Cam Zink's Big Move

Feb 2, 2014
by Mike Levy  
 
You must login to Pinkbike.
Don't have an account? Sign up

Join Pinkbike  Login
Cam Zink with his YT Original photo by Dan Severson

Cam Zink doesn't do half measures. In a sport where immense skill is often mistaken for a rider simply having gonads the size of watermelons, and where ''going big'' is the rule rather than the exception, Cam can lay claim to both calling out and pulling off some of the largest moves ever seen. That approach to riding might have made him one of the most visible mountain bikers in recent memory, and unlike some of the crash filled blooper television shows that see the general public tuning in to solely for the carnage, Zink's widespread media presence can't be put down to toe curling wrecks. No, he's landing moves that are making the general public take notice, and remember that these are the very same people who have been desensitized to feats of human courage from watching things like freestyle motocross and fifteen year old news clips of Bender carcassing off of retaining walls. That's not to take anything away from other sports, or Bender's efforts to shove the preconceived limits of what's possible on a mountain bike straight off of a cliff, but it's clear that the newly signed YT Industries rider from Reno, Nevada, is one of the few current riders in a field of amazing athletes who is legitimately changing the game. Who else has the balls to call out a move like flipping the Oakley Sender, have a special kicker made for the event, and then stomp it so cleanly that it may have well been any other Sunday and on a jump in his backyard? The answer: no one but Zink.
bigquotesEvery day there is something that inspires me, but it's not always in mountain biking. The level we are trying to progress to and the things we're doing obviously haven't been done, so you have to look for motivation elsewhere, like snowboarding or moto. With that said, there is a hell of a lot that is being done on a mountain bike that gets me stoked to ride, even if I couldn't care less about doing a triple whip. I see T-Mac and Brandon doing opposite double whips and it stokes me out to go do a holy grab or something. I don't care about certain tricks, but when people are riding at a level that high, it motivates you to up your game in whatever style you care about.


0% Loaded prev 1/15 next
.

Asking the man who has done things like backflip the 'Bender Sender' for the Casio G-Shock ad, spinning the original Oakley drop twice (the second time came after a huge crash on the first attempt) and, more recently, backflipping an ever larger version of the same drop, the feat he's most proud of reveals a more relaxed psyche than one might expect to find. ''It's just the next chapter, right? Seeking out all the opportunities you can, wherever you are,'' says Zink. ''All of them were hard in their own ways, but spinning the original Oakley drop was definitely the hardest. Anyone who has spun a DH bike knows how hard it is, and to do one of that size is kind of ridiculous. I would rather have spun it on a slope bike, and it might have been easier, but the landing on the DH bike definitely helped; my suspension was so dialed.'' Anyone who has struggled to ride off of an unfamiliar drop or jump knows full well that there is more to it than having the right technique, with the battle you have to fight inside your head sometimes being the biggest obstacle to overcome in the name of progression. ''As far as mentally hard, the most recent one was the hardest,'' Zink explained without pause. ''With all the other things aside, the baby, my infected hematoma in my groin and massive amounts of blood that drained into my leg, and the wind, it was the most dangerous thing that I've ever done. Sometimes you don't realize how gnarly it is until after because you just want to focus and make it happen, but I had friends of mine telling me to not do it. Afterwards, I know of at least ten badass, grown men who cried.''

The obvious question on many people's minds after the seeing what went down at the latest Red Bull Rampage was just how much bigger can things get? And do we even want to see these riders going any bigger? People are injured everyday on their mountain bike, it's just part of the sport, but it's surely only a matter of time until the unthinkable happens during a live internet feed given that the gaps are growing, take offs are being placed higher and higher, and riders like Zink are redefining what's expected from our two-wheeled heros. ''Things are about as big as they can be, but it's mainly because it's so hard to find stuff that lines up that well,'' he told us. Don't take that as Zink backing down, though, because he's never been shy about being the guy to commit to hitting something. ''If we find something bigger and it lines up, we will hit it. And I've always said that if you can jump it, you can flip it. It's just a matter of finding it.''

It's certainly not surprising to find that one of the sport's most respected freeriders is confident that bigger moves can and will be done, so long as the jump and landing makes sense, but Cam's nonchalant attitude on the subject probably goes in contrast to what you might expect to find from someone at the forefront of the sport. One topic that does get him going, however, is what him and his fellow riders are getting paid. Sure, there are a few who are likely raking in healthy six-figure numbers, but the very large majority of his brethren see a pay scale that doesn't quite balance out the dangers involved with their chosen profession. It goes without saying that none of these guys are in it for the paycheck, but shouldn't their earnings compensate for the effort and risk involved?

bigquotesPay is what it is and you can't complain about something that you don't do anything to change. Everybody just complains about being underpaid, but doesn't do anything about it. We are underpaid for the risks we take and the coverage we get, but who can afford to pay us more? A lot of companies are barely able to stay afloat. Outside industry sponsors are coming in to help fund the madness and create progressive, amazing things, but the other industry companies still pinch pennies. A lot of them simply can't afford it, and some of them just don't think the riders deserve it. Well, they get what they pay for. The thing that grinds my gears the most is contest money. Some contests can't afford it, but if the prize purse isn't up to par in snowboarding or skateboarding, people just don't show up. Look at Rampage where the winner gets around $20,000. Not much to complain about, right? The 3D crew was rumored to be making $500,000 in 2010... Any filmer at Rampage is making more for the weekend than 4th place and below. We couldn't have Rampage without filmers, but we obviously couldn't have it without the riders. If you make the finals in a freestyle moto contest, aka if you show up, you usually get paid around $1,000 - $5,000. At our contests you get nothing outside the top ten, besides X Games which we don't have any more. Rampage gets more coverage than street league skateboarding in my opinion, and the winner of a street league contest gets $100,000... six times per year and $200,000 for the championship! I am grateful for what we have in this amazing sport, but it just sucks to have all this money around the contests and have the prize purse always comprised of whatever is left over after everyone else is paid because they just don't show up if they aren't paid their going rate. We are paid far below our potential and other sports.


YT riders
bigquotesSome people enjoy questioning my loyalty rather than the brand's. As if there is no way a bike company would drop a rider? The idea of brand loyalty is a bit of a pipe dream and a false sense of security. If you aren't performing, most companies will drop you on your ass. Even if you are performing, they might just let you go after you buy your first home and not tell you until after Interbike when everyone's budgets are all closed. I really FELT that one...With all that said, there are some great brands in this world that will stick by you through the ups and downs. I absolutely love riding for Troy Lee Designs, Oakley, SRAM, Deity, SDG, Monster, and obviously Sensus. I have very close personal relationships with many people in each of those companies and they are like family. They will go above and beyond for me and my family, and they know I will do the same. This is what I want in a frame sponsor.

