9point8 Fall Line Dropper Post - Review

Oct 20, 2015
by Mike Levy  
I don't think I remember how to ride a mountain bike with its seat post at full mast, but I do recall it being a lot less fun than how most of us ride nowadays. Thankfully, there are a number of different options when it comes to getting your seat out of the way at the push of a button, with Canadian company 9point8 being one of the smaller brands to choose from. Their size hasn't stopped them from offering two completely different dropper posts, both largely manufactured and assembled in their Ontario factory, and both being pretty unique compared to other options on the market.

The $379 USD Fall Line seat post uses an expanding brake, dubbed the 'Mechanical DropLoc', to hold it in place anywhere in its stroke, and is available only in an internally routed style. Travel options run from 75, 100, 125 and 150mm, and the longer versions can also be shimmed down to offer less if the rider doesn't need that much drop or requires a shorter overall length for a certain bike. 9point8 also has built-in a nifty quick-disconnect feature that should make removal a cinch.



Fall Line Details

• Intended use: having more fun than tall post'ers
• Stroke: 75, 100,125, 150mm (tested)
• Infinetly adjustable through stroke
• Adjustable air spring
• Independant seat angle and fore / aft adjustment
• Titanium seat clamp hardware
• Inline and offset head configurations
• 325, 350, 375, 415, 440mm lengths
• Multiple remote options
• Diameters: 30.9mm, 31.6mm
• Weight: 607 grams (all parts included)
• MSRP: $379 USD
www.9point8.ca
9Point8 Fall Line review test


While not available quite yet, 9point8 are working on even longer travel versions of the Fall Line, with 175mm stroke (500mm overall length) and 200mm stroke (560mm overall length) options that will bring the total number of choices to seven. I can see the new long-stroke dropper posts being ideal for bikes like Kona's Process range that sport relatively short seat tube lengths, thereby letting the rider have even more drop while also taking care of seat post extension challenges for riders with legs that don't quit.

If you caught our 'First Ride' article on Race Face's new dropper post, you'd know that it uses similar internals to the Fall Line. In fact, Race Face (and, because they're owned by the same people, Easton) have licensed technology from 9point8 to build their Turbine and Haven droppers. That doesn't make either of those the same as the Fall Line, though, and both of the former are manufactured in Asia while 9point8 does a lot of their fabricating, and all of their assembly, in Canada. Race Face and Easton's seat posts will both likely see some OE spec on top of aftermarket sales, whereas 9point8 sells their dropper posts consumer-direct on their website (on top of retail sales at the same price through shops), a tactic that allows them to price it at $379 USD. That's almost a hundred less than what Race Face and Easton price theirs at. You can also order many of the small parts that you might need for the Fall Line directly off of 9point8's website, including optional bits like an offset seat post head and the 1X Adapter remote mount.





Construction

The all-black Fall Line post features a four-bolt head that allows for completely independent fore / after and angle adjustments, something that should go a long way to making setup and on-trail changes a simple task. All four of the 4mm hex head bolts are titanium, and it's good to seem them go up from the 3mm bolts that were used for angle adjustments on their older seat post. My Fall Line came with a zero offset head, but there is an option to spec it with a 25mm offset version for the same price, or you can buy an aftermarket conversion kit for $36.00 USD if you find you need to change it up down the road.
9Point8 Fall Line review test
The Fall Line's head allows you to adjust your seat's angle while the rails are still clamped tightly, and vice versa.

Internally routed dropper posts make for a nice, clean look and no annoying cable rub that can occur if you don't go to town with zip-ties, but the flip-side to those pluses is that they can be a pain in the ass to install and work on. Depending on what type of bike you ride, routing the housing through your frame may or may not be a dreaded task with the Fall Line, but that's true for every internally routed post. However, 9point8 has come up with a quick-disconnect system that should make removing and re-installing the post an easy task, with the cable assembly screwing into the bottom and the 'Cable Seal Nut' locking it in place. Both are only ever to be tightened by hand, so no wrenches needed, either.


9Point8 Fall Line review test
The quick-dissconnect assembly threads into the bottom of the Fall Line.
9Point8 Fall Line review test
Inside is where the magic happens.


Riders have the option of using one of three different remote mounting layouts, and 9point8's ThumB lever sits on a split perch that lets you remove and install it without having to slide your grip off the handlebar. If you're using a front derailleur and shifter, you'll be best off mounting it above the handlebar in either the vertical or horizontal position, but those using a one-by setup also have the choice of going with a below the handlebar, horizontal position that should make it easy to hit with your thumb. That latter option does require 9point8's 1X Adapter (not included when you buy the Fall Line), which is really just a small sub-mount that positions the lever in the right spot.


9Point8 Fall Line review test
  The split-perch remote can be mounted three different ways, which should keep pretty much everyone happy.





What's Inside?

With its 'Mechanical DropLoc' system holding it in place anywhere in its stroke, 9point8's newer Fall Line seat post uses an entirely different internals compared to their older Pulse dropper that I reviewed back in 2013. It's basically a mechanical brake system that sits stationary inside of the outer tube, with the stanchion passing over it as the post goes up and down through its travel. The brake, which looks like a stubby cylinder (pictured to the right), expands against the inside of the stanchion, locking it in place when you release the thumb lever. According to 9point8, the brake compensates for temperature change when you depress the lever to allow the post to go up or down, much like how today's open-system disc brakes are able to.
9point8 Fall Line review test
The brake is an expanding cylinder that locks against the inside of the post's stanchion tube to hold it in place.

The brake works via a spring loaded plunger that enters a fluid-filled cylinder, causing it to expand and lock against the inside of the stanchion. Depressing the remote lever reduces the pressure and lets the cylinder contract, allowing the post to move up and down. This means that if the actuation cable breaks, or if the post ever sprung a leak from its air spring, it would still be able to be locked in place.


