branch... But for that price you must have it and you can buy new every other week...
  • + 1
 Whoa look at mr moneybag here!
  • - 21
flag scott-townes (Nov 9, 2017 at 7:37) (Below Threshold)
 PB doesn't give a crap about reviewing products that most of their users can afford. They get to keep this stuff so of course they're going to use their website to snag as much expensive freebies as they can.

Way to go PB, you just "reviewed" (more like shamelessly advertised) a $475 shell....
  • + 5
 @nozes: A garbage back shootout would be epic. Come on PB? It would cost you so little, and provide SO much entertainment for your reader base...
  • - 1
 @Powderface agree 100%. reasing the first line I just asked myself: why is he reviewing something that expensive ?? We all know why...
  • + 4
 Common 13 gallon kitchen trash bags have a flattering athletic fit and custom vents can be added with your scout knife. I recommend staying away from those large black trash bags. Their bulky size leads to inferior aerodynamics and the thicker materials leads to faster condensation build-up.
  • + 1
 Indeed!

That is one hella way to price yourselves outta the market with this jacket.

My berghaus bike jacket does the job - cost me £40 or £35 iirc.
  • + 6
 Isn't that kind of what vernon did by recommending cheaper alternatives in the "Pinkbike's Take" section?
  • + 2
 How about more reviews of mid-range gear and bikes in general. Whether bikes or whatever, most of what we see here is top-end stuff. And the deal-of-the-month articles don't count.
  • + 1
 @thinkbike: and you can get them scented like a dog poop bag too.... bonus....
  • + 59
 Hey all, thanks for reading about the Rev and appreciate the feedback, good and bad! Our goal is to make the best performing apparel we can for people that want to be able to ride in difficult to extreme conditions. The Rev in particular is designed for multiday backcountry or alpine condition use. We understand the market is much bigger for mid and low-end product, but a lot of brands offer those products already. You don't need that from us, and that isn't what we started 7mesh to accomplish. Our goal is to make the best, so we don't start with a market analysis and target pricing. We source the best materials in the world (from 13 countries currently I think), work with the best mills and vendors, then use hands-on design and prototyping to control every aspect of what goes in to our products. We also partner with the best manufacturing facilities for final commercialization and production. Our manufacturing partner is KTC, one of the top technical apparel factories in the world. (Of what we call the "Top 4", 1 is the Arc'teryx factory in Vancouver, the other 3 are in Asia.) Many people may not realize this, but the days of China being a low cost manufacturing centre for apparel have waned. Most outdoor apparel has moved (or is moving) to Bangladesh, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar etc, and we'd be there too if pricing was our top priority. All that said - nice stuff and good work cost money. If we could make a Rev and sell it for $50 or $150 or $250 we would, because everyone would buy one and we'd be a massive business! It's way too competitive a world for any of the small companies in our space to make premium margins on the basis of brand. So though the Rev is indeed expensive, it's because of what the product actually *is*, and we think it's great value for those that choose to buy one. It's lighter, more functional, more comfortable, more packable, and more breathable than just about any jacket we can compare it to. If that's what you're after hopefully the price makes sense for you. If it's not worth it to you that's fine too, we're not suggesting everyone needs the Rev. Thanks again everyone, happy to answer questions!
  • + 5
 I've used cheap jackets on multiday backcountry trips and regretted it. Learned my lesson, never again.
  • + 57
 Couldn't even make it $500 even no balls cmon
  • + 5
 Don't worry we went bigger in Canada to impress you! ;-)
  • + 3
 @themountain: I'm going to disagree on those jackets doing exactly the same, but what matters most is whether it meets your needs - so if you've found one that does, that's great! (Their cheapest is less than 10 Euros...no idea how anybody can do that, cue more garbage bag comments!)
  • + 1
 @tj7mesh: there are plenty of options for way less money that are as good or better than this jacket
  • + 44
 For those complaining about the price, just move along. Who are any of us to be pissed at a company for making a premium product? If I owned a company that made widgets, I would for sure make a high end expensive model made with the finest material to cater to those that wanted the product. Nobody is forcing anyone to buy this jacket.

Years ago I bought a Carhartt work jacket for when i was working outdoors, 2002ish? If memory serves I think I paid around $300? Yesterday while wearing it for the 5000th time I actually stopped for a minute and realized I still had this jacket amd its still in mint shape. Thats 15 years! Best money I ever spent even though everyone said i was an idiot back then.

Point is you get what you pay for. Dont want to pay it? Don't then, use a garbage bag. At least you're not being FORCED into buying it like a new bike standard right?
  • - 9
flag Poulsbojohnny (Nov 9, 2017 at 8:05) (Below Threshold)
 I think it is pricey just to by pricey, though. Not because it is 5 times better than a $100 jacket.
To the Google!

Gore-Tex 3L Pro - ~$20 a yard raw
Seam Sealer ~$2 a yard
Waterproof zippers, $3 a yard.

These are retail prices, of course. Buy in bulk and you pay much less, especially if you aren't in the 'developed' world.

Figure about a yard of zipper, 3 yards of sealed seams and 2 yards of fabric. So $47 worth of material. Add in another $5 to have it built by slave labor in a 3rd world country, and shipped in a container to the US. So, $52 in initial cost to get it on the ground in the West. Another $5/jacket to ship it to a shelf. From there it is all markup.

For me it was the same head scratching when Arc’teryx showed up here 10 or so years ago. Really expensive fashion gear with a cool skeleton on the breast. Any better than the $50 one I could buy at Target or where ever? No. But fashion...

As for the Carhart. Yes, I have one too. I've had it for a decade, but I didn't pay $300 for it! I think it was around $80.
  • + 5
 @Poulsbojohnny: To be fair you could use that same example on the cost of a bike. My point at the end of the day is getting angry at a company for putting out a product you dont have to buy is kind of weak. The jacket could be $1000 and it wouldn't effect my our anyone's life in the slightest.
  • + 22
 @Poulsbojohnny: This type of analysis is so half-baked and does anyone reading your comment a disservice.

You realize there are people that need to design the jacket, develop the jacket (put all the materials together there are more than what you listed and guess what they have minimum orders...), test the materials, test the colors, construct the jacket, ship the jackets (let's not forget duty and exchange rate costs), distribute the jacket, market the jacket, etc. Not to mention that using Gore-Tex Pro requires certain face fabrics and construction that cost more than the $100 jacket you describe.

