2012 Fox Factory-Series Float RP23 Shock Long-Term Review

Feb 1, 2012
by Matt Wragg  
Take a look at how many bikes come with Float series shocks today. Other companies would kill for that kind of market share. In recent years the competition has really stepped it up, so if you’re in the market for an air-sprung shock, there are some serious alternatives to consider. The 2012 Factory-Series Float RP23 is Fox responding to that pressure. The 'Factory-Series' designation means that nothing is spared, inside or out - and the air-sprung damper bristles with features like super-slick Kashima coating on all sliding surfaces, 'Boost Valve' position-sensitive compression damping, a number of air-volume sleeves to tune the air-spring curve, and its 'Adaptive Logic' three-position low-speed compression adjustment. We put the Factory-Series RP23 through its paces on some big-mountain terrain for a long-term review.

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Fox Factory Float RP23 Features:

- Kashima low-friction coating on shock body and internal shaft
- Adaptive Logic three-position compression adjustment
- Pre-set on/off ProPedal function
- HD Rebound
- XV (extra volume) air chamber
- Boost Valve position-sensitive compression damping
- Weight: 208 grams
- MSRP: $420 USD

Factory RP23 Details

Straight out of the box, you can’t help noticing the RP23's low-friction Kashima coating. 'Gold' and 'Shiny.' Those words are music to the ears of bike tarts everywhere and for our money, this is the best-looking shock out there. Kashima coated parts are sent to Japan where the patented (and expensive) process is applied, so we wondered why it looks like the coating was on the outside of the air cannister too. A quick call to Fox Racing Shox, and they explained that both the shaft and the inside the air can have a Kashima coating as there are seals sliding on each surface. Because the parts are immersed to receive the special coating, the outside of the air can gets coated too. The XV air-volume boost sleeve is not coated because it has no moving parts

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The Factory-Series 2012 Float RP23 shock alongside the standard 2011 version.

User-friendly dials: There are some small but very useful details that Fox has added this year. It’s nice to have a little diagram beneath the ProPedal lever that clearly designates its features. In previous years there was always that embarrassing moment, trying to work out which position is which. They’ve re-profiled the rebound adjuster too, so it’s now easier to adjust with cold, fat fingers in wet riding gloves. Which is just as well, because they’ve doubled the number of clicks you get on the rebound, they call this HD rebound. You now get 16 clicks, rather than eight, but it is still in the same range as previous versions, so you can fine-tune your rebound more precisely.

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Here you can see how different the 2012 rebound adjust is (on the left)

Adaptive Logic: For 2012, fox has re-worked the adjustment on the ProPedal and re-named it 'Adaptive Logic.' You still get three options for the little dial on top of the lever, but now they are numbered '0', '1' and '2' and it sets the shock's low-speed compression damping. The compression adjustment controls the shock when the ProPedal lever is switched to 'open.' Turn the two-position lever to 'ProPedal and you get super firm pedaling that is preset internally. Adaptive Logic's low-speed compression adjustments control ride-height and mid-stroke suspension action. The redesign gives the RP23 damper a wider range of tuning options without the complication and added weight of a piggyback-reservoir type damper.

Get the right tune: If you are thinking about buying a Factory-Series RP23 aftermarket, we would advise strongly that you buy it from a proper Fox supplier, as there are different tunes available for the boost valve, XV sleeve, compression and rebound damping, and ProPedal. We went for medium tunes on the compression and rebound, and 175psi in the Boost Valve. In fact, there are several hundred variations you can get, so to find the best one for your particular suspension design and and riding style, it’s best to ask the professionals and get them to help you select the right tune. Buy the wrong one you’re going to have to send it to them to get it re-tuned anyway. While we would have liked to see more tuning info on the Fox website, Fox's Race Program Manager sheds some light on the tuning options available:
bigquotesWe offer both Light and Firm compression and rebound tune options for customers, in addition to higher and lower Boost valve pressures. All of these variables are dependent on rider weight, riding style/level, leverage ratio, and the amount of bike travel. The compression and rebound tunes are related to wheel/shock velocity. The boost valve pressure effects the damping force at a specific position in the shocks stroke. For example, if a rider prefers more propedal platform or firmness, we would raise the boost valve pressure. Another tuning change example would be if a 100 pound rider requires light air spring pressure, we would run a lighter (L) rebound tune. - Mark Fitzsimmons, Fox Racing

