Crankbrothers Kronolog Adjustable Seat Post

Mar 5, 2012 at 0:02
Mar 5, 2012
by Mike Levy  
 
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Source: Crankbrothers

Adjustable seat posts have become a staple in mountain biking, especially for all mountain riding. Since Crankbrothers has been in the adjustable seat post category for nearly five years, we have learned a lot about what works and what doesn't. With that knowledge, we decided it was time for a better approach. With a fresh set of eyes, we designed a post that we believe in. It is technical, durable, and beautiful. We consider it to be the eggbeater of the adjustable seat post market. Introducing the kronolog.

Crankbrother Kronolog

Inspiration: Through our experience in the adjustable seat post category, we have learned that the main source of failure is an overcomplicated design. Hydraulic posts are heavy and problematic, so we took a different route. We wanted to create something simple, and it became clear that a mechanical design was optimal for an adjustable seat post. The kronolog was developed over a two-year process that included extensive design, development, prototyping, testing, redesigning, retesting, etc. The post went through ten design iterations, and even more when you include incremental changes. Through the process, the post was extensively tested both in the lab and on the trail. Crankbrothers even developed proprietary testing fixtures to truly push the post to its limit. We were dedicated to getting this right - and we think we did.

Technical details:
Material - aluminum
Post length - 405mm
Weight - 465g + 28g (30.9mm + remote)
Adjustment range - 125mm/5in
Adjustment type - remote w/ standard shift cable (4mm brake housing)
Diameters - 30.9mm, 31.6mm
Standard colors - black/red, black/black
Color kits - clamp and lever kits available in gold, blue, orange, red, black (sold separately)
Warranty - 2 years w/ proper maintenance
MSRP - $300 / €300

Kronolog features: The Kronolog is a fresh new design with many unique features:
Robust simplicity - The Kronolog is a very simple design, with a limited number of functioning parts. Fewer parts means fewer failures. The Kronolog passes 2.7 times EN fatigue testing, making it twice as strong as other posts on the market.
Mechanical design - The mechanical design allows for very accurate, precise movement. The Kronolog is the only mechanical post that is infinitely adjustable.
Hydraulic feel - Although it functions mechanically, the Kronolog feels hydraulic. It is smooth, supple, and quiet.
Air spring technology - The air spring technology allows you to adjust the preload and return speed simply with air using a standard shock pump.
Two-stage damping - Air damping allows the saddle to return to a normal riding position in two, smooth stages.
Rotational stability - The unique keying system between the quill and shaft virtually eliminates rotational play.
Two-way locking - The seat post locks into position both upward and downward. Pull up on your saddle, and your seat post stays in place.
Improved cable routing - The cable routes from the postʼs stationary body, so when the post moves up and down, the cable does not move. No excess cable to interfere with your riding.
Travel adjust - It is possible to reduce the travel of the Kronolog in 20mm increments by simply adding a spacer.
Remote adjust - The Kronolog remote attaches to the handlebar using a standard handlebar clamp, and can be configured for either right or left hand control.
Stronger and lighter - the Kronolog seat post offers more travel, durability, and robustness, all at about 50g less than the previous Crankbrothers adjustable post.


Crankbrothers Kronolog

The Kronolog is already being ridden by some of the best mountain bikers in the world. Sponsored athletes include Hans Rey, Richie Schley, Chris Van Dine, Jill Kintner, Bryn Atkinson, Andreas Hestler, Holger Meyer, Karen Eller, Lars Sternberg, Team United Ride, and many other talented riders. Many of these athletes were closely involved in the Kronolog testing and development process, and they are excited about the final product:



bigquotesI have been testing the Kronolog and working with the product managers and engineers for the past year. It is a mechanical system, so it is light, strong, and reliable. Don't let the ''mechanical'' throw you off though. It is a Crankbrothers product, so it has a sleek look with attention to design, right down to the cool Crankbrothers logo remote. - Richie Schley

