Cowichan Valley, Southern Vancouver Island - Opening New Trails

Nov 22, 2013 at 11:05
Nov 22, 2013
by Sharon Bader  
 
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The Cowichan Valley is a Year Round Mountain Biking Destination
West of Vancouver is Vancouver Island. Islanders enjoy being separated by Georgia Straight from the rest of the continent with the water passable only by BC Ferries. This has guaranteed that even the densest population Island centres of the South Island are not heavily populated. It also has resulted in a sense of strong community; the majority of people who live on the Island are passionate about it. The mountain bike community is no different.

We visited the Cowichan area on this trip. This area has Duncan as its hub and contains many smaller communities such as Maple Bay, Cowichan Bay, Cobble Hill, Chemainus, Ladysmith and extends all the way to the west coast to Nitinat Lake and the West Coast trail. Even ten years ago, the Cowichan had a decidedly industrial flavour and was more well known for malls and gas stations along the Island Highway. It's now not just a bedroom community for the entire South Island and Victoria area; the relatively good weather, low rainfall (rainfall stats for the Cowichan area put it among the lowest rainfall totals of BC); its also a destination in its own right - attracting locavores, wine-addicts (over 10 vinyards in the area), retirees, people who crave good weather and lots of tourists.

The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Sharon Bader, Robin Kenyon of the CTSS and former pro downhiller Brant Lyon out to celebrate new trails. Lots of industry (3 bike shops had tents out) out to support the new trails




Cowichan Biking
Among those tourists are roadies and increasingly, mountainbikers. Trails have been built and ridden in the Cowichan area for well over 20 years. As in the majority of the province, there was no sanctioning mechanism for these trails so pioneers like Dan Berard, Trevor Prest, Robin Kenyon (and many others whose names are unknown to us) built trails for the enjoyment of all with nary a care. This has now changed with the creation of the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society (CTSS) in early 2013 and the signing of a license of occupation with the Municipality of North Cowichan, which formally endorsed the 9km long Maple Syrup and Solar Coaster trails on Maple Mountain (resolution is here). The CTSS can now boast of having sanctioned Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain. Check out map at Everytrail.

Why bother you ask? People have been riding these trails for years without any problems. In order for the sport to grow it needs legitimate trails. Locals such as that same Robin Kenyon previously mentioned, Jane Kaiser along with persuasion from Riley Mcintosh, who, even at young age has been involved with many aspects of mountain biking, saw the potential of this area as a great place for mountain biking trails. Together they are convinced that it's time to start thinking bigger and build a legacy that will endure; something that will not just grow a local community but perhaps that will also attract visitors. Through the CTSS, the locals see that legitimate trails accessible to all levels of riders, trail maps and signage will go a long way to create a kickass destination in the Cowichan Valley.

The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Riley McIntosh and a cadre of CTSS trailbuilders who put in thousands of hours of work into work on Maple Syrup (Trevor Prest's original gnar line from the top was largely preserved) and re-routing the bottom half while adding some new school berms and flair in some part to mitigate private landowner issues. Here's Riley doing his first repair work on the trail fixing a berm highsided by a previous rider


Maple Syrup and Maple Mountain
The first trail chosen to create this legitimacy, engage the Land Managers and other users was Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain. The original top part was already wonderfully routed. However, the bottom section ran through private land necessitating the need for a reroute. The CTSS crew went in, assessed, rerouted and rebuilt the bottom section of this 9km trail using about 2000 hours of volunteer labour.

On Oct 26, 2013 a grand opening day was held on the trail. 60 hikers and 140 mountain bikers hiked and biked the trail. The CAO of the Municipality (Dave Devana) also participated along with one of the Councillors (John Koury) to show their support for the projects. All land managers should be this progressive - such a good model to inspire and for others to follow. The three local bike shops - Cycle Therapy, Experience Cycles and Cowichan Cycles - were also there with demo bikes along with other industry reps and other shops from all over Vancouver Island.

The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Some of the woodwork on Lower Maple Syrup


Why is the Cowichan, Duncan BC area worth a visit by bikers? It is unique in its proximity to the ocean and the mellowness of its weather; which lends itself to a long riding season. The mountains where the trails are built are round and relatively low (Maple Mountain, Tzouhalem, Prevost, Sicker, Brenton all rise a mere 500 or so meters above sea level) . The terrain has some unique rock features and dirt composition similar to the coast. BUT it sees a fraction of the rain normally falling on the west coast of the Sea to Sky area or Vancouver Island. It also sees very little snow creating a year round riding destination. Sure there is more rain in the winter, but very little snow and not as much rainfall.