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The new position diagram is really welcome

Inside the shock: Inside there are enough features to keep even the nerdiest rider happy. This latest version is the product of constant development and you’ll find all the features from the last few years like the larger volume air can (XV chamber) to help the shock feel less progressive (so it ramps up less aggressively at the end of the stroke) and a Boost Valve. The Boost Valve is the feature that Fox is most proud of. Working off of the preset pressure of the shock's internal floating piston, the Boost Valve meters the compression damping throughout the stroke, making the damping action position-sensitive, not just speed-sensitive like other shocks. For example; when you reach the end of the stroke, even if the shock is moving relatively slowly, a huge chunk of compression damping kicks in to prevent an abrupt bottom-out.

Factory RP23 Performance

We’ve had the RP23 shock attached to a 140mm Saracen Ariel since August 2011. In that time we’ve put it through what our cigarette-packet math adds up to well over a hundred hours out on the trail, which is getting towards a years’ riding for an “average” rider (although what’s average, right?). Most of that time it’s been out in big, alpine terrain with 1000-meter descents. Being happier going down hills, rather than up them, we set the shock with about one-third sag, and pretty fast on the rebound.

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The shock on our Saracen Ariel test bike probably cost more than one of the beater cars in the background of this photo.

Initial impressions: The first thing we noticed was how easily it slides into its travel. With the Kashima coating, Fox has created an impressively supple shock that just gets better as it beds in. We’d go as far as to say that this has the least stiction of any air shock we’ve used. Out on the trail with the pro-pedal off, that translates to good small-bump performance and plenty of grip, it is noticeably better than previous versions of the RP23. If you really give it some stick, you can find the edge of that grip, but you have to go looking for it. With the 140mm Saracen that we had the shock strapped to, we could never smooth the trail out like we could with a big DH rig, but the RP23 kept things surprisingly smooth. Even when we got onto flat-out, chattery stuff, the bike stayed composed, taking the edge out of the rocks, while keeping enough in reserve for ugly things that came up.

Big-hit performance: In the middle of the stroke with the low-speed compression in the '0' (fastest) position, we found occasionally that we wanted something more to push against to pop the bike. That was the exception not the rule though, and we were impressed by the way the new RP' managed its travel. At the end of the stroke it was a civilised affair, unless we got our huck-to-flat on, we rarely noticed we were using the whole lot. In the entire time we had the shock we can’t remember more than a couple of occasions when we felt a real harsh hit as it reached full travel (and generally it was our fault, not the shock's if we did).

Adaptive Logic in action: If we had only used the shock in the big mountains we’d have been tempted to suggest that the Adaptive Logic wasn’t much use. On that kind of rough, natural terrain we only used the shock in the wide open position to descend. When we got onto man-made trails where we wanted to pump the bike more it really came into its own though. With the Adaptive Logic set to the number one position, it gave just enough extra compression damping to work the bike, something more to push against, while keeping the bike more composed. We didn’t go up to position two that often, but it was nice to have the extra firm option. Fox really has worked out what trail riders need with Adaptive Logic. Sure you get much more range of adjustment, on a DH shock, but you can adjust the Fox RP23 on-the-fly out on the trail. The RP23 gives you quick, simple and meaningful changes to the way your bike feels to adapt to whatever may be ahead.

ProPedal: There isn’t much to say about the ProPedal action. If you’ve used a Fox shock with ProPedal any time in the last few years you know what you can expect. For anyone who hasn’t, simply, it dials in a shedload of low-speed compression damping at the flick of a lever, meaning the bike barely bobs even if you mash the pedals. All you need to know is that it has always worked well and Fox has not meddled with its winning formula.