This is a pretty standard price for a Gore-Tex Pro jacket with these features... Wonder why that is? Maybe because everyone's costs are relatively similiar for this type of jacket...
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: @Poulsbojohnny: At least Arc'teryx used to be made in Canada by people who I assumed were making a living wage. I shelled out (he he) about $350 for one of their top notch jackets several years ago. When a zipper began to fail, I contacted them and they instructed me to send it back to them and they shipped me a new jacket! This has happened twice now so I'm on my 3rd jacket from them. Great quality stuff that they stand behind with an excellent warranty. And for the record their stuff is far superior to anything you'll dredge up at Target.
  • + 15
 @Poulsbojohnny: "[Arcteryx] Any better than the $50 one I could buy at Target or where ever? No."

Are. You. f*cking. Kidding. Me. If you want to say it's not worth the money for you, that's fine, but there's no way you can honestly say that an Arcteryx or other premium shell is no better than a $50 generic shell. Does my cheap REI shell work great around town, on day hikes, summer backpacking, etc? Sure, that's what it's designed for, but it's also not that waterproof anymore. Am I going to take it on a winter overnight ski touring/mountaineering trip? Hell no. My $400 mountain hardwear shell (got it on clearance) is tougher, more waterproof, gets less clammy inside, has a hood that fits over a ski/climbing helmet, and is cut for greater range of motion.... because it's designed for a specialized purpose. There are different levels of gore tex membrane, different features, different fit and range of motion. Yes, they're both jackets, but the quality of materials/manufacture, the amt of effort that went into design, and the level of customer support are all different. Not to mention the size of the respective markets (casual day to day user vs people doing serious mountaineering/backcountry travel).

Your "analysis" only looks at material and shipping costs.... you've completely ignored costs of labor (mfg, supply chain, design/engineering, customer support, etc), amortizing mfg equipment costs, inventory space, sales volume, etc, for all the months/years of iterations required to get a product right. Anyone who's actually worked in product development knows how absurd/erroneous it is to say "hey there's only $50 of material in my jacket!!!" because a jacket isn't 2.5 yards of material, it's a damn jacket. Your analysis is like saying a bike frame is just a $100 pile of tubes.
  • + 5
 @Poulsbojohnny: Honestly, all this analysis demonstrates is that you don't really know what you're talking about.

First of all, I think your $50 manufacturing and shipping cost could be a bit low... But let's say it's correct.

It costs an awful lot of money to design a product, and you have to make that money back. So add R&D costs to the price. Since this is a high-end jacket, they're probably not expecting to sell too many of them. Hence each jacket has to pay for quite a big portion of the R&D. Then you have marketing costs, and you have to pay the salaries of everyone working at the jacket company... Accounting, designers, logistics, management etc.

Then there's the store's markup. This can easily be 50 %. You know how stores often have 50 % off sales at the end of the season? They're not making a huge loss, they're probably breaking even.

So the jacket company most likely makes under 250 bucks per jacket, and it has to pay for all sorts of expenses.

Also you're claiming that a 50-dollar jacket from Target is as good as Arc'teryx, making it obvious that you haven't used both in demanding conditions. I've been in a blizzard in a mid-tier jacket (already better than the Target one), and a Gore-Tex jacket. The difference is very real.

TL;DR: making things is expensive and making nice things is very expensive.
  • - 1
 @samimerilohi: Thanks for the responses all. Consider this, though. The same R&D, test, business costs, etc. apply to ANY product you buy. So, I don't think that the argument is that invalid. A $100 jacket or a $1000 jacket should have a fairly even design/production/ship cost. So, that should not be part of the equation. It really isn't any different than the $10k bikes that show up here and people complain about. A $3k bike or even a $1.5k bike will get the job done just as well and are certainly not 3 or 1.5 times worse than the $10k job.. At the end of the day, some folks will buy the $500 jacket or a $10k bicycle because they 'have' to have it, not because it is 5 times better or that they need it to get the job done.

@pdxkid . Your statements make no sense. You've had to send a $350 jacket back 3 times to be fixed, yet it is quality? Obviously they stand behind their product, which is a good thing.
  • + 3
 @Poulsbojohnny: True, though I'd argue that it costs more to develop a high end product. It has to be the best thing out there, so you have to develop cutting edge tech and do everything as well as possible. On the mid-tier product, you can use tried-and-trusted tech, maybe even the same tech you developed for the high-end jacket five years ago.

Also since you'll probably sell fewer units of the more expensive jacket compared to the cheaper one, you have to recover more R&D cost per unit sold.

You're absolutely right that a 5x as expensive jacket won't be 5x as good as the cheaper one. That's called diminishing returns and it applies to most products. If you want the best, you have to pay a lot more.
  • + 4
 @Poulsbojohnny: Again, even if you assume that overall R&D costs are similar (which is probably not the case, since bigger, more established companies are just tweaking products from year to year and small/new companies are designing from scratch), the $100 jacket amortizes those costs over tens of thousands of units sold, vs probably hundreds for a product like this, because they're targeted at a larger, more generalized market. Throwing better materials, mfg methods, and features may only increase the actual material/labor cost slightly, but those slight increases push the jacket into smaller and smaller target markets with fewer volumes sold - cuz at the end of the day most people just want something to stuff in a backpack for a day hike. So if you come at it from the perspective of "I want to make a very high quality jacket", you're already talking about a (relatively) tiny sales volume, which means each unit will carry way more of the building rent, sales/support staff wages, etc than a cheap, high volume one will.

In addition to that, capital amortization and overhead costs (like building rent/mortgage) are relatively more expensive for a smaller company than for a large one. TNF/Marmot are cranking out jackets, gloves, hats, and pants by the tens of thousands, all under the same roof in a developing country, with fewer tooling changeovers between models/sizes/etc. A small player like 7mesh is paying rent for a warehouse suite and making only dozens/hundreds of a small family of products.

And even with all that, the 7mesh jacket price isn't really out of line with comparable high-end goretex jackets from Arcteryx, Mountain Hardwear, etc. So they're probably taking considerably less markup than the big players are.