You might expect a rider of Zink's caliber to be on a long term lockdown when it comes to a major bike sponsor, but that hasn't been the case in his past. Yes, he has sponsors who have been with him for the long haul, through injuries and other setbacks, including Oakley for twelve years now, SRAM for ten, Troy Lee Designs for nine, Deity for eight, SDG for seven, and four with Monster, but it's not a stretch to say that Cam has moved between frame sponsors faster than many of his peers. Why hasn't he found a long term frame sponsor to call home? ''I have left some, and others have left me,'' he says without any of the mincing of words that we often hear from riders on the subject. ''I have always enjoyed where I was with all the sponsors, and I wouldn't take a paycheck to ride a product that I didn't want to ride... at the time. There have been a few companies that have good people working for them, with a solid image, and they make promises to make new bikes or whatever and it just falls through. There are times when a company promises to pay you, in writing, in a contract, and that falls through, too...'' That last point might not be the end of the world when you're a fresh faced teen who's trying to make a name for himself, but he's long past that stage. Cam the home owner, Cam the entrepreneur, and now Cam the new father, simply can't be in it for the love of the game anymore - love doesn't pay the bills, and equipment troubles make that hard to do as well.

Cam is optimistic despite past setbacks, though: ''I have only been with YT for a month now, but I have a very high respect for the way they do business and their loyalty to riders like Andreu. They get me and we see eye to eye on what mountain biking is and what it can be. They realize that a brand is a living, breathing thing and people associated with it must live the brand. It just so happens we have the same opinions on what is wrong with the mountain bike industry and they have the power to change it! It's a perfect fit, and I can see myself being with them for the next ten years or more.'' Strong words from a rider who isn't afraid to call it as he sees it.

So, has Cam found a place to call his home at YT Industries? He certainly does seem like a good fit, with the pairing of Cam with Andreu Lacondeguy, another hard charging rider known for his all-or-nothing approach, likely to lead to some exciting times. YT Industries has embraced Lacondeguy's somewhat controversial persona, a fact that means Zink might feel more at home than he has with some of the more subdued North American companies, and if Zink's signing is any indication, we can expect to see their bikes on our shores in the near future. For his part, Cam seems to be excited to be involved with a brand that fits his image: ''The new bikes that you haven't seen yet are unbelievable. That, and the vulgar advertising that they aren't shy about. I don't know if people will be as accepting of their company slogan here on a predominantly English speaking continent, but 'f*cking good times' is what I am all about, too. ''If good times for Cam means throwing down massive moves on the center stage, and some stability when it comes to a bike sponsor, we're all for it.



Cam Zink and his YT Tues. Photo by Dan Severson.

Zink's YT Industries Tues downhill bike may be a new sight for some North American readers, but the brand has a strong presence in Europe thanks to their direct-to-customer online sales via their website. This approach is something that isn't as popular on our side of the Atlantic, but it has allowed YT Industries to offer their bikes at some very competitive prices. The 208mm travel Tues has garnered most of the attention, with the aluminum framed bike said to offer some impressive bang for your buck performance that puts some of the more boutique brands to shame. We'll be testing that claim ourselves soon, and are eager to see how the design's 'Virtual Four Link Chain Stays Kinematics' rear suspension functions.
Details

• Production aluminum frame
• Rear wheel travel: 208mm
• RockShox BoXXer BlackBox fork
• RockShox Vivid R2C shock
• Novatec Demon wheels
• Kenda tires
• Deity handlebar and stem
bigquotesI am pretty picky with my bikes. I put every titanium bolt on I can, and I keep it as quiet and dialled as possible all year long. My biggest needs, besides short chain stays, are in the shock and brake department. People get on my bike and think my brakes are broken - I run my hand on the outside of the bars and my levers the reach adjustment set as close as possible. They pull almost to the bar, so if you were to grip on the inside it would hit your middle finger's knuckle. My shock has to be extremely progressive but not mucho stiff. I have been working with RockShox for the last six years, (mainly with Jimmy Donahugh) to tune my slope bike and DH shock to the masterpiece that it now is. The latest one for Rampage, the "Zink Life Saver Tune" is unbelievable. It still tracks like a DH bike should but ramps up when I need it to. You will never feel it bottom out, but it does and I use all the travel. I feel like I can jump anything with it. Thanks Jimmy!


Cam Zink and his YT Tues. Photo by Dan Severson.
Cam Zink and his YT Tues. Photo by Dan Severson.
Cam Zink and his YT Tues. Photo by Dan Severson.


www.yt-industries.com
Must Read This Week

147 Comments

  • + 113
 Sweet write up, glad to hear that Zink's happy about his move. PS...can I have a zink lifesaver tune? Or maybe even a noobhackterriblerider tune? Wink

On a more serious note, there IS too much money floating around in the bike industry to not pay our top athletes. And that goes for XC, Enduro, DH, slopestyle...everything. These are the people who push the boundaries of the sport, in our case going faster and higher, more stylishly, than anyone else. Zink is a dad who has a family to feed, it's the least that a massive bike company can do to keep him on the payroll and with fresh stuff while he's out there risking his life. Doesn't sound like he's being greedy at all, it's honestly a pretty realistic requirement of your sponsors. Mini rant over...
  • - 65
flag tdoyle1995 (Feb 2, 2014 at 17:40) (Below Threshold)
 I dont think the top riders are really starving, and just scraping by..Sure they dont make huge football player salaries but they get paid a reasonable amount to ride thier bike for a living and basicly have fun everyday
  • + 19
 I don't have any educated idea of how much they make...I'm also not saying that they need a football player's salary. But it seemed to be insinuated in the article that the last frame sponsor dropped him rather unexpectedly, which is not good at all.
  • + 52
 You think thats bad, the money float around in football(soccer!) over in England and Europe is disgraceful. In the premiership which would be the British soccers version of the NFL or the NBA the top 30 or so players earn about 200'000-300'000 PER WEEK!!! Not a misprint. (they also get more on top of that if they score or assist in scoring a goal)
They dont have to pay for travel expenses to and from games and accommodation when on tour or anything like that all paid by the club.

To think that if every professional player gave up one weeks wages they could clear the debt of nearly every regular family in the country is disgusting, or provide food for millions of children who are starving worldwide.