General issues: Reliability is the second most important issue for a shock. The RP23 shines here too, we haven’t had to touch or think about it since we’ve had it. We are slightly past the recommended service interval now, but practicalities have meant we haven’t had a chance to get it looked at and it’s still working fine. You can service the main parts that will wear out yourself, like the seals and the mounting hardware. However, for a full service the shock will need to go to a professional as it's charged with high-pressure nitrogen inside, which is not something to be messing about with.

One criticism that people have about air shocks is that they don’t work on long descents. That’s quite frankly nonsense these days and the RP23 is no exception to that. On big descents (we’ve tested the shock on descents up to an hour long) it did heat up, you only have to touch the air can after to be certain of that, but this didn’t affect the performance too much. Sure, you do lose a little bit of damping performance if an air-shock gets seriously hot, but no matter how long or ugly the descent, our RP23 stayed controlled and composed.

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Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe only need three words to sum up this shock: still the benchmark. While the competition have been closing in on Fox, they have upped their game again with the Factory Series RP23 and it is still the air shock that all others will be measured against. If we had to pick another three words to describe it they would be supple, controlled and reliable. We pointed the test bike down the gnarliest trails we could find and it never came up wanting. If you are not sure just how good the new RP23 is, ride one for a week and then spend a few hours on any air shock from one or two years ago. You'll appreciate how far things have moved on. The Factory RP23 is a class act. - Matt Wragg



Your thoughts about the Fox Factory RP23 shock?






81 Comments

  • + 11
 I wonder when Fox runs out of marketing names, it has to happen some day Razz


However I'm glad to hear the shock works the way it's supposed to, it's amazing how Fox can step up their game every time they come up with a new product.
  • - 2
 PUSH Industries has said that a pushed Monarch has some advantages over a pushed rp23...
  • + 18
 and would you care to tell us these advantages or you keeping them for your self?
  • - 1
 Maybe next year they'll have an RP234 XP
  • + 2
 I have not ridden a monarch like frijolemoreno said up there.... but I have a 2010 revelation and a 2010 talas fit and I must say the revelation is a significantly nicer fork.... it is much stiffer, smoother, and more adjustments with the dual air. So I would be up to try out a monarch... however I do enjoy my DRCV rp23.
  • + 5
 I've had a new bike every year for quite a few years now, and they've all been Fox front and rear.

Over the past two years I've noticed the longevity reduce. I am one of the few people that do change all seals and oil at the specified intervals. My latest OEM 120 RL has stanchion rub in 30 hours (i.e. BEFORE the first service interval was up). The previous bike's fork had stanchion rub in sixty hours (including new seals and oil at 30 hours).

My OEM RP23 has play in the mounts in 50 hours. All my shocks have reducer/bearing play within a year.

I love how the forks and shocks work, but I'm not impressed with their durability lately. Yeah, they are under warranty, that's fine, but then I have to borrow a bike or fork while the fork is sent off. Again.

And looking at the other forks I've owned and serviced, its about 2009 that the forks seem to suffer stanchion rub early. My LBS also reports this. It is sad that I can service a 2007 fork that has been ridden to death and t has less stanchion rub than a 2010 fork.
  • + 5
 Just take your location in to consideration here buddy. Maybe the dust and heat of the summer have an effect on the oils and rubbers of your seals? Not critising in any way but they will be made to the standards of the environment of the FOX HQ over in the states. It maybe a different environment to yours.
The UK has always had issues with products coming form the states and made to the corrosive standards of their soils and weather. The UK is harsh compared to over there and tends to eat things at a fast rate than other places.
  • + 3
 Yeah the stanchions are really made out of crap. Especially the 2011 Kashima. A friend of mine (who is the national champion over here) has the 32 RLC, and after one year of riding, the stanchions are worn out completely. You can actually feel with your fingers how the bushings "dug in" it, and the aluminium is visible. Don't get me wrong, I really like how Fox forks work, (especially the 36RC2) but there is no way that I'll spend that much money on a fork that needs new stanchions, and some other parts after a year or so...

btw. I have a 2004 Marzocchi Z150 SL, and it's stanchions are almost like new. I can't imagine a Fox with stanchions that last half as long as that.
  • + 2
 gazmataz, I understand your point, but I spent three years living in NorCal and that's where I first noticed this 'accelarated wear' issue on my own forks. My LBS here has seen the same change in the longevity of forks.

