Maxxis High Roller II Tires Review

Aug 8, 2011
by Dunbar Cycles  
What is it: The original High Roller has proven itself to be both a top contender and a great all-around tire, having numerous World Cup and World Champ victories to its name, but Maxxis has been working hard on a new version, aptly named the High Roller II, that builds on the original design. Maxxis claims that they have improved both braking and cornering traction, as well as created a tire that rolls faster. There will initially be just two versions available: both using the same 2.4" wide, 2-ply casing, but one utilizing their 3C triple compound, and the other their longer lasting 60a rubber - although you can be sure that smaller volume options will be added in the near future. The 3C compound High Roller II tested here retails for $93 USD, similar to their other 3C offerings, although you'll likely be able to find it for less at your local shop.


Maxxis High Roller II
The new High Roller II takes the best attributes of the original design and builds on them, with Maxxis claiming that the new model rolls faster, brakes better and corners more predictably.

Maxxis High Roller II details:

- Initially available in two versions: 2.4'' wide, 2-ply, 3C compound/2.4'' wide, 2-ply 60a compound
- Weight: 1290 grams (3C version, actual)
- MSRP $93.00 USD (3C model)


The details: Maxxis hit a home run with their original High Roller, one of the most successful tires ever made, but riders are going faster and further than in the past and it was time to look for more performance from an old favorite. The High Roller II uses the same basic arrangement as the original design, and even the same casing, but knob shape and layout have been altered in an effort to find more braking traction and corning bite while also looking to improve rolling speed. The chevron shaped crown lugs have been reversed and feature a much more pronounced braking edge to them, along with a sipe from left to right to allow for more knob flex. One of the few complaints about the original High Roller was an uncertain feel from the tire when transitioning from the crown to the shoulder knobs, something that Maxxis have claimed to address with the added vertical sipe to the braking lugs that span the tire's center section. A tire is judged greatly upon its cornering abilities and while the original High Roller is known to be among the best, Maxxis wanted to take it to the next level without losing the attributes that made the first design popular to begin with. The cornering knobs were altered with this in mind, angling them slightly for more bite and adding a vertical sipe, again for added knob flex to allow them to conform to the ground better than a solid knob. Changes were also made to have the cornering lugs bite sooner than on the previous design.


Maxxis High Roller II
The High Roller II uses a revised cornering knob layout (left) that have been designed to engage sooner in an effort to provide a more positive turn-in feel. Sipes have also been added to the side knobs that allow them to flex and conform to the ground better. The crown knobs feature far more prominent braking edges, and also see sipes incorporated.


Given that a tire's width will vary depending on the width of the rim, size is always a tricky thing to discuss, but it is universally agreed upon that the original High Roller is slightly undersized compared to the advertised width. The new High Roller II uses the exact same casing as its predecessor, which Maxxis says uses a 2.4" volume, but also employs taller shoulder knobs that give the tire a wider footprint than the original High Roller. The difference is clear to see with both versions mounted to the same DT 2350 wheel (24.8mm internal rim width): the original High Roller measures up at 2.28"/58.1mm wide, while the new High Roller II comes in at 2.32"/59.1mm wide. Again, because the casing is the same, this difference is solely down to taller shoulder knobs. This is slightly slimmer than the claimed width, but keep in mind that tire size is a function of rim width and it will vary accordingly.


Maxxis High Roller II
While it's easy to see where the High Roller II came from, there are also some clear differences between the two that should create a tire with a different personality. Beyond changes to knob shape, the new High Roller II is also slightly wider due to taller shoulder knobs - 2.32'' wide compared to the old versions 2.28'' wide, measured on the same DT Swiss rim.


The performance: I tested the High Rollers II's on a 2011 Intense M9, mounted on an MTX 31 rim in the back and a Mavic 521 rim up front. After some experimenting I settled on running 25psi in the front, paired with 29psi out back with XC weight tubes. One of the first things I noticed on the High Roller II was how much more I had to lean the bike into corners compared to the original High Roller. The old High Roller had a fast, almost harsh transition when going from the center to the corning knobs, where the High Roller II takes a bit more energy to get on the side knobs, but provides a much smoother and predictable setup into corners. Once I got used to leaning the bike more I was blown away by how far I could push and lean the new tire's shoulder knobs and my confidence in them quickly skyrocketed. When the knobs did start to break loose, it was a lot more predictable than the original High Roller. Overall, the High Roller II provides a smoother and more predictable feel throughout the corner. One thing to note was that on some of the harder packed corners in the Whistler Bike Park I could feel the longer, angular corner knobs of the High Roller II starting to fold over, causing the tire to lose traction. Do keep in mind that it's not designated as a hard pack tire, and those same long cornering knobs are what enables the tire to find its impressive traction in the slop and loam.


