10 Companies Offering Repairs on Bike Clothing

Jul 29, 2021
by Alicia Leggett  


The bike industry, with all its bright colors, changing standards, and synthetic clothing is not always the most environmentally conscious and has a part in the massive amount of material and resources wasted by clothing production each year. Over the last several years, some companies have started breaking the mold by encouraging customers to send worn clothes back for repairs rather than discard damaged apparel to keep buying more and more. Here are some examples.

Velocio, Apidura, Velocolour & 'What Happened'


US bike clothing company Velocio has partnered with companies in the UK, the EU, and Canada to facilitate product repairs around the world. The collaboration, Velocio said, is to minimize global shipping, which will help reduce both the environmental impact and the cost of repair.

UK bikepacking gear company Apidura has an existing in-store repair program alongside a program for selling the repaired gear. Now, in addition to repairing their own used packs, Apidura will fix clothing such as jerseys, shorts, and other layers sent in by Velocio customers in the U.K. Similarly, Canadian company Velocolour, which produces an impressive range of cycling clothes, bags made from recycled materials, and custom paint jobs for bicycles, will adopt Velocio repairs alongside its usual collecting and repurposing unwanted pieces of gear. To cover the EU, Velocio enlisted a one-woman Slovenian operation known as What Happened. The owner, Neza Peterca, worked for Patagonia's Worn Wear program (described below) before starting What Happened, which deals with all kinds of outdoor gear repairs, custom products, and gear education. The collaboration seems to be a more efficient system for gear repairs than we've seen so far in the bike industry and will hopefully be a mutually beneficial partnership all around.

Patagonia

Patagonia Hydration pack

It wouldn't be a list of companies that emphasize repairs without Patagonia. The outdoor gear giant has long led the industry in sustainability and encourages customers to keep gear in play for as long as possible. The brand encourages customers to send in damaged clothing for repairs, and if the items are too far gone to fix, Patagonia gives store credit. Items that are traded in and salvageable go to the Worn Wear store once they're fixed. Patagonia also makes care and repair tutorials with catchy descriptions like "We can put a human on the moon. But fixing a broken zipper? This video shows you how to do one of those things." (I'm about to watch that one because 100% of the zippers in my life seem to be broken at once.)

Patagonia's warranty and repair policy also seems to be about as forgiving as possible. Rather than just compensate customers for quality issues like most warranty programs do, the program is genuinely aimed at extending the lifetime of all products. I currently have way more Patagonia store credit than I deserve for sending in a pair of tattered old ski pants that had crampon holes all over the ankles. I was sure that they were beyond repair and beyond warranty because all the damage was definitively my fault. As it turns out, you're expected to wear out your gear, and Patagonia's trade-in program will give you store credit even for clothing items that fully deserve retirement.

Kitsbow


Kitsbow's whole ethos is about cutting down on manufacturing waste. The brand goes a step beyond local production by making each item specifically for the customer in its North Carolina production facility, a process it calls "lean manufacturing." Since the idea is to eliminate waste from unsold clothing and scraps, it only makes sense that Kitsbow also encourages customers to repair, rather than replace damaged items.

Customers can reach out about manufacturing defects, standard wear and tear, and crash repairs, but Kitsbow does reserve the right to charge a repair fee for fixing some items that are damaged from crashes or everyday use.

Pearl Izumi & The Renewal Workshop


Pearl Izumi's Keep You Riding program is for items that are still in good condition but need minor repairs. Those situations include things like broken zippers, some loose stitches, and crash damage. The Keep You Riding works just like the standard warranty program, and Pearl Izumi will decide whether an item should be repaired or replaced.


When a Pearl Izumi item needs more than just minor repair, it is sent to an organization called the Renewal Workshop, which has a partnership with Pearl Izumi. The Renewal Workshop sorts clothing based on how much repair the items need, repairs all manner of problems, stamps the Renewal Workshop logo, and sells the refurbished pieces on renewalworkshop.com.

Also, Pearl Izumi has been making big steps in becoming carbon-neutral by 2025, has encouraged customers to bike instead of drive to offset carbon emissions from the manufacturing process, and makes 40% of its clothing from sustainable materials.