bigquotesI am not willing to compromise on a good descent, and the Kronolog post does what it is supposed to do... Let's me climb with full extension, and reacts quickly and quietly when I want to drop my seat down to shred. For a cable driven system, the feel is really smooth and consistent, plus reliable in all conditions. I find the routing off the back of the post an obvious improvement, and the logo as the lever a thing of beauty. Adjustable posts make riding more fun. - Jill Kintner
bigquotesFor trail riders, the drop post is one of those products that drastically improves the ride, regardless of genre, travel, or wheel size. It's worth its weight in gold. Crankbrothers has been in the drop post game from the beginning. The Kronolog is something we've been working on for quite a while now, and it is the evolution in adjustable post technology. I've been thrashing the Kronolog for months in different conditions, environments, and applications, with no play or failures. This is refreshing because I'm not a fan of bleeding my post after a failure on the trail. The Kronolog is packed with features and refinements, and it is by far my favorite drop post on the market. Take one for a spin and you'll understand. - Chris Van Dine


About Crankbrothers
Founded in 1997, Crankbrothers is known for its highly inventive products and refreshing focus on design. The company gained momentum with the launch of the eggbeater pedal in 2001, and has since brought forth a diverse line of pedals and bicycle components that are distributed globally and enjoyed by many of the worldʼs top athletes. All of the Crankbrothers products are designed in Laguna Beach, California.

www.crankbrothers.com
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136 Comments

  • + 40
 "We consider it to be the eggbeater of the adjustable seat post market." So you consider it to be the poorly-designed constantly breaking seatpost right off the bat, huh? Well that's noble of you I guess...
  • + 5
 I want to shake your hand!!
  • + 3
 Another 125mm seatpost. Fantastic. How about a company come out with something for us bigger guys. RASE is the closest at 9", but it rattles like nobody's business. The next largest dropping one is KS (2012 looks sick) and 150mm, not enough, but I'd rather go with that than 125mm.
  • + 1
 saintjimmy, I use the KS Supernatural 150mm drop post on my Nickel. I'm 5'11" and I choose to ride a medium frame for the shorter top tube. I can truthfully say that the Supernatural drops more than low enough to be of use for someone who is riding a bike that is "too small" for them.
  • + 1
 What an unfortunate, but wildly appropriate turn of phrase for Crank Bros. Seraph do you use the remote or non-remote version? I'm using the non-remote version and so far so far good. It's been reliable through a fall and winter of occasional rides. Will see how it holds up as more rides are piled on
  • + 2
 I use the remote version. The lever is very simple and smooth. I would only replace the post with the new 2013 model because of the improved cable routing. Sometimes if I slam the post down all the way the cable rubs on the tire in the back.
  • + 2
 Thanks for the info Seraph, I'm 6'2 riding a large Cove G-Spot (new style). I'm waiting for the KS Lev to come out (150mm) and see how that works for me... unless RASE can fix their rattling.
  • + 1
 I've got a non-remote version which worked great....until.... I stored my bike for a few months of non-use. Which rendered the seat post useless
  • + 2
 *Every* piece of CrankBros equipment I've ever owned has been a well-marketed piece of crap, without exception.