Like @samimerilohi said, I've been in blizzards and freezing rainstorms on glaciers and shit in the backcountry. I've done it in a high-end purpose-built mountaineering/ice climbing jacket, and I've done it in a $120 REI jacket. There's big difference. Neither one was necessarily comfortable, but one was a soggy, shivering sufferfest, and the other was a slightly damp but in-control adventure scenario.
  • + 3
 @bkm303: Good points BKM/Sam
And thanks for keeping it civil!
  • - 4
flag pinhead907 (Nov 9, 2017 at 13:40) (Below Threshold)
 So conversely, who is forcing you to read comments from the peanut gallery? And, what is this, the first time you ever read a comment on Pinkbike? Complaining about expensive stuff is what we do, man.
  • + 1
 Excellent post. b.
  • - 1
 @dhx42: I’m sorry, but the majority of the costs you have listed are no different to the clothes you buy at target. Also there you have test things, match things design pay shipping, exchange rates etc. The jacket is overpriced. Full stop. You can right goretex pro all over it, nothing has really changed in goretex for the last 20 years. The $50 was maybe extreme but nowhere near the $500,- it is. There is nothing special with this jacket. It’s longer at the back, like all bike jackets. Have been for decades. My 30 year old Northface hiking jacket is still without holes so material is nothing special either. Watertight zips? Old! What fester does this jacket have that is not out of a standard catalog?
Remember the PB article s few months ago about building your own bike in the Far East? This is 20x cheaper for clothes, because it’s easier.
Do I mind the jacket? No, but please don’t pretend it’s not overpriced.
  • + 3
 @samimerilohi: what R&D? What does this jacket do that not every outdoor jacket for the last 25years is doing? The materials are stock materials off the shelf. The design is boring. Nothing tells me that wow, these guys made something spectacular good. I’m sure it works well, the material is probably nice and all, but it is overpriced for what it is.
  • + 1
 @Tmackstab: Seriously? You've counted every time you wear your jacket?! Consider me impressed and also disappointed in equal measure.
  • + 3
 @mitochris: "The jacket is overpriced. Full stop."

Based on..... what exactly? I'm not aware of ANY Gore-Tex Pro / DryQ Elite / eVent Expedition / etc jackets under $400 MSRP. Sure, if you're lucky you can snag one on clearance for half that, but I'm sure people get deals on 7mesh too.

We get it, it's too expensive for you. That's not the same thing as "overpriced". Personally I wouldn't spend this kind of money on a shell for mtb, but if I was into real backcountry riding, bikepacking, etc I might.

I got a killer deal on a DryQ Elite jacket for winter backcountry stuff a few years back and it's honestly made a massive difference in comfort, warmth, staying dry, etc. Luckily I didn't have to drop $475 on it but I'd be lying my ass off if I said it wasn't any different from the $120 rain shell I used before. That's like saying a Pike is no different from a Sektor. Yup, maybe they're both forks with the same travel... but they're not the same and we all know that.
  • + 0
 lol at that cost analysis
  • + 38
 'The shit tonne (/tʌn/ ( listen)) (non-preferred SI derived unit; SI symbol: st), commonly referred to as the metric shit ton in the United States, is a non-SI metric unit of mass equal to 1,000 shit kilograms; or one shit megagram (sMg); it is equivalent to approximately 2,204.6 shit pounds, 1.102 short shit tons (US) or 0.984 long shit tons (imperial).'
(Wikipedia)
  • + 12
 Polartec Neoshell breathes way better than Gore ProShell. Pro Shell is wind proof whereas Neoshell is wind permeable but waterproof (the holy grail for high aerobic waterproof jackets).

I have been riding in the Meridian Jacket from Acre Supply for two winters now and its sensational. I paid full retail for it and it is hands down the best jacket I have ever owned for high aerobic condidtions, worth every penny. It still looks brand new despite use 3 times a week over two winters.

To qualify this I worked for The North Face for 10-years and have had access to whatever jacket I could possibly want in the most expensive technical fabrics imagineable and I would buy another one of these in a heart beat. You wont be disappointed.
  • + 5
 I have a Polartech Neoshell jacket - Rab Myriad from a couple of years ago. In fact, it's so good I bought a spare when I saw one in the sale at half price. I agree - it's the best jacket I've worn for riding. Superb, very impressed with the material. Stands up really well to UK riding all year round.
  • + 2
 Good lookin out man. Looks like any jacket out there made with the GTX pro material is almost $500 or up. The Polartec jackets run more around $200-$300.
  • + 2
 @charmiller: I have a $50 Pearl Izumi rain shell I bought 10 years ago. Still looks new, still keeps the rain out on rides, and the hood zips in. I'd buy it again in a heartbeat. But, the Polartech Neoshell pricing isn't terrible.
  • + 2
 I've heard top remarks about the Acre Supply jackets. I couldn't justify the AS jacket at full pop compared to the 7mesh at closeout. Glad I've never seen an AS jacket in the flesh. I wear the Revi jacket with nothing more than a merino shirt underneath it including last week on a snow ride.
  • + 1
 I just wear a Dry-za-bone horsemen jacket, sure it's long, and uncomfortable, and everything that you shouldn't wear on a bike. . . But it's the Australian thing to do I wear an old, pretty beat up Goretex North Face Serrak shell that you can't buy any more, had it for about 9 years. I don't ride in the rain that often, but when I do, I take my jacket straight off and get sideways in the wet.
  • + 1
 @dwojo The Meridian looks like a great jacket. Is NeoShell that much better for breathability than Pro Shell? I have an Arc'teryx Beta, but find it does get sweaty under physical exertion.

Speaking of pricing, the Meridian is on par with the 7mesh jacket, so not cheap!
  • + 1
 @kr2ranger: Yeah it is noticeably more breathable. Pro Shell is great in cold dry environments like alpine conditions and when you are walking but if you increase activity into the aerobic zone it can't deal with the moisture vapour you pump out. You will inevitably sweat and feel clammy inside.

Neoshell is next level and doesnt get this clammy feeling. You can feel some wind through the fabric and it ventilating. A great test is to put your mouth up to it and blow on it. You can feel your breath through the fabric. This is not possible with Gore-Tex.
  • + 10
 The thing that has always bothered me about 7Mesh is they make themselves out to be so luxury but then all their clothes are just made in Guangzhou, China like every other brand. For that kind of money I expect some Canadians to be makin' my jacket!
  • + 6
 Acre Supply has you covered then.
  • + 3
 a few more pockets with Acre as well:-)
  • + 10
 you guys like to complain more than you like to actually ride your bike. The point here is it's a premium product, just like the bikes reviewed, tires that cost you $120 each, etc. The amount of people rolling around with PUSH shocks, carbon wheels, carbon frames, Kashima coated bike racks, are all ogling over premium products and throwing their dollars at items they hope to notice makes a difference to their ride. The idea here is you get a very well made, light weight, durable jacket, that fits well, and it backed by a small brand in an outdoor rich community. You don't have to buy it. But, if you want to ride more than spend time on here complaining, maybe it's your ticket to comfortably withstanding the less than idea conditions that come around this time of year.
  • - 1
 If you think a product is overpriced, or that yuppification is bad for our sport, then saying that in a PB comment makes sense. Comments are everyone's chance to speak up and persuade others. If you persuade others, you impact the market.