9Point8 Fall Line review test
  The fluid-filled cylinder can be seen in the top right corner. This is the brake that locks against the inside of the stanchion tube to hold it in place.


The mechanical brake depends on a coil spring to activate it, but 9point8 went with an air spring to bring the seat back up. The recommended pressure range is relatively low, between just 20 and 40 psi, and you adjust it via a Schrader valve at the post's head. The seat has to be removed (or at least unclamped on one side and rotated out of the way) to make an air pressure change, although it's not something that you'd be doing too often. Less air pressure will make for a slower rebound speed whereas higher air pressure will obviously have the seat coming up quicker.





Installation

Here's a list of things that are easier to do than installing the Fall Line seat post: removing a motorbike tire with only one hand and no tools, running a sub-four minute mile, raising a child. I jest, but getting the Fall Line up and running isn't a quick and easy job, and it takes a good amount of patience on the first go. It's not technically difficult - some hex keys, common sense, and the included (nicely made) instructions will see you through - but the post's design, specifically how the housing and cable attach to the quick-disconnect mechanism, make it a tricky affair. Quick-disconnect it might be, but quick assembly it most certainly isn't.

You start by feeding the supplied cable housing through your frame and making sure there's enough length there for the handlebar to spin around when you crash on your next ride. 9point8 says that you'll need about six-inches of housing protruding from the bike's seat tube so as to have enough slack to thread the housing into the actuator. Yes, the housing threads into something called the T-nut (it cuts its own threads into the housing) that needs to be positioned halfway through slots in the actuator while you clamp the cable with near microscopic set-screws. It's critical that you nail this part of the process. Sadly, I didn't do it correctly on the first go, having positioned the T-nut too high and causing it to top out before I could apply enough cable tension to activate the seat post. My bad.


9Point8 Fall Line review test


No big deal, right? Just re-position the T-nut and be done with it. The rub is that you need to unthread the quick-disconnect assembly from the seat post after first unthreading the cable seal nut, and that you've had to cut the exposed cable so short (9point8 says to leave just 2mm or less exposed due to clearance requirements) that it's a bit tricky to get it right on the second try. I did, thankfully, otherwise I would have had to un-lodge the Fall Line seat post from my workshop's wall. I ran into another problem when I couldn't get the quick-disconnect unit to thread back into the bottom of the post, and in my panic began to believe that I had damaged the threads hidden up inside of it. It took twenty minutes and an entire bag of nacho chips before I realized the problem: the opposing set-screws that clamp the cable need to be tightened down an even amount. In my frustrated state after the first issue, I had dialed one of the set screws all of the way in before tightening the opposing one until it stopped, but the latter was protruding by the smallest amount, probably less than a millimeter. That was enough to keep the quick-disconnect unit from being able to slide deep enough into the post to grab the threads, and it all went together easily after I figured that one out.


9Point8 Fall Line review test







Riding the Fall Line Dropper Post

There's something awesome about being able to go from cross-country bandit to downhill hooligan with the push of a button, which is exactly what the 150mm stroke Fall Line lets you do. The seat disappears under you as soon as you push on the sizeable remote lever, and it drops down easily under your body weight. I started with the maximum recommend air pressure, which is 40 psi, thinking that I'd want the quickest rebound speed I could get, but I did have a bit of trouble getting the seat to drop the last inch or so at this air pressure. A firm push with the ass and it would go down all the way, but I found that 30 psi was the ideal pressure for my 165lb weight. The post's rebound speed was still quick enough that I never had to wait for my perch to return - slower than a D.O.S.S. or Command Post, though - but it also fully lowered with next to zero effort. Lighter riders than me can run even less pressure, down to 20 psi, and the post will still come up quick, if maybe just a touch slower.


9Point8 Fall Line review test
  The Fall Line was trouble-free during my entire time on it.


An audible top out clunk lets you know that it's at full mast, which I never thought was that important until I used a dropper post that was nearly silent. Was it up, or did I need to push the button again? No, I want to hear it top out so I know I can release the lever, and the Fall Line does exactly that. No guessing here.

I used to swear that I needed a dropper post with an infinitely adjustable stroke, somehow convincing my brain that my seat needs to be dropped just 7mm more so I feel comfortable on a technical climb or another 15mm for those rolling trails, but that's not the case at all. A three-position dropper works just fine, and I've come to like the set "cruiser position" that sees the seat dropped a touch from the full height - it leaves nothing to think about. But getting on the Fall Line took away that dependency on knowing exactly where that seat height was, and I ended up thumbing the remote until I got it just right. Riders will have their preferences when it comes to using either a three-position or infinitely adjustable dropper post, but I'm convinced that it doesn't make a difference at the end of the day, and that we'll just get used to whatever is under us so long as we can get the seat out of the way when it's time to jump and skid. Now that I'm very familiar with the Fall Line, I can get my seat exactly where I want it to be quicker than I can shift to a different gear, and I do appreciate being able to have the seat anywhere between DH mode and 'Ugh-I-have-to-climb-that.'


9Point8 Fall Line review test
The infinite travel adjust lets you lock it anywhere in its 150mm of travel.
9Point8 Fall Line review test
Party mode: engaged.


Ergonomics

I wasn't a big fan of 9point8's previous remote that was basically a pint-sized brake lever, so it's good to see them use something different to control the Fall Line. I mounted and used their ThumB remote every which way but had expected the horizontal, below the bar position to work best, especially because there's no front shifter on my bike. That wasn't the case, though, as I ended up preferring the vertical position more, but it's not a stretch to see that most riders are going to like the lever oriented to mimic a shifter.


9Point8 Fall Line review test
Most riders will probably end up preferring the under the bar mounting that works well if you don't have a front shifter.
9Point8 Fall Line review test
You might end up running it on top of the bar if you have a front derailleur, although the vertical position will also work well.