To this good weather, add some pretty special bio-geo-climatic features like red-barked arbutus trees, HUGE stands of Garry Oak, sword ferns so green they defy photoshop saturation, moss so thick the beds deform under footstep, pine needle carpets and thick loam. Add a community that actually supports bike trails and hasn't made an effort to put golf courses or condo tracts through perfectly good green space; then mix in lots of amenities like good food & accommodations. Suddenly the Cowichan looks like a good place to ride bikes to people from Victoria, the Lower Mainland or from other places.

Bottom line is that the Cowichan Valley needs to be on your list of places to ride.

The Area:(click for the map)
There are three main mountains plus smaller areas in the Cowichan Valley with trails. Mt. Prevost, Mt. Tzouhalem, Mt Sicker and Maple Mountain (Mt Richards is a tiny bump) all of which have trails in various states of repair. Duncan is the biggest town in the North Cowichan, 50km south of Nanaimo on Hwy1. If you are to stay there, the coastal communities of Maple Bay or Cowichan Bay have a bit more of touristic ambiance.

Why we were here
We were here to check out Maple Syrup's Grand Opening. It looks like just the first step for the CTSS in beginning its journey to legitimize trails in the Cowichan, to galvanize local support and to create a world class mountain bike destination in the Cowichan Valley.

The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Bikers wait for the hikers to go first.


The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Local Fireman drops in


The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Lee rockin' the Maple


The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Nice dirt on the old school top section


The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

With some cool mossy rock


The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Then you get to the Riley inspired New School section


The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

This 9km trail will challenge all riders. Go fast go slow, its a great ride.


Maple Syrup Map

Other trails in the Cowichan
There are a whack load of trails in the area including the Cobble Hill area in the video below. Downhillers tend to look for a gravity fix on Prevost. Some of these trails are signed and shown in the Mountain Bike Vancouver Island (4th edition) guidebook.



We also had a chance to ride Big Dog aka Mad Dog on Tzouhalem. Look here for a map of Tzouhalem or check the guidebook mentioned above. The network of trails here is vast and convoluted. There are maps, but good luck figuring out a good loop without a local to tow you around. Big Dog is a pretty fantastic 525m descent on rock, moss and roots from Tzouhalem to Genoa Bay. It’s got some eye-popping scenery. Bring good brakes, some decent tight turning nose-pivot skills and commitment.

Descent from Tzouhalem to Genoa Bay in brilliant late October weather

Top of Tzouhalem looking towards Cowichan Bay


Descent from Tzouhalem to Genoa Bay in brilliant late October weather

Technical old school trail, or a hiking trail.


Descent from Tzouhalem to Genoa Bay in brilliant late October weather

Rambling through the Garry Oak


Descent from Tzouhalem to Genoa Bay in brilliant late October weather

Cowichan Bay views


Descent from Tzouhalem to Genoa Bay in brilliant late October weather

Viewpoint looking down to Genoa Bay or up to... something I'm sure.


Descent from Tzouhalem to Genoa Bay in brilliant late October weather

Arbutus, Garry Oak, moss and ocean




Getting Here:
From most places in North America you travel to Nanaimo from Horsehoe Bay on BC Ferries. From Victoria you drive N over the Malahat.

The first officially sanctioned trail in the Cowichan Valley was originally built by Trevor Prest and subsequently reworked and brought back to the world by the Cowichan Trail Stewardship Society. The CTSS brings you Maple Syrup on Maple Mountain.

Catching the 3:00 ferry on a Friday. Reservations are recommended


Staying Here:
We then drove the hour to Maple Bay to check into our B&B Funky Frog and to meet our hosts Veronica and Dave. The Funky Frog has been in business for one year, can sleep up to 15 people; two bedrooms have ensuites and a private seating area. They love mountain bikers!

Funky Frog

Hot Tub, Common area, one of the bedrooms.