And in line with what Lehel said, I've seen the original Marzocchi Z1s ridden in my area for ten years and they have no rub whatsoever, and they've been neglected. Why can't Fox have that sort of longevity?

I'm getting to the point that if Giant change to Rock Shox or even Marzocchi as the OEM supplier on their high-end Maestro bikes, I don't think I will be disappointed.
  • + 1
 Interesting point. Marzipan' have always had issues with their seals on the older forks so the lack of wear as you put it could actually be down to the minimum contact of seals to stantions. Don't get me wrong, I'm not defending or incriminating either or, it's just two ends of the spectrum. The coating may be the mut's nuts but it will fade and wear off quickly if it's a soft compound based coating. Obviously something that is a compromise for fox. The lasting power is obviously something they need to address here. Let's hope they do.
  • + 5
 I love my 2010 Trek Tuned RP23 but i'd never dream over upgrading, 400 odd quid!!? I serviced mine a while back and I was expecting all sorts of black magic inside but to me they seem deceptively simple on the inside, And the is Kashima coating . . . im sure it makes for a slightly smoother ride but to me it just seems like unnecessary bling. I'd rather see better value for money than gold coatings . . .
  • + 1
 Yeah dido..can't really seem to find anything wrong with my rp23...well not enough to invest that amount of money. The original works really well.
  • + 4
 A car shock costs around 20 Euros at a carpartsstore. Add 3 Euros for levers and valve, drill and tap 2 holes. Incredibly expensive to what amounts to a low tech device made of aluminum tube and some seals, that lasts for 50 hours from service to service...
  • + 2
 I thought the review was good Matt. You clearly gave a detailed review and expressed everything which was needed, after all a review is pointless if it isn't detailed. As for comparing different shocks i don't know how people expect you to do a run after run after run swapping over shocks, it would be pointless. A product review isn't a comparable test
  • + 2
 Cheers dude.
  • + 1
 good one
  • + 2
 Wait huh? I feel like the explanation of this needs to be clarified/ rewriting, seeing as how it is written sounds a little contracting.

"larger volume air can (XV chamber) to help the shock feel less progressive (so it ramps up less aggressively at the end of the stroke) and a Boost Valve. The Boost Valve is the feature that Fox is most proud of. Working off of the preset pressure of the shock's internal floating piston, the Boost Valve meters the compression damping throughout the stroke, making the damping action position-sensitive, not just speed-sensitive like other shocks. For example; when you reach the end of the stroke, even if the shock is moving relatively slowly, a huge chunk of compression damping kicks in to prevent an abrupt bottom-out."