I used the Fall Line for about a month with the remote set up in the horizontal, below the bar position before swapping it to the vertical mount, a change that took all of two minutes. This felt absolutely spot-on for me. When used this way, it looks and feels a lot like an up-sized and sturdier version of KS' remote, and I would have preferred to leave it as it was but for having to give the horizontal, above the bar mounting a go for testing's sake. This didn't work for me at all as the lever felt too far away, and I had to unwrap my hand even more.

It's cool to see 9point8 taking Burger King's old motto to heart and giving people the option of having it their way, and the flexible mounting also means that the remote will play nice with all cockpit setups, even if you're running three shifters, an aero-bar and a bell on each side. You can even use the brake lever-style remote from the older Pulse seat post if you'd like, although I suspect that nearly everyone will end up preferring to bolt up the Fall Line's stock remote as a mock shifter.


9Point8 Fall Line review test
  I'm a fan of the remote's vertical position, but the ability to mount it three different ways is a huge plus.


Reliability

It's getting better every year, but it sometimes seems that a lot of dropper posts still have a worse reliability record than 1970's era Volkswagen vans, although at least the vans are easier to work on than these seat posts. Given that installing the Fall Line nearly gave me an aneurysm, I expected to run into some sort of trouble down the road... but I didn't. Not a single iota of bother after six months of pretty intensive use in nearly every sort of weather, including the kind where you spend all your coins at the car wash blasting mud off your bike. No joke, I haven't even needed to adjust the Fall Line's cable tension, which is ludicrous and shows that the 9point8 dropper isn't overly sensitive to adjustments. The post is also just as smooth through its travel as it was the day I unboxed it, and I haven't even heard the post's head make a single creak or groan of disagreement.


9Point8 Fall Line review test
Not one single squeak or creak from the Fall Line's head.
9Point8 Fall Line review test
It's tricky to reach the schrader valve with the seat on, but undoing one rail clamp lets you rotate the seat out of the way if need be.


Issues

I've got nothing; the Fall Line is an awesome dropper post once you get it set up. And that's the only complaint that I can level at the Canadian-made dropper. The average home mechanic will need to take his time and have some patience (and maybe play some calming music or one of those relaxing audio tracks where all you hear is the ocean and seagulls and dolphins being happy) when installing it.



Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWhen I reviewed 9point8's older Pulse dropper post back in 2013, my final line read, ''All things considered, the Pulse requires some refining before we'd choose it for our own bike over other dropper posts.'' Well, 9point8 decided to design a completely new seat post instead, and the finished product is reliable, works extremely well, and is damn good all around. It doesn't hurt that it's also one of the least expensive high-end options out there, despite being largely manufactured in Canada. In fact, I might argue that the Fall Line is the best dropper post on the market right now given all those facts.- Mike Levy



Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this review





201 Comments

  • + 113
 My dropper spends 60% of the time all the way up, 39% all the way down and 1% anywhere else in it's stroke by accident. Infinite Shminfinite.
  • + 39
 When you are riding up a lot in a day, it's nice to have a bit of adjustment at the high point so you can work your muscles a little differently from climb to climb. On the way down it's obviously bottomed out, but infinite adjustment is not a bad thing. It's the best possible option, right?
  • + 105
 I change my seat height more than I change gears.
  • + 43
 Maybe for jumps or real steep terrain but when riding flat-ish singletrack I prefer the post somewhere in the middle of the stroke so I can still sit and pedal, without having the seat up my ass when cornering and pumping.
  • + 12
 I'm with NoDH, my post is either all the way up, or all the way down. I still think the specialized after market lever is the best one out there. that clamphead looks awesome.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Oct 21, 2015 at 2:44) (Below Threshold)
 When I ride XC I adjust my Reverb all-da-time. I could get away with 3 positions but... infinitae!
  • + 4
 bonkywonky I recently picked up a Reverb, previously used a D.O.S.S. I preferred the three position given by Fox. Its impossible to get the right seat height from the Reverb on the first try, its always too low or too high. Fox lets you set the midstroke, and that's where it always goes. My next dropper will be the same. Since I ride in winter I would prefer the cable over hydraulic as well. My Fox never failed me, even at -20C! I really like the coupling that comes with the Fall Line though, easily disconnected when needed with no adjustment thereafter. Would be awesome to see a mix dropper that can give these two positive points.
  • + 7
 Same. I actually prefer the three position setting. Also it's probably because I was using a XTR shifter to go into those setting. I been on my current Reverb for a year and really really hate that remote.
  • + 3
 i rode a Gravity Dropper for years with the full up, full down, and then a 1" from full up 'cruiser' position.

I rode the previous version of the Command Post with a similar setting for a cruiser position and other than the ridiculous set back thought it was a great performing post.

I've been on a Reverb for past 2 seasons. I miss that set 1" drop position of the GD.

It sucks trying to find that optimal middle ground for technical xc pedalling without the preset position(s). If your riding does not include that kind of terrain then it won't matter to you.
  • + 2
 Maybe it's because you don't have any Downhill runs in Kentucky, you don't see the benefit of infinite adjustment?
  • + 2
 Now, the world don't move to the beat of just one drum. What might be right for you, may not be right for some.

"Cruiser" for me is between about 35-55mm down. For tech climbing, I drop it a little less than inch, I'd guess.

There's room for both kinds of posts. If I didn't have two Reverbs that I'm perfectly happy with, I'd definitely give this one a shot.
  • + 2
 I've ridden both infinite and 3-position, and honestly the 3 position is just so much better IMO. I feel with the infinite, it just isn't ever in the right place when I have to adjust it suddenly on the fly (which is obviously most of the time). It's either too high, or too low. 3 positions for 3 situations of riding (pedaling, moderate DH, steep DH) is perfect. But of course, each to their own.
  • + 3
 I'm another fan of the 3 position variation of the dropper post. No guessing and no unpredictability. I use the middle position quite often on sections requiring technical climbing/rolling terrain.
  • + 0
 When I use a reverb and want to reach that "cruiser" position, I sit on the saddle, push the remote, put the crank in the vertical position, straighten my knee and fully drop my heel.

