9Point8 Fall Line Dropper Post - Sea Otter 2015

Apr 18, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  

Mechanical, Stealth Routed Dropper Post

The Fall Line is 9Point8's newest creation, a stealth routed, mechanical dropper post that's been certified to the rigorous EN seatpost standard. This isn't the Canadian company's first post - we previously spent time aboard the Pulse model - but there are a number of smart new features that make the Fall Line a competitive addition to the market.

Reliability is still the biggest issue that plagues seat droppers, and even though things are much better than they were a few years ago, that doesn't mean that smooth sailing is guaranteed. For that reason, 9Point8 chose to go with a mechanical brake to hold the seat securely in place at the desired height, which means that even if for some reason the post lost air pressure, the seat height wouldn't change. The brake works via a spring loaded plunger that enters a fluid filled chamber, causing it to expand and lock in place against the inside of the post. Depressing the remote lever reduces the pressure, allowing the post to move freely. The remote lever is cable actuated as well, and can easily be removed by unscrewing it from the base of the post.

Several different remote lever styles are available, including a nicely shaped under the bar option that takes the place of a front shifter for riders on 1x setups. The return speed of the post is dependent on how quickly the cable actuated lever is depressed, and an infinite number of positions are possible before reaching full extension. 30.9 or 31.6mm diameters will be offered with either 125mm or 150mm of drop, and it's possible that an even longer version will be released in the future. For riders who are seeking less travel, the post can be shimmed internally. Expected weight for the 150mm version is 579 grams including the lever, cable and housing. MSRP: $379 USD.
Sea Otter 2015

Sea Otter 2015
Ti bolts are used in the seatpost head, which also houses the air valve for the return spring.

Sea Otter 2015
The thumb remote doesn't take up much room on the bar, and even has small dimples for extra traction.
9 Point 8 Fall Line dropper post
A look at the Fall Line's internals.



Be sure to check out all of our Sea Otter Classic images in this gallery.




62 Comments

  • + 32
 I know many long femur'd riders would love a 155-160 option! especially when riding in places like laguna where its steep both ways.
  • - 25
flag Teebird117 (Apr 18, 2015 at 16:07) (Below Threshold)
 Oh, you want to do Stairsteps? Have fun hiking the entire way back up in clippless shoes while burning because of California's love of droughts.
  • + 10
 I sat my eyes on one of these bad boys enduro-mtb.com/en/vecnum-moveloc 140 170 or 200mm of travel, light weight, german engineering
  • + 2
 @quebracho, And its black, sik!
  • + 9
 i like how german engineering is a seller, but nobody ever says american enineering... =[
  • + 4
 All these dropper posts being made, and no carbon option. Surely reducing the weight is something people are looking into?
  • + 2
 @moth423, what did you use to type that comment? IPhone, pc..? Lol
  • + 2
 doesn't ks have a carbon?
  • + 4
 @moth423 by "American engineering", I assume you mean marketing bullshit for those a*sholes convinced that America is the greatest country in the world.
  • + 0
 I am from the United States IN America, and that is the best comment I have ever seen.
  • + 4
 'MURICA I hope you still keep us under your military protection shroud tho hehe.
  • + 3
 @jrocksdh its a droid, lol. Also murica for the win! Haha.
  • - 11
flag zede (Apr 19, 2015 at 10:05) (Below Threshold)
 I you need more than 100mm, you should think about the way you ride (and get some serious mtb lesson). xc racers are able to descend everything without dropper post (probably faster than you btw).
Basically, 50mm dropper post is sufficient to put your ass behind the saddle, 100mm is for extra comfort or for big guys.
  • + 1
 My bike fits me and rides well. I only droo my reverb 100 mm most of the time. I am only 6ft1 though.
  • + 4
 @zede, riding styles, bike geometry, seat tube angle, exposed post, weight penalties, should I keep going? Take a class on not being conceited. I ride a 125 cuz if it gets really sketchy, I want to drop the seat all the way. Also lowers your overall center of gravity. Also good for fat biking in snow, you can change weight distribution and traction. Its cool.
  • + 24
 Sweet! A mechanical dropper post that dosent look like it's from 1997 (Gravity Dropper).
  • + 24
 Think of a Gravity Dropper as being like an AK47, ugly, simple enough inside that anyone can take one apart and put it back together again, reliable enough that it will work every time you pull the trigger.
.
Besides, you don't look down at your crotch when you're riding, so who cares what the seat post looks like?
  • + 7
 Ya never know...some people might
  • + 56
 I assume other people look at my crotch while I'm riding so my seat post has to look great.
  • - 8
flag pencil-sr (Apr 18, 2015 at 16:18) (Below Threshold)
 @Fix-the-spade I guess you haven't ever shot an AK47, they aren't that reliable at all. That's why they are so easy to take apart, so you can fix them after every few shots. haha
  • + 4
 @pencil-sr, dont know why you got neg propped, AK's suck. if they are so good why does our military continue to spend millions of dollars on weapon development? certainly not because the russians in the 1940's had it all figured out?
  • + 3
 @pencil-sr I don't know how reliable AKs are but I'm sure that it wouldn't look good if all of our troops were using Russian guns.
  • + 3
 They spend millions on weapon development because if they didn't, they'd get less money next year. Same as any business.
  • + 5
 @mikekazimer we're do you think this post ranks out of ..lets say the Thompson, Lev & Rock Shox ?