Now some do charity work and donate money, but usually just a small percentage.
  • + 8
 I'm putting this here just so people see it and it's a bit off topic but... did anyone notice the insert about payout at the X-Games, which we don't have anymore? Does that mean since half the riders didn't feel like riding at all that slope is no longer an event at the X-Games? It wouldn't surprise me but it'd piss me off knowing that the decision was made because that reason... just because riders like Zink and all the pioneers put their lives on the line to progress this sport (albeit their intentions are most likely not superficial like being an X-Games event) only to have a few overly cautious and/or/apparently less passionate riders piss away an incredible opportunity.

Those were my thoughts, it's off topic so please don't turn it into a discussion about that especially on an impressive interview about Zink. I just wanna know if X-Games has given mtbing the boot and it'd be tight to hear some of the rider's honest opinions about that.
  • + 14
 I know Tdoyle1995 got neg. propped for his comment bad but he's onto something. Nobody is demanding Zink to progress the sport, nobody is demanding any of these guys to progress the sport. If it weren't them, they'd be missing something huge in their life. At 18 years old, like myself, they could be grinding in the library with Calculus, Chemistry, Physics, much like I am just to become a mechanical engineer. Having gigantic student loans that I'll have to pay off once I graduate. I don't know if ya'll remember, but back in the movie "Roam" Stevie Smith was quoted saying "Yeah it's definitely a huge motivation - to get to ride my bike for a living instead of work in an office". Let us all not forget, many of us are riding bikes for the love of it - I play college football for Washington State University and it's nowhere near as fun as it simply was in high school, not even close. Zink gets to do what we all love! More importantly make enough of a living to live comfortable, I know many people without jobs or work jobs that barely scrape by to put the cheapest gear on their bike just to get from day to day to ride - because they love riding.

Now with that said, yes there needs to be balance in action sports salary's. I would love to see skaters, motos, snowboarders either brought down or bikers brought up in pay. Riders are promoting products for companies much like actor's in commercials. Their cut of the profit needs to be higher. On the contrary, they're making livings off of our passion and joy, much like Stevie Smith said. So let's not turn biking into a business, but business is still business and they do deserve a larger cut and better treatment.
  • + 23
 these guys deserve WAY more than any "professional athlete".. they put their lives on the line literally, and should be well payed for it. I would rather watch crankworks or rampage than ANY lame ass team based overpayed mainstream sports Circus..
  • - 14
flag parkourfan (Feb 2, 2014 at 20:10) (Below Threshold)
 I wouldn't go that far...plenty of these "professional athlete"s, while overpaid, imo, are putting their lives on the line. Plenty of injuries in football, soccer (heh) etc. However, if it's a football related injury, they often get to keep their money.

Ditto on the crankworx/rampage thing though Big Grin
  • + 4
 They'll never make more than an NFL player, a soccer player, or rugby player in Europe for example. Simply because the amount of money in those sports opposed to the amount of money in biking. And most bike companies revenue are not only from the riders, it's from their products, opposed to a football player (just for example) all the revenue is based off of their action. In addition, to say (I go back to football because that's my experience, but there are other sports) a football player doesn't put his life on the line. I would argue it's very much more so than a biker, you try strapping on a helmet against future NFL stars. I did, I ended up with several dislocated shoulders, concussions, and much more, including a few surgeries along the way. Regardless, the amount a person puts his life on the line shouldn't judge the paycheck, it's respectable, no doubt. The paycheck is generated from the revenue of a company in correlation with the athlete - bikers, with my little knowledge of the industry but from Zink's interview, do deserve more.
  • + 2
 Freerideguy since you play for wsu next year when you play osu you should drag a bike down to Corvallis. Ill drag you out to black rock on Sunday if that's even a possibility!
  • + 0
 Haha if I wasn't on a schedule that doesn't even have 5 minutes to spare - I'd absolutely agree to that! Going to be trying to get to a few Oregon Enduro's this summer though!
  • + 1
 Freerideguy14: the thing is, if they didn't progress the sport, we all would ride a Stinky at best and the gnar would be a one meter drop. It's the people who push it beyond retarded, where the younger of us will eventually get and give the sport another push in the direction they do. The industry needs such people to keep it moving, and keep the money coming in to spend it on progression.

That said, does he have to do it? No, he doesn't, but if he gets the regular pay of a grocery clerk, he'll perhaps be able to pay for living. But do you often see a grocery clerk risk his life for the job he does? There's always a possibility that sh*t will hit the fan, and then there's (especially in the famous 'Merica) them medical bills, inability to ride=work for a significant while. It's a high-risk employment, and it should be rewarded as such.

On an off-topic note, look at football. They risk breaking their hairstyle once in a while, and they get paid ridiculous money. It perhaps takes skill to be good at football too (talking the actual football that you play with feet here, because it's football right? Yes, I'm european), but the risk right up there with the grocery clerk, level of commitment doubtfully as high as the top riders in our sport (not saying there's none, although I find football sexually confused to be kind), and the pay is ridiculous. And the TV coverage it gets, considering it's way below entertainment level of watching a whole lot other sports I'm not into either.
  • + 3
 Tdoyle1995, What a lot of people need to realize is that once you turn pro, it's actually like having two jobs (unless your a hotshot with the extra cash for an agent). A lot professionals that had a desk job before taking the plunge spend just as much time at a desk as they did when they were in a cube. Except now, instead of promoting a company or analyzing spreadsheets, they're spending 8 hours a day trying to come up with ways to promote themselves as a brand using Blogger, Twitter, Facebook, etc. or editing film to send off to try to get the attention of a potential sponsor. The fun kinda goes out of it then. If you have a passion, you should pursue it, but you need to be a realist when analyzing your chances of making it.

That being said, I spent two years of my life (albeit in high school, when I didn't have bills and such) trying to make it as a semi-pro triathlete. I didn't make it, but I had one helluva a fun time meeting new people, traveling the country, and having a blast racing.
  • + 3
 " x games but we dont have that anymore " whaaat since when?
  • + 0
 MrDuck: See the thing is, I feel we'd progress the sport as is, who says they need to do it? Yes they do but I didn't necessarily progress to my level because of them. I progressed to my level because of my inner competitor inside me, competing with friends to do the bigger drop, or cooler jump or what not. Then seeing some non professional at Whistler do a line I've never imagined and thought "shit i'll try that".

A grocery clerk doesn't risk his life, but a grocery clerk doesn't get to travel the world to ride in cool places. Let us not venture too far away from this point, he's riding bikes making a grocery clerk's pay (if not more, i'm not sure what they make). Once again, are non professionals risking their lives riding? Absolutely, are they progressing the sport? Absolutely. He's taking all of our hobbies and making it a living. A high risk employment is such of a coal worker (or something dangerous I can't think of requiring labor). That demands more pay because the job demands more. He wasn't demanded to risk his life, none of us ripping down A-line in the summer were asked to risk our lives, we simply do it for the love. He's very lucky to make a living out of that, once again, much like Stevie Smith said.