Trek and Specialized will sell you a $4000 bike for $9000 if they can. PB comments are a way to try to make it harder for their strategy to pay off. A tiny way, sure, but I don't see why you'd think folks aren't allowed to try.
  • + 2
 @Phillyenduro: like it worked with 27.5 and Boost and 29 DH bikes
  • + 1
 @likehell: I voted against Trump, that didn't work either. And yet.
  • + 1
 @Phillyenduro: next time it will work! (I hope with Trump at least)
  • + 9
 Hey Felton: quality review. Nice work. Told me everything I'd want to know, and kept me amused along the way. Not everything you write makes me want to hump your leg, but this one was a winner.
  • + 7
 Thank you, @Phillyenduro, but if I ever write something that makes anybody want to hump my leg, I'm in trouble. Cheers.
  • + 3
 @vernonfelton: It's just lust Vernon, like owning an original Yeti 303 in Team colours, but with modern geometry, a bigger head tube and better suspension, with 29" wheels, and having a large bank account, and dating a supermodel . . . Sorry, I got carried away
  • + 7
 I guess you don't need high end outerwear when all you do is sit behind a laptop all winter, complaining about how expensive outerwear is on Pinkbike. Know who isn't doing that because they're too busy being comfortable and safe outside? People who own high end outerwear.

Sucks to be the average Pinkbike user, I guess?
  • + 0
 I think most people that own high-end outerwear spend a lot of time in mountaineering stores and coffee shops. My experience, anyhow.
  • + 7
 Should have stuck the Gucci stripes on there along with the 'SUPREME' logo on the back. It would sell out in minutes to all the broke teens who spend their wages entirely on 'trendy' clothes to look rich and cool. Call it this;
Gucci x Supreme 7mesh Revelation Jacket V2.
As worn by legends such as 'Gucci Gwin' and the notorious 'Prada Peaty'.
  • + 13
 I am a 'teen' and don't condone this type of behavior
  • + 1
 @ibishreddin: same, not all of us teens are complete nincompoops who waste their lives on social media
  • + 1
 Many of you out there probably believe fidget spinners are just a toy for kids. You don't know how f*cking wrong you are. Fidget spinners were designed for elite athletes, CEOs, and arch-bishops. Kids merely adopted the spinning, we were born in it, moulded by it. I've dedicated my life to fidget spinners. I'm the only truly certified grand master of fidget spinners; 3 time defending world champion WWE belt holder of fidget spinning. So I believe I'm the only one truly qualified to tell you that fidget spinning is a man's sport, a man's man's sport. I was once a boy who became a man thanks to fidget spinning and also natural ageing. Do you wanna know the difference between me and a child? I'm 22 f*cking years old, children are usually under 12 depending on what criteria you're gonna use to classify someone as a child so think about that shit next time you see me torpedoing down a slip-and-slide sailing at an atom splitting 68 miles per hour going straight into a f*cking brick wall of manliness. How do I stay in top physical form becoming this athletic specimen that scientists can't even fully understand? Well it's all thanks to my work out and diet regimen now it'd make even LeBron James shit his pants. I wake up at 4 am everyday , I drink 3 raw eggs with the side of pancakes with nails sprinkled on top and also a glass of straight uranium, I then grab my favourite fidget spinner: the triple XL gold-plated 25 pound weighted Air-Cutter supreme-extreme maximum turbo overdrive spagooter with pump-action assault-grip as well as extended magazines and a silencer, I've even customised this bad boy with a laser dot sight with a green finish as well as further modifications including hydraulics, 3D printing capability as well as doubling as a fax machine. This is a gadget straight out of MI6, this is right brewed up from f*cking Q laboratories- he used to make gadgets for 007 now he's making fidget spinners for me. Do you still think this is a fad for kids you f*cking troglodyte? Well I guess if that's how you wanna spin this story, but for me I know the truth, I know that this game was made for men and I've mastered it. I live and breathe fidget spinning. So go ahead, play your boring traditional sports like football and baseball. I'll just be here like a diss-jockey spinning it. Hugh! Sorry about that, just had to dodge another vagina that was just tossed at me, it's not easy being the grand master of fidget spinning.
  • + 7
 Ok, the Price is high but the gurantee is very nice:

Within 90 days of purchase: if you damage your 7mesh product in a crash we will repair or replace it at our discretion.
Within one year of purchase: if you damage your 7mesh product in a crash we will repair it or offer you a 50% discount off retail on a replacement purchase at our discretion.

Thats an nice offer!
  • + 4
 def get it, $475 is a lot of money. However, considering the average price tag of the “long travel 29ers” posted yesterday, maybe don’t make this all about the price.

I own this jacket. It is definitely not the piece for you unless you prioritize a superior fit, durable construction and a piece that will straight outperform every other jacket in its’ class. Just live literally every other piece from 7mesh, it is bombproof and just flat out works. Why spend $9,000 on your yeti and then be miserable in a Pear Izumi jacket? Smarten up and learn to budget
  • + 4
 What upper class world do you live in where people spend 9 grand on a bike? Wealthy people are so detached from everyone else its almost comical.
  • + 4
 I get that this isn't for everyone (it's certainly out of my price range) but a jacket like this is an investment. Owning a good waterproof can be the difference between riding or not and any money spent to get more riding time in can only be a good thing. If you have year round wet conditions I can absolutely see why some may justify this - feeling comfortable in horrible weather is important. I got a similar jacket massively reduced on closeout a good few years ago, and it's still going strong despite some abuse.
The good thing about GoreTex is that it is repairable as well.
  • + 3
 This. These idiots are commenting like "this is for suckers! I got a jacket for $50 that's exactly the same except it's not gore tex, doesn't breathe, the cut is different, fewer features, and the customer support is worse". When I dropped the money (on clearance, mind you, cuz I'm not just throwing money around) on a high end jacket for skiing/mountaineering/climbing it blew my mind how much difference it made in terms of comfort, moisture, features, etc. On some days it's the difference between a comfortable adventure vs a soggy sufferfest, or even getting out in the mountains vs staying home. And aside from some tree sap stains, it still looks/works as good as new.
  • + 3
 that jacket looks super clean. it is really expensive but, smaller companys don`t sell that much stuff like the big players....so i kind a understand the pricing.
in my opinion, the only "bad" thing is that the hood is not atached with a zip or something better than those small buttons.
  • - 4
flag Weens (Nov 9, 2017 at 6:23) (Below Threshold)
 "smaller companys don`t sell that much stuff like the big players"

moreover, companies that ask $500 for a f*cking jacket don't sell much regardless of the price. Maybe they advertise it's made from organic, fair-trade nylon, with an anti-beard snagging zipper it might appeal to DC or Portland hipsters that love buying shit they can't afford.