Maxxis High Roller II
A predictable feel and more control when braking make the High Roller II an improvement over the original design.


To be honest, I didn't notice a massive difference between the old High Roller and the new High Roller II when it came to straight line braking. The High Roller II still offered the same great braking power that made the original such a popular choice for a rear tire, but the High Roller II excels in braking control while cornering. I found that the old High Roller could make the rear end hard to place on the steeps when on the brakes hard, but the new version feels like it now has a touch of the Minion DHF braking control in it, turning the rear end of the bike into a rudder on the steep stuff that can still be easily moved around. However, the High Roller II offers more outright stopping power than the Minion DHF due to its large paddle-like center knobs.

Given that conditions can vary so much on the same trail, rolling speed can be hard to gauge, but the High Roller II does feel like it rolls a touch slower than the old version. This is probably due to the increased contact patch from the center knobs being flattened out, along with the fact that the tire is slightly wider and has increased spacing between the knobs. That increased spacing may slow down the tire a bit, but it created great mud clearing performance that I was impressed by. One race in particular was under horrendous conditions that saw the usually fast rolling course transformed into a series of swamps and muddy ruts. Many riders made the switch to full-on mud tires, but I decided to stick with the High Roller II's to see how they would handle the nasty weather. Every time I would stop during practice I was blown away by how there was next to no mud packed into my knobs, while other riders around me had Minions that resembled semi-slicks. The High Roller II cleared great in the sloppy conditions and found tons of traction where I thought that they may struggle.


Maxxis High Roller II
The 3C compound High Roller II (left) after nine days of solid riding, including time in the Whistler Bike Park. The updated High Roller managed to stay remarkably clear in muddy conditions (right)


When it comes to durability you need to keep in mind that this is a performance tire that offers superior traction, and therefore it sadly does not always last as long as some of its harder compound competitors. I put a total of nine days of solid riding and racing on the 3C compound High Roller II's, but this included full days in the Whistler Bike Park that can easily count for a week of riding in other locations, and would likely replace at least the rear tire around the twenty day point. After feeling the cornering knobs fold in some of the harder packed corners in Whistler, I was worried that the thin and long side knobs of the High Roller II were going to start tearing at the base, and although there was a small amount of tearing beginning to show, they did hold up better than expected. During my time in the Whistler Bike Park I pushed the limits of my wheels, putting a couple flat spots in my rim without suffering any flats. I would by no means say that these tires are more resistant than any previous 2-ply Maxxis tire though, as I have always found that the rubber and sidewalls on the Maxxis' offers great flat protection. One thing to note is that on some of the high speed, hard packed corners the wider flanged and thinner side knobs sometimes will fold over causing the tire to lose traction.


Pinkbike's take: We loved the improved predictability during cornering and were impressed by how well the tire performed in the sloppiest of conditions. The new High Roller II is a step away from a comprehensive dry tire, and a step towards a true all-conditions option that can be used in more settings. It slots in between the Minion, a dry tire, and the Wet Screams. The original High Roller was, and still is, a great tire, but I think it's the same as the comparison between the original Knight Rider to the new Knight Rider. David Hasselhoff might now be an alcoholic, and who cares that he might only be popular in Germany, he is still a timeless classic who will never be forgotten. For those who don't understand my bad analogy, I'd still use the first generation High Roller, but the new version is an improvement in nearly every regard.



- Adam Mantle
Intense Bikes
Dunbar Cycles


Check out the Maxxis website to see their entire lineup.


Have you ridden the new High Roller II's? Agree with Adam's impressions? Let's hear what you think - put those thoughts down below!