They still have good marketing I see....
  • + 1
 I have their Iodine 11 bars. So far so good. Pretty sure they don't actually make them though, just put their name on them.
  • + 3
 Eggbeaters may have mediocre bearings and seals, but no other pedal I've tried will reliably engage and disengage in Ice, snow, mud, mud combined with gravel...
  • + 1
 saintjimmy, sucked in for being tall
  • + 1
 forghorn1, I have seen Egg Beaters fail in many different ways, from breaking a spring (thus rendering the entire pedal useless) to outright snapping all the way off. If I'm going clipless, I at least prefer a design that utilizes two separate springs, thus making it possible to still slip in even if one spring should fail. Also I prefer a pedal with a bit more cleat engagement. The pedal and cleat on the Egg Beaters are so small that it's oft hard to even find the damn pedal to clip in.
  • + 3
 Crank brothers ' if only our product was as good as the packaging it arrived in '
  • + 1
 saintjimmy - RASE are bringing out a new version of the 9" Black Mamba in a month or so. I think it'll be slightly shorter with an 8" drop (still enough) and they're claiming 'No Play'. If that means no rattle, then that would be lovely. My Black Mamba rattles like a bag of spanners, however it more than makes up for this when fully dropped into my size M Cove Stiffee's frame, effectively turning it into a trials bike. I'm almost sitting on the rear wheel now. I know a lot of people think a 5" drop is enough, but I can say for sure, the extra 4" of drop I get is incredible, meaning I can ride down seriously steep/rocky terrain (well, relative to my crap handling/nervous disposition that is !). I wouldn't buy a 5" dropper post now that I've got used to a 9". If a 9" Reverb was to come on the market, I might consider buying that, just so that I don't have the rattling any more. But that's not going to happen for a very long time is it, unless someone else comes up with it first, and SRAM have to follow the trend...
  • + 1
 That is some great news! I'll be waiting patiently!
  • + 11
 I DO like that the remote cable doesn't move with the seat. That is actually pretty cool. The cable on my Specialized Command Post doesn't get in my way, but it does slap against my frame a bit, which is annoying but not really a problem. If the new CB post proves to be reliable, I might consider it as a replacement. I am going to need proof though.
  • + 1
 I route my cable through the small gap in the seat clamp. Bit of a squeeze, but it means the slack cable is forced to stay above the seat clamp and hence the cable around the frame to bars stays tight. If you can visulise that..
  • + 15
 No way I will buy another CB post after the crapy Joplin
  • + 16
 keep in mind that the joplin was the 1st dropper post on the market, so you can't expect it to be the best. This post is probably going to be a lot better because: a) its been a few years, and b) they have some competition. plus it looks sexy.
  • + 11
 Joplin wasn't first. Gravity Dropper was first. Joplin was purchased from Maverick; it's their Speedball. It was a half baked design they bought into; unfortunately.
  • + 3
 Gravity Droppers post seem to do fine and they were also one of the first on the scene. Just because you're first doesn't mean it's okay to put out crappy parts. CB reminds me of Apple, except Apples product actually works.....I'm not blasting you Bjammin, just not a fan of CB.
  • + 7
 Give this one an opportunity at least. Every company makes a bad product at some point, somewhere down the line. The gravity dropper works very well but aesthetics wise it looks awful. Which is probably the number 1 selling point of any product in MTB anyway.
  • + 6
 I get really annoyed when people complain about the Joplin, heck it had its faults. But many of those faults could be avoided if people actually maintained (even cleaned) the post in the first place. I service some where people have not even applied new grease, and the original crease has turned to clay. Its not difficult folks, you have to do it to suspension forks...
  • + 1
 well mine were brandnew and they kind of liked to raise during a longer descent. and jeah i really look after them!
  • + 1
 As I said, there were some faults, and definitely faulty batches (you probably have an old version schrader valve fitted). I meant that most people don't bother even cleaning them.
  • + 4
 Mine failed raising one month after buying it too. I had no chance to clean it even once! They should be named Crapbrothers!
  • + 1
 ^^^ Manuel, your comment was hilarious; made me smile. Especially when I think of you saying "crapbrothers" with an accent. No te ofendes; tambien soy mexicano.

Oiga, I say we give c-bros another chance.

But, this is still heavier than the reverb. Really want someone to come out w/ a lighter dropper post
  • + 2
 Hey frijolmoreno, no offence taken man, cause I have no accent. The little flag next to your name can be a bit missleading mate Wink . But you give them that chance. I'll wait for the Fox Dos or a better designed Command Spesh post cause I will never, ever, buy any CB crap anymore.
  • + 10
 An adjustable post is the best money i've ever spent on my bike, makes it faster and funner to ride. But I will avoid the crank nros posts for a while, that joplin was awful and the reverb, specialized, and gravity dropper are just too nice and dependable for a similair cost.
  • + 6
 My KS supernatural is: A. mechanical B. Infinitely adjustable C. 6" of adjustment (150mm) and D. Rick from KS takes care of any issues lickety split (mine had a bad seal). The new KS post will also not have a moving cable. I sure hope the Kronolog is better than the Joplins, but that's a pretty low bar to surpass.
  • + 4
 After my terrible experience with the 50/50xx pedals, the Joplin, and a headset (can't remember the model) ....I have SUCH a hard time giving my hard earned money to a company that uses consumers as guinea pigs.
  • + 2
 I'ts probably made out of glass like the previous Joplin R and their pedals and basically everything they make.. ( I have at least 10 broken pair of Mallet and Candy's )

Thank you Sram for the Reverb seat post.
Now please someone make and alternative to the Malet pedals.
  • + 1
 Off topic...but after having to constantly rebuild and destroying multiple sets of Mallets, I switched to TIME pedals, and will never go back.