On a final note, as a current student of a Mechanical Engineer (any others out there will agree), the amount of studying and school work that goes into it is crazy. Of course it's high reward. It's quite simple, if you don't like your job, well work a little harder. Let us not forget once again, he's riding bikes for a living. Any engineers out there will agree with me, as students we're busting our asses for high rewarding jobs, you get out of it what you put into it. Simple equation. Now with that all said, yes as a promoter of large companies they likely do deserve larger pay cuts of the profits. And most definitely deserve respectful treatment from their sponsors.
  • + 2
 You sure make valid points there, but I believe the point is actually is that these guys have it as their job, we have it as our hobbies. Would we want to be paid for riding? Most of us probably would, but I myself am not good enough, not even remotely close, yet I think I can ride somewhat well. When Stevie said he's lucky to make a living out of that, sure, that's awesome. He's got what it takes, and I do think he should be well rewarded.

Obviously we do risk our lives. We don't have to backflip a 20m drop to risk, and with their levels of confidence it's probably about as dangerous as myself hitting some of the (mental yet awesome) Shore trails, but for us it's a hobby, for them it's a job. I also have a quite rewarding job, I'm a software developer, and it took me well over 10 years to learn what I'm doing now (and I'm still a scrub), but I'm not one for the 100 best in the world. In anything. Well I was close to that in World of Warcraft but that's not something I want as a job Smile If I was one of the 100 best though, and had the luck to put that in a good use, 'cos that sure does matter a big deal too, I'd better get paid quite well, so why shouldn't that apply to the biker.
  • + 1
 There are perks in most jobs, the biker gets to travel the world, I get a flexible schedule and workplace, and pretty much all the jobs that take some skill have something. It is just making a living out of what you like to do, and it's the right thing to do. Except there's a much bigger market for developers, than there's for bikers, but it's still a job, and if you're one of the best, even if you're not in top 10 on Rampage or WC, but good enough to have what it takes to do it, you should get the reward.

Sure, there's not as much money in the bike industry as in others, I mean, road cycling has a whole lot more money to pay the pros. But the biker is more like an actor than a clerk, there are people playing shows in a small theatre for fun as their hobby, and there's this Dicaprio guy making millions. He's got what it takes (I guess, not really into that business, but I read about it on 9gag)
  • + 6
 The issue is that the majority of people who follow football / soccer have no concept of what it's really like to leave the safety of your front room or car. They have no interest in getting into mountain biking, and in a way I prefer it like that. Imagine if your local trail was like a city high street at Christmas.

No thanks.

Less interest = less cash = less idiots on the trails.

You can't have it all unfortunately.
  • + 2
 I think the X-games deal has to do with the cancellation of the "Global X-games" thing they did last year where they had multiple events all over the world. They announced in the fall that they were cutting it back to just the 2 US events, winter and summer. And along with that the summer x-games is moving to Austin Texas, which I don't believe would have the ability to hold any kind of slope style MTB event.
  • + 0
 Very true, I mean a free bike with top components, air travel and shipping fees, race entry, all that paid for they should still get a good salary. I'm not saying they need 7 million a year like most NHL players but at least $750,000 plus **ALL** medical bills paid.
  • + 3
 750,000 is a fuck ton of money...
  • + 1
 Yea seriously. $750K is a HUGE salary. And most NHL players don't make anything near $7M a year. A $7M a year salary in the NHL would put a player firmly in the top 25 highest paid players in the league. That's a top salary.
  • + 2
 It is important to remember why athletes receive the pay they do. A football player does not receive the pay they get because of their talent on the field, it is their ability to attract advertising dollars. That is how pay is doled out. Mountain bikers, whether they are risking injury or not, simply do not have the same commercial value. I don't imagine there are too many MTB fans out there who do not actually ride themselves, unlike other sports.
  • + 2
 That's great that you would rather watch rampage and so would I but rampage is a drop in the bucket compared to professional ball games. That means it brings in WAY less money, and less money to go to the riders, plain and simple. What's really f##ed up is that the camera crew makes more money than any rider under 4th place and that's the bigger issue. The little money that these even bring in is not divided the way it should.
  • + 1
 Are you real? Stevie smiths quote is "to ride my bike for a living" when he said that he.was probably your age so, just like Zink says in the article, all he wanted was to get his name out. Now he is one of the top riders in the world and gets paid accordingly and that is because he is pushing the limits and the sport, that's how he can make a decent living. If he didn't push himself to the absolute limit and only get mediocre scores he would probably only scrape by. And he doesn't have a family! Most of the riders start as kids but they all grow up and become responsible for people other than themselves. They need to make more money.
  • + 1
 Cam Zink has a wife and kid, that's a family....unless you refer to Stevie.....
  • + 2
 I agree with almost everything you said. Football players get paid retarded amounts of money. But football players get hurt on a regular basis, sometimes it multiple concussions and sometimes its life changing injuries. So lets give them a little more credit.
  • + 1
 Yes I was talking about Stevie
  • + 0
 His quote had something to do with riding his bike for a living rather than working in an office. Remember - he took his hobby competitively and it's his job. It was his motivation, he gets to do something he loves for work rather than working in an office that many people don't love, which also requires likely more "busy work" to say that is more stressful and strenuous. Look man, simple fact of the matter is, they're still riding bikes for a living and competing in their field of passion. Sure they deserve to be treated better than just tools of the trade, much like any athlete, but with the exposure of biking and once again back to what their "jobs" are, which is riding a bicycle, if they want more money, there's always school and labor jobs...those people truly risk their lives in some jobs to just scrape by, and no they're absolutely not doing their hobby and passion.
  • + 1
 ^thank you, thats exactly what i was trying to say...
  • - 1
 I think that Cam should get paid for doing this interview. We all logged in and read it. We all saw the adds on this site. I doubt Pink Bike paid him. Mike Levy,do the right thing.
  • + 2
 Pay him. Really? Pinkbike is a free forum and biking site. They don't exactly have the funds to give Cam $$ unless we all are required to get plus memberships, and I like keeping it free...more people join.
  • + 3
 i would pay to watch rampage, i don't think i would pay to visit PB though. cam did get payd to do this interview.. its PR and its part of the job.
  • + 1
 Have you ever seen cool mountain bikers in a movie? or a commercial? No big money because there are no big players.
If you want the big pay cheque work at making your name a house hold name we all recognise.
Cam you deserve a bigger pay cheque. Think out side the box bro!
  • - 1
 @ tdoyle1995