the review sounds like everything in the REI catalog: it's 0.001% better than the competition and only costs 1000% more. Such a bargain.
  • + 1
 @Weens: We buy Endura in PDX. Biased tho.
  • + 1
 @pizpisoc A zipper is another option, unfortunately both can require a bit of fiddling. A zipper is probably more of a failure risk, and is heavier and difficult to install in a clean way, but it would be more bombproof when attached. So it's definitely a valid potential option with some trade offs. Thanks for the input we appreciate it.
  • + 1
 @tj7mesh: i was really close to buy one, the vents on the lower arms are the the thing i‘m missing on my sweet protection jacket. make it without a detachable hood and the jacket is perfect.
cheers
  • + 5
 WHY IS EVERYTHING IN AMERICAN DOLLARS ON THIS SITE!!! the brand is Canadian, the site is Canadian, maybe lead with Canadian pesos first once in a while for crissakes.
  • + 12
 Fair enough -- it's 302 toonies. Or 46 liters of maple syrup. Or 87 toques at canadian tire. Or 3,040 timbits. Or one skookum as frig husqvarna saw.
  • + 1
 @geephlow: Actually laughed out loud to this... Well done sir
  • + 1
 Sounds like you guys watch AVE o YouTube
  • + 6
 I picked up 3 of these on sale for $375 each, one of every color.

I just wish it looked more pretentious
  • + 4
 you can always leave the price tag on and pretend you forgot about it Smile
  • + 2
 In a way products like this make me glad riding in wet weather is a big no-no here in central TX. On one hand the price seems ridiculous to me for sure as I would never use it.. On the other hand if wet weather riding was a fact of life where I lived, maybe an uber-garment like this would be worth it if it maximized comfort in already miserable riding conditions. No idea as I've got virtually no experience with this type of gear.
  • + 2
 On the other hand a great way to deal with poor conditions is to just enjoy riding your bike and bring a change of clothes!
  • + 2
 Gore jackets are pointless for mtb. Goretex fabrics rely on the DWR (durable water repellant) coating to keep water beading up on the surface. If the coating is compromised and the outer nylon layer is allowed to absorb water then any breathability that the jacket once had is completely gone turning it into an expensive plastic bag. Yes, techwash and a DWR retreat fixes this, but. If you are riding in wet weather, you're getting filthy. Mud, sweat, your back pack, smoke, even regular laundry detergent all ruin the DWR coating. Yes that's right. Special soap only. Gore only makes sense for snowsports.
  • + 4
 It works fine if you're prepared to wash the garment regularly (which you should do with goretex anyway, it degrades and delaminates if not washed often). If those elements were a deal breaker, SOF units wouldn't be running goretex product, but they are (arc'teryx LEAF shells for instance: leaf.arcteryx.com/ca/en/shop/mens/alpha-jacket-gen-2-multicam). IF you leave it and don't clean it, then yes, everything you said will be true and it will become a bag. Wash it every so often and place in drier to revise the DWR coating and it will work fine. I use an old boarding jacket for very cold days (I've got about 5 goretex jackets so the oldest one becomes my riding jacket).
  • + 2
 Pricey? Simple answer yes!
I rainy/winter ride in there REVO shorts, and they are the best riding shorts I have ever worn. (nothing better than a dry but after a wet ride.)
This Jacket will follow in the shorts footsteps. If you want to ride in the winter weather that is common on the coast or the PNW this is the jacket that you will want to be in. Enough said.
Can not wait to visit the boys at 7MESH and pick one up.
  • + 2
 Quote:"I’m not here to convince anyone that $475 constitutes a “good deal” or that anyone should buy anything. That’s not my job as a reviewer. My job is to determine whether or not a product performs well." This! I like that guy from the first day he came to pinkbike. The best reviewer and writer.
  • + 2
 The only problem with ski jackets is that they are cut for being upright and to fit several layers underneath. So the fit could be overly baggy. One can size down of course but then the sleeves and body might be too short. I got a 7Mesh jacket at the end of last season for $300 Cdn. It's excellent. For me there are three waterproof fabrics to use, Goretex, Neoshell and Event. Many others are absolute garbage. I probably spent more money on shit jackets that leaked, wetted out, and fell apart before I got smart (and lucky on price) and bought the 7Mesh. I bought the matching shorts too. The shorts are brilliant.
  • + 2
 Personally, I never understand why anyone buys riding gear this expensive. I ride almost everyday no matter the weather and defo crash from time to time, no piece of clothing survives this unharmed longer than a couple months. I get why people drop this kind of money on skiing outerwear but for Mountainbiking? Think they are kinda missing the point
  • + 2
 That was actually less $ than I thought, and I'm more frugal than Scotch brand. Gore Tex Pro IS the Shizzniz, I have an Arcteryx GT Pro jacket that costs more and can vouch for the fabric, which, BTW is warrantied by GORE, so if it fails, it should be replaced. Arkteryx is wonderful, no questions. Thing is, I rarely wear the Arcteryx mountain biking for a number of reasons; it's probably going to rip on a tree, or when I crash, dirt is the enemy of this fabric and wears it out. I'm also usually only riding for 2- 3 hours, and can get in a nice dry car or truck on way home. I keep the good jacket for overnight hikes, all day ski trips, cycling trips etc, so I went and bought a cheap Mountain hardwear that is 70% as good at keeping out the water/ breathing, and wear it. It also has the plus of packing down nicely so it fits in the pocket of my riding jersey.
I WISH my jacket had a detachable hood, btw, thing is always getting in the way.
  • + 2
 I am not “rich“, and like most of the rest of us, work hard for what I have. I choose to ride in this jacket and their crazy expensive gore winter long shorts as well. For me, it was the difference that keeps me riding day after day in cold wet Squamish fall/winter/spring. I use this gear almost daily and it is worth every penny to me. I have used other gear in years past but this stuff is amazing and works great for me. The perception of value is different for everyone. Thanks to 7mesh for making great gear with great attention to detail, and that keeps me riding year round.
  • + 5
 Please insert typical ‘this is fu#king overpriced’ pinkbike comment below.....
  • + 26
 this is fu#king overpriced
  • + 6
 Where's the Dentist when you need him? Is it Waki in disguise?
  • + 1
 I get the idea it may be, these alias' are great fun though! :-) the more the merrier I say!