What I think they now call the "Z Strong" is the best pedal I've ever used. I run them on my DH and AM bike and they can take a beating. They have sealed bearings and after 3 seasons of riding on my Specialized Enduro, still don't need a rebuild.

I would highly recommend them as an alternative to the Mallet.

That being said, this new CB dropper post looks awesome. Simple and Effective. It's more reliable and durable than the alternatives, it should be a home run.
  • + 2
 One nice thing for the short riders, the ability to shim it down to small rider size. A buddy of mine is going to be stoked as he is looking at a blacklight and another option would be appreciated. Still, will advise him to hang off until CB's iffy quality is tested, especially a gen 1 product. michael
  • + 3
 I really like the concept of this post being mechanical and not hydraulic, the gravity droppers have always been reliable and easy to service. now we just need to see if this post will last.................
  • + 2
 In case anyone is listening, I want a free ride dropper post. I use a specialized command post now, it it gets the job done mostly. But i want something more robust and able to take my butt hitting the seat without tweaking the seat to the sky after a hard landing, even the Reverb with its two bolt seat attachment, it moves too. Don't forget the free-ride people, build something stronger, I know that means more weight, but just do it! There are so many people I ride with that won't get a dropper because it just can't hang with the level of drops and jumps we hit, so they would rather stand up and pedal their squishy bikes than have a post they can't trust. Build us a post we can trust! Looks like this is at least a step in the right direction.
  • + 2
 KS i950r or RASE black mamba
  • + 6
 Ill stick with my reverb k thx bye
  • + 0
 I'll stick with a seatpost clamp !
  • + 3
 dropper posts have seatpost clamps too!
  • + 3
 I've never yet seen a dropper without issues. The reverb my buddy bought spankin new last july had play by august. I won't touch them for another 5 years. Until then I might have to take 5 seconds longer during my ride to change my post height twice.
  • + 1
 @taletotell... Exactly, I know 3 people who have them out of varying stables and all of a sudden its "can't ride today my post's fcuked" or "I can't ride today my post's not working right"

sad state of affairs !!
  • + 2
 Well i have a joplin for two years and its never failed me, not even once, although it is a later model. However its not very smart to own an adjustable post and not have a back-up post, i mean thats just common sense people!
  • + 1
 @fedz that's why you should keep a regular seatpost as a backup heh.
  • + 1
 @PLC07, yep good idea
  • + 4
 Looks interesting. Funny that crank brothers can call someone else's design problematic though. Nowhere to go but up compared to the Joplin.
  • - 2
 looks like with the way the cable is attached to the post, your seat will still be about an inch and a half or so above fully slammed when the post is down. If thats the case thats a pretty major flaw, that inch will make a pretty big difference when you want to really shred. that being said i would love to see what the pinkbike testers have to say about it
  • + 4
 I don't see that being a problem at all...at least not for most people. When the post is fully extended and your seat is at the proper pedaling height, the point where the cable attaches to the post is not going to be slammed against the top of the seat tube. There will be extra space for seat height adjustments and no matter where you put it you still get 125mm of dropper travel.
  • + 7
 I've never ever had to slam my post... Even my DH bike has a good 6" of exposed post at any time. Its good to have more than just balls between your legs when it gets gnarly.
  • + 2
 I'm with Lester, I know at least a couple of girls who already have issues with minimum seat heights, and they're on the right sized frames. @bunkey, of course it isn't a problem on a DH bike, they're designed with low seats in mind.
  • + 1
 I don't think that's a girl specific issue...that's a short legs issue. A fix for that would to be offer a post with less than 125mm of adjustment then. Even if the cable attachment point is moved back under the seat there still has to be a minimum of 125mm of exposed post.
  • + 2
 im with lester too. im not tall so i can see this problem might crop up once i get a hold of this seat post.
  • - 1
 I don't want offend anyone but why would short people need adjustable post anyway? are they trying to fit in? negitve prop me all you want but don't bash something that you can't even use! The main thinking behind the design is to able to climb and descend. Remember people come in all different body shapes and sometimes people buy small frames, adjustable posts aren't for everyone
  • + 1
 im not a girl, and im 6'1 and ride a large frame. I just like to have the ability to get my seat as low and out of the way as possible on the downhills
  • + 1
 Hmm I really hope CB have tested this post as I know countless folks with failed Joplins and it really was nothing to do with lack of maintaining them.