When the seat post is in full extension, I set the reverb so that my heel can't drop at all if it is at the bottom of the crank stroke. Something I would never do on conventional seat posts.
  • + 1
 I got the newer version of the X-Fusion Hilo Strate and its great.
$200, infinite adjustment, lever design is simple and perfect, internal routed.
Just throwing it out there because $400 is way too much in my opinion.
It is slower than my KS Lev Integra and much slower than the Specialized Command Post.
  • + 1
 @enduroelite Give it some time. The Reverb's lever is quite sensitive so with a slight and short push you can stall it at the mid position.

That said, I could certainly live with a three position post, I don't really run my Reverb at 1/4 or 3/4 height..
  • - 1
 Am I missing anything here? I never really got the point of infinite adjustment. If I want it out of the way I want it out of the way and if I want to pedal I want it at the optimal pedaling position. I don't get what a sub-optimal seat height would achieve aside getting tired faster.

What I would really like though is a faster reverb because at the fastest it still feels too slow on the way up even at max psi.
  • + 2
 @rifu So you do all of this while riding into rock sections? I can adjust my Reverb to exactly where I want, AS LONG AS I'M STOPPED. Once your moving there's no way to get it to stop in the same place, mid stroke twice.
  • + 0
 The point of infinite adjustment is that your dropper slides all the way down freely with no additional resistance. I do fine adjustments in highest position for seated pedaling, depending on terrain I ride.
  • + 3
 Been riding droppers since GD first came out, and the 3 position is best. Up, down, 1" drop.
  • + 4
 A gravity dropper 3 position 5" is like $225 on sale and won't need maintenance for years. That's my definition of "high end".
  • + 1
 @bonkywonky I've given it too much time....I'm replacing my Reverb stealth with a D.O.S.S. and selling it cheap. Any takers?
  • + 1
 @enduroelite If I want to do this, one second of coasting is good enough. Practice makes perfect. Different case for descending technical rock sections, fully lowered for that.

I agree about stop the seatpost in literally the same place, but the way I do it makes it perceptively the same. No human beings can feel 0.95 mm difference in seat height anyway.
  • + 1
 @PLC07 some technical slow speed uphill section can be ridden better with your seatpost a tad lowered.
  • + 1
 Yeah whatever @rifu, thanks for being my armchair co-pilot....Reverb Stealth for sale....
  • + 58
 YAY 200mm stroke! Us tall people thanks you!
  • + 3
 Not only tall people want more drop, build it and the short people frame builders will respond.
  • - 3
 to be honest, i think you have the wrong frame size
  • + 7
 Loads of folk would use 200mm of drop. I'm 6ft and on a large frame and would definitely use one rather than have 50mm of seat post lower exposed and have to use the QR a lot for jumps and proper steeps. Some people don't understand the need for a longer drop, fair enough, but you can't go telling others their frame is the wrong size just because you don't get it!
  • + 1
 Those of you interested in the long stroke posts... Check out the survey for fitment details:

goo.gl/forms/EL4b1IXzNA
  • + 20
 9point8's stuff is so customer centric. Lots of cnc and machined parts so you can customize the post and trigger to fit. Perfect for the ADD cyclist crowd. Which means they've thought through the target market.

Have 35+ days on my Fall Line post right now - no issues. Have 80+ days on my Pulse post. Also no issues. Kind of a sad statement about dropper posts that the 9Point8's reliabiliity makes it a standout but there you have it.
  • + 12
 its just so damn refreshing that there is a company that says.." they like this, they like that, we think this could be cool..." AND EXECUTES EVERYTHING WELL! and people have one LESS thing to complain about in the comments on PB.

but then I wont have any entertainment...
  • - 27
flag CliffRacer (Oct 20, 2015 at 23:23) (Below Threshold)
 I think I'd rather just get one of the new easton or raceface posts than something from a company I've never heard of.
  • - 23
flag Mattin (Oct 21, 2015 at 1:20) (Below Threshold)
 If you haven't heard of it, read the comments: it is owned by Easton.
  • + 24
 @Mattin... what?
9point8 is an independent company. Fox owns Easton (and RaceFace). Fox is licensing 9point8 technology for the new droppers under Easton and RaceFace brands.
  • + 3
 9point8 is cheaper than RaceFace so that's a no brainer.
  • + 2
 Lee, how's the play on the post? Is it comparable to Thomson?
  • + 2
 I have had several several different KS and Rockshox dropper posts over the years and my current 9point8 is by far the nicest dropper I have owned. All of the features are well thought out and executed. One biggest improvements over other posts I have used is the lack of play on my 9point8 - the saddle is nearly rigid in either the dropped or extended position. Also, FWIW, I had no problems installing the post after the appropriate amount of barley pop was had.
  • + 1
 @Jhou almost zero play on both posts. Still smooth
  • + 21
 Reverb's been away for three weeks now, after about 30 hours of riding since new..... very intrigued 9point8.
  • + 7
 My Reverb works about 50% of the time, too. It's been in for service and warranty and warranty and service so many times I've lost count. This looks a lot better. Might try to sell mine while it's still working to get one of these units.
  • + 2
 My reverb just crapped out after about 30 hrs also. I'm only 150lbs with gear and i killed it. Was looking at the new easton haven post but this looks like a nice option for sure.
  • + 3
 Both Easton and Raceface use the 9point8 mechanism licensed out in their droppers.
  • + 8
 My reverb is still going strong, after 2 seasons.
  • - 1
 I rode three seasons on a first gen Reverb and now I'm on a second hand one from the latest gen and it works. It is not perfect but feels better than KS Supernatural I have on another bike
  • + 1
 Kinda hit or miss in my experience, I've seen them last for seasons like yours but mine shat the bed within a year. I have to add that I'm a dropper post's worst nightmare though based on the number of seats and posts I have gone through so far..
  • + 0
 Hit or miss is totaly my experience as well as I know people who hate their droppers of all makes. It will get better though, I am sure of it. Brakes used to be like that before Shimano introduced the latest generation of master cylinders and pistons, just like it happened to Sram/Avid when they finally noticed that Elixir 5 and 3 are way easier to bleed and more reliable than CRs, first gen X0s and XX.
  • + 13
 I recently bought a Fall Line post and didn't find the installation to be too challenging. I didn't make Mike's accidental mistake with not tightening set screws evenly, and I managed to get the 50% position for the cable on the first try. I am used to small set screws on my KS LEV post so it didn't seem unacceptable to me.