Eating Here:
On our first night we had dinner at the Terrain Garden in the Oceanfront Suites at Cowichan Bay. Fantastic views and wonderful food define this restaurant. The cool folksy localness of its location entices you to wander around and explore the wharves and water to work off food after you're done.

Oceanfront Suites Dinner

Dinner at Terrain Kitchen, they have breakfast deals here too.


For more restaurants and cool Cowichan tourist attractions check out here.
Must Read This Week






104 Comments

  • + 75
 Yeah it's pretty sh*#ty living on the west coast BC. No one should ever come here to ride.
  • + 2
 I agree, it really sucks here!!!
  • + 14
 It's so awesome in Ontario that I think I should take it down a few notches and visit a place like this, where it sucks. Wink
  • + 19
 Cowichan trails are of acceptable quality
  • + 1
 backhanded complement?
  • + 1
 accurate comment.
  • + 2
 No chair, no care


(i'm kidding of course)
  • + 1
 I was thinking that his comment was actually quite kind. Considering the fact that the lower trail in the first vid was brand new, why are "builders" still using logs to hold the trail together???? Disappointing at best.
  • + 6
 I hope that is sarcastic, what are they supposed to use? Boron fabric/thermosetting resin composite? Trail looked like a good effort. Not quite a coastal crew trail but more of a natural trail.
  • + 2
 Each build area is a bit different. The dirt quality they had looked stellar, so one possibility is to build the berm wholly out of dirt. Laying out a support wall, for lack of a better term, of dirt that will never be ridden on and acts as resistance to the tire pressure on the riding surface of the the berm. If dirt is of short supply, you can use rock. Not just rock tossed in a pile but a rock wall that will hold back the dirt on the riding surface of the berm. And if all else fails you can always use boron fabric thermosetting resin composite.
  • + 1
 The composite would really be best and it would give the berm wall some nice spring back. You would be able to rocket out of it without any erosion. And it would probably last around 10,000 years! But may be a tiny bit expensive, might have to be stolen from Airbus.
  • + 1
 Nice. Maybe have to run for Senator and divert some of my housing money into trail building. Your point is taken thanks for not getting too crazy on me. cheers
  • + 4
 Ya know what last as long as the boron fabric thermo composite ? Big rocks! They also last for thousands of years. Then you put a smattering of dirt over top of them.
  • + 2
 Ya, but it sounds so low tech. Flintstones vs Jetsons.
  • + 7
 Its easy to diss some ones trail building efforts. The fact that these people volunteered on their own time to contribute to a sport they love is what is important. Sending out my thanks to every one who builds /maintain trails.
  • + 6
 I lived in Duncan for 10 years during the 90's, I rode all those places when they were in their infancy, they are some of the best I have ridden. I'm glad to see some of the people involved are those same people I rode with so long ago, and that they are still pushing for the things we all love.

The Cowichan Valley has riding for everyone, from steep gnarly rock faces, long fast flowing descents, to epic challenging XC. Living here you need to own several bikes to enjoy the variety of mountain bike disciplines available.