Rapha


Rapha stands behind its clothing and offers free repairs on most items for the clothing's lifetime as part of its plan to go green. The brand is clearly committed to sustainability and aims to be carbon neutral by 2025. On top of that, Rapha has committed to reducing absolute emissions, rather than just focusing on net impact by offsetting emissions. Of course, to get there, Rapha has to cut waste and emissions from every step of the garments' lifetime before repairs even come into the picture. The company is actively working to improve manufacturing processes and operations of its brick-and-mortar locations as well as the longevity of the clothing itself.

Most items in Rapha's mountain biking range come with an iron-on patch kit to encourage riders to repair their clothing. If clothes need more love, customers are encouraged to send them back to Rapha for assessment and repair, though some items are not covered by the policy.

Norrona


All Norrona products are meant to be worn for a long time, so Norrona plans on repairing them whenever possible. The brand is currently remodeling its headquarters, which will include a new and improved sewing and repair room. On its website, Norrona has a price list for common repairs, with zipper replacements ranging from $33-$72 USD, button replacement for $11 USD, and pant shortening or lengthening starting at $55 USD.

Norrona also has a five-year warranty on all products (seven years for so-called Loyalty members), so damages not caused by crashes or normal wear and tear are repaired for free for the garments' first five years of life.

And for those inclined to fix their garments themselves, Norrona has the spare parts and instructions for that, too.

7mesh


7mesh is another brand that prides itself on making high-quality clothing that it fully believes in and stands behind. Based right near Pinkbike's home in Squamish, 7mesh offers repairs for damaged clothing for a small fee. If the clothing is beyond repair, 7mesh still has you covered and offers a crash replacement discount for the replacement.

Furthermore, even though 7mesh is a relatively small operation, it has repair centers in the US, the UK, and Europe so customers don't have to send items back to Canada, reducing shipping costs and environmental impact.



Let us know what you think. What did we miss? Which of your favorite companies offer repairs?


135 Comments

  • 164 42
 this feels like a very outside-y article
  • 22 3
 seriously
  • 24 2
 Ha. I'm surprised on the downvotes. I guess you don't get endless outside spam emails of "Top 10 [something something] that is [changing the world, disrupting the industry, making your life awesome, to watch out for]" templated content.
  • 52 3
 Nah it is super nice when you buy a premium piece of kit to have the manufacturer stick with you. I've ripped a few pieces of patagucci clothing and had them either fix it or replace it for free. It's more sustainable and it pays for itself pretty quickly.
  • 21 1
 @CarlMega: Probably Outside bots down voting you
  • 48 0
 I actually don't mind write-ups like these. This article actually shows you how some manufacturers/brands actually stand behind their products with actual life-time warranties. And yes, unfortunately, the buyers pays for that long term quality of the product.
  • 21 0
 @CSharp: Me neither. Repairing gear and putting it back in service is commendable. Very much behind this.
  • 4 0
 LOOKS like it too….
  • 2 0
 The AI comment bot is only going to mention Outside next time it's published
  • 3 1
 Outside vibes score = 2.9 out 10.
Don't know what it is but I sense it....and it scares me.
  • 4 0
 That's like, your opinion man.

Actually I know Alicia is a true mountain biker and has taken on a lot on articles on pinkbike recently. I doubt Outside had an influence on her.

But I do enjoy the "outside" jokes as mush as anybody,
  • 5 0
 @Ride406orDie:

Totally. Just having fun, man ; ) I actually appreciate the article and information.
Also, if the article was about 9 clothing companies instead of 10 my 'Outdoor vibes score' would be closer to a 1.5.
  • 5 0
 It might, I haven’t read anything from outside in well over a decade, so in really not familiar. From a pure interest level though, I honestly am glad to know about it. 7Mesh especially, as they are the closest to “local” for me.
  • 2 0
 I see what you mean, joking or not, with the 10 brands and it being all good for the planet and everything. I really enjoyed it though. I really like hanging on to stuff when it's still good to go. You get attached to stuff a little, it wears into you and how you ride. It costs less money and yes... it's probably good for the planet as well. I wouldn't mind more articles like that. "When are your parts really worn" "Ten strategies to make your bikes and parts last longer" "These components cost a little more but last longer", that kinda thing. Who would enjoy that too?

