Jérôme Clémentz's Cannondale Jekyll - Enduro World Series 7

Oct 21, 2013
by Mike Levy  

Finale Ligure, Italy
Clémentz's Cannondale Jekyll

WORDS Mike Levy
PHOTOS Richard Bord

To the victor go the spoils. Jérôme wrapped up the 2013 Enduro World Series title before rolling out of the gate at this weekend's race meeting in Finale Ligure, Italy, but that didn't stop the diminutive Frenchman from racing hard over the last two days. Hard enough, in fact, that he took the overall win by a scant 1.2 seconds over Jared Graves, an impossibly small margin of time after nearly twenty minutes if timed racing. To put it in perspective, that amount of time could be lost in a single blown corner, or by dropping just a tenth of a second over twelve corners during a weekend of racing at redline. Clémentz took the win aboard a very special, one-off Jekyll that Cannondale assembled in secret in order to surprise the champ, with a matte black paint job and "Enduro World Series 2013 World Champion Jey Clementz" decals that set the rig apart from his usual steed. It's good to be the champ.
Jérôme's Jekyll details

• Rear wheel travel: 90mm - 150mm
• Wheel size: 26"
• Frame material: carbon fiber
• DYAD RT2 shock
• RockShox Pike fork
• SRAM XX1 drivetrain
• Quarq power meter
• Mavic Crossmax Enduro wheels

bigquotesA good weekend of enduro is one that you share with you friends and some nice trails. I think that enduro is a balance between physical and technical skill. I think the good balance is when a downhill guy and a cross country guy can race together, and they both have the chance to win. If just a cross-country guy can win, it's not an enduro. When just a downhill rider can win, it's just a longer downhill. So we have to find a balance between them, so both kinds of riders can battle together and be at approximately the same level.



Suspension: The Jekyll is quite unique in that it utilizes a special pull shock rather than a more traditional damper that nearly every other bike on the market utilizes. Yes, it's far from being the first pull shock around, but it could be argued that it is likely the most evolved of the species, as well as the most adjustable. ''The DYAD was developed as a collaboration between Cannondale and the suspension wizards over at Fox Racing Shocks,'' Murray Washburn, Cannondale's Global Director of Product Marketing explained to us. ''In its most simple form, the DYAD RT2 is two completely different shocks in one. You have a short-travel shock with a small air volume and a long-travel shock with a bigger volume, both of which get their own dedicated damping circuit designed specifically for the travel.'' A handlebar mounted remote is used to control the flow of damping oil, as well as how the shock uses its two
air chambers that determine whether the bike runs in its 90mm or 150mm travel modes, with both chambers linked to create a longer and more linear stroke when Jérôme has it set to its 150mm travel full open mode. When he approaches a section of trail that could be ridden faster with a firmer setting, Jérôme switches the shock to its 'Elevate' mode that completely closes off one of the air chambers and redirects the oil to the suitable circuit. This has drastic changes to both the shock's spring rate and damping, creating a 90mm travel bike that obviously rides much firmer than when run open, which in turn also tweaks the bike's geometry. There is no denying that the DYAD RT2 is more complicated than a standard shock, but its instant adaptability also perfectly suits enduro racing that might include short and intense climbs during timed stages or long ascents during transfers. Remember, Jérôme took the win in Italy by just 1.2 seconds, a meager amount of time that could be won or lost anywhere on course.

This is what we call a special race bike dedicated to the first Enduro World Champion. A part of the Mountain Bike History is here.

Of course, the key to any technology designed to make you go faster is being able to make use of it, and having all of the above be controlled by a shock mounted lever that would require Jérôme to reach down to switch between the two settings would be a complete waste. Picture yourself breathing through your eyeballs at the base of a climb and then taking one hand off of the bar to reach under you... it likely wouldn't end well. Stock Jekylls come with a thumb operated DYAD remote that is mounted on top of the handlebar, but Jérôme has enlisted a SRAM Grip Shift on the left side (pictured above) to do the same thing, with a cut down WTB lock-on grip butted up against it that allows him to toggle between the bike's 90mm and 150mm travel settings without having to move his thumb around. It's not only a trick setup, it is also one that any Jekyll owner could employ, so long as they run a single chain ring are are okay with a bit of tinkering to dial it in.