btw I understand how it all works. I'm bringing this up for the benefit of people who might get confused by it.
  • + 1
 I'd stick my neck out and say there isn't a contradiction. One of your examples is about the spring curve and the other how it damps the movement, which although similar, aren't the same thing. In both instances the shock has been developed to reduce violent movements.
  • + 1
 That's bang on. The spring rate is related to the load applied to the shock and linear is generally better. The damping is relative to the shaft speed and/or shaft position, the bits which fox has managed to isolate and is therefore proud of.
  • + 1
 Actually, Fox is proud for other people's findings and how they bought a patent. BoostValve is nothing more than the old SPV, named "a la Fox", since they brought in Roy Turner, the patent owner for the bicycle related SPV products.
  • + 2
 I have been using manitou air shocks and found them vastly superior to the pre 2011 Fox shocks. I haven't used the 2011 and newer fox stuff, but the older stuff was crap.
  • + 1
 Matt what you wrote was clear I was just saying that it should probably be edited since that distinction between the spring curve and the dampening wasn't clear (ie was overly simplified)
  • + 2
 Ok,
Does anyone else find the new propedal diagram sticker contradictory to how propedal works on earlier models of the RP23?
The sticker seems to suggest that when propedal is switched 'on' that it goes immediately to setting number '3' (max propedal compression damping), while when it is switched 'off' it goes to 0, 1, or 2 (depending which one you have the knob set to).
The non-kashima RP23's (according to fox's website) work in a way that if propedal is switched 'off' they are fully open (or set to the equivalent of '0'), and that if propedal is switched 'on' then it sets the damping to 1, 2, or 3 (depending which one you have the knob set to).
Off of fox's website for the earlier RP23's: "The ProPedal knob only changes damping when the ProPedal lever is in the PROPEDAL position."
Is it still the same and I'm being confused by the sticker, or am I missing something?
  • + 1
 Vicrider, the 'Pro-Pedal' lever does now work in almost the exact opposite way, whereby one side is for Full-On ProPedal, (at any time, just a flick of the switch) and the other side is for 'Open, or 1 and 2 (levels of damping.)

This means that you can have firm (3) at the flick of the switch, rather than choosing whether you have 1,2 or 3 at the flick of the switch, it puts the onous on needing (3) on demand, rather than needing (0) on demand. Much like reversing the rear mech release for more DH type bikes, (Low normal) where the faster release (Dropping of chain / un-tensioning of spring) gives you a longer bigger gear when you need a burst of speed, as opposed to giving you an easier gear if you need to suddenly tackel a climb (unlikely in DH).

It makes sense where the most critical gear change is to find an easier gear to tackle unexpected obstacles at slow speed, thus its more AM/XC focused, as it should be really.

Hope this makes sense.
  • + 2
 Thanks for clearing that up, it does make sense. The confusion stemmed from the article insinuating that the propedal on the new one hadn't changed at all. All clear now, cheers.
  • + 2
 i actually quite dislike my RP23 (non Kashima) I feel it has too little rebound adjustment. I believe there's only 6 or 7 "clicks" and I find that on 2 clicks from slowest - it's too slow, and 3 clicks from slowest it's too fast. It would be nice to be able to fine tune the rebound more
  • + 1
 i had that same feeling and got it tuned by Mojo... now it completely rocks. of course it does depend on the bike and your riding style. i am outside the normal rider weight bands but after the tune the range of adjustment is just dialled. love it.
  • + 1
 I'll give the tuning a go before dtching the shock in favour of a CCDBair... though I suspect that might be a waste of money... as I'll probably end up with a CCDBair regardless :p
  • + 1
 i hear what you are saying... CCDB is on my wish list still.
  • + 1
 I'm 210lbs and my DHX Air blows through travel on my 6.75inch bike. It really doesn't handle the hits I thought it should. The RP23 is obviously more advanced and tunable, but would my experience with it be any different? I can't help but interpret "The first thing we noticed was how easily it slides into its travel" as that I should expect the same issue.
  • + 1
 Is this for the 2012 DHX Air? What bike?
  • + 1
 I'd see about getting your shock tuned. Out of the box, shocks come tuned for an "average" rider, which is always a compromise on every front. I don't know how you ride, but you definitely weigh more than that notional average rider. I saw a really good piece somewhere last week, explaining why everyone should have their shocks custom-tuned to them and their bike, so they can get the best out of their kit (although I can't remember where it was). Initial stiction (how easily it slides into its stroke) doesn't mean the shock won't have plenty of damping when you need it.
  • + 2
 Had the same problems with a 2011 DHX Air. Just went for a RS Vivid Coil, everything is fine now.
The rp23 was a little bit better, but after rinding just a half day in DH conditions in an enduro it went in the opposite direction. It did not respond at all, was hard like a brick. Even lowering the air preasure did not help.
Nothing helped, was changed on warranty & sold it.