My first thoughts are why not 6" drop. 5" is good for 80% of the time but I find some of our really steep and techy trails I need to get the seat right out of the way.

Its nice to see the fixed cable. Between my wife and I we have 3 gravity droppers which have this = no nasty cable rubbing on the frame and seat clamp. My wife now has the KS900i as the gravity droppers are only 4". The KS rubs the anodizing off both the seat clamp and the frame.

I hate how recently some manufactures are swapping out allen headed bolts for torx. Most trail tools only have one size torx required for the rotor bolts. I can't tell for sure but I can't believe the torx head for adjusting the inclination of the seat is the same size as that style of clamp will require quite a torque.

Time will tell.
  • + 1
 I have personally had the Joplin, Command Post(both versions) and the reverb. I had great luck with the Reverb and it is easily the best of the bunch. My biggest complaint with all of them was having the cable move, all other issues are simply part of the product take it leave it nobody cares, its your money. Clearly CB has seen the writing on the wall and is addressing the main issue, hopefully it works, personally as soon as the new KS model hits I'll be throwing down for it.
To anyone who hasn't tried riding a real All Mtn trail with an adjustable post, it dramatically improves the ride!
  • + 1
 Had a chance to see one of these demo posts last fall, and was underwhelmed.

The flat sides are to reduce the play that the Joplin made infamous, and make everything feel more solid. In the unit I saw, they were using a round wiper/seal at the top, and forcing it around the odd shape at the post, which makes me think that it's going to suffer from premature wear in those areas. Mechanics looked solid, but I'd be concerned with the durability.
  • + 29
 For $300 I will stop, get off the bike, use my trusty QR, raise the seat, close it, and ride away happy with $300 in my wallet. The prices on bike parts lately, especially dropper posts, are bullshit.
  • + 1
 That doesn't sound very promising.

Question: Does the cable exit from the front or back of the post, or can it be run either way?
  • + 11
 Yeah its a shit load of money, but everyone who shells out the money says its the best investment they have ever made on their bike.

But then you as a gnarly hucker wouldn't appreciate the advantages of it whereas an all mountain styley rider would (didn't mean that in a negative way, its just not something thats fairly riding genre specific)
  • + 3
 I definitely agree, that's probably why I can't see spending that much money on one, though I do ride a fair amount of AM and everything here is either hike or ride to the top...We don't have many rolling hills here though, It's usually time to stop for a breather once you're at the top anyways, so we have time to lower/raise our seat. Maybe it's worth it to some people, but I'm just not seeing $300 worth of technology here
  • + 5
 Try crossing the pond where its £300 for us..
  • + 1
 @jezzah... you are wrong, the Kronolog will retail for less than £300
  • - 1
 I love how I get negative propped by someone, yet I know more regarding this issue than pretty much all of the people commenting here....
  • + 4
 It had better be less - annoys me when they just change the dollar sign for pounds and we end up paying 50% more than our US friends... But I wouldn't even spend £200, or even £100, much as I'd like a dropper - in any case I use a 27.2 seatpost and I doubt you can get them that thin. Gonna make my own... Wink
  • + 1
 In fact, the reason things become more expensive over here, is that by the time shipping charges, taxes, VAT and border control taxes have been added... the price has to increase. It is the same for Hope lights, they are pretty reasonably priced here, but over in the US hardly anyone buys them because they are so much more expensive after all the added costs. Roughly 90% of people with lights in California area use NiteRider...