Actually, a metric "f*ck ton of money" measured in $1usd, comes to $908,000. So $750,000 would be about 2/3 a 'f*ck ton'!
  • + 40
 WAIT YOU GUYS AREN'T WATCHING THE SUPERBOWL TOO?
  • + 14
 Nope
  • + 24
 I am, really struggling to see the appeal of the game, and trying to figure out how it works :L
  • + 5
 Broncos might be too high to function. This game has been pretty brutal for Denver.
  • + 12
 Im actually pretending to watch it with my family, while secretly going on pinkbike Big Grin
  • + 4
 Manchicken: Well i'm not gonna sit here and pretend football(American) is the most entertaining game ever, but that superbowl was the worst one and the worst example for a football game you could have watched. Dont judge based on that game. With that said, still not a big fan, rather watch mountain biking anyday.
  • + 11
 YT has a bike called the "Andreu Lacondeguy Signature Bike f*ck Yeah!" That is the actual name of a product of theirs. Football has nothing on mountain biking
  • + 5
 I have no excuse. I live in Seattle(well, 1 hr away) and I can hear people outside my closed sliding door screaming from other apartments and I'm still not watching it. I was looking up tire reviews. I don't dislike it.. I just never got into it for some reason. But 4am World Cup DH stream? I'm there...
  • + 7
 I stopped pretending to watch the game to pretend to do homework and keep a PB tab open. Like every other day...
  • + 12
 Manchicken, it's a bunch of hyped up, one play, stop, one play, stop, losers who get cocky over absolutely anything. My favorite part is that they (announcers and even press) call it a world championship aswell. What in the f*ck!?!? I don't see any other country in the world but America playing in the NATIONAL football league. But f*ck me it's a world championship, right?

f*cking clowns.

I'll stick to riding bikes, because football players need hero's too.
  • + 1
 What's the quoted estimate, 11 mins of play time per game? It's exciting if you're there, like many other sports. It's exciting to watch with a group of people who care about it (sometimes). But give me the world cup series for DH, and I'll watch that all day long...
  • + 14
 whats that Smile
I AM smoking a super bowl ..
  • + 4
 seahawks would be baked to hahaha both states its legal
  • + 3
 A super bowl, you say? Save some for me...
  • + 6
 Well clearly the seahawks can handle their shit. Haha
  • + 4
 Hey us in the great PNW are very good at handling our shit!
  • + 1
 Agreed. The one sport where a frame can be named after an epithet.

F*ck me, I love this stuff. And YT seems to have their head on straight, but we'll see. It would be nice to see companies pushing forward for their athletes.
  • + 3
 Is that some kind of oversized bowling?
  • + 9
 Guys, let's just hold on a bit with this SuperBowl / Soccer hate and get down to it, what makes those sports such freaking utter crap. That is a gajillion of losers, wankers on couches or in the pubs drinking beer and shouting advices at the TV. That is people who get overexcited over a sport they most likely don't practice themselves. People who are bypassing their need of experiencing their own success by watching others doing it and feeling as if miraculously they were part of it, numbing the hunger of doing with empathy. Fans think they are necessary because they drink beer and watch commercials, eventually even buy a product from them ("Hurricane Colon" laxative to move the burger, pizza and popcorn out of the system?) - what a great contribution - NOT! I am guilty of thinking such stupid pish as well and it is on "paper". I'm no hollier than thou, but still:

If we want to make the world a better place, if we want to make mountain biking a bit better sport and a bit less like Super Bowl, then let's stop getting too excited with the World Cup, Rampage, Crankworx. Let's do more, ride our bikes, do some workout, meet some friend we haven't seen a while - achieve something, I don't know, 100 sun salutations, 30 push ups, clean our bike, serice our fork, get anything done that moves us a bit forward towards being freaking happy with ourselves.
  • + 2
 haterz gonna hate
  • + 1
 These comments actually really make sense for this article. All I think about on Super Bowl Sunday is WHY? Why is Rampage not the biggest event in all of sports.
  • + 3
 Sithbike - because then it would be us sitting on the couch, drinking Monster Bud instead, shouting at our wives: "I thought i told you to shut up" and telling our kids that the order of values in life is: "The Team", "The league", "Gawd" "Two Trucks" "bacon" and then comes your mother eventually
  • + 2
 That was a shitty super bowl anyway
  • + 2
 Huge letdown.
  • + 1
 Bacon mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
  • + 1
 @ manchicken " I am, really struggling to see the appeal of the game, and trying to figure out how it works :L"

Once you figure it out, they're just going to add another rule or two and the confusion starts over.
  • + 18
 Professional athletes....Ridiculous how a football player is on the sideline right now not playing in the "F*CKING SUPERBOWL" because he has tightness in his back. Doesn't matter he is still gonna collect his paycheck..... Yet Zink is in the hospital with an infected hematoma days before "his Super Bowl" and still goes out and gives it all he has the next day putting it all on the line and does something amazing. True professional athlete right there.
  • + 17
 Thats not exactly fair. Football is a team sport. You don't think an injured player would want to be playing in the Super Bowl? Tightness in a guy's back might not sound like much, and it might not be, but its a team game. That player could and likely would gut it out if he could, but what's the cost to the team if he's not 100%, or if it makes him less able to do his job? He's no good to the team if he is ineffective. For the good of the team, the backup player who is 100% would be more effective.