Components: Jérôme's bike is built up with a full XX1 group from SRAM, and he chooses to run a minimalist chain guide that includes an upper slider and taco-style protection to keep the 36 tooth ring out of harm's way. While we've seen other racers going with a guide-less setup and have little or no troubles, Clémentz spent the seven event EWS season fighting for an overall title, a crown that he didn't want to forfeit due to a minor mechanical. Interestingly, his drive side XX1 carbon crank arm has had its spider swapped out for one that integrates a compact power meter from Quarq, a company that SRAM purchased in 2011. Power outputs aren't likely to be something that Jérôme would pay attention to during racing, but we could certainly see him gathering information for an off-season of training, thereby giving him some precise numbers to base his workouts around.

Jerome Clementz s Cannondale Jekyll Photo by Richard Bord

In a bit of a French connection, Jérôme's bike is fitted with Mavic's new Crossmax Enduro Wheel Tire System that includes the new yellow hoops and Mavic's Charge and Roam XL tires. The rims actually feature a different inner width front and back, with a wider 21mm design up front that better suits the high volume 2.4" Charge tire, and a 19mm width for the rear rim to work with the 2.3" wide Roam XL rubber. The differences don't end there, though, with 24 Zicral spokes up front and just 20 out back. Mavic says that the UST wheelset weighs in at 1,660 grams for the pair, and further grams are saved by the sealed rim bed not requiring a rim strip to seal it. Other details include a set of Shimano's standard XTR pedals rather than the Trail model that feature a larger platform, and a 750mm wide carbon fiber BlackBox handlebar from Truvativ, one of the few BlackBox labelled items that consumers can get their paws on.

Jerome Clementz poses with his brand new special race bike a Cannondale Jekyll full painted in a black mat with special stickers. Jey Clements Number 1

www.cannondale.com


114 Comments

  • + 140
 If Mavic are matching wheels and tyres, and going go with a half-logo style... why the heck wouldn't they make the rims have the bottom half of the decal to match up with the tyre's top-half, spelling out the full cr*max logo? Aaaaaaaaargh *twitch*
  • + 94
 First world problem
  • + 2
 bwahahahaha nice one lol
  • - 29
flag mnorris122 (Oct 21, 2013 at 3:40) (Below Threshold)
 You can fix that yourself, bud...rotate the tire to where you want it. I'd just prefer to see them offering a black colour option
  • + 7
 Because they realized that pedants would loose too much time fixing a flat on the trail which is already hard enough with Mavic UST rims.
  • + 5
 cos mavic likes to watch the world Burn!
  • + 5
 Still don't understand the rear sus
  • + 2
 Why do the desticker the FOX damper? Wink Razz
  • + 2
 Cause the guy is sponsored by sram, why would they keep a fox sticker on it?
  • + 2
 They are offset by exactly half the distance which means they did it on purpose. I think it probably looks better that way with the complimenting yellow and black colors. Just puts all the OCD-ers out ther on nerves.
  • - 2
 because it was sarcasm, dude, it was sarcasm.
  • + 5
 Ain't nobody got time for that...
  • + 50
 That bike looks like a bike
  • + 24
 Because its a real mtb(26")!
  • + 44
 And has two front fork stantions....
  • + 13
 but two rear shock bodys !
  • + 5
 No, because it has 2 wheels not 1.
  • + 34
 Two wheels AND two fork stanchions? Total copy of a Session...
  • - 4
flag rednova (Oct 21, 2013 at 9:48) (Below Threshold)
 Next season he will be on 27.5!
  • - 1
 No lefty. Yeah
  • + 32
 I want the Tech Tuesday back!!!
  • + 22
 Dear Jerome, Thank you so much for not using a Lefty! Congrats on your latest victory Sincerely, Lilshredman P.S. That is one sick bike!
  • - 16
flag richierocket (Oct 20, 2013 at 21:58) (Below Threshold)
 Dear child^, obviously you have never used a Lefty.
  • + 10
 Clearly you are not fast enought if you think the lefty is a good fork-
  • - 5
flag amirazemi (Oct 20, 2013 at 22:51) (Below Threshold)
 @richierocket clearly neither did you!! /watch?v=ptBD4xGuTbk
  • + 32
 You can still ride fast with a lefty I think Cedric proved that
  • + 1
 Enough about not using the lefty. More importantly, thank you FOR using Gripshift!!
  • + 18
 I think his gripshift is used to change the travel in the shock. On the right side he has a trigger shifter underneath the brakes.
  • + 7
 Ah crap, wish I'd actually read the article first now rather than looking at the pics and just posting straight away...
Guess it was just too much to hope for. Cry