"low rainfall (rainfall stats for the Cowichan area put it among the lowest rainfall totals of BC)" stats Canada must have faulty equipment, bring your rain gear, especially if your coming between November and April.
  • + 3
 Don't forget this is where Stevie Smith is from!! That's gotta count for something
  • + 2
 should probably have been lowest rainfall on Vancouver island... They are in a rainshadow, which is why there are so many arbutus trees.
  • + 8
 I need to move to Canada, every where looks awesome from what I've seen on pb
  • + 18
 we also have a lot of topless beaches and free beer for tourists
  • + 6
 On the same location? Big Grin
  • + 0
 Where do I have to say I'm from to qualify for the free beer?
  • + 6
 Utah! at 3.2% alcohol content the poor bastards deserve a break Smile
  • + 5
 Nope they have it all wrong. There are no trails and you have to walk up for the trails we do have. The ferry is expensive, the locals are assholes and it is so ugly here. Stay away.
  • + 1
 Haha. I grew up on the Island riding those areas, and that's actually pretty accurate.
  • + 3
 might as well bring in the pavers --- locally, we have a few large bikers groups that blaze trails out at the local county and state parks, when they do, they over blaze the hell out of the trail in IMO, make it far too easy to ride. to the pint it's not too far from riding on paved trails. me, l don't care for that type of riding. Moab is sorta like that (as an example) -- Moab is a dope place to ride but it's actually pretty easy riding because the trails are so heavily used. There's nothing difficult about the riding (aside from some really steep climbs and the sheer height of the random cliffs you're riding next to). Not saying l expect to crash and without crashing it isn't fun... just saying -- l prefer the natural elements of a rugged trail over those trails that are super smoooooth cause they're so over groomed.
  • + 4
 i don't know where you normally ride that causes you to think trails like Porcupine Rim and Mag 7 are smooth and easy, but i've ridden all over North America, and thise trails are in the top 15 - 10% as far as technical xc goes.
  • + 5
 I agree with the over grooming of trails but you must've only ridden slick rock in moab. Most of that area is all technical. The old classic Poison spider, Amasa back, Behind the rocks, Burro pass, Captain ahab, golden spike and the list goes on and on. So I and probably alot of others don't really see your point about that statement. Maybe you didn't know where to go or ask around for some tech trails, I don't know.... But I do know moab has boat loads of tech that I guarantee you will be challenged way beyond your ability.
  • - 1
 ha -- yeah did slick rock --- ok, that's just silly fun because it's sooooooo different but did most of the other trails you speak of too. -- yeah, not saying we didn't hit the hard stuff... we did. just a whole bunch of it is smooth sailing and the F-up factor is of course pretty dang dangerous.
  • + 0
 oh and ... don't get me wrong... moab's a sick place to ride.... and there's sure as heck some silly crazy - difficult - places to ride out there. element of risk is huge -- deadly. just saying, in general, l don't too over grooming of nice trails. l like them kept natural as much as possible.
  • + 3
 well when a trail has just been built it looks this way groomed and manucured.... but take a look at the very same trail about 1 or 2 years after and it'll be a whole different ball game
  • + 2
 Moab? Easy to ride? Overused?