Love the fact it's a local ( Ontario ) company but have not had the chance to ride one yet.
  • + 6
 I haven't spent any time on it yet, so I can't say for sure, but first impressions are that the build quality matches that of the bigger names in the industry. We have one on the way for review - stay tuned.
  • + 6
 Hopefully it's not "pre-production". Wink
  • + 4
 I had given up on dropper posts due to durability. I was hesitant after watching various dropper posts fail on rides, and when I finally gave in and tried one (Reverb) it lasted only three rides before it was f*cked.

I bought the 9point8 Pulse seatpost a couple of years ago and I can tell you it is BOMBER. I'm definitely not worried about breaking it. I love the post, for me the downsides are weight (although this new post is much lighter) and the fact that both of their remotes are awkward. I run older Saint brakes and I can't find a good position for either style of remote and they take a LOT of pressure to activate the post. Still, those are fairly minor compared to having a reliable post.
  • + 3
 i have used a demo pulse supplied to me by steven at 9point8. and i loved it. my firebird will be getting one. KS reliability absolutely sucks. talking with my old local shop in colorado, tommy is expensive, and expensive to rebuild. talking with my current shop the 9point8's are bombproof............ so yes, i am sold on the 9point8. great people. cool product.
  • + 1
 I have had my Ks fail once and I've never seen a Ks supernatural fail. Only the Lev . I gotta hand it to Ks. American made, and a great smooth feeling post. We are lucky that rock shox has the dollars to support so many warranty claims, but remember Ks only does posts and coils. Pretty impressive that they fix ur post and everyone else's in 3-4 weeks, without just shipping you a new one.
  • + 1
 umm, moth, are you certain the ks US made? i'm almost certain that they are asian.