183 Comments

  • + 34
 Guys quit complaining! Yes they're expensive but so what? Nobody is asking you to go out and buy them! If you don't want them go buy some minions or some regular high rollers! Cheesus. Also looking at it they're only expensive as any other Maxxis 3C tire, there will be cheaper single and dual play versions, keep your pants on people.
  • + 6
 The wirte up on dirt said they tried cut down the blank spot between middle tred and the side tred as some people said they felt a lack of grip there? it looks like the tredless gap is even bigger now. and when they say they used the same 2.4 width form the last highrollers. Mine are 2.5.

dont care though I still want them I think Maxxis know what they are doing and I cant judge a tire by looking at it.
  • + 6
 Yeah I'm not really gonna question Maxxis, I'm 99.999999999% sure they know what they're doing lol And as I said, nobody is saying BUY THESE TIRES. There are plenty of other options on the market, if people don't like them, buy something else lol
  • + 41
 You have to understand that bike industry is a big joke, where everything is way overpriced just like this circle shaped rubber - 100$.
  • + 3
 Lewis check the small style knobs in the centerline, they now have an edge pointing towards the blank spot. The bigger of the center knobs are spaced farther and siped. The side knobs are taller by a bit. They gave it more bite when your riding in that open spot on the tire.
  • + 6
 Its quite naive to think tires are just rubber circles. Think of all the work that goes into making them, to get them to EXACTLY the right size, in designing the tread and testing them, manufacturing and distributing them. If you think you could design and mass produce a winning DH tire just like that and make it super cheap then you're a very silly person indeed.
  • + 5
 scrippsranc I see dude, since the tred is farther appart they well she dmud better too. It just seems like they did the opposite of how dirt explained it.

and dude abouve he was overdoing it saying they are jsut rubber circles but you can see where hes coming from. especially if you go and ride moto for a while most stuff is the same price and you get so much more for your money. especially with tyred they cost the same and you get 50X the product when it turns up in the post.

and when you go to a track you spend £10 entry fee and £10 on petrol ride the whole day, spend 5 hours actually riding the bike. Go to fort william on your DH bike pay £30 to get on the uplift, ride all day and if your a hero manage 8 runs, sub 6 minute runs each thats about 45 mins of riding. its not fair.
  • + 3
 Well okay but thats only applying to DH. And petrol prices have nothing to do with biking. I just go to my local trails, spend no money on fuel to get there, no entry fee, no uplift. Most trail centres are free admission too.
  • + 3
 meh I guess so, but we shouldn't pay the same price for most parts. It's a shame we are willing to.
  • + 2
 I know what you mean. At least it is all really good stuff. It would be very annoying if it was this expensive and not even worth it.
  • + 14
 OTehNoes: It does take design and work to make a great tire, but when you compare the cost of a tiny MTB tire to the cost of a giant car or truck tire which requires 100 times the material, more design, quality testing and government certifications and huge liability it doesn't add up. You may think economies of scale weigh in which I'm sure they do, but then look at motorcycle, motocross, or ATV tires, they are all bigger, require just as much design, and are significantly cheaper. It just doesn't add up.
  • + 3
 Yeah I do admit they are expensive compared to everything else. The only conclusion I could come to is they've been around for longer? Like, car tires and motorcycle tires have been developed for their jobs longer, whereas DH has really only boomed in the last 10 years or so?