Its OK Gripshift... I still love you. Smile
  • + 16
 So... I thought somebody was banging into my head countless times that more options is only better for a customer... Quite frankly if someone does not like Lefty forks , not being even close to break one by himself, he should go and finger himself with a thumb dipped in tabasco. Im no close to buy one, but I like diversity, I resect Cannondale big time for developing Lefty, for trying something different, banging a huge beige wall with it and making it happen. Bike World is full of weird designs that rarely make it further than floors of hand-made bicycles trade shows or Eurobike. But Lefty made it to the top of XC World Cup so if you haven't done anything signifacnt in your life and talk such crap then get some cut through Jelapeno put it in your kulo and feel alive for the first time in your life. They might be hard to get spare parts to, but it's a damn original design and it works well
  • + 5
 You hit it right on the head. I have loved all my leftys from day one.
  • + 3
 I apologize for being offensive, that was unnecessary. I just like to suggest people to experiment with stimulating certain parts of their bodies using fruits and vegetables - i hope they discover same vivid experiences that I did when I was younger, inspired by an old South Park episode
  • + 1
 "thumb dipped in tabasco"

new favorite quote
  • + 1
 And all of you still with stinky tobasco thumbs should seriously consider trying one out. I was a hater until I had one. They are half a double crown fork and still strong and light.
  • + 0
 Have you ever tried to rip a berm or corner on one?
  • + 4
 No I rode straight for a realllllllllllly long time.
  • + 3
 have you?
  • - 4
flag Lilshredman (Oct 22, 2013 at 6:19) (Below Threshold)
 I was at a bike demo, and only tried it once! They corner life crap! Sure they're nice and light, but I hate them!
  • + 4
 brian lopes and cedric dont agree with you
  • + 2
 I could say the new Fox 40 corners like crap if it wasn't set up properly
  • + 15
 it should be a law that only deemax are yellow.
  • + 1
 I read the "max" and thought these were Deemax at first glance... coincidence?
  • + 14
 The Idea of the shock is cool but it must be a pain to have it serviced
  • + 6
 nah. my shop does it. not bad. ive ridden them, super buttery and easy to use
  • + 8
 Absolutely not:
pack it. Send it to fox service center. wait 2 weeks. open your mailbox. Ride one more year.
I ride a Claymore.
  • + 2
 Service is simple. Fox knows what they're doing, and gets it done quickly when service time comes.
  • + 3
 My mate owns a Claymore and my god that shock is heaven! So ridiculously plush!
  • - 1
 I'm doubtful these shocks will last along time compared to standard push shock since they use the rod area as the damper.... I just don't get it why they would go for such a design as almost every other hydraulic/pneumatic system in the world puts the rod area as the return cycle whenever possible.
  • + 12
 Finally a good use for a grip shift. Hats off to the mechanic, that's just damn clever!
  • + 2
 I will second that. Very trick. Although i don't understand why the article said you must run a single ring up front. You could have the grip shift controlling the shock and then a trigger shifter mounted to the bar controlling a front der. No?
  • + 2
 I wonder if it would be possible to get the grip shift to adjust the rear shock and the fork at the same time. Maybe with a split cable or something like. That would be a real clean compared to the heinous fox remote lever
  • + 1
 I have the same bike and have gone with single ring up front too. I don't find the shock lever a problem, though I switched it to sit underneath my bars, rather than on top as I find that more intuitive. Having said that, my wife has a gripshift set-up on her xc bike....wonder if she's going to notice a switch to a trigger shifter next time she go's out? :-)
  • + 9
 For a blackbox athlete and mavic rider how could they allow him to use xtr pedals!? He should use mavics new pedals or other french pedals..
  • + 8
 Because he clearly doesn't like the other options he was given. And seeing as its his choice rather than the companies... well maybe they should listen to him and design a new pedal for him?
  • + 0
 And a fox DYAD?
  • + 3
 As far as I know SRAM doesn't have a pull shock available for their athletes but I could see them prototyping in the near future.
  • + 1
 Ya...SRAM should probably get on that. Interesting shock though!!
  • + 2
 SRAM doesn't make clipless pedals or pull-shocks, so they probably aren't worried about his using other products there, and putting an entire new product line (designing a pull shock) in play just for one bike/athelete probably wouldn't make the bean counters happy...
  • + 2
 I think he was talking about Mavic's pedals (they do make a nice range of clipless mtb pedals).
As for the DYAD, well seeing as the Jekyll he rides is practically built around the DYAD and one of the things he credits with his success is its ability to switch between modes, it doesn't really make sense for him to be using anything else.
  • + 2
 It would be very French of him to run time pedals or the mavic time pedals. Maybe next year? Mavic didn't start their deal with time until very late in the year and didn't take delivery until around euro bike. But now that mavic is up and running with time pedals we might see him start next season in them.
  • + 4
 Cannondale is a special company. First off, their Lefty has a Cannondale design and construction, along with a RockShox remote and Fox internals- just saying that as a preface.