On another note, I just got a Pearl Izumi jacket for £69.99 on sale that has all of these features other than the goretex, but better cuffs and a fully attached hood, fits like a glove and looks better too! Love it!
  • + 2
 Read the whole thread.
  • + 3
 I feel bad for dentists, as a child bike rider we had sort of a code to do the craziest things on the shittiest equipment to win. The shittiest equipment aspect was kind of money related, and nobody really got what they wanted, but also it looked bad having the best equipment, and sucking. I feel bad for the dentists because we would have hated them as a child, but in retrospect I rode a shitty bike because I was miserable, so who knows? Now I see problems with super expensive equipment, so maybe it's best not to care. I see biking as you would see a gymnast now, it's pretty much up to the rider and their skill, and it takes a special person.
  • + 1
 I can totally relate. When I was a kid, we gave that one dentist kid such a hard time. What a prick. Always arriving late on his fancy bike because of his appointments running late. Don't get me started on the orthodontist kid I met in highschool.
  • + 3
 There are few more pathetic things than a rich kid with a great bike who can't ride... but there are also a few things that are more annoying than a rich kid who is few levels faster than you... Then there is this dude in Sweden, Cyclist aka Dangerholm, who builds some of the lightest bikes in the world. He had 13,5kg Session (2ply tyres included) and recently he has built 7,4 kg Scott Spark. And people laugh at him, tell him to go to the gym, drop some fat and learn to ride. Turns out, he is super ripped, super strong and freaking fast... it just... it just hurts trolls so much... I want to lick their bitter tears mmm mmmmmm so sooo good!
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: I've never understood the hate for bad riders riding high end bikes. If you can afford the high end, then why wouldn't you? It'll make riding more enjoyable regardless of your skill level. There's this weird attitude that you have to "deserve" a good bike. If a wealthy person gets into riding, should they buy a cheap/low end bike on purpose?

Also that bad rider buying the expensive bike brings money into the industry, helping companies pay for R&D and then bringing those high-end technologies to more affordable bikes. Literally everyone wins.
  • + 4
 @samimerilohi: yeah, don't even get me started on this "deserve" thing. Same kind of mentality that makes idiots tell others that they must start on hardtails otherwise they will never be good. And then there is this kid that used to ride with us who jumped almost straight on a DH bike and smoked everyone in town and almost everyone in Sweden... some people are just bitter inside and try to deal with their poor riding skills and poor economy by shitting on others. As if there was something to be ashamed of. Nobody gets everything. What enrages me is the fact that I saw this kind of behavior among my friends when we were 21-23, at that time I thought it was already childish enough, that we were too old for that. Yet there are some 30-50 year olds who still behave this way.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: yeah, just ride what you bloody like! As a lad of 13 I was green with envy of the older dudes with Intense M1's and Foes etc... but even then I understood that if I could I'd spend all that and more on a bike if I could! My mind has changed a bit now as I don't spend as much as I used to. Two cars, house, kids, wife all taking their toll. Saying that I've just got a new bike, coat, bag and shoes, so I'm one of the offenders im sure!! Lol
  • + 1
 Guarantee is nothing on arc teryx I have a couple of alpha SV's which are pretty bomb proof The material holding the draw cords had started to fray. I dropped it off in a store in Switzerland. 2 months later it was returned to me as good as new for free. I think it was 7 years old
  • + 1
 Unsure as to why the fit on this jacket was updated. It's supposed to be a sleek fitting jacket for longer hauls on the bike. Even looking at their product photos has pictures of people riding road bikes in the jacket. One of the reasons I bought this jacket. 7mesh also has a more mtn bike cut 3L Gore jacket coming out soon.
  • + 2
 @gonecoastal Don't worry, we tweaked the fit, but not a lot. We lengthened the back 20mm and cracked the waist and hip area open 20mm. This doesn't change the overall sizing but it lets the jacket sit down a little lower and not ride up as much. The upper dimensions basically haven't changed but because it now tends to sit a little bit better it feels a little less binding, even in the upper arms and chest. We all feel the difference but we're all still wearing the same size. It's still a lean cut overall.
  • + 1
 I owned a set of 7mesh bike gears. This jacket in particular is very well made. I have Oakley, Peral Izumi, TLD, Race Face, Fox and Alpinestars. These brand names never compared to 7mesh when it comes to quality and the technology that was implemented to make one Revelation Jacket. You cannot compare the seams on this jacket to other jackets i mentioned above. The technology,seal, hems, joints and ergonomics are what your paying for this jacket. I will use this jacket for 10 years at minimum and yes crash included( which is rare for me).
  • + 1
 I will entertain an uneducated guest- To all negative thinkers out there- I know how much technology that are invested and implemented on all 7mesh product lines. How do I know? I've been to Squamish! This is way beyond threads and needles folks. Peace!
  • + 1
 Eh...maybe it's worth it. I have an old North Face shell that's been to hell and back several times since I bought it in 2001. It was a $500 jacket back then and I gotta say I've gotten my money's worth and then some. It's still waterproof and I still wear it. Hearing about the fit of this jacket would make me think twice though. I'm a skinny bastard and I find a lot of rain jackets have a baggy fit on me. It sounds like this one would be more of what I already have too much of.
  • + 1
 @RunsWithScissors See the other comment I posted on fit, I think the review might be giving the wrong impression to some people in that this is still a quite lean, athletic fitting jacket. Making a cycling specific Gore jacket means w can eliminate a ton of the bulk and articulation volume that's built into most outdoor jackets. Our size charts are pretty accurate for fit so have a look at them if you're curious, or drop me a line with any questions, cheers.
  • + 1
 @poulsbojohnny I used the jacket for production tree care climbing for about 2 years. If you use something, it wears out. Tree climbing in the PNW is extremely hard on equipment, especially soft goods. Every other jacket I’ve tried didn’t last a full season.
  • + 1
 Similar money buys a nice Arc'teryx jacket. Not sure who in their right mind would spend $500 on a jacket to ride in the mud with, when an old snowboard/ski jacket from AK, NF, Arc'Teryx, etc, will do the same job. I guess you need a $500 GTPro jacket for some drizzly days while riding that $10,000 superbike. Just make sure the colors match or it doesn't count.