  • + 0
 Oooo, is that a new fox fork I see in the last picture?
  • + 0
 Possibly, but it does just look like destickered 40's..
  • + 2
 @Rasterman. Not saying I appereciate the price of MTB Tires, as I don't, but I also would not campare it to car tires, or atv tires. Comparing the amount of material used is a useless comparison here. Technology...perhaps... but I still think the biggest thing driving up the prices is the market size. The Mtb market, and specifically those buying Maxxis tires, is relatively small compared to other markets. You kinda have to divide the development and production costs between a smaller consumer base to justify production. I wish they were cheeper but at the same time, as is the case with Chris King, high end Mavic, Pauls. Phil Wood etc. If you want a specialized product you end up paying for it.
  • + 3
 everything is overpriced because we keep paying for it
  • + 1
 looks like amix between the minion and the ardent..wich is great
  • + 2
 @necro
Not exactly. Nothing gets written on the package when it comes to design costs, shipping, research, refabbing machines to creat new prducts. But that doesn't matter right? You can see it as a overpriced circle of rubber, I see it as the only contact patch btween us and mother earth, so don't skimp.
  • + 1
 i think your confusing me with variiis, i never said "circle of rubber"
  • + 1
 to support the argument that bike tires are over priced, i can get 4 tires for my car for a little over 100 dollars.
  • + 1
 they can charge that much because they have the reputation of being a kick ass tire and lots of pros are riding them etc. it's the "bling" factor. it's expensive : it must be good. marketing works like that. apparently it's a good tire, but they seems to get used quite fast...
  • + 3
 maxxis has caught the schwalbe disease, go f*ck yourself and your 30$+ price hike
  • + 5
 Bike tyres really are stupidly overpriced. There is significant developement yes, but the same goes for every piece of equipment in the industry, but you don't go through 5 sets of brakes, shifters, and rims each season. But you do with tyres, and the prices are not THAT much different that its justified. There is a small ammount of material used, and they KNOW we'll be back to buy more tyres in a few months. I've been running the same cranks for 3 years now, and they only cost 2-3 sets of tyres. Also, Maxxis developed the Minion in the early 2000's, so they've been rocking it for at least 6 years now. They have definitely recouped their developement costs. As stated above, they only charge that ammount because they can.
  • + 1
 you just got to know the right Mexican stores to get those cheap stolen tires at for 100 dollars for all four.
  • + 8
 I'll take no pinchflats in my holidays over being a weightweenie any day. With all the mud hanging to your bike after a days riding in Europe you don't notice the difference anyway.
  • + 2
 Werd... And tubeless is badass as well, tup
  • + 5
 OK, OK. Some of you don't like the price. (SUCK IT UP) Some of you don't like the weight. (Yes, they are 1290g, Dual-ply DH casing, confidence inspiring) Some of you don't like that there's an updated design! ( Evolve, you frakin caveman)
The changes that Maxxis has incorporated, make sense.
I've been riding High Rollers in Whistler for 1.5 season. They have an unsure point when transitioning from center to shoulder. Not unsettling if you aware of it, but it does cause me to adjust my line early, when cornering.
If you got some tech corners in your line. Knowing that your tires has a tendency to disappear when cornering at moderate angles. Makes line choice... all that more important.