i've had 3 failures on 2 posts from them. like i said, the reliability sucks. and i can't recommend them to anyone, nor would i have got a 2nd one by choice. it came on a bike i bought used. that's not a great track record. the best thing about KS is the actuator, being a grip clamp, and small and discreet it's the best part. but you don't buy a car with a blown up engine just because you like the steering wheel diameter.
  • + 1
 Probably wouldn't buy a car with high miles and complain about its reliability either. And I only assumed they are us made because of the whole "Ks USA" thing they have all over the box... Wait... You bought it used...
  • + 2
 i said 1 came used....i bought my lev new, and if you look at the destruction manual, you will notice the company is asian. it also failed with less than 50 miles on it. if you had better luck, great, awesome, good for you. like i said, 2 posts, 3 failures. not a great track record. i will admit the one that came used, sure, no idea the history, but it also isn't the lev, no idea which model, i gave it away.......... 9point8 is local to me, i was at the shop friday. and yes, far fewer out there, so the real test on reliability has really yet to be proven, but 2 local shops speak VERY highly of them. my time on the pulse was great. so to answer the original post question, i have a VERY hard time to believe that the 9point8 will be less reliable than the tommy and the KS. the downfall of the pulse, was weight, they are a touch heavier than the competition.
  • + 4
 since *IT* was purchased. my bad
  • + 3
 looks like a great set up. we'll see how they hold up durability wise, hope there aren't any issues
  • + 3
 Mexhanical design ensures nothing - Specialized command post requires seeing a mechanic as often as other posts
  • + 3
 I guess other posts are super reliable too then, my command post hasn't seen the inside of a LBS since I was purchased three years ago, but I'm handy enough to swap out the actuator cable so maybe that's where we're different
  • + 3
 Uh id' have to agree with squishybikes mine has had one service in the 2 years it's been going,and servicing the command post is easy.
  • + 9
 You were purchased 3 years ago?
  • + 6
 You know, he's a specialized bike. Probably with a BRAIN rear shock. I guess we weren't aware of how capable they are...
  • + 2
 You guys wanna see my specialized brain...
  • + 2
 moth423 - I bet you run it on auto sag
  • + 2
 always. My dampener is huge. hahaha
  • + 1
 Dear 9point8, tall rider here. Please make the 200 mm dropper, I will buy it.
  • + 1
 what post is good? i have had three and all have lasted just a few weeks, im on reverb now but its broken
  • + 1
 I want a modern 27.2 sized dropper that won't cost me my first born child. Guess its Gravity Dropper or nothing.
  • + 4
 The X-Fusion Hilo 100 comes in 27.2mm, and it's $199 which is cheaper than the Gravity Dropper. It only comes in 100mm, but that seems like a pretty sweet option.
  • + 2
 x fusion also makes a 27.2 about $200.
  • - 7
flag larryssman7 (Apr 18, 2015 at 21:12) (Below Threshold)
 But it's an X-Fusion....
  • + 1
 Get a Ks. Supernatural are pretty cheap
  • + 1
 I have an X-Fusion O2 so I am not against purchasing the Hilo, but only the original comes in 27.2. Apparently the SL update is quite a bit better, and has more travel (important because most of my height is in my legs). Still considering it, but the $:durability ratio is a lot less competitive.

I hear the GD is stupid simple to maintain, so could I run it without the boot and just service it more frequently? Function should always come before form, but that boot is just so damn ugly.
  • + 1
 Satori Sorata (aka RSP Plummet in the UK). £80. Simple. Bombproof. Works. Ugly as sin.
  • + 1
 Looks like a winner 30.9 with 150mm of drop and I might assume lifetime warranty as well! 1 please.
  • + 1
 The giant contact post is pretty reliable
  • + 1
 Lolbawesome
  • - 1
 Good luck getting to that air valve!
  • + 11
 It's not something you'd need to adjust very often - seat posts are more of a set and forget type item compared to a shock.
  • + 4
 @savage47, that's where the reverb stealth and LEV integra valves are as well. I've had both and @mikekazimer is right, it's not adjusted much.
  • + 4
 Loosen the lever on the bars to create slack in the line, pull the post further out of seat tube, inflate if required and reverse the previous procedure. I stood in an lbs this morning and watched a client come in on a very expensive and high end mtb and ask the lbs saleman if he could adjust his grip by loosening and rotating it a bit. .......Please don't be that kind of guy, figure out how things work or make a plan to make it work.
  • + 2
 Actually, the design of the head clamps the saddle rail using the bolts on the side. By simply loosening one side you can flip the saddle up for instant access to the valve without altering the saddle configuration. This truly is an extremely well designed and thought out product!
  • + 1
 Sorry rubi, wanted to give youpositive props but clicked negative by accident on the cell phone s small screen
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