You have no clue.
  • - 1
 Ehhh...you're missing the point...nevermind
  • + 6
 This area has something for everyone, the top of this trail and the trail we rode on Tzouhalem is plenty technical. The new section that Riley built was his style and design and was built to bypass private property. I like it all quite frankly. In this area a trail that is 'groomed' by man will very soon be 'regroomed' by nature.
  • + 2
 I love hearing the crowd weigh in on the "too smooth", or "it's too easy now" comments. If your truly after the old school gnar gnar, xc or dh, then maybe ditch the disc brakes, telescoping post, remote lockouts, full suspension,etc etc. I love all the goodies we have on our modern bikes, but if the trail seems to be getting easier don't bitch at the trail builder/maintenance crew for keeping the "erosion" to a minimum. Just ride harder and faster, and you will get your gnar gnar on and the sweat will pour.
  • + 0
 so maybe trails, so little time......go ride. before this thread turns into a MTBR rant sesh.. l will say, you should see the two trail systems here in the local area that l'm talking about which are now too easy, too smooth.... they used to be great trails that were IMO fun and challenging because they were left, for the most part, natural now they're two bike wide, mostly hard packed gravel to the point it's like riding a paved trail. fun to a certain degree.. if you're into that type of riding.
  • + 1
 Smooth trails get more peeps onto bikes so they are here to stay. Unfortunately If I ride these trails realy fast so they are actualy fun. I have to skid like an idiot to make the corners. I can erode these types of trails very quickly! This makes me feel bad. So I don't ride these smooth easy trails they are not for me. I like Gnar. Plenty of Gnar out there. Just please don't dumb down the Gnar.
  • - 2
 same here.... pulling out a stump that grabs your tires every time, moving a jagged rock that's sure to rip ya a new one is one thing but clearing eeeeeeeeeverything two bikes wide drives me nuts. l used to frequent these two trails systems back in the day... shoot, it's waaaay back when the trails were "money", dates back to when Vbrakes were a new thing on the market. back when l was ghetho riggin' my own single speeders. 5, 6 years ago a couple organized bike clubs got the green light to go in there and groom new trails. that's when l stopped going there as often. don't get me wrong, they're nice trails for everyone now, even a rookie rider can ride them... to me, they bore me now. it's a 50 minute drive for me and there's plenty of other more challenging trail between here and there that l will go to. to each his own. as far as the whole erosion topic, l simply don't agree with what those clubs did trying keeping the erosion down. so they're clear-cutting who knows how many trees, adding gravel hauled in from another local, adding concrete and pre-treated lumber, that to me, doesn't add up.
  • + 1
 I think this is a good conversation to have. We get to express what works/doesn't work for us. In the end it is feedback for builders and maintenance people who are now working on trails, and for those who will become trail people in the future. I have to admit my earlier comments about poor quality building did not include the fact that i liked the look of the trail design. I am personally sold on berms as a legitimate part of everyday trails and the builder obviously delivered on that. I just hope for better and better on each build, with regards to the actual structure integrity(kind of a Mike Holmes approach, build it strong and with the right materials no matter how much longer it takes). I regret that i didn't point out that this is my personal opinion, and not fact. Keep building. cheers.
  • + 1
 no offense but the brakes failed on that run! Can't do anytthing about that when it happens! Just pray you don't DIE!
  • - 1
 yeah, l saw this video years ago when it was sorta current and on one of those "extreme TV" shows... you know, the type, the type where the lead up takes a good 10 minutes for a 10 second shot. turns, out, that's Lion's Back out in Moab (Slick Rock). it was some chick in her husband's truck. she should have slapped that beyatch into 4x4 LOW from the get go, never should have just relied on just brakes for something like that. me and my bud did the hill next to Lion's Back (in his truck) which is not near as extreme as LB... my knuckles are still white to this day --- holy crap that was scary. Funny part, there's nothing "slick" about Slick Rock. Traction is silly on that rock, it's like riding on sand paper.
  • + 2
 As a trail builder this is embarrassing to see. The pictures clearly show berms on stacks of rotten logs with no backfill as well as not peeling bark off of the logs. These are some rookie moves that unfortunately will result in these trails being in need of some serious repair much sooner than necessary. Cowichan Valley should invest in a copy of the IMBA trail building book…
  • + 13
 the last time i rode on IMBA trails they turned smooth single track into a 5 foot wide bumpy trail, all machine work so IMBA can stay away from the island! Trails will naturally evolve. There's always this overkill that people expect with trails now, some of the best trails i've ridden on are hiking trails with no work done
  • + 2
 From my experience some time the only thing you have to back up a berm or a shelf is a log that will surely rot. If it's done right thought the log will only need to do it's job until the berm becomes solid and supports itself. I've built plenty of short traverses over small washouts where the first piece of the puzzle is a down tree. Then rock, then dirt. Years later the log is irrelevant. But I get the comment relative to the blown out berm pic. Maybe a little more berm needed there.
  • + 6
 The "Riley" they are talking about is Riley McIntosh. He is a bit of a trail building legend, and has parts in at least 2 biking videos that I own. The trails are built to last, all it will take there is a good rain fall and those babies are good to go. Trust me I lived in Duncan for 20+ years. These guys know what they are doing, they don't need to read a manual!!
  • + 3