I think if Mike had gotten the 50% thing and the set screw deal right on the first try it would have been a pretty easy install. Hopefully that doesn't turn people off from these as it is a fantastic option. All of the parts seem to be very user friendly. The head design, remote and all of the parts seem to be very well thought out.

There is also a "pulse" model if you like to have it click down to other positions instead of being infinite. The Pulse model does do the infinite travel mode just like the Fall Line if you pull the lever all the way in instead of half way.
  • + 7
 Sorry - commenting too much. But I made the same mistake as Mike with the set screws. I was off by like a hair and couldn't get the damn thing assembled. Once i figured out the company is run by automotive engineers it all made sense. Crazy tolerances
  • + 2
 It's really not difficult, I got mine working first try...maybe don't try doing it before a ride but if you relax and take it step by step its easy as hell. Its so much better and more positive feeling than the Reverb!
  • + 1
 Yeah, I had some similar hiccups on my install (good call down0050 on not trying to install when you're trying to get out the door for the trail!).
But, I'm loving it now. Not a single issue since day one.
  • + 1
 Yep, I did the same thing with the set screws but coming up on 30 rides with it and very happy thus far. Plus it was not an oily mess to install like the reverb stealth that I had before. I love the ability to have the remote in various positions also.
  • + 3
 Same here, recently purchased a Fall Line and can't say I had any installation issues. It was no more finicky than installing the stealth KS LEV and Specialized Command Post I've owned before. I really like the separate adjustment for saddle position and angle, and the post action is buttery smooth. Very well thought-out remote lever as well.
  • + 1
 I like setting up new parts and drinking beer.. As long as the trouble is just in familiarity, but it's consistent after that, I'm good. A couple tries to get it right just means more beer drinking. Sounds like a solid post once it's dialed.
  • + 1
 @shrockie: same, haha. I 'looked over' the instructions and went for it. Had to tweak cable length a couple times but overall it's not a difficult install at all, just need to read carefully and take your time. Great post so far!! Easton has an install video too but he tells you to leave the housing much too long, arghhh.
  • + 15
 Enough about the dropper post. Tell me about that seat! Enduro?
  • + 5
 tioga spyder, google is your friend
  • + 1
 It's one of these:
www.tiogausa.com/main/products/saddles/spyder-outland

I wonder what it's like...
  • + 10
 @fredgrillet - It's really, really good, at least for my ass. One of the most comfortable seats I've used. Here's a review of the lighter duty Stratum, although the Outland model pictured here on my bike is stronger and more suited to how I ride. www.pinkbike.com/news/tioga-spyder-stratum-seat-review-2014.html
  • + 3
 I had a tioga spyder on my XC bike and just put it on my road bike. Multiple 80ish mile rides on it now and I love it
  • + 4
 I use a Tioga Spyder, it's surprisingly comfortable. Almost everyone who sees it makes a comment about how painful it must be
  • + 1
 Love my Spyder Stratum...Ive been running it for about 6months and its holding up good...I killed a WTB silverado in less than that last time..
  • + 8
 Clever name. 9point8, 9.8, 9.8 m/s^2 = acceleration of gravity.

I'd like to see how the post holds up after multiple years. That mechanical brake has me worried about wear and I'm worried it might start slipping down the road. My Reverb was the jam for 2 years and now it squats 1/2" when I sit on it. Have bled it twice with no luck and ain't no one got time to send it back for a rebuild.
  • + 5
 ~200,000 cycles of "dragging" the brake under full load resulted in negligible wear or reduction in holding capacity. Just like your brakes, the friction material tends to "bed in", and the holding capacity tends to go up. They hold a minimum of 600 lb in both directions when new, and are typically 800-1000 when bedded in.
  • + 1
 Sweet! Sounds promising. But any engineer will tell you that the best bench top tests still aren't the same as real world use, misuse, and abuse.
  • + 7
 I've been planning on buying this post for a bit now, so it's nice to read such a good review! I'm excited to have this on my next build!
  • + 4
 I have used the fall line for an entire season. I can honestly say this is the best dropper I have ever used.