I guess actual content is what should make the difference right?! (and if it's behind a pay-wall!) Not whether it looks like it's from Outside (mind the difference between Outside magazine and the outside consortium!) or whether it /looks like/ it is from a particular worldview.
  • 1 2
 On Brands you've never heard of... fox and TLD be laughing hysterically..
  • 3 2
 Really? Feels dead standard for any website on the internet pb included.
  • 41 6
 Oh man here come the "(X number of brands) that (do something generic, or are 'changing the game') that you should look out for" articles.
  • 39 7
 Quality of content has reduced dramatically.
Quantity of content has gone up.

Vague, empty, boring "articles" with lists and video links....

Oh pinkbike. What a shame.
  • 8 0
 Yep, case in point: Dunbar Summer Series article - "A few races happened... Oh, and someone put these videos together, check 'em out".
  • 3 0
 Was thinking the same, but I think this is fear more than reality. Occasionally PB is quiet, then it ramps up.
  • 6 3
 I actually didn't watch Hardline this year because I was so sick of it before it even happened.
  • 6 0
 @Bob-Agg: Then you missed out, the race itself was great. Hang in there next year!
  • 2 0
 @mammal: Not that most of PB readers have been waiting for some racing content.
  • 2 0
 @Bob-Agg: ridiculous. Just say you're not that into the sport, it's fine.
And as long as this is still free, they can spam the hell out of their own homepage if they want, but they don't control you're clicking finger.
  • 24 0
 I thought Endura might have been included as they’ve been offering a repair service for years and deserve some credit for being one of the first to offer that service
  • 4 0
 Second this. They saved my nearly new jacket with their repair service.
  • 3 0
 I had no idea Endura did a repair service! Thanks for the heads up, I have a ripped hardly worn pair of MTR shorts in the drawer...
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I remember them putting new zippers in to jerseys back in the TAL days. Should send them my Midlothian RT top one day.
  • 2 0
 Seems to only be available to UK and EU customers currently.
  • 4 0
 @piranah: makes sense they aren't included by outside then
  • 1 0
 This article is only for expensive boutique brands, Endura didn't pay up. A new zipper for $72 USD you say!
  • 18 2
 The best move I could make for bike clothing (and snowboard clothing) was finding a local who taylor makes all my stuff. It's much cheaper, built how I want and comes with repair services. I'm pretty damn sure anyone with a bit of tech know how could find themselves the same type of shop. Haven't spent over 100$ for a pair of shorts or a jersey in a damn long time and it's just way better quality.
  • 18 0
 How does that work...first time I've ever heard of custom clothing being cheaper than mass produced stuff.

Don't get me wrong, sounds awesome, but I don't understand the economics when a pair of mass produced shorts is what $100, it's gotta be a days work to do custom shorts + material + overheads
  • 14 0
 They are undercharging if you are serious.
  • 5 0
 @RadBartTaylor: That's the luxury of not having to pay for a stores margins and overhead. My last pair of bike shorts cost me 60$. A Goretex bib pants with all the bells and whistles cost me 200$ for something the likes of Burton or others charge upwards of 600$.
  • 3 0
 @RadBartTaylor: Fashion markup is ridiculously insane. Yes, clothing markup is anywhere from a minimum 200% to whatever anyone can pay. This is pretty much what it was for skiing and now the brands have set their own price for bike fashion.
  • 21 0
 @RadBartTaylor: pattern design software is now open source. I can make a pattern and size it based on a customers measurements. The final pattern can be output to machine readable formats and automatically cut. If you optimize for minimal sewing (fewest seams possible) labor is also reduced there.

I have actually been building this up not as a business, but as a way to make fun money. I’m working on DH pants right now, but my skills aren’t up to tech materials quite yet. My goal is to have a core set of clothes (no choice in color or materials) customizable to exact fit that I could produce based on orders.

I’ve been doing this from scratch ( I didn’t know how to sew, much less pattern build and tailor a year ago) and am reasonably progressing on my goal. No reason someone trained or experienced in the business couldn’t do it much more quickly and efficiently.