They were both non-kashima versions.
  • + 1
 @mattwrag

unfortunately there aren't really any tuning options for the DHX Air, I speak from experience having owned 3 on different frames Frown

its a fundamentally flawed shock based on old technology and even Fox's distributors have admitted to me that for trail / all-mtn the RP series is the go to choice, with the DHX coil and RC coil shocks the go to choice for FR and DH, with the DHX Air languishing in the hinterland///
  • + 1
 I have a 2012 Giant Reign X. Instead of buying a new shock, I'm using that money to swap my bike and pay the balance on a new Faith. It's already coiled and spec'd higher. I'll be crazy and 2x it in the future if I have to. A guy pedals up our local trails on a Driver 8. So I think I can handle the heavier Faith.
  • + 1
 This is such a sick shock! ive tried the 2011 and the 2012. Its a big diffrence, the "lock out" actually works on the 2012 one. The gold coatings is also a nice addition to it. The auto sag feature i found doesnt work very well. It sets it to soft i found that i need to run 20 psi above what auto sag sets me at. When it bottoms out its not harsh at all it very smotth as with the 2011 you know when you bottom it out.... The longest decent ive done on it was 3 miles of rocky and flowy single track and i never felt that the shock heated up so much that it started not to work very well. One thing i dont like is it developes a little bit of "play" in th intial stroke of the shock i thought they would have figured it out for 2012 but its still a issue that i wish they would deal with. Overall its a great rear shock. Tested on a 2012 Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Carbon.
  • + 1
 mojo in the uk have sorted that problem out where it has that little bit of play. they have changed a air seal leaving it with no play, and its not lock out its propedal. lockout shock are triads and rpl
  • + 1
 It is good they have put the propedal on off diagram on, since of the many people I know with float shocks one of them is certain as to which way on and off are. The rest know no better, and are happy like that! A plain float r is a great shock, better than most others. All the flasher models (RP23 etc) I guess are even better, they must be because they have more buttons.
  • + 1
 Hello ALL!

I wanted to ask from yaals opinion on this---> i have 2009 fox dhx 5.0 im a newbie and im trying to get the correct sag for me.....its eye 2 eye is 9.50" but after i put my riding gears and i get on the bike my eye 2 eye goes down to 8.25" is that too much sag(1.25") for a casual rider like me? and or should i stiffen up the spring collar until my sag reduces to maybe 1"?
any help/advice would b awesome yaal!

tnx
E
NORCAL
  • + 1
 I REALLY want to try one! I have always been a COIL guy until I swapped out my coil fork on my Nomad to a new 36 Float Kashima with the new Fox seals. Such an amazing fork, I never thought a air fork would out perform a coil fork for me. I currently have a DHX RC-4 with Ti-coil and think I might buy one of these and keep the shock I like best!!!
  • + 1
 I have one on my '12 Nomad and its amazing. So supple and smooth it's crazy. Can't wait to ride some DH on it and see how it stands up to the test.
  • + 1
 I guess I can't say I'd be one to go for anything with the Kashima coating, a lot of local guys have had major stiction problems after only a few months of riding. These are guys who have other bikes too and rotate the stable, and all of them have complained about stiction in the newer Fox forks and shocks. I'll stick to my Rock Shox for the time being.
  • + 1
 I'v had big problems with stiction on two forks, it turned out that some material (i dont know if its from the seals, something in the soil or mud or water, i dont know) had started to deposit on the stanchions and was forming spots with massive friction (i think its much like the bedding in of brakes, where the pads deposit some of the pad material onto the disc and form a coating). You couldnt see it but you could clearly feel it, very tacky. It was hard to get off too, much like trying to remove sticker glue.
When I realised, I started cleaning my stanchions (with something like alcohol or brake cleaner) and applying a tiny bit of suspension grease (like slick honey), in between every ride. Suspension feels 95% as smooth as right after a complete rebuild, all the time.
  • + 1
 with this new RP23 I have seen a lot of bikes that would use a DHX air normally switch over, I do not think that the DHX air will last long unless it is turned into a full DH airshock.
  • + 0
 Thank you for the informative article. However allow me to comment that tests such as that, are more like essays trying to squeeze as many compliments as possible in a certain length of text.