Oh... do you think Maxxis won't come out with versions like UST, eXC, LUST? And that those versions will be about a pound lighter. Keep Watching.
  • + 24
 Exactly. best GRIP lowest WEIGHT lowest PRICE you can only pick two....... the third is going to be sacrificed.
  • + 1
 Well said, lol!
  • + 5
 pinkbike should do a write up with the highroller paired with a few different front or rear tire setups, not just other Maxxis tires. I've been running Minion DHF's for the past 2 years, I'm curious to try something else but my current setup would be hard to stray from....
  • + 6
 keep in mind $93 is for the 3c compound. i'm sure the 2-ply will be a lot cheaper and similar to the current price.

anyone know when i can buy these in the UK? i need some new tyres!
  • + 4
 I'd just check all the obvious places like CRC, otherwise just google them and click shopping tup
  • + 5
 You mean the 60a compound, because both 60a and 3c are 2-ply.
  • - 1
 dunbar cycles.com
  • + 1
 can't find them on there. there's only just the previous high roller and anyway it's not a uk shop so it will costs loads for P&P and customs
  • + 5
 blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/maxxis-high-roller-2

kid woo posted a little more in-depth technical review above as well. worth a read IMO
  • + 3
 you lot need to stop bitching about the price of tyres, its only going to get worse. 1. the raw material prices have gone through the roof, one of the ingredients for rubber for tyres is from the oil industry........ 2. the tyres are manufactured in Taiwan, it is no longer a second or third world country, workers are being paid more getting closer in line to north america and Europe 3. don't try and compare prices of car tyres to dh tyres. its economies of scale. think how many car tyres are produced a year in relation to the number of dh tyres stop and think for a minute before making retarded statements about a subject you know nothing about.
  • + 1
 Well said sir
  • + 5
 we are all muppets in this industry they say buy and we say ok! thats just mountain bikeing they got us by the balls MASTER OF MUPPETS
  • + 1
 I recently changed my setup from running kendas now running high roller 2 . 2.4 front and 2.3 rear must say I'm impressed with the stopping power of the high roller 2 over the kenda. Think I will be sticking to the high roller 2 from now On.
  • + 1
 ive never ridden maxxis at alll and i just ride blue grooves which are very washy evan with sticke so im looking for somethinkg differ ent but not those and im not that picky so im probly just gonnna get simple old minions cheap and my bike already wighs 42 lbs so it wont make a differance everybody makes a good tire and some make better but if you tear through tires the get some intense 909s on pricepoint the 20 bucks eachhere everybody i know rides them
  • + 1
 here as in in canmore
  • + 1
 my Minions have never let me down...
  • + 1
 I managed to get one of the first 3C sets of these from my LBS back on July 15th.
Been riding them for 4 weeks now and I can say they are as advertised, great all around tire.
I rode them in muddy conditions at Silver Star in late July and now dry conditions at the beginning of August.
I also just got back from a pedal me up rip down run and was very impressed with how they roll and grip uphill.
They are definitely better in the tacky or wet conditions than the dry. (Minon F still owns the dry)
The "vague" feeling of the old HR's going from the center knobs to the side knobs is still there with the HRII's but improved.
Once over to the side knobs they do grip like a pitbull.
On my all mountain rig I am going to continue to run the HRII's front and rear.
On my downhill rig I'm going to stick with the Minnon F on front and rear or maybe roll an HRII on the rear.
  • + 1
 If It aint broke, don't fix it....

make it better tup

I really like the look of these and will definitely be trying them once they have some other compound options and the prices come down a bit.


Edit: does anyone else miss the old high roller logo on them?
  • + 1
 size is everything all y'all : i am only 5'2" 135 lbs and i can run the new Maxxis Minion EXOs [ 3c front / 60A rear ] for DH and they are awesome; i only got my 1st pinch flat after 2 mos. of hitting [ some on purpose to see if they would flat ] everything from loose baby heads to wedged larger rocks - AND, they are only 630 grams ea. a total weight saving of 1.5 lbs on your ride. i may never go back to double sidewalls - little people rule ! [ Maxxis EXOs come marked on the tire DH but XC on the pkging - it seems up to about 160 lbs is a safe rider weight for these to perform comparably to double sidewall Minions.
  • + 5
 skidding is getting expensive
  • + 1
 I refuse to pay more than $50 for a tire. However good they may be, I can not afford it. I avoid skidding to save tires and all but usually, DHF last usually less than a month and after than I tell people i run slicks to fight rolling resistance. But really I'd rather have tires that may offer less initial grips but cheaper so i can replace them more often instead of buying 3c and trying my luck with chewed down nobs.
I'm not a fan of nevegals but for less than $50 a tire, you get pretty good all around tires that last.

I really hope they will cut the price down to fit under the DHF.
  • + 4
 every company sells hard compound tires. And all the hard compound tires are almost half the price of the soft compound. You are weird my friend for not knowing this already since you buy tires "every month". If you are using the hard compounds and you still replace them this often then you must be a super hardcore rider!
  • + 2
 Think of it this way. Do you want to get more rides out of your tires, or less rides but be able to perform at another level. These 3c, soft, or multi compound tires that companies sell can let you get away with more aggressive cornering and overall better performance. If all you care about is performance and don't mind changing your tires more often, soft compounds. If you want to get more riding time out of your tires and dont mind sacrificing performance, choose hard compound tires.
  • + 1
 A DHF Soft compound 42a is way softer than the nevegal stiky E. Dare i try putting a 42a dhf again on my rear tire, It literally lost KNOBS on the 2 first runs.

Also please show me, do quote where you saw me say that: I change, let alone buy tires every months.
  • + 2
 " I avoid skidding to save tires and all but usually, DHF last usually less than a month and after than I tell people i run slicks to fight rolling resistance."


^^^^^^Sorry I thought you would replace your tire like a normal person at this point ^^^^^^^
  • + 2
 Ocean, you could compromise by putting a nice sticky tire on the front, and a cheaper tire on the rear. That way you bike will always go where you point it, albeit a little sideways. Generally I wear out three or four rear tires per front tire. And oversteer is always safer than understeer in my books. And more fun. Another benefit would be less rolling resistance since much of the time most of the weight is on your rear tire so you could run the harder compound on the back.
  • + 2
 Sorry, 'Oceen', not 'Ocean'.