The problem from a corporate perspective is that people don’t want to measure themselves and want their thing now! So they have to do sizes (which largely ignore body proportions) which is going to create a lot of waste as many units don’t sell, have a distribution network and marketing etc. there isn’t an inherent reason you can’t make tailored for cheaper, but given our culture, it is going to be a niche business at best.
  • 9 0
 Your actually not wrong - a local taylor cut 2 holes in a bin bag and gaffa taped it around my crotch providing me with a whole week of clothing for literally pennies
  • 10 1
 @CSharp: 200% is on the low end. I own a small Screen Printing and Embroidery business and even what Pinkbike ( not picking on you PB just using you as an example) is charging for a single color print on a black t-shirt on their scale cost them at most $4-5. They are charging you $26 for it. Now that is a lot of profit. But that is what many people will pay so, go for it. But the cost of making that garment is cheap!!!!
  • 2 0
 @pcmxa: That sounds super cool! You got a website or anything?
  • 2 0
 @pcmxa: fair enough - but when you factor in business OH costs, computers, software, materials, storage, storefront (or house)....do you think you can sell for LESS than what I can buy for? If so, I'll take 2 pairs of bike shorts similiar to my Gore ones, drawstring, side pocket, stretch fabric in the legs...more durable stuff in the seat, $99 online....how much time would you have into this?
  • 1 1
 @Three6ty: It's not all profit....not saying it's the right $, but in ANY business has costs associated with doing business, storage, S&H, marketing and many other OH's. Think about it in terms of time, if each shirt needs 5 min to ship, labor @ $40/hr (burdened wage including insurance/health/perks = $20/hr employee take home), that adds $3-4, effectively doubling the price before anything else is added.

Wine is another example, $20 bottle at store is $60ish at restaurant....they need to order, manage, receive, store, serve and profit....again, $40 markup may be generous, but it's closer to $60 than $20 for them to cut even and make the margins they need.
  • 6 0
 @RadBartTaylor: absolutely not. I can’t produce a custom copy of what someone else is making fir less than their price. But I can produce a custom pair of DH pants to my design for less. What’s custom isn’t color, material, or features. What’s custom is fit. You get a pair of pants that is exactly the right waist size, exactly the right front and rear drop, exactly the right thigh size, exactly the right knee size (and where the knee falls at your knee, and inseam and ankle opening. But there would only be one choice for features, materials, and color.

The current model is to have lots of variation of colors, materials, and features and like 4 sizes.
  • 2 0
 @m47h13u: pics please
  • 5 0
 @pcmxa: neat
There is a guy here in Melbourne that makes old school waxed canvas Anoraks and sheepskin vests. Pretty boutique and pricey, but incredible kit. He’s just launched a Kickstarter on his Anoraks, check it out.

www.kickstarter.com/projects/peakoilcompany/waxed-canvas-anorak
  • 2 0
 @Waldon83: This looks cool.. maybe I have to try the DIY kit and sew it myself.. sounds like a challenge and a lot of fun.
  • 10 2
 I got drunk at a Nuggets game, had to piss so bad on the lightrail ride home that I left my group and hopped off the train at the Alameda station. Pissed behind a dumpster, found one of those electric scooters you can rent, rode the remaining 3 miles home in a snow storm (think I Strava'd it). Crashed multiple times on Broadway in my Pattagucci pants tearing a whole in the thigh and crotch . Do they repair those kinda tears or do I just have to take it to the old cranky Ukrainian lady down the street who I can barely understand?
  • 7 0
 Taking it to babusya down the road is more eco friendly but patagooch will definitely repair/replace that. I blew out the crotch on a pair of their jeans in 14 months and they said “hmm that’s not supposed to happen…let us get you a new pair”
  • 3 0
 You pay more for the gooch but the lifetime warranty is a very nice reason to buy their product. Reminds me, now that its summer, I should probably send my ski pants off to them! Thanks for the reminder haha
  • 7 0
 “Pearl Izumi… has encouraged customers to bike instead of drive to offset carbon emissions from the manufacturing process” is that supposed to be employees rather than customers? Otherwise very circular logic where you’re buying bike clothes so you can ride to offset the carbon from manufacturing the bike clothes so you can ride so you can offset the carbon from manufacturing the bike clothes so…
  • 4 0
 i do coke, so i can work more. so i can do more coke. so i can work more...
  • 9 0
 Got a sewing machine a few years ago and learned to operate that along with some needle and thread, there's a lot you can repair. Refuse. Reduce. Repair. Reuse.
  • 1 0
 Sewing is fun!
  • 2 0
 @likehell: It really is, and a very beneficial skill to have, I just wish I was better at it. Luckily my wife is much better than I am, as an outdoorsy family with kids we're constantly patching, altering, and creating things.
  • 1 0
 @chacou: True! I made some bags, fixed a some stuff and altered a lot of gear! Cheers and have fun!
  • 6 0
 Also Vaude has a repair service since several years. You can send your jacket with broken zipper and they will repair it free of charge.
  • 1 0
 Just wanted to mention this as well Smile
  • 1 0
 @Alicia Leggett
  • 4 0
 Alpkit have their own dedicated repair workshops that do brilliant work at a reasonable cost. They got a knackered old down jacket back on the road for my wife - then she spent the money she would have put into replacing it on other Alpkit gear anyway...
  • 4 0
 The only proper repair program is Patagonia. Worn wear tour even allows you to repair any clothes even if it is not Patagonia. All for free and sometimes with adding some fun stuffs. Patagonia is expensive but their position for sustainability is for me beyond any other brands and since years ! It is still a lot of marketing but at least in a good way for our planet. Probs to them !
  • 5 0
 Something simple to fix blown out shorts/pants - Iron on/sew on. Fox/100%/leatt take note - why do your pants last 6 months trail riding before I have to repair them?
  • 6 0
 6 months for Fox? You must have got a good pair.....
  • 1 0
 Actually - that is unfair - I have a pair of Fox Sergeant shorts from 2013 that are still going strong (the material has gone shiny on the arse but no wholes, rips or tears.