As far as the installation, I have no idea why this guy had so much trouble. I had it installed and properly functioning within 10 minutes of opening the box. I have used it for an entire season and have never adjusted anything...cables or air pressure. Just follow the instructions. I can't stress enough how easy it was. No need for "calming" music here. If you can adjust a rear derailleur, you can install this with zero issues.
  • + 4
 Like many, I purchased the fall line out of disgust with the reverb my bike came equipped with. The reverb failed 2x in a year, and I could see it would be a battle to keep it working. After some dialogue with the guys at 9point8, I ordered the dropper. It shipped the same day and I had it early the next week. Installation was simple but I did have the same problem that the reviewer did with the set screw. However, that took only a few minutes to figure out and really should not be a detraction in any form for this product. It's an extremely minor quibble in the bigger picture. I've had it for a couple months and am extremely happy with the post and the customer service from them. I was never quite happy with the remote, even though it appears to one of the better on the market. I run a 1x and I ended up doing the front shifter conversion and couldn't be happier. I wish I would have known about the longer lengths coming out as I would have likely waited. Regardless, the post build quality is exceptional. I have no reservation recommending the product at this point, but I realize that reliability is the achillies heel of dropper posts, and that can take a while to determine.
  • + 4
 Sounds good, I fancy one. If I am in the UK and want one of these do I have to import it from Canada ? What about warranty returns, are they back to Canada ? The customs charges here could add about $120 to the price, not great.
  • + 2
 The same thing for us with ChainReaction Wink
  • + 7
 Lots of choices for dropper posts these days. When is PB going to do a shootout?
  • + 15
 I hate the idea of a shootout and the usually too brief and summarized information that they're usually full of. Ratings and shit. That said, I'll be putting together exactly that in the near future now that we can link to the full length reviews of each and every dropper post that we've reviewed.
  • + 4
 A mate of mine bought me one of the UK bike mags for my birthday (he thought he was being funny as it contained a home mechanic how-to guide for me). It had a few shootouts in there that I used to love and live by back in the day but as I read I realised that half of their info was incorrect on sizings, etc; the info I wanted just wasnt even mentioned in many cases. I think Mike is right, proper full length reviews are much better. We are spoiled by the amount of info available to us now, strange thing when you know more about a products specs than the publication doing the review (thats the mag not PB, all hail PB \o/)
  • + 4
 "I hate the idea of a shootout... that being said..." Love it Mike.
  • + 0
 A shootout might be nice but Mike stated that he thinks it's the best dropper around. As he's given a clear opinion then a shootout isn't as necessary, for any review I'm more interested in giving a rating against the current "market leader" (e.g. suspension rated against a Pike, dropper against a Reverb etc).
  • + 1
 "shoot out" smells too much like Mountain Bike Action.. Compiling reviews so you can read into each in depth is much more informative.
  • + 4
 Sometimes you just want a rating out of 10. It's hard to get an objective agreement on what product is better than another when reading subjective reviews. At least if one was 8 and the other 10, for example, the reader can work through key points to figure out what's right for them. I dig this approach used in other mags as it forces the reviewers too to set a benchmark and be honest about it.
  • + 2
 The trouble with ratings out of 10 is that they will vary from reviewer to reviewer so you can only really compare ratings from the same reviewer, if pinkbike did them with their 5 or 6 main staff writers the variation would be a problem. Mike Levy's 8 out of 10 and RC's 8 out of 10 might be completely different.
  • + 7
 When can we have an i-beam dropper?
  • + 1
 I think KS used to make an i-beam dropper post. No idea if they are still available though.
  • + 1
 Gravity Dropper has i-beam options
  • + 4
 300 USD Big Grin who are you kidding ?


They are 500 EUR in EU ! Thats still like 570 USD now that the euro is weak.

And ive heard even the prices in USA will go up this year ?! to like 480 USD !
  • + 1
 Yep, price stupid.
  • + 2
 well 380 USD, still A LOT more here.
  • + 2
 I can get a reverb stealth for 30% less than it would cost me to buy this via the 9point8 website. Hopefully they'll get some local distribution with a bit saner prices.
  • + 1
 They got local distribution in EU ... and the price is 500 € Smile i can get a stealth Reverb for 250€ easy
  • + 1
 My Fall Line was cheaper than would have been a KS LEV or Reverb Stealth in my LBS! Even on internet with custom fees and all that bullshit that goes with it! But guess how pricey a Scott or Lapierre bike is around here... Wink
  • + 2
 Well you would be stupid to by a Lapierre anyway. Worst customer service ever. Had a warranty problem with them years ago ... it dont even wanna write about it anymore, its like talking to a wall, i just say " go for it (f*ck you)" to the folks that are still interested in Lapierre
  • + 5
 Great to see you actually read all these comments in posts Mike, damned if I could be bothered doing it.
  • + 2
 I found the install super easy - the instructions are clear. The dudes at the company are great too - answered all my questions and were helpful. I've had no issues with the post - love it. My reverb was smooth as can be, until it was sticking and broken at the first sign of mud. I had concerns about buying a complicated part from such a small company, but it was the right choice.
  • + 1
 Yep, the 9point8 dudes have been great from experience too.
I've had the Pulse for almost two years, and I just put the Fall Line on new (stealth-friendly) frame.
  • + 2
 I love fox's 3 pos dropper. infinite adjust is annoying and I find you spend lots of time looking for that middle position. Someone needs to come up with your own middle position you can pre set. like a CTD post but the middle position can be set so that you can easily return to it.
  • + 2
 Only downside i could find is that there is no 27.2mm option. Damn my 27.2mm frame, on my next one I will make sure it has a seattube wide enough for standard dropper posts. Seems like the x-fusion hilo is still most probably my best option right now.
  • + 2
 Satori Sorata (RSP Plummet in the uk) is £60 and fits 27.2
  • + 1
 Awesome, cheers for sharing! Beer For that price it is worth having a look at / doing some decent research about it and probably give it a try. Have you by any chance ridden one or know anyone who has one? The quick google I just did sounds good: a mechanical dropper post that works with a spring and a pin, and weighs about the same as the posts that cost 3 times as much. User experiences seem to be all positive aswell from what I've found this far
  • + 1
 And GD, of course !!!
  • + 1
 Thanks for the Satori/RSP dropper tip. Unfortunately only available in 360mm length?
  • + 1
 Alas, I think it's kind of a one size fits all (with shims) kind of deal.
  • + 2
 And yeah, @Mattin, I have one, very happy with it. Ugly as hell, has a bit of play at full extension (but not enough to be a problem/distraction) and only available in one size/drop. But it's so simple you are unlikely to have any reliability issues that a quick strip and re-grease won't solve.
  • + 1
 Oh yes, and 3 positions, the middle one of which is far more useful than I would have expected, a really good halfway house for flowy single-track.
  • + 1
 Good to hear Alex, for this low price I will give it a try Smile
  • + 1
 You won't regret it! Enjoy!
  • + 1
 @mikelevy

I have been waiting for this review!!! I have been holding off buying a dropper because I am not impressed with the other offerings, however was impressed with the mechanical function of the Fall Line.