All my suspension products are from Fox and I am a repeat customer. In this test I would be interested to know how the RP23 compares to the more expensive Fox air shocks.I would be interested to have a testers opinion on whether one for example with an Intense Tracer 2 with an RP23 should consider upgrading to a DHXair or not. How far would I be pushing it if I asked to compare it with a coil shock from Fox or a CCDB for the Saracen and not compare it with a downhill rig as in the test? It is my opinion that this shock is just a very good, in terms of quality and reliability, option to include in a bike and be able to offer it as economically as possible, good enough , "enough" being the key word here, for many situations but is it enough to offer us the joy that we seek with an all mountain rig? I believe not and shocks like that should be acceptable in bikes up to 100mm travel.
  • + 1
 Yes, l am also very interesed in how a Tracer2 would work with a DHX air kashima. As what your review said there are hundreds of variations with these shocks. If someone could explain to me the T2s VPP suspension characteristics to help me get the right tune that would be great! Does anyone have any experence with 2012 dhx air? I have always heard the old ones were junky
Excellent review, Matt!
  • + 9
 I take offence to you suggesting my review is an essay trying to cram compliments in. Fox sent me the shock to test and I've tried to describe how I found its performance as best I could - as it happens it's a very good bit of kit. As I'm writing for a website I have the luxury of being able to write at some length about it, rather than trying to condense points.

I am curious how it would compare to a back-to-back with a DHX Air, however I can't run direct comparisons to a coil shock on that bike as the coil doesn't clear the linkage (I tried to fit a DHX 5 on there). It also gets much more complicated logistically to run that kind of test. I was guiding for most of the time I was testing the shock and that means I wouldn't have time to switch shocks between runs, or do back-to-back runs on the one track to make a proper comparison. As for this shock only being suitable for 100mm bikes? That's just nonsense.

Panzer, cheers. If anybody at Intense is reading this and fancies letting me abuse a Tracer II, I'd more than happy to let you guys know how the shocks get on! But, to get the best information, as I say in the piece, have a chat to the guys at Fox.
  • + 0
 im running it on a nomad, and for me its as he describes it, you dont even realise the suspension is working and how big the hits are and im on 160mm....super smooth. Pro pedal is perfect. my buddy has a dhx5 coil on his nomad we could do a direct comparison on the same trail next time your here matt.
  • + 2
 Dear Matt, I am sorry if you found my comment offensive, I did not mean it in a disrespectful way for an article that is informative, well written and detailed. You must however see my point of not seeing everything on the RP23 on the positive side, hence my opinion that is not suitable for bikes with longer than 100mm travel. I am rather passionate about the negative aspects of this shock or others with similar arrangement as I recently bought two bikes with it. The first one is also mentioned somewhere above. I got it with a RP23 against my better judgement after reading its review in a German Magazine which described that the bike is even making clonking sounds... Another bike in the same magazine is one year category winner with a DHXair and the next year a category looser with a Monarch. Longer than 100mm travel bikes and especially bikes with vpp, DW, or FSR need more tunable shocks requiring the Boost valve adjustment and bottom out feature as in the DHX air. Single pivot bikes even with a linkage actuated shock like the Ariel may be less complex in their leverage ratio progression trough their travel.
  • + 0
 i have learned and choose not to support a company that has horrid customer service. bring on the neg props, but how would you feel to send numerous amount of warranty/service work to them from myself and customers from my shop i worked at and told them one to two months later that fox hasnt gotten their suspension item on the table for repair yet, sorry. i will still continue to support other suspension manufactures for this reason alone.
  • + 0
 For years the RP23 was a benchmark in lightweight, multipurpose and multi-adjustable shocks. I must agree it's a nice piece of kit but personally feel that aesthetically the 2012 models look crap with those gold details and painting. Very USA.
  • + 2
 Would like to ride kashima version of Trek's DRCV shock. The dual air can way out-performs anything else i've ridden.
  • + 1
 That's the first thing that I'we thought of reading this! The RP23 combined with the DRCV.... That would be madness! Big Grin
  • + 1
 I have the previous model and it works great on my Prophet. An improved RP23 would be unimaginably great if all performs as said!
  • + 2
 RS all the way, fox is a weekend warrior "it must be good cos it says fox in it" kinda brands.