Also all GoreTex product needs cleaning and doesn't leak when dirty, rather it clogs the pores causing moisture to trap in the jacket making it feel like it's leaking. The proper soap cleans this out and replenishes it. Putting the jacket into the drier restores the factory DWR coating, which this jacket will also need (GT is just a membrane, the outer of the jacket can still get waterlogged if not treated).
  • + 1
 Love my Rev jacket. Fit could be a little bit more relaxed
  • + 1
 I mean.... if they're similar price and similar quality, I'm not sure I see your point. Arc stuff isn't cheap either, but it's super high quality and lasts (almost) forever. If you already have a high end ski jacket, sure, go ahead and use that. If you don't have one already and you bike more than you ski, get the 7mesh. Either way, these high-end, purpose-built jackets make a big difference vs cheaper all-purpose ones in my experience.

idk how this rumor got started but for almost a decade I thought you weren't supposed to wash your gore tex, as it would ruin the waterproofing. I remember tons of people saying it at the time too. It was such a surprise the first time I washed an old jacket and it actually worked again!
  • + 1
 @bkm303: yea you have to wash it often. if you don't wash it, the acid from sweat and the environment breaks down the membrane and delaminates it. I found out with a Patagonia jacket, which they replaced no charge. Now I wash often to reduce the goretex from stiffening up and tearing.

I agree that Arc' stuff isn't cheap, but imo it's better. Just saying, $500 goes a long way on a jacket these days from all of the major brands. This being gore pro is good though. I'll stick to using the oldest GoreTex jacket I have and saving the new ones for the snow.
  • + 2
 @clemson: Are you on the original? I feel the same way about the original, but the updated version adds just enough of a relaxing to not feel like it's constricting you--yet it's still a sleek, athletic fit. It was a good move on their part.
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: still on the 1st one aka original one
  • + 1
 Big question is whether it'll survive a minor crash or snatching a bunch of brambles. If it does and REALLY stays waterproof for years I would actually think it's worth the money if you live in a wet area and like to ride the whole year..
  • + 1
 Dutch riding for example ; )
  • + 1
 It's the kind of price where you can send it back to get repaired for free
  • + 2
 @ibishreddin:
It's the kind of price where you should be able to send it back to get repaired for free