Thanks again!!
  • + 1
 I've been using a GD for 4 years now without a single issue. I'm the only one in my group ... Is has three positions. IMO, this is the best dropper Seatpost. Works all the time. I just replaced the cable last month just to prevent it to break.
  • + 2
 $500 CAD - no thanks. The only reason I could see spending that much on this post is if I needed the extra long 200mm drop. Otherwise there are lots of other options in the marketplace at much better price points.
  • + 1
 Still a lot cheaper than the KS LEV at my LBS.... So went with it and no regrets at all!
  • + 1
 Excellent post. I recently purchased and installed my second one.

I don't see why people say setup is difficult. Read and follow the instructions. Make sure cable/housing slack is taken up before fastening and cutting the cable.
Other than getting the cable housing length right on the first try it couldn't be easier.
  • + 1
 I can live with my KS lev's performance when it is working as designed...BUT in 3 Canadian seasons it has become a real Jetsetter. It has been flown to the Canadian West distrib for rebuilds 4 times. Some was covered on warranty buy 2x $120 for rebuilds does not seat well with me! Sadly after last yrs rebuild it malfunctioned after 1 ride and went awal for 2-3 weeks again. Not exceptable......9point8 is up next for me. Big Big Bonus that it's made in Canada by this small company and they say it works in winter which is a total no go for most posts.
  • + 1
 It should be noted that 9.8's Digit remote reverses the orientation of the cable, placing the head at the seatpost end of the housing. This makes cutting the cable to size much easier, plus the set screws that Mike had a tough time (initially) with are discarded, making the install process MUCH simpler than it was previously.

I just installed a 175mm 9.8 post and it was a piece of cake!

If I were 9.8 I would let everyone know of the improvements enabled by their digit remote.
  • + 1
 It's late to reply but all I can say is I'm glad I picked one of these up. After reading this review and knowing that 9point8's office is in Hamilton, it was time to scrap my Reverb and get on something more reliable. I couldn't be any happier now Big Grin
  • + 1
 Being able to shim the stroke down is AWESOME! I was barely too short for a 150mm LEV on my Stumpjumper, but will want a 150mm on a newer frame, so I'll end up wanting to buy a new post when I get a new frame. If I had been able to buy a 150mm and shim it to 125mm for the time being, I would have saved a good chunk of money.
  • + 4
 Shut up and take my money already for a 200mm or 175mm. So tired of the double drop for the steeps!
  • + 1
 I have tried most all dropper posts and it is true. Most are not that great. I like they way reverb works when it works. and I can always make it work. But the last time it cost me $130 to rebuild one post. I have not had many problems with my lev. It is on my newest bike,
Too bad they don't make one with external routeing.
  • + 1
 I like the seat clamp head on this unit. My KS Lev is a creaky POS, I've replaced the head clamp plates already and those little oval nuts for the clamp are pretty bad too. This, by contrast, looks much more robust (though I'd still probably use stainless bolts instead of Ti.
  • + 1
 Been using this post for approximately 4 months (500 miles) and it's been flawless for the most part. Smooth action throughout the travel. Doesn't feel like it's going to hit you in the nuts on return like some posts. Pricepoint is high, but at this time i think it's worth it.

The install isnt too bad, but i had issues trying to get the inner portion of the connector into the threads. Kept thinking i was going to strip it.

It started to get slightly sticky recently, like the post was low on air. According to the 9point8 FAQ this is normal as the post breaks in.
  • + 4
 I've had mine since June, not one complaint, once you remove it a couple times it becomes very easy. A+ in my book.
  • + 1
 I like this alot, very simple but clever looking design idea and layout. should make it a doddle to service when eventually it needs it. Definitely my next dropper when the reverb dies. even the cable housing looks like a good fit at the lever end to stop muck getting in.
a 175+ drop aswell sounds sweet and I'm not even tall and ride a process but I hate having a seat any where near my bike when descending
  • + 1
 I've had one for about 4 months now, and like it way better than my reverb. You don't think about it when you use it, it comes up as fast as I need without a sac punch, the lever is ugly but better ergo than reverb. (the race face one looks cooler- I hope it's compatible)
Only issue i've had is one time it dropped when I was turning a tight circle (not enough cable housing)
The seat head is nicer too- not having to mess with tilt AND rail position is really nice when you're swapping seats.
Good company, root for the plucky little guy! (Ordered direct from 9point8- not affiliated)
  • + 1
 Too bad the "Quick Disconnect" remains attached to the cable, effectively preventing removal of the cable and remote from the bike if you're heading out for a park day. Thomson has the other end of the cable at the post end making this possible, I think it would be better to do something similar here.
  • + 1
 Thomson cable set up is by far the worst of the cable actuated post.
  • + 1
 Don't like Thomson, then do it some other way. Point is why have a quick disconnect if the connector, cable, and lever remain captive on the bike.
  • + 5
 Can't wait for 175mm of drop on a 440mm post.
  • + 4
 when is the 200mm going to be released?
  • + 3
 Is there a non-stealth version so I can keep my antiquated SB66 a little longer?
  • + 4
 Drill the frame. NBD.
  • + 2
 Have more details on how to properly do that?
  • + 1
 Dude has bigger balls than me.
  • + 1
 I would do it. Its not like you're drilling carbon.
  • + 2
 I have a carbon sb66 and drilled it. No big deal for stealth dropper. So much better looking and no more cable rub. Easy to do.
  • + 1
 My man right there.
  • + 2
 @eurospek
Peter Verdone is pretty damn cool. His PVD skate trucks are rather legendary among slalom skaters. They feel like nothing else out there, and are rightfully very expensive. Beautiful bit of passionate engineering and precision manufacturing. Just like everything else he does. haha
  • + 1
 I like Peter Verdone's mod, but you can get the little plastic grommet that manufacturer's like Intense use for an even cleaner finish. I believe Fanatik bike carries it for a couple bucks.
  • + 2
 Hardware stores also sell rubber grommets for pennies. I've drilled out my Ibis Ripley to work with a 9point8 dropper post and have had zero issues. The new, gen 2 Ripley is ready for internal routing.
  • + 1
 Anyone taken it even further and drilled out internal routing for shifter and brake cables?