But I also have a pair of Fox ride pants that were as waterproof as a tissue and got snags and pulls in them after two rides (no crashes) and a pair of gloves that lasted only slightly longer than the TLD ones they replaced (which lasted a month or so)
  • 2 0
 @paulskibum: I found the best way to keep my Fox gear lasting as long as possible is to not wear it. The seams on my elbow pads, knee pads, gloves and chamois, as well as the sit bone areas of my shorts all blew out in about 6 months of 3x a week riding and super gentle cleaning. No more Fox for me.
  • 1 0
 I blew the zip out after 3! @paulskibum:
  • 1 0
 @sjma: I always seem to get through Fox gloves in a few months. The worst of all were a pair of TLD gloves which looked crap after a couple of rides before splitting after a month (these were replaced by the LBS and the new ones also wore really badly).
  • 7 0
 Grandmama...reparing my gear since the 1980's.
  • 3 0
 I actually like this article. I was familiar with most of the brands and like what they do. Keeping things going instead of replacement all of the time is a pretty sweet move and I want to see who does that. For sure costs money though. The new mtb Rapha stuff looks sick.
  • 2 0
 Props here from me to Pearl Izumi. I've sent back a two-year old jersey that was well-used but had a broken zipper. They fixed it and sent it back within a week - no charge. I sent back a pair of four-year old Pearl triathlon shorts that started fraying. I had 6 tris and lots of training on them, so they took a beating. They sent new shorts, again within a week, without charge. Best clothing support I've ever received from any brand, so I buy Pearl Izumi whenever I can.
  • 1 0
 I really appreciate a company that will repair their product when damage occurs. I recently crashed and ripped up my favorite pair of TLD shorts and found out that their warranty doesn't cover crashes. Now I am looking for some new shorts and reparability is a must.

Does anyone have recommendations of companies in this article to look at or maybe some others? Am I looking at paying $150+ for a pair that have high quality and a good warranty? The only sub $100 dollar shorts I found were from pear izumi. I don't really mind paying more for better quality but I am not sure what to expect or what is the norm.
  • 2 0
 A local tailor will do a fine job!
  • 3 0
 I feel like Endura gets left out of a lot of articles here on PB, even though they do what the article is about. Does PB editors just not like Endura??
  • 1 0
 They’re not based in BC…
  • 2 0
 The worn wear program is for any brand. Their sewers are absolute wizards and love a challenge. Bristol and Manchester in the UK have Patagonia shops that do regular in house stuff as well as touring from time to time.
  • 1 0
 Really like to see stuff like this. When I came off last year I tore a camelbak rucksack in a couple of spots rendering the pockets useless. Seemed like such a waste so I just stitched it up myself, not pretty but did the job so it’s great to see companies offering this
  • 1 0
 Shout out to Alpkit (Sonder). Reasonably priced, great gear with repair service thrown in. I am not doubting the quality of some of the kit featured in the article, but I wonder if the prices are hiked up due to the repair schemes, in much the same way as carbon wheels offer lifetime replacement schemes.