FTFY
  • + 2
 I've crashed more times than I'd like to publicly admit in my 7mesh jacket and it has held up fine.
  • + 3
 @Sontator: Anything starting with Dutch sounds rude, but that's too much.
  • + 1
 @BenPea: because the dutch are perceived as rude while they are just efficient ; )
I agree dutch riding sounds interesting. Wonder what that would mean. Same as there are french lines. Riding dutch is riding only in the wet so your tires keep longer. Ha!
  • + 2
 @Sontator: It may be because the Dutch are perceived as innovators in all things sinful. Could be worse. French lines are also all about efficiency.
  • + 1
 If you're doing any climb where the descent will be worth the effort, then you definitely let off more than steam vapor. No matter what I wear, I'm drenched from sweat so really what I want from a rain jacket ***that I use for everyday mountain biking**** is lightweight, packability, a little warmth and some wind resistance and lastly, a little water repellancy. Rain jacket for commuting? Yeah, waterproof as all get out.
  • + 1
 Do people ride with their helmet on top of their hood? Never in my life have I thought about doing that. After the rain stops your helmet is going to be soaked. Doesn't the helmet make the hood stay in place and thus every time you turn your head your whole jacket is twisting? Seems crazy to me.
  • + 1
 @Rigidjunkie We agree most people don't normally wear a hood while riding at all, but this hood is designed for when you need to have it on during long days in the rain, riding up/down/cross country. Riding fast with a hood over the helmet turns it into a wind and rain catcher. And the helmet holding the hood in place is what makes it great in these situations - you can turn your head and still see, which is challenging with an over-helmet hood. The jacket is patterned to allow that motion without the whole jacket twisting. All that said, most rides with the Rev are done with the hood hanging free, or detached. But it's there for you when you really need the protection. Cheers
  • + 2
 Also wanted to say that @tj7mesh nailed it as to what this jacket is for. I wish I had the time and flexibility to pull off some multi-day alpine rides. Alas, not in the cards. . .for now!
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton Every 7mesh review has to point out the cost vs quality but one huge point in favor of this premium gear is the lifetime warranty is it not? Lifetime on the waterproofing from gore and life time (including mechanical rips and tears) from 7mesh. I justify this type of product by looking at cheap gear that I have to buy repeatedly which performs worse vs expensive gear that performs better and I only have to buy once knowing its fully backed.
  • + 1
 With that price, Lifetime warranty/ crash replacement is standard? No? Hell no then! The Velcro cuffs are stupid cause when you get any dirt or mud on them, they don't work! The zippers on the arm, that's a double whammy if you crash! Northface....seam tapes, zippers broke, just send it back for fix free!
  • + 1
 @drivereight Officially our warranty is one year, but we've been honouring it longer so we'll probably update that. We do have a crash replacement policy. And just like TNF, if your zippers break or seam tape falls off that will absolutely be fixed for free, so please let us know if you have that problem. On Velcro, what you're saying is true of the softer hook and loop options that manufacturers choose because they feel nicer and are cheaper, but yes they absolutely clog with mud. We don't use those - we use full strength, aggressive to the point of being almost annoying scratchy, so no we don't have problems with it clogging with mud. Cheers
  • + 1
 How about that water proof complete suits ,that seems to be way better then just a jacket,do a comparison on them ,cause it might look strange but I think they are the real deal in terms of riding in the rain and so on ,or at least I think they are
  • + 1
 Unless you intend to wear this around town only, 1 big problem is probability of falling off and damaging a jacket is so high that even people with cash to spare will probably get a decent gore jacket for £100 to £150.
  • + 4
 I'll stick with my Arc'teryx jackets and their lifetime warranty....
  • + 1
 I see what you did there...
  • + 1
 That’s a metric shit ton to spend on a jacket. --- There should be like 3 exclamation marks instead of the period to end that sentence!!! To make this short and simple ---> WTF?!?
  • + 3
 Just wanted to say their logo is the worst I have ever seen on such a high end brand. Comic-sans-looking-ass logo.
  • + 2
 Funny thing is, I think they updated their logo. Some product has a different logo, some has this one. No consistency.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the price tag warning. I scrolled to the price, then down here to comment that I am only wasting my time typing this comment, as opposed to reading the review, then commenting.
  • + 2
 For a jacket of that price, my hood better be permanently attached to my jacket. It is a big $ rain jacket and what happens if you miss place or lose the hood?
  • + 1
 Yeah or what will happen if you don't properly tighten the rear axle on your 10k santa cruz?!
  • + 2
 @brncr6 So far that's happened maybe 3-4 times, and we've just replaced the hood for free (though that's not part of our official guarantee).
  • + 1
 @tj7mesh: how well is the hood staying on over a helmet? Snaps unsnap?
I like my marmont precip because i can ride with the hood over the helmet.
  • + 1
 --
  • + 2
 @brncr6: The hood on the Rev doesn't fit over a helmet (not properly anyway). If you're looking for an attached, over helmet option we are dropping a new jacket approx Nov 20th. Cheers
  • + 2
 Been riding in a 7mesh jacket for 2+ years, daily commuting and multiple crashes on the shore. Thing's light as hell and keeps me bone dry. Recommended
  • + 2
 Got it. The jacket works well in the rain with nice pockets that your now empty wallet will fit in.
  • + 1
 If your going on an all day ride in the rain maybe. But if your going out for a 2 hour or less ride how could it make sense?
  • + 2
 Read the first two sentences of the review and jumped straight to the comments. Nothing for me up there.
  • + 4
 Laughable...
  • - 1
 It would be truly shocking if one day PB threw one of these ridiculously priced items up, but instead of thanking the manufacturer for the 'gift' by giving it a glowing 'review', maybe show a picture of it along with the caption "since we feel the majority of our readership wouldn't even think about spending such a ridiculous amount of money on something that has equal and better counterparts in the market place for 1/5th the price, we sent it back to the manufacturer with a cordial note saying words to the effect of 'thanks, but no thanks'.
We feel our readership is MUCH better serviced by 'reviewing' products that they'd actually buy and use(and we get enough FREE swag as it is). "
  • + 1
 Wouldn't that be a thing?
  • + 2
 Um.... he did recommend cheaper alternatives in the summary section, and acknowledged the high price. Seems like he was far from "thanking the mfr for the gift".
  • + 4
 Gouge tex
  • + 3
 Really nice. But it costs like a revelation fork.....
  • + 1
 Does it come with a crack pipe and some crack? Because you will need it if you pay $475 for a riding jacket.
  • + 1
 In lieu of a decent time machine, can you please do a review on your reasonably average time machine? Thanks!
  • - 1
 LMAO 475 for a biking jacket that will get torn by a branch or a minor spill... No thanks, I'll stick to my perfectly reasonable sub 100 dollar underarmor/mountain hardwear jackets.
  • + 1
 Up next on PB - reviewing $25k carbon road bikes and other pointless shit nobody will ever own.
  • + 0
 At that price I want it to last not only my lifetime, but also my son's and his son's. Imagine crashing and ripping it a new one though...
  • + 2
 The snaps on the hood of this thing *are* garbage.
  • + 1
 Man, a lot of butthurt and very little sense of humor in the comments on THIS story. Down boys, down.
  • + 1
 For a minute I thought maybe Kanye was making a jacket to go with his shoes
  • + 2
 Here is SOCAL we don't need jackets! So I just saved $475 plus tax!!!!
  • + 1
 North Face Alpine Project jacket. Gore Active shell with 90% of the same features, but can be picked up for £100-150.
  • + 1
 Dayam. I bought a completely awesome Shimano rain jacket on closet for about $25. It works unbelievably well.
  • + 2
 close-out, not closet. Argh. I edit my stupid post how?
  • + 1
 Hey Vernon, is there a big patch sewn into the back of your jacket? What's the story there?
  • + 2
 way too expensive to be destroyed after the first real crash...
  • + 2
 475usd = 602 cdn seems a little steep for a jacket.
  • + 1
 Yes, because 602 is more than 475. Wink
  • + 1
 too bad the dentist account already got banned
  • + 1
 Impossible
  • + 1
 $475 Eek I'm going to have to sell a kidney to afford that !!!!
  • + 1
 They're from Squamish...where everything is expensive.
  • + 1
 Hahahahaha hahahahaha $475? Hahaha only a stupid moron would pay that much
  • + 2
 fuck right off
  • + 2
 475 huh
  • + 1
 It is “a metric sh#t to spend on a jacket” ????
  • + 1
 Rather wear a $10 poncho
  • + 1
 I'm getting one!!
  • + 1
 Hahahah dammmmnnnnn
  • - 1
 Why would readers write the Revelation off after reading the word 'That's'?
  • + 1
 My dentist jacket ;|
  • + 0
 The price isn't right.
  • + 16
 The price is wrong Bob
  • + 0
 Looks really nice!
  • + 2
 It does look nice. No way in hell I'd spend $500 for it though. I might do $100.
  • + 2
 They are a really nicely fitted jacket (at least the old one was, not tried the new one) and feel really comfortable even when tried on in the store. If they had an overhelmet hood I'd have found the cash to buy one by now, but the underhelmet hood completely kills it for me on an MTB.
  • + 2
 @delusional: Our first over-helmet full protection mtb jacket has just been pre-launched to our email subscribers, it will be available at retailers and online approx Nov 20th. Ping me if you want more info, cheers.
  • + 2
 @tj7mesh: That's fantastic! I'm back being a student right now, so unlikely to be able to pick one up for a little while, but it'll definitely be something I'll be after once I have a proper income again.
  • + 1
 @tj7mesh: how about offering an over the helmet hood as an option for the Revelation would be great. I like the fit and the venting of this jacket but for mountain biking would prefer a larger hood. The Guardian lacks the ventilation that this offers. I would love to have an under the helmet hood for road biking and an over the helmet for mountain biking.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.189064
Mobile Version of Website