Also if you read the VitalMTB feature on the Kronolog, they are working on a 27.2 version. KS already have one anyway.
  • + 2
 Kind Shock has a 27.2 post with 4 inches of "travel". I actually have it for a year and a half, it still works perfectly.
  • + 2
 @domino0, you work at 2pure? I've not been impressed with the Joplin's but this looks better, lets see after a year or so of normal customer testing.
@bmbracing, Gravity Dropper have been doing mechanical posts in a 27.2 size for years.
  • + 1
 Was the round wiper/seal on a preproduction model?
  • + 1
 Looks fairly promising. Looks fairly robust other then the seals. Hopefully the post hold air and the dampening sticks around for at least a season.. Can't wait to hear some long term reviews... I want a dropper post.. just no one has sold me yet, not for 300 plus bucks anyways.
  • + 1
 Ok CB dont have the best rep when it comes to adjusterble seatpost but hay full respect to them for pushing new nech.I hear alot of bad things said about CB on this furum but hay if it works it will make alot of riders happy and thats the main thing .Never knock new idears and tech.
  • + 1
 Been looking for a dependable adjustable seatpost (doesn't have to be remote) but as you can image I haven't got too far. Thinking of either a Reverb or a Specialized Command Post. Anyone care to chip in their 2 cents on these 2 or on something better that i've missed. Cheers
  • + 2
 If Shimano released a dropper post and claimed "We consider it to be the XTR SPD of the adjustable seat post market" then yes, perhaps I might buy it....but from any other company...nah mate....
  • + 1
 i'm not even sold on this, who makes a seatpost you can't even put your bike upside down on the trail to work on your bike? they did... they made junk seatposts to begin with, if it's as good as they say & believe in them... maybe they should have named it "redemption". don't get me wrong, i love their other products, just not a huge fan of their seatposts.

get a KS!!! (they have a 6" version now)
  • + 1
 No one (promotional guys don't count) has tested it in in the real world. So, like innocent before proven guilty, I will give this the benefit of the doubt and wait to see how it pans out. Crankbros. say they have "proprietary testing fixtures to truly push the post to its limit." There is no substitute for real world riding by many different guys over the long haul to truly test it. That's what will sell it best.
  • + 1
 Thanks, I replied there as well. I hope it proves reliable. I'm definitely keeping an eye on it.
  • + 1
 I just saw a video of this post on a different website and I've got to say the internals look frighteningly bad!

I've have numerous dropper posts now (Gravity Dropper, Joplin, Speedball, Reverb) - they all have their glitches and it looks like Crank Brothers may have finally produced a really decent design - BUT one this really worries me: mud!

This product (like every other CB product I've owned) looks great for SoCal riding, but what happens when it goes near UK mud and grit (e.g. Welsh grinding paste)? Usually it results in fail.

If this thing can last the mud (which I haven't seen them mention testing in this condition) then I think it'll be good - but I am sceptical.
  • + 3
 How exactly does a 'mechanical' dropper post work? And it's a shame we only get the in-house jargon at this stage, I'd love to see what the pinkbike testers make of it.
  • + 2
 Cable actuated instead of hydraulics
  • + 1
 With a remote that size? How does that work?
  • + 0
 The remote is in an orientation that shows off the CB logo. It's a simple thumb lever, similar to Giant's OE dropper post.
  • + 1
 Yeah, that I understand. But how exactly does a thumb lever produce a range of 5" using cables? :S
  • + 1
 It uses an air spring. Just as bigkat mentioned, the mechanical lever probably just acts as a limit to how far the post returns to full travel.
  • + 2
 All it has to do is release the collet / whatever mech they are using to secure the vertical travel.
Same as the reverb, the fluid does the same job. The difference is that hydro allows you to lever mount a speed adjustment, as well you don't have to worry about cable stretch.