That said, none of this is to take away from Zink of the other riders. These guys are completely badass. I'm just saying its not fair to put down the football players. Those guys on that level take quite a beating too.
  • + 5
 But that's what you seem to be missing -- a team can usually carry the weight of an injured athlete, while Zink either plays or loses the game. There is no between space, no paycheck, no record setting if he doesn't do his job. There is no bench sitting in professional biking. You're either in or you're out.
  • + 2
 ambatt: +1. I admit I'm a football/soccer hater, yet this is like saying Zink would get paid 'cos Andreu is riding instead. The whole team has to perform, and they get rated individually. In football they don't get paid as a team either, so these sports aren't actually comparable at all and what I wanted to say initially is invalid realising that.
  • + 1
 This just show who really love the sport if any of this guys road, xc, soccer or whatever make the same money as those riders, they would never ride or play, that's for sure!
  • + 1
 Both are professional athletes, Both get paid for producing results. Although football is a team sport, each player has their individual role. Zinks role is to compete. I would say you could compare them. Other than Zink won't make nearly as much a football player sitting on the bench because he has tightness in his back. Nor would zink sit at the bottom of rampage even though he would still probably get sponsor money... But I don't think money was Zinks first thought while riding at rampage. Yes being a professional athlete is their job and they do have to make money to support themselves and their families. But its still their lifelong passion and when a true athlete commits themselves 100% to something not much (including injures, and money) will stand in their way of their goals.
  • + 1
 Well, technically, the NFL is a non-profit, which means teams playing in the league are already getting paid simply for showing up via different channels, including sponsors, 'donors', team owners, TV networks, cities, states, etc. In fact, did you know that some teams are actually paid a base level by the city they're in to simply play there? Yeah... So... That's not usually how it works in MTB, except for few very select athletes. Okay, that's NEVER how it works in MTB, even with the Atherton crew. They're thrilled when they get mainstream media exposure. For footballers and baseballers and tennis players even golfers, their exposure level is measured on a weekly or daily basis, while their advertising level is actually ridiculously low. Most Americans (on average) can only name ten or twenty prolific NFL players, depending on who's embroiled in scandal at that point in time. So does being a football player with tons of exposure earn them tons of money? No. Their contribution to a team sport that is watched for entertainment while we're swamped in advertiser-propaganda is what gets those players paid. Let's be honest. Is playing the game well important? Sure. If you're a star player. But those linebackers sitting on the bench and still making more than your average heart surgeon? Nope. They're called 'backup' for a reason.
  • + 1
 My only point in all this was that you don't need to shit all over football players to make your points about how badass Cam Zink is. To me that's not fair. To make it as a professional athlete in any sport takes a tremendous amount of hard work, and in the case of football players, they take a tremendous beating along to the way too. Probably just as much as a mountain biker does. Watch some of the recent documentaries that have come out, like 'league of denial' about the long term health of former NFL players. These guys by and large are in terrible shape and many without health insurance. And risk? Yes Cam Zink takes risks when he backflips massive drops and puts his life on the line. But you think football players aren't doing the same? Look up the stories of Eric LeGrande, Mike Utley, Dennis Byrd see if their lives were changed by injuries sustained on the field.

So yes I get that mountain bikers are super tough, but they aren't the only tough athletes in the world. Thats my only point.

And a side point about the NFL and its non-profit status. Its a bit of a misconception that the NFL is not paying any taxes. They certainly are, they just pay them on a team level not on a league level. The 'NFL' itself is the non profit, meaning the league front offices. But all of the revenues the NFL generates are then split and pushed to the individual teams, and the teams then of course pay taxes on it, based on each teams own corporate structure, state jurisdiction etc. But you are right that some teams do received a hefty amount of tax subsidies from the local municipalities in order to keep them there.
  • + 20
 Ha, ha, ha! He FELT that one Wink
  • + 2
 He does them a favor by saying he liked all the frames he rode. I always thought his custom felt DH bikes looked ridiculious and thought to myself "I hope he's getting paid a bunch to ride that thing." Turns out it was quite the opposite.
  • + 2
 I laughed a bit at that one, too.

It's a shame as an athlete to stand behind a brand and pray you can be the difference for them, the ground-level guy (or gal) and then have the company just shit themselves, regardless of your level of commitment and passion and work.

I can't even begin to imagine how Zink feels over that stuff, especially with the history he has in bikes. Ugh.
  • + 5
 If you look at how much media the big sports get like Super bowl now, you almost have a whole country watching that. Then compare it with MTB, if the sport had more media coverage more money would be in the sport. Plus you would have more people buying stuff in the MTB world. If we would have that all the riders would get more paid, we also need more time to get bigger. The sport is still kinda new on the competion side. But thats what i like about this sport, its not like every other sport. Definitely not as big as many other sports, we bikers like stick together more. It becomes like your life style, we do it for the love of the sport. With time i think biking competion will get more money to the riders, but thats what i like about it. It is not a big sport that every singel persson know about and i kinda like it that way!
  • + 4
 Agree, With more publicity comes more money... I framtiden kommer det nog vara mycket större prissummor, tror inte alls det e långt kvar, sporten växer som fan
  • + 3
 I'll tell ya what, that Zink fella is a hell of a lot more talented than Peyton Manning. It makes me sick thinking of all the money and coverage that is involved in team sports when MTB requires so much more talent and is something everyone can be directly involved in. I just don't get how people would rather watch some balls being thrown around than grow some and go mobbin through nature, and hence, get a real appreciation and excitement for the talent when watching it.
  • + 3
 It's funny, the lads at my local bike shop recently ranted at length about companies like YT being bullsh*t because of their lack of professional rider input - they were adamant that their bikes were subpar because they were wholly CAD-generated, and simply didn't perform in the real world.

This was before Zink signed, but Lacondeguy was on board at this point, so this point is founded on shaky logic. Clearly, then, the actual issue they have is with direct sales brands - i.e. bikes that they're unable to stock in their shop, and I can understand why. The more popular this sales model becomes, the closer to extinction the LBS moves.
  • + 2
 gnarbar: The equation you are suggesting is that "trails" and the "MTB community" are inexorably linked to the existence of ans LBS. Well, if that were so, we should be able to see evidence of that were we to look. Are there any undergraduates on PB looking for a social science dissertation? Well, here's your chance people, a couple of hypothesis for anyone to try out "There is a causal link between the health of a local MTB community and the prior existence of an MTB based LBS" or "The development and health of an MTB trail system requires the prior existence of an LBS network".

Taking just one example from my neck of the woods the answer, admittedly upon only summary looking at the evidence, would seem to suggest that it has been the MTB community together with local landowners and local economic regeneration councils and authorities that are the king-pins of the trail development and maintenance here, certainly not the LBS. The LBS benefit because of that initially, they are not the root cause. Sure, they COULD be, should they wish to be, however, as we all know, suggesting that all LBS are the same is ridiculous.

So, therefore, is your argument that buying online makes someone part of the problem. Unless that is someone wishes to try out this hypothesis "The increase in online MTB sales has reduced the number and quality of MTB trail networks in areas where LBS have recently closed".
  • + 1
 Are there any good LBS in your area Dave? Ones that dig?
  • + 1
 "One's that dig"? I'm afraid to say mate that there aren't any I know of. It is the riders' groups that dig, including me when the family schedule allows!!!. Then though, those digs are exclusively done on land that the groups are leasing or renting to be able to do so...