Personally my high priced items are not used for mountain biking in their first life cycle. For instance, expensive waterproof jacket will be used for hiking until it is showing signs ageing, then they are unleashed onto the bike.
  • 1 0
 If you appreciate customer service, steer clear of ION. I bought a pair of their Scrub MTB shorts and within 2 weeks the stitching started to come apart. I emailed and called ION in hopes of getting them repaired or replaced, to which they replied:

Hello,

okay for warranties please contact the shop that sold you the product as they are your contract partner and are responsible for your needs. The shop will then get in touch with our warranty department.

BR Melanie

I've emailed Cambria bike multiple times and even sent pictures of the shorts. The rep at Cambria, Alan Forrest
(CBO Warehouse Team), says he's called and emailed ION several times. I guess ION doesn't feel responsible for their faulty products? I first emailed ION 5/29. Its now 7/30 and they have yet to help me out.
  • 1 0
 I've contacted Rapha a couple times about repairs and both times they said they weren't offering repairs in my region and sent me a 50% off coupon code. Nice, but would of rather spend $20 on shipping to fix some worn stitching on otherwise perfectly fine bibs.
  • 3 0
 7mesh has a 500 dollar jacket. Does it keep you warm or make you poor.? Or keep you warm when you become poor?
  • 4 0
 No mention of NF anywhere? Frown
@travis-the-tailor
  • 1 0
 I stopped by a while ago and they patched my merino wool jersey on the spot, free of charge.
  • 1 0
 Is what it is $$$
  • 2 0
 Not repairs but Nukeproof Outland gear is made from off cuts and wastage of pervious years stock, so same performance at a cheaper price, and saves on waste.
  • 1 0
 Norrøna got you covered of something fails. 3 times I got vouchers for new garment after failures. One example; GTX delamination after 4,5 years. New jacket, no questions asked.
  • 1 0
 That's pretty compelling
  • 1 0
 I don't know if they do that in the US though?
  • 1 0
 @DirtyHal: That's a good point, but you'd think their policies would be universal regardless of the customer's location. I'll have to look into that. Norrona, although expensive, has a lot of products that conveniently cater to tall lanky people like my wife and I.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: A couple years ago I reached out to Backcountry.com as they were (are?) the sole distributor in the US and they said they didn't do repairs and just replaced the whole garment which seemed a waste as it was a 1 year old ski suit that was really expensive.
  • 1 0
 @DirtyHal: That sucks. Definitely a waste. They must only do repairs at their shop in Sweden.
  • 3 0
 Ah yes! The lost black art of stitching with a needle & thread. Are people useless these days?
  • 1 0
 I’m up for playing seamster but the job Patagucci did on a down jacket with extensive damage was incredible and undetectable afterward.
  • 1 0
 Yep, I often regret not having taken home economics solely for the ability to sew and or use a sewing machine.
  • 1 0
 Good for companies repairing clothing but I can’t help but think that the quality put out there now is nothing but a race to the bottom. 2004 bought a pair of fox shorts that lasted 12 yrs. 2021 shorts lasted 3 rides.
  • 1 0
 Did you have infrequent and soft crashes for 12 years and a hard crash in 2021 that destroyed your pants, or did you genuinely wear out your pants or have them fall apart on you in three rides? I feel ya on the race to the bottom though. Sometimes it seems like the companies are too vested in the materials and not enough in the assembly process.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: actually fell more back in the day and even used them as swim shorts in chlorine regularly. The new ones haven’t seen a fall but 2 of 3 zippers have failed and there’s a hole.
  • 1 0
 @jclaremt: That is definitely disappointing.
  • 1 0
 Given the prices of some of this clothing, I would expect it to come with extras like repair kits or free repairs. Sorry Rapha, I'm not paying 100+ bucks for a short sleeve riding jersey
  • 4 1
 My gear lasts for years....................
  • 1 0
 How often do you ride and how often do you crash?
  • 1 0
 You're either really good or you're not riding hard enough.
  • 2 0
 What's it smell like?
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: Often...... Hardly ever
  • 1 1
 Something tells me that Patagonia will rarely actually opt to repair clothing or gear and will instead just offer credit so that the owner has to buy something new and they don't have to fuss with a tricky repair.
  • 3 0
 Not true at all, sustainability has been a core tenet of their company since long before it was fashionable.
  • 1 1
 @salespunk: Sustainability does not inherently mean they are willing to repair, that just means they use environmentally friendly materials and production processes.
  • 2 0
 Look for my longjohns in the Patagonia Worn Wear store – midweight Capeline, dog bite repair on the calf, skid mark.
  • 1 0
 Down here in New Zealand we have Cactus (with their almost bombarded proof gear) and Ground Effect who have decent repair programs.
  • 1 0
 Tasco has offered to repair their shorts and/or have a local seamstress fix and they would pay the bill. Great customer service.
  • 2 0
 Endura also offer repairs. I've used them on a number of occasions and super efficient.
  • 3 0
 Expensive brands.
  • 6 0
 Not really. Reminds me of the saying, "it's expensive to be poor."