 I agree that berms don't always have to be built up to bike park standard, often my favorite kind of single track is one that appears to never have been touched by a shovel.
  • + 5
 I'll defer to Riley wrt to building berms. He's built a few and they last.
  • + 4
 Hey hidden-heights, stay in the US and ride your text book trails! better yet, why don't you revamp your IMBA manual to include cutting down trees and paving trails... they will last longer!
  • + 0
 @hidden-heights, keep up the good work. Nice to see a young person looking at the build quality, and seeing the truth. The wooden structures looked bomber, and nice to look at, but the berms are brutal. You can support your local builder for there selfless energy but face it, books or no books those section of trail where ready for a rebuild already. Do it right the first time!
  • + 3
 Look! The Cowichan valley now has rollercoaster bridges! Leaving your mark Rilor!
  • + 0
 @hidden-heights, keep up the good work. Nice to see a young person looking at the build quality, and seeing the truth. The wooden structures looked bomber, and nice to look at, but the berms are brutal. You can support your local builder for there selfless energy but face it, books or no books those section of trail where ready for a rebuild already. Do it right the first time!
  • + 3
 I love how you guys cut out the ugly 5.5km hill climb to get to the top! lol...
  • + 2
 not the worse climb we've done, but it will warm you up for sure...
  • + 1
 Ya, not the worst for sure for me either, but I got a laugh out of it, as I always think twice before heading to Maple just for that climb...
  • + 2
 It'd be nice if the bureaucratic idiots here in east Tn realized more trails = more tourism = more money. So much great terrain here
  • + 5
 10/10 would ride
  • + 4
 hikers!? need to keep the vermin off the trails Smile
  • + 4
 or recruit them to help you preserve the area for trails...
  • + 1
 perhaps, but they would decompose even faster than rotten logs alas
  • + 5
 Amateur's.
  • + 1
 Good to see trails being built or legitimized, in San Diego trails are getting shutdown by the CDFW and what few trails we do have are over crowed and poorly designed.
  • + 1
 I dont understand why people still use "chicken wire" that stuff is more slick when it gets wet if you run tires with larger treads that dont fit the little holes.
  • + 1
 I have used housing shingles, cut to various shapes to fit the structure, for all season grip. It has been a descent success so far.
  • + 1
 Hmm I've never thought of shingles. I just bought some grip tape put on stairs for decking.
  • + 1
 cool idea. when i first started getting into doing trail work, my favorite work was building/fixing structures. i had little to no money so i would dumpster dive for 2x4's and whatever i could get my hands on. so when the 2x material is wet it is really slippery, so the shingles were a good fix for that material. now working in areas with cedar trees, i just use stumps from logging operations and split decking from that. i know i'm certainly not the first but i see why it is so popular to use. they are super durable, and the uneven surface makes for a better traction surface than any 2x material.cheers.
  • + 3
 Nice Boreale Mtn Biking sticker! Glad to see someone repping the Yukon!
  • + 1
 worth going just for the food, but ehy might as well hit the trails while there. Another trail location added to my wish list !
  • + 3
 Haha that's my dog at 0:37 in the first video
  • + 3
 Vancouver Island sucks! Tell your friends Wink
  • + 1
 These trails looks like most of the trails of the east coast. If i'm going west one day, that's not what i would like to ride
  • + 3
 the views might be different...
  • + 1
 That's for sure. My comment was about the trail itself, not it's environement.
  • + 1
 The DH riding on prevost in Duncan has really gnarly trails if that's what you want lol. Harder than wbp imo
  • + 2
 Awesome, great to see the island on here again. Mt tzou's a good time will have to try Maple.
  • + 2
 Rotten logs in corners ? I'm very surprised
  • + 6
 Better than the main riding spot in Norwich- it has STEAMING logs on most corners... If a dog owner does pick it up and put it in a bag they go round the corner and through it up a tree. Nice.
  • + 3
 Yep I really hate these people that tie bags of dog shit to trees leaving it like some kind of Christmas tree of filth and nastyness. I would rather they just got a stick and flicked the shit , unbagged , into the brush , there is a tree near a style where I walk my dog and the thing is literally a Xmas tree made of dog shit bags. Still surprised they use such rotten logs in a corner though , and only covered with top soil with out the back of the berm covered , on a local style trail thats fine but on a trail you are expecting to bring tourism and high rider volumes it seems very back wards to me.
  • + 1
 The logs probably aren't rotten. I don't know for sure what he used but in that area there are a lot of garry oak and they're pretty gnarly looking.
  • + 1
 The logs are not rotten and are not garry oak.
  • + 2
 haha that xc guy's shirt says team puke Big Grin
  • + 4
 PUKE = People Using Kinetic Energy!
  • + 2
 oh Big Grin
  • + 2
 Why is everyone riding so slow? Ha! Nice work on the trails.
  • + 3
 Didn't seem right to trash a new fresh trail especially when riding with many of the people who helped build it.
  • + 4
 what's the rush, we were on Island time!
  • - 1
 Good point!
  • + 3
 dat star wars song
  • + 1
 I live on the island and bulid trails on these mountains all the time.
  • + 1
 "New school" trails don't look like very much fun to me.
  • + 3
 Absolutely no fun what so ever..
  • + 1
 more uphill than downhill on the trail itself
  • + 7
 It's uphill all the way down
  • + 1
 When did we piss off the Israelis?
  • + 2
 I love this article
  • + 1
 This looks amazing! What a place to live!
  • + 1
 Can't wait to ride maple syrup, it's 10 seconds from my parents house.
  • - 1
 Where's the flow?
  • + 1
 Did you ride it?
  • + 1
 No, the video is deceiving. The show cased trail or trails look old school techy.
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