If it weren't for the riders' groups, there would be no trail development around here unless the dedicated MTB ski-slopes or BMX parks put the money into their facilities. There is one guy (I'm sure you know of him... Ogawa-san) who runs a great bike shop who tries to organize events and rides out, but he's a one-man show, a great guy who I got my last frame from, so he has limited time to put into it. Nope, it is the riders around here who get things done, and would do with or without the existence of any LBS. The riders themselves often know as much about A, B or C as any one at the LBS too! Having said that there are people who rely on the LBS because they haven't got a clue!!!
  • + 2
 Well put on how these amazing athletes are not properly compensated for the risks they take. To add to that, it seems to me that they are not even properly supported at the events. These guys show up at a broadcasted event with one bike and a gear bag. I have seen top riders have to bow out due to a taco'd wheel in practice. Rheeder had to borrow a wheel to get a complete run in at the X-Games for God's sake! Give these guys what they deserve!
  • + 2
 For those who are already excited about the bike and can't wait for Pinkbike reviewing it, let's say Dirt Magazine considers it the best DH bike around, and not just in its (incredibly low) price category. Best DH bike. Never tried one though, but just the price/equipment ratio makes it incredibly appealing.
  • + 1
 How can people bitch about how much the pro athletes are getting paid while at the same time buying everything for the biggest discount they can find???

Mountain Biking is, fortunately, very much different than skateboarding, soccer, football, etc. The companies involved with those sell so much more product because the demand is so high, the markups are huge AND the costs of each item are so much lower than mountain bikes.

Right now mountain biking has so much supply and still relatively low demand- I've been into mt biking for over 20 years and I've never seen so many different brands out there. It's great for the consumer because one of the few ways left to attract buyers is through competitive pricing. It is certainly a mixed bag.
  • + 1
 its all about numbers. the average lazy American can grab a football and go out and play with friends in the yard or pig pen. its something they can relate to and enjoy on a personnel level! big corporate feeds on that!!! they cant however envision themselves grabbing a bike and hucking a flip. its too far fetched for a normal person. that's why its extreme sports not team sports. sure the sport is progressing and in a lot better place then 10 years ago but its growth is limited.
  • + 1
 I don't see anything wrong for leaving a frame brand, if they don't pay the right money. I think that if they are not paying you what you deserve, then they are the ones who are not loyal to there customers, and there rider.
That sad, I am very happy to have Cam with YT Industries since I own one my self Big Grin
  • + 1
 I think some of the hate on other sports is a bit unfair. It is much easier/cheaper to develop a love, talent, passion, opportunity for certain sports that are easier economically for a majority of kids fortunate to play in programs close to home. It is what is. You generate a lot of revenue when you sell tickets to fill seats. Road, mtb....it's literally all free for the spectator. So it puts the burden on the sponsor/athlete to risk it all. Can't grow without growing pains. Cam is doing what any professional athlete with a narrow window needs to do with a new family has to do.
  • + 1
 would it kill a few bike companies to have a decent consulting company come in and help them figure out a way to price that will allow them to pay for r&d, manufacturing and marketing?

zinc makes a very good point- whats up with skateboarders making 100k per event multiple times a year, but bikers making way less? i attribute this to a) being stubborn (I already know how to run my company) and b) being ignorant (lack of business acumen).

there is a ton of money out there, this industry is growing in a massive way. there's no reason to be cheaping out on our ambassadors of rad - they are a precious resource.
  • + 1
 Great to hear that 2014 is coming together. Keep killing it like you have been. Cliché but still, do what you love and the money will follow.
  • + 1
 I actually really FELT that Hyper was a yoyo (you only yolo once) brand...Carter and Zink out of there = no more Hyper crap!
  • + 3
 That bikes a beaut.
  • + 4
 indeed, that drivetrain is interesting though, derailleur in particular
  • + 8
 Nahh...Cam's the real beaut.
  • + 1
 wow, can't wait to see the new bikes. the current ones look pretty awesome.
  • + 1
 THE BEST RIDER OF THE WORL IS CAMERON ZINKKKKKKKKKKKK........................
  • + 2
 Cam Zink uses Nevegals, to all the naysayers.
  • + 1
 Yea, but he also rode a Hyper when they gave him one... (ps, I get hammered by a dude on Nevegals regularly. Just making fun)
  • + 3
 You let guys hammer you?
  • + 1
 Oops... good point. I'd better read my posts before Submitting. I deserved that ubuale!
  • + 1
 So who rides for Hyper now that Zink and EC have left?
And what's the story there?....
  • + 1
 Looking at their site it seems like they got out mountain bikes altogether.
  • + 2
 Sounds like Hyper just dropped him (and EC) like a sack of potatoes. Did they think that having Cam alone was going to make them a top 5 bike company overnight? Didn't seem like they had a long term plan for slow growth with all the competition.
  • + 1
 Not stoked on the factory direct... Not good for industry growth. Heathy industry = cheaper prices on all products.
  • + 3
 That isn't true.. If a job can be replaced, it should be. Doing so will get rid of market inefficiencies and make the industry grow.
  • - 5
flag gnarbar (Feb 2, 2014 at 19:06) (Below Threshold)
 inefficiencies, meaning bike shops?

yes let's shut down the bike shops. then who will support the trails, fix your broken crap that you bought online to save two bucks. allow you a sux day a week walk in advice service to help you out. CRC cannot do that for you

rider direct is a poor business model that does not relate to MTB in any way. we are grass roots, bike shops included. if you are not grass roots, you are PART of the PROBLEM and they'd is a hells lot if you out there not helping the industry with whining, being chespskates, and endless demands from bike shops who are facing numerous challenges to keep going. you think your certificate in Marketing or MBA (Maybe Best Avoided) informs you as a subject matter in things MTB. news; you are not, you are just gullible cannon fodder for bigger business that is trying to eat up all the small MTB fish

just because Mr Zink is hyping rider direct sales does not mean you have to be a dumb mindless SHEEPLE. can you not even see thru the sponsorship myth?

in ten years time YOU will be whining about the lack of bold shops. because YOU whined about paying three bucks more for a part or having to stump up for a ten buck installation fee

God bless the bike shops and all who spend money in them
  • + 6
 Oh yeah, those fond memories of poor little bike shops.
I remember that good old bikeshop in Leogang, Austria... I lost 2 of my chainring bolts and my chain flew off on the trail. After rolling my bike down to the shop the friendly guy had me pay 14$ for two USED (oh yeah, thats right... used) chainring bolts, because I couldn't find mine anymore. Think he paid tax money? Think again. No that money went straight into his own personal pocket. Love those bike shops.

Oh wait, no I don't because they suck you dry. Just because they know they can.
They know you'd do anything to go back on the trails and ride your bike for the rest of the day you've already paid. f*ckers.