I've got a pair of kitsbow shorts made from schoeller material that I bought in like 2014. They have many, many thousands of miles on them and are still one of my favorite pairs. In that time I killed 2 pairs of fox shorts, so kitsbow were cheaper in the long run.
  • 5 0
 You get what you pay for. I ran several sets of Pearl shorts for over 10 years. People isht on Patagucci, yet their stuff lasts forever.

In contrast I have several sets to shorts from other companies I won't name that are blown out and not repairable after 3 years. So which has the lower total cost of ownership on an annual basis?
  • 1 0
 You get at a good point. Some people would like to replace their gear every year or two, but still want it to be of good quality. The market is not built that way though. Cheap clothes typically last 2-3 years (1 if you ride a lot and crash a lot), while more expensive ones will last longer. Problem is many people grow bored with a certain look or kit after at least 5 years. Arguably the expensive brands are still too much even for a 5 year rotation though. I for one feel like the following garmets should never exceed the below prices and yet they do all the time by a significant margin.

Socks- $10/pair
Shorts- $60/pair
Pants- $100/pair
Jerseys-$40/shirt
Jackets-$100/jacket
Shoes-$200/pair
  • 1 0
 @simirving: This does not take into account the subjective satisfaction an item brings to its owner. Somethings I want to last a long time (like my bike), others I would prefer last only a few years (a few being 3-5). Problem is the expensive stuff lasts way longer than I want it to making it hard to justify replacement and the cheap stuff won't last long enough to meet my needs. And then in the event that I damage the expensive gear I have to replace it which is again expensive. In my experience, I'm more likely to damage my gear than I am to exhaust its service life from normal wear and tear. So yes the cheap stuff costs more because you have to buy more often, but people are not willing to pay top dollar for used high quality clothing so you end up with a stale wardrobe that you cannot sell nor justify replacing because it is so durable or you ride in fear that you will destroy your expensive kit which inevitably means you will crash and destroy your kit. I'm still undecided which items are best to cheap out on and which to be more invested in.
  • 1 0
 yeah, if you're paying an arm and leg for 7mesh, they better help a person out when their stuff breaks
  • 2 0
 My 7mesh padded bike shorts are blown out, looking into dis^
  • 1 1
 Give me a company that's offering something for the constantly ripping seams of gloves and shots. I'm built like Richie rude + 5% body fat and taller.
  • 1 0
 Dakine will stand behind their gloves for 2 years and are an email and picture away from replacement. Never had to return shorts before.
  • 1 0
 Anyone know if FOX offers warranty/repairs on knee pads? Just ripped mine today...
  • 1 0
 They wouldn't fix my shorts (broken button) during their warranty period, so I doubt it.
  • 1 0
 Endura's repair service is very good, and Alpkit too. Morvelo's will be available from September.
  • 1 0
 Do Morvelo still do MTB gear or are they focusing on Gravel & Road?
  • 2 0
 @korev: Overland is their gravel-focussed brand. Morvélo still make road and MTB gear.
  • 1 0
 Arcteryx repairs and warranties there clothing- and takes it back / repurposes it when your done with it.
  • 1 0
 First Ascent has repaired a couple of items for me. No questions asked, just the courier cost to and fro.
  • 2 0
 DAKINE
  • 1 0
 Deuter didn't want to repair my backpack becaus it looked used
  • 1 0
 What about shoe companies offering re-soling....
  • 1 0
 Flylow also does, they just fixed up a zipper on my shorts.
  • 1 0
 Osprey has repaired my hydration pack twice.
  • 1 0
 Get ready for the list articles!!
  • 1 4
 What their actually saying is, Our clothing sucks and will fail so well fix it.
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