michael
  • + 1
 Thankyah
  • + 1
 The lever is just a release. You sit on the seat to make it drop while you have the lever depressed. You then stand to take your weight off the seat and press the lever to make the post extend back up. At least that is how my mechanical dropper post works.
  • + 2
 I think what MtBxKinG wants to know is that a 'mechanical' dropper is something like from RASE or Gravity Dropper where the post moves up via an internal metal coil spring. There are no hydraulics or air springs and no seals, just plain old metal tubes and a large spring. The post remains in position via a small metal plunger (sometimes called a 'pin') inserted into one of many holes in the post. If you want to move the saddle up, you pull the remote lever, which pulls a cable, pulling the plunger out, allowing the post to spring upwards, and when you let go of the lever, the plunger springs back into the nearest hole. The number of selectable height positions is determined by the number of holes. The RASE Black Mamba has 22 holes, each 1cm apart, hence 9" total travel. These systems can be quite reliable, but suffer from 'play', i.e. the gap between the inner post and outer collar, which leads to rattling when you're out the saddle (not noticeable when you're sat down). Hydraulic droppers don't all have this 'play' but have other isses such as air/oil seal reliability, not being able to lift them by the saddle, etc..the only other thing you need to know is that the remote trigger itself can either by mechanical (pulls a cable) or hydraulic (push button like SRAM XX forks remote lockout). You only get hydraulic actuation with hydraulic posts. It's probably better than a cable, a bit like comparing mechanical and hydraulic brakes...
  • + 1
 Diabolicus, indeedy it was. Cheers Salute
  • + 1
 with an exception being the AMP post.
This is fully mechanical as well, but it uses a pivoting collet mechanism. When you activate it, the cable pulls the collet out of lock position allowing the post to move to the next detent stop. My AMP is a 1 -4 drop. It uses groves and ball bearings for guides and stops. I don't think is is in production anymore, was bought out a while ago and seems to have disappeared.

I currently run the AMP on my sons bike, and a Reverb on mine. Never had any problems with either over the years....
(me thinks I may have just jinxed myself...)

michael
  • + 3
 I want to give it a try. I really don't like my command post and I don't want to deal with a hydraulic dropper post.
  • + 1
 iagree i would always pass on hydraulic posts its all goo and well intill it gos wrong cable or even just the boloacklever would be best
  • + 2
 is this gona be as unreliable as the joplin if it is i would recomend gravity dropper or ks suernatural my seals went on my joplin in a few weeks
  • + 1
 I hope someone from CB reads this.

Dear Crank Brothers.

After my experience with your 50/50 pedals and Joplin seatpost I've decided that I will NEVER buy another Crank Brothers product. EVER.
  • + 0
 Fashions come and go, does anybody remember when people wanted 10" of travel and the burliest parts possible were considerd the "dogs" look at bmx 5 years ago it was 7lbs frames and strengthend this and that strongest this etc now theyre lightest this and that but allways breaking, there will allways be the lates fad and trend no matter what people say its human nature to want more or better, its embedded in us, dropper posts are the next 10" travel frame, kid yourselves onto "oh i need it its essential to my ride" so what did you do beforehand??? All those trails u enjoyed so much are they now boring or un dooable without the latest fad??? Il stick to my 170mm hardtail with innertubes and a real £12 seatpost and my right hand that costs me nothing to adjust just a second of my time to soak up that im actually riding and not sat with a catoulouge on my lap wanting more.
  • + 7
 My guess is you have not ridden with a dropper post, or you live somewhere that is either totally flat, or so steep that you ride straight up a fireroad and then stop to drop your seat and turn around and ride straight back down. Or maybe you're just a guy that never puts their seat down and doesn't like to lean the bike over in corners or whip off jumps. On the other hand, there are people who have one and like to lean their bikes over, lay it flat or whip it out, live places where the trails go up and down frequently and generally have a dislike for having a seat in the wrong place pretty much the entire ride. The perfect height for one moment is a total compromise the next. You have two choices, leave it too low and suffer in the pedalling bits or leave it too high and corner like a roadie and jump like a toad. These posts sit squarely in the same 'fad' category as rear suspension, disc brakes and derailleurs. Some people ride single speed hard tails with V brakes and have a grand old time I'm sure, but I'll never have an AM bike without a dropper post again.
  • + 1
 I have owned /maintained dropper posts i have ridden them and broken them, in my eyes a bonus or fancy overpriced gimmik and why would you pay £300 when you could buy a new set of forks or even a hardtail frame?? Its just an absolute joke bike companies running out of ideas and over modding perfectly functional items. And i live near the lake district and pennines, some of the worlds most beautiful scenery and riding terrain in the world, everybody is entitled to an opinion, but buy a dropper (again) or put towards next build or a family day out????? No brainer tbh.
  • + 1
 Fair enough that you don't see the value for where and how you ride, but I'm not calling you on your lack of desire to buy one. I'm calling you on your classification of 'fad'. I don't need new forks, a hardtail or a family day out and I sure didn't pay £300 for one either. For my money, it's the best cash I've spent on my bike in a long time. I would be willing to bet this is not a fad like 10" travel forks and you will be seeing more affordable and more reliable dropper posts in the future and for as long as there are mountain bikes. No, it's not essential to the ride, but it suits my style and has had a huge impact in how enjoyable it is to ride my old favorite trails. As much as rear suspension and disc brakes.
  • + 1
 I do see the draw to them but in uk climate it destroys them, i ride street, trials, and xc i pop my seat up to ride to the place and when i arrive it gets lowerd, i ride a norco torrent set up for allround and i find it perfect for do all and do anything, im 6,4" and 20stone so a dropper dosent work on my weight or the way i ride its a lot of money for what it dose, i still rode xtr v,s up until a bargin set of hope discs came availible and the vs preformed excellently in all conditions i just find tech these days to be drawing on more extras than needs. I mean reverting back to 2pce cranks??? When 3piece are mechanically more sound and servicable?? Ie bend the axle on a 2pce u need the arm/spindle on a 3pce its 1 piece, dropper post screws up on a ride what do u do? Carry a spare?? A simple straight piece of ally/carbon vs a technical and another piece of kit to possibly go wrong?? I do see the perks but a bit young in development for me.
  • + 3
 maybe they learned from their mistakes. But no way I would ever stock another CB post. what a headache.
  • + 0
 Simple but takes two years to design. How does that work? Why shouldn't a a post be essentially a suspension design with a lockout valve? Why does that take years to develop and end up totally unreliable if suspension forks have been around for so long? Why do the bushings fail so quickly? Why can't you grab the seat to lift the bike onto your rack?
  • + 1
 Making something simple to use doesn't mean it's simple to design.