Personal opinion mind.
  • + 1
 nice! all it needs now is high speed compression adjustment and separate rebounds for low and high speed compression. that's just me though.
  • + 1
 does this mean that I can re sticker all of my s p v shocks and sell them to you guys for adaptive logic on sale .
  • - 2
 As amazing shocks produced by different companies seem and are in come cases Fox seems to have a certain style that is unbeatable. Throughout the years I've ridden many of their shocks along with shocks produced by RockShox, xFusion and other companies but Fox always always amazes me with its smoothness and reliability! Don't get me wrong, there are many different shocks that are starting to catch up but not quite yet Smile

Kashima seems to do wonders too, I wonder when someone will come up with and equivalent to it.
  • + 2
 That's total bullshit. Fox has nothing against Vivid RC2/Air, CCDB/Air.
  • + 0
 I was talking about trail/XC shocks, my bad.

When talking about Vivid RC2 I would say it definitely misses the propedal however, performs better than the DHX 5.0 (only comparison I can make). The Monarch certainly beats the 5.0 by far. My personal experience with the 5.0 in 2009 was not bad but I heard many stories about it blowing through the travel. Maybe it Fox has looked into it and improved its 2012 model. I've never tried Cane Creeks double barrel, I need to in the near future though.

By the way @tabletop84, what is your impression, why would you say the Vivid and CCDB are better than Fox shocks? Just curious, since you didn't give a reason.
  • + 3
 In short: they are technically more advanced. The CCDB has completely independent oil circuits for low speed and High speed compression and rebound. The vivid easily tuneable with different shimstacks, easier to service and has also independent beginning and ending stroke rebound.
  • + 0
 fox have moved to the rc4 from 2010, the only thing in competion with that would be the ccdb
  • + 1
 Beautiful engineering as what we all expect for Fox. The black & Kashima gold is very nice indeed!
  • + 1
 You mean like a monarch plus rc3?
  • + 1
 The bike is so sick !!! No dealer in canada Frown
  • + 1
 So for UK Fox tuning/servicing. Mojo or TFTuned?
  • + 1
 mojo, cause tf send there stuff to mojo
  • + 2
 love that fork 3
  • + 1
 I prefer my CCDB coil over my Fox air shocks
  • + 1
 The CCDB makes my Blur LT feel like a DH rig yet delivers excellent pedaling performance. The RP23 just always felt kind of harsh on the small stuff, even though I had it PUSHed. It's more plush than my XC race bike, but the CCDB really takes the bike onto a totally different level.
  • + 2
 ^i totally agree with this. having swapped an rp23 with a ccdb on my tr. covert, you just cannot beat the hi/lo spd adjustments on the ccdb. Obviously, we're not talking apples to apples here but I have had a much better experience with a stock RS Monarch and Plus rc3 over my then "tuned" rp23.I felt the Monarch's compression tune gave better grip. Having ridden a buddy's covert with the Kashima coat..i don't get it. no real difference to my total notapro style.
  • + 1
 Fox > Rockshox

But that's because of my bad experiences.
  • - 3
 in the survey... WOW i have no experience on the fox rp32, hows that shock?!?
  • + 3
 The yet-to-be-released RP32 has three blue levers, each with a unique, pre-set low-speed compression and Propedal value. You can mix and match the lever stack on the fly (similar to the combination lock on a Gucci carry-on bag) to achieve a factory-level custom tune for every trail situation.
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