The DYAD is a Cannondale designed shock that was designed specifically for the bikes in their OverMountain line. It would not exist without these bikes, and the bikes would not exist without it- the purpose of the OverMountain bikes is to have the "two-bikes-in-one" feature fully incorporated into the design. It would cost a lot of money better spend on things such as R&D in order for Cannondale to design and manufacture an in-house suspension product so they got Fox to collaborate with them- even though the shock is not technically a Fox product.
  • + 8
 19mm wide rim. Where are you armchair engineers? You should be frothing at the mouth...
  • + 6
 god damnit pinkbike I just changed my desktop background to Martin Maes' Force yesterday, now you're really gonna make me change it again?
  • + 8
 That bike is pure sex.
  • - 17
flag gerhards (Oct 20, 2013 at 20:21) (Below Threshold)
 no cannondale is sex.
  • + 3
 What???
  • + 7
 His previous green/yellow colour scheme was WAY hotter.
  • + 4
 The fact that he uses a power meter is most interesting. I wonder if he uses it to maintain reasonable levels on the climbs, or to review the data on the DH for to better tune his training, or that and more?
  • + 3
 There is almost nothing you can't use a power meter for in training when it comes to putting power to the pedals. You can Analyze race files to tailor your training, you can gauge the effort in climbs to save your legs, and very importantly you can review files over time to insure adequate recovery and avoid overtraining. Road, track, XC, triathlon, and BMX riders at the top level have been using them for a long time now. So I expect that to come into gravity as well. Stages Power Meters start at $700 or so. So if you are riding and maintaining a high end bike and going to races, it's affordable. If you know what to do with the data it will make you faster than any other piece of equipment. That's a big if though, especially if you can't pay a good coach.
  • + 1
 Why doesn't he run an angleset? The HA on Medium Jekyll seems to be 67.8 deg according to geo chart which is really steep. Basically cross country bike territory. Having personally experienced what a huge improvement a slacker head angle makes in descending, this seems really strange to me. I would imagine 66 deg HA being the sweet spot in enduro, and maybe some riders going down to 65.
  • + 1
 not available yet for jekyll
  • + 4
 Its good to see that first and second place were both taken with 26" wheel bikes! (not sure about third and so on)
  • + 1
 Joe I, confused help, XX1 is narrow wide thats what XX1 is, btw I run XX1, I think I know what you're trying to say. He's actually not running a chain guide as such its a top guide and a taco, they're is no chain guide retention that a std chain guide provides! Sic bike, 27.5 Killer cant argue with results! Smashed em bro!
  • + 1