And you can lift it by the seat. Watch the vid or Vital:
www.vitalmtb.com/photos/features/First-Look-crankbrothers-kronolog-Adjustable-Seatpost,3283/Slideshow,0/bturman,109
  • + 1
 the joplin you couldn't though. I was referring most of my angst to dropper posts in general.
  • + 3
 $300, or €300. $300 in Euro is €226. As usual, Europe gets ripped off. Fantastic.
  • + 2
 Crank Brothers should offer a Jolpin trade-in upgrade for their customers. Mine has broken clamp sitting in box for last year and half. But would like to try new one.
  • + 1
 They initially messed up with the Joplin but who knows, maybe this time it will work. Like Microsoft, it didn't work with Vista but it did with 7. Razz
  • + 2
 300 € ? A fashion ripoff ! I have a KS and I paid less than half that. Get real with the prices !
  • + 0
 MSRP - $300 / €300 lolwut
  • + 1
 Maybe I can just buy that lever and retro fit to my Gravity Dropper. It looks like the most reliable component of the whole thing
  • + 2
 i will keep my reverb to but this post looks sick
  • + 1
 I just got my first one of two. I love it!!! Easy install. Functions flawlessly. Quiet. No regrets.
  • + 2
 Save your money for something else. $30 dollar seat Post works just fine.
  • + 0
 but a 30$ isn't telescopic. It makes a huge difference lol.
  • + 1
 Sure it's telescopic. You just have to loosen the quick release and adjust accordingly. 300 bones and more to compensate for something that takes seconds to adjust seems crazy! You can definatley make use of a couple hundred bucks. Just think of all the BEER u can get with that! Haha
  • + 2
 Just go with the Gravity Dropper ... if it ain't broke ....
  • + 1
 GD + Mud = Fail.
  • + 2
 So it is simplified but costs more money? No thanks!
  • + 1
 where do they measure the 400 mm from? is that the entire length of the post once it is fully extended?
  • + 1
 are adjustable seat posts the new thing?
  • + 1
 Funny.
  • + 1
 Just hold tight the KS Lev is going to be out soon
  • + 1
 get ready for play and constant rebuilds guys!
  • + 1
 Reverb all the way every day
  • + 1
 I just hope it works right
  • + 0
 Hey! I just got this email too!! Brothers?
  • + 1
 Looking good !
  • + 1
 no video ?
  • + 0
 KS makes an infinitely adjustable mechanical post? c'mon crank bros..
  • + 1
 KS posts are hydraulic - they're just mechanically actuated.
  • + 1
 ah gotcha, this makes sense.
  • + 2
 I'd probably still go with KS or Reverb. KS looks better I think.
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