www.jensonusa.com/Giant-Rubber-Frame-Grommet

Those are clean. A little pricey, but I take into account how much time I will waste finding a proper hardware store, then finding the grommets within said hardware store...plus it is always a good excuse for spending $50 on bike parts to say "honey, shipping was free".
  • + 1
 Any chance of a picture of the Ripley drilled out?
  • + 0
 Revereb options the same with better lever for less, as well as worldwide spare parts availability; and 2 minutes for instalation

Nice dropper for sure, however nowadays bike equpped with "boost" standards, imho dproppers should be controlled via bluetooth. Othervise why should i pay more?
  • + 4
 if you pull up the seat will it extend? I find that annoying
  • + 7
 No, the brake holds it in place.
  • + 1
 I don't know for sure, but judging on how it operates, I'd hazard a guess, 'no'.
  • + 2
 Supposedly one of the only/few droppers where carrying from the seat isn't even frowned upon.
  • + 5
 New stuff is cool
  • + 3
 Can't wait for my seat post to have more travel then my bike!
  • + 3
 Nice detailed review. Thanks
  • + 1
 I don't care about this one, but I really want to read a review about the 200mm one. I want to now if it's a "game changer" or if you think it's overkill...
  • + 1
 I've got about 9 inches of usable non dropper seat post and I still can't get it high enough OR low enough for XC or DH/Jumping.
  • + 1
 Great review. My reverb is great after an overhaul for about 3 months and then it slows done and does the creaky thing. Hohum... I am now thinking of the 9.8
  • + 3
 Tioga seat review anyway soon?
  • + 11
 Review: the most comfortable seat I've ever used, and I like it because it makes those who don't know say "Whaaaaaa?"

Here's a review of the lighter duty Stratum, although the Outland model pictured here on my bike is stronger and more suited to how I ride. www.pinkbike.com/news/tioga-spyder-stratum-seat-review-2014.html
  • + 1
 I want to try these out, but I just... Can't stand looking at it!
  • + 0
 I have a Rase 9
I've used it for 5 years with no problems
It has up to 9' of drop , mine is set at 7" currently
Because the head moves side to side they died :-(

It does not matter AT ALL , the extra travel does . :-)
  • + 1
 160+ needed please...I'm all femur n short reach. Gotta always dbl lift/drop for steeps.
  • + 2
 Made in Canada. Priced in USD.
  • + 24
 Should Chinese made bikes be priced in Yuan?
  • + 3
 Haha. Nice one
  • + 0
 "Should Chinese made bikes be priced in Yuan?"

If/when they're being sold in China...
  • + 0
 Whacha smoking schlayar? Priced in CAD from my computer!
  • - 1
 I disagree, the Thomson Dropper post is probably the best on the market. Pricey at MSRP, but I used a discount coupon offered by Jensons and got it for a more palatable price.
  • + 1
 Pulled my Thomson for a Fall Line and never thought twice about it. By far the better post out of the two. I have put a lot of miles on both. The Thomson has no top out noise. Will start sagging out and not returning all the way. Also has more side to side play than the Fall Line.
  • + 1
 200mm dropper needed!!! I still have to lower my dropper post on the steeps!
  • + 1
 I have a 27.2 seat tube on my old yeti asx. Tell me dear mtb industry, should i go f*ck myself ?
  • + 1
 Buy a Gravity Dropper post. A little overpriced for what they are, but very reliable, easily serviced and with the best customer service in the industry..
  • + 1
 Just got a tip about the RSP Plummet, a mechanical 27.2mm dropper that only costs €100 and weighs average at 600g. Apparently super reliable because it is mechanical, only read positive reviews from users online.

Another option, if you rather want hydraulical, is the x-fusion hilo. Had it myself and was satisfied with it. The only thing is that you immediately have to replace all the bolts after you buy it, because the original bolts are made from butter
  • + 1
 Looks good, too bad I can't find any distributor in my region. Frown
  • + 1
 Where in the US to buy it?
  • + 1
 Funny bit about the difficulty of installation. Had me creasing!
  • + 1
 Dropper posts look sooo fancy! And they are quite useful aswell, yeah.
  • + 1
 I'll buy this as soon as my gravity dropper breaks. Might be a while.
  • + 1
 LOL same here!!!
  • + 1
 I would love to buy it for 400 USD .. in Europe ;-)
  • + 1
 You would npt pay 400USD for it in USA. You would pay 400USD plus sales tax. ( In UK, or imported to UK, that would add 20%)
  • + 2
 Yes, exactly I meant I would love to pay 400USD for it inluding taxes and duties ;-)
  • + 1
 German distributor will have it for 499 Euro Frown
  • + 1
 Would be a good replacement for my POS command post.
  • + 1
 You guys need to test a Yep Components : www.yepcomponents.com
  • + 0
 This post is super easy to install and simply works.
  • + 1
 Norbs got married!
  • - 2
 Boom. Your move, rockshox, fox, Thomson, etc.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.126785
Mobile Version of Website