 It's funny how magazine writers and critics ignore the fact that the pull shock on the Jekyll is based off the Scott DT Swiss Equalizer pull shock. Scott made a true 3 switch remote on the handle bar that really let's you control the suspension yet it rarely goes noticed. Someone once told me the person who helped create the pull shock from Scott left and now works for cannondale. I could be wrong since I have no idea but it would make sense if it were true. Jerome is the worlds best enduro rider and my hats off to him as it's mostly his skill and strength that makes him the champ and not the bike. I just wish people would stop ignoring the fact that the Jekyll is based off the Scott Genius. Sorry for the rant.
  • + 1
 Interestingly, Jerome Clementz (5'6" / 167cm) rides a medium Jekyll, with a seat tube length of 18in / 467mm and a pretty long top tube length for his size.
  • + 2
 I've raced down hill on one of these, sturdy, quality rig.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/10237786
Props Jerome.
  • + 2
 Sweet rig.... why is Jerome always smiling like he knows something no one else does? Congratulations champ!
  • + 9
 Every Claymore or Jekyll owner smile like him Smile
  • + 2
 That bike! That color! That setup!
  • + 1
 i ride the same bike and i freggin'love it, it rides like a downhill bike and climbes like an XC one...
  • + 3
 Dream ride
  • + 2
 Cannondale is the pioneer of weird shit
  • + 2
 perfect soft tail bike,great SRAM XX1 groupsets
  • + 2
 where's the "looks like a session" guy???
  • + 3
 Or the "Cannonfail" people?
  • + 4
 On Ebay, selling their bike.
  • + 1
 Never heard of Cannonfail... But i do own a "CrackNfail" road bike!
  • + 0
 and just when you thought suspension technology was already getting confusing.......
  • + 1
 im might be the only one but that bike looks like f@#k pie Razz
  • + 1
 That thing is goooorgeous!!
  • + 1
 Surprised he isn't running 27.5
  • + 1
 oh he will be...dont you worry Smile
  • + 8
 no he won't, he's very slightly built and the 26 is spot on for him
  • + 1
 C'dale may just force him to, if they decide to drop 26" bikes from their AMSuperTrailEnduro lines like all the other manufacturers seem to be doing.
  • - 1
 You'd need gloves made of alligator skin to protect your hands from those cheese grater grips!
  • - 1
 1x11 with a chainguide, but I thought you didnt need one now....
  • + 7
 On particularly gnarly trails, the chain can still come off when using a w/n chain ring. In an enduro race time is your enemy when you get a mechanical, so some riders choose to do everything they can to keep from having their bike fail in any way.
  • + 5
 The better safe than sorry approach.
  • - 4
flag Joe-Gray (Oct 21, 2013 at 0:54) (Below Threshold)
 he isnt using a narrow wide chainring. hes using the xx1 crank and chainring combo. a narrow wide has been proven at rampage not to come off. but with everything else you still need a guide
  • + 4
 That's definitely a narrow/wide chain ring. You can see right on the side it has the XO1 logo and you can barely make out that it says "X-Sync".
  • + 1
 The vital mtb made a bike check of his bike at the Winter Park race in july, and he was a on a XX1 drive train not a X01, and he already had the chain device on. Maybe it`s just me, but I don`t think the Enduro World Champion, puts his full trust into this drive train.
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