How about learning to take care of the stuff you own for yourself? I don't need a shop for that. It's not the people who are responsible for bike shops to be at risk. It's them.
  • + 5
 Haven't bought a thing from the LBS for 6+ years. Buy online, cheaper, more options, better service. Then buy the tools and do your own work, bicycles are really simple once you have the correct tools.

Bike shops that focus on post sales service will always be in demand.
  • + 1
 I try to support lbs's but really don't like paying more money for something they have to order that will take a week or two to get in, that I can have in two or three days for usually quite a bit less. It's a lame deal for the shop's and I understand they need to make a buck and huge inventories are impossible to keep up with all the different brands but I just find it hard to justify paying a premium for the long wait times for a part I can get in a few days. Service is where I think they have to excel and the elitist attitude that I'm sure many of us have experienced can leave a bad taste in your mouth. I had a shock rebuilt this fall where I was happy with the experience on the whole it still took about 4 weeks for the damn thing to get fixed. If I had the tools and the suspension rebuilding knowledge (all other aspects of bike I find pretty easy) I would have gladly done it myself and probably had the parts in a few days.
  • + 1
 Gnarbar, even the most complicated bike parts are fairly easy to fix with all the required how-to knowledge available online. Bike trails are also, in my opinion, fun and rewarding to build. The only thing you need to build a trail is a shovel, pulaski, a solid lunch, and some time... not the support of your LBS. Furthermore, by learning how to fix your own components you will be able to restore many parts that you LBS cannot, simply because they can't perform jobs that pay less than what it costs them to do (eg: rebuilding a Sram trigger shifter, which due to the labour would cost far more than they could justify charging as a new shifter is relatively cheaper).

I refuse to pay a premium for products which have no benefit over the alternative just so someone can have a job. They can go out and get the skills needed for a job that doesn't require pity money.
  • + 2
 Time will tell if the rider direct model pays off or not, but one thing you can't do is blame the customer for wanting to seak out the best possible price. Question: How many LBS owners are out there buying on Amazon, New Egg, Walmart/Target, etc on a regular basis? Answer: all of them.
  • + 2
 you all need to take a step back. don't be so one-eyed. LBS are a gateway for noobs into the sport. a one stop shop for advice, pricing, bike fit, community, rides, meet people, grow into the sport, spend more $, get local info. no bike shops, no gateway. sure, peeps will buy stuff online, poor quality and bad bike fit, fail, lose interest. circle of failure. bike shops are part of the community of MTB. maybe you're so cool and experienced you don't need an LBS. but the majority of riders do. fewer LBS means price gouging, which you're all so anti.

problem with PB is you're all so cool and superstar, you forget where you came from. short memories, tight wallets. you're actually a bunch of Walmart shoppers who got too big for their breeches and thing their rocking out on Rodeo Drive.
  • + 3
 Calm down champ, you're the only one on here laying down the hyperbole.
  • + 0
 It really is a shame that pro skateboarders, pretty much the least gnarly action sports "athletes" there are, get paid so much more than a super gnarly dude like Zink.
  • + 0
 skateboarders aren't "athletes"?
  • + 6
 I liked the part where he was wearing a helmet....oh wait.
  • + 13
 "least gnarly action sports athletes" Have you ever tried skateboarding!? haha.


Stoked for Cam though, the part about Felt made me laugh, what a shady move on their part.
  • - 5
flag DrSanchez (Feb 2, 2014 at 18:55) (Below Threshold)
 "Rampage gets more coverage than street league skateboarding in my opinion"

- Not even close to same caliber

Progressionobsession, I think you have it opposite there bud. As a skateboarder and a mountain biker I can tell you that skateboarding is the hardest 'sport' you could ever do.

And please go away with helmet comments on skateboards. Jesus.
  • + 0
 ROFLMAO hahaha Sanchez, how moronically ignorant & generalized your presence is here!!!! So you're saying that because you are a mountain biker & a skater that you are qualified to judge the difficulty of those two sports as well as all others? As someone who isn't so cerebrally limited (maybe you've hit your head a few too many times? Maybe a skateboard helmet might be good idea, no?) I can tell you that the reason trials riding is so unpopular is because it is so immensely difficult & frustrating as well as dangerous. I used to skateboard as a kid, so I guess that qualifies me to make the statement that trials riding (arguably a form of "mountain biking") is substantially harder than skateboarding? Simply because the trials riding I do is so much more difficult to me than the skateboarding I did when I couldn't afford a bike?

Dude, the human condition makes the kind of comparison you TRIED to make, completely impossible. No action sport is any more difficult than any other. Every participant is applying pressure on known boundaries to see if they can move them. The bike riders continually seek the same thing on the bike that the skater does on the board or the skier does on the skis & that's the limits that we as humans are bound to. In other words, it's all as hard as we can & want to make it.

Do you really think you are someone that would be qualified to argue the difference in difficulty between something like a flip double whip or a bar cash vs. w/e flip kick skate thingy you think is hard? Even if you could do all that has been done in both sports, it would still be pointless. FMB is younger than all other established action sports & we have a long way to go, but human abilities & difficulties in finding boundaries don't change between the sports that innately test them. I think it's time for a new hat, your ass looks a bit worn out. Wink
  • + 1
 That Nyjah Houston video was unreal. Stoked that he was the first black "skater of the year" Smile I don't think action sports need to hate on other action sports so much. They are all gnarly sports in different ways
  • + 3
 After reading it again, I apologize for my previous comment about skateboarding. While I'm not a fan, I'm actually not really a hater either. I guess if we want mountain biking in the spotlight as much as other sports, we'll just have to patient and persistent.
  • + 1
 "Afterwards, I know of at least ten badass, grown men who cried."
  • + 1
 Congrats Zink! Keep sending er huge!
  • + 1
 no chainguide???thats scary
  • + 1
 I got so much god damn respect for this man.
  • + 1
 I never knew Gods complained about money.
  • + 2
 You da man Zink!
  • + 1
 You are bad @ss Cam Zink _____O^O____
  • + 1
 Cam, your bike is ALOT sicker now.....
  • + 1
 Money! that old chestnut. The more involved the worse it gets.
  • + 1
 mad !
why he have old avid rotors ?
  • + 1
 That is a sweet looking ride
  • + 1
 Truly an inspiration to us all, on and off a bike.
  • + 1
 Zink Rules.
  • + 1
 Lovely bike
  • + 1
 Now that is a Man!!!
  • + 1
 Great article!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.094318
Mobile Version of Website