It is common to want more grip on the front, hence Mike is running 4psi less on the front (though the rear tire is also more prone to pinchflats than the front, which is another reason to have more pressure in the rear). Most people who care about such things run 3-4 psi less on the front. Sorry if I am telling you stuff you already know.
  • + 2
 It all comes down to how much anyone wants to invest in tires. Most peoples i know have 2 sets of wheels. They practice and have fun with one while they save the second one for their race run. Doing this allows to save the knobs. Sharp knobs gives the best grip but get destroyed pretty quickly even on 3C or dual compound. For the sake of my wallet, running a 3C upront and a 60a rear is the best compromise for the broke rider or 3C front and rear and when worn down, just buying a new one for the front and moving the front in the rear. I also did try to run 42a up front with 3c rear, The grip was legendary and both tires seemed to wear down at the same pace. That was the smartest thing i've done in a while. Anyway, back on topic, i know they must be good tires as some named their child after the High Roller. The pattern did not change much and we get lethal side knobs as a bonus. I will definitely give them a go once they reach my affordability bracket.
  • + 2
 @scrippsranchdj

I've expressed my opinion. Did not diss the product or even the company. You on the other hand, replied to my comment paraphrasing it wrong trying to make me say things i did not. On top of that, you are trying to make me sound like a troll without taking the time to read my post properly. Unless Maxxis is your mom, dad, or whatever relative, why would you take their defense and be offensive when my comments have nothing negative to say about the performance of the damn tire? If you would have said i was cheap or poor and it would have make more sense.

If you are NORMAL and NOT WEIRD as you point out i don't seem to be, why don't you take the time to read my post instead of assuming things i did not write?

I would have let this slide and die out but it pisses me off when someone invents stuffs and try to bring down their twisted and wrong sense of justice trying to convince me on things you are making up on your own.
  • + 1
 Kind of a wash... form maxxis.com
26x2.40 High Roller II: Wire Bead, Single Compound, 60TPI, 2PLY, 1260g $76

Heavier (every gram count lol) than a DHF of the same size and compound and the same price.
  • - 1
 Jeez bro you said you worn down your tires fast and I said maybe try hard tires.... and I didn't even say anything offensive towards you. Need a tissue for your issue?
  • + 3
 I can see both sides. $96 is ALOT for this tire when you can get Minion DHF SuperTacky's, which I run on my race bike, for around $50-60 bucks if you look around. I have a second set of tires, cut down Wetscreams I use for mud and I paid $65 each. Untill I can get these for around the same I dont think Ill be trying them. That being said, I think you will be seeing these selling around the $75 mark, if not right away- eventually. There are too many other options, great tires like the ones I mentioned, Muddy Mary's, ect, that sell around that mark. The market will decide, enough of you will go out and buy right away to keep the price up for a bit, but it will come down.
  • + 3
 I'm with Oceen246 on this. It's a retarded amount of money to pay for tires for playing. HOWEVER... no one is forcing anyone to buy them. I'll never buy a Maxxis product for a few reasons. A: They are douchebags on a general level, mostly that f*cktard that runs his mouth on here claiming to be the designer and that "all other companies need to get in touch with him and he'll do them all a favor and design them a single winning tire as well." How nice. And B: because I, along with NO ONE ELSE ON THIS WEBSITE is riding at a WC level and needs the "top line" of anything. I ride Kendas. I get them cheap and I've never crashed and exploded for no apparent reason and in fact...I kinda LIKE them! CRAZY! Been riding Kendas for 6-7 years now, not a single pinchflat in all that time, be it Whistler, PNW, the steep-rough-fast gnar-gnar of Colorado, whatever...no flats on 14psi front/18psi rear.
Does this mean I'm slow? Who friggin cares if I am!? I'm having fun, and I'm having more fun than most of you because I always have new tires(like 3 new Kendas to you Maxxis riders' 1), and I don't have to run them down to the wires to get every cent out of them, and I'm not scrounging to buy a new set of tires because I think I have to(or can even come close) perform at a WC level on my random Tuesday ride.
98% of the riders on here would not notice the difference between tires ONCE THEY LEARN each tire's individual differences from the last tire they rode. And EVERY tire has a pro and a con over another, be it price, lengevity, or performance.
  • + 0
 Also, not to pimp Kenda on anyone...but this "new" High Roller looks a LOT like the new Kenda Nexcavator. Which will run about half this things price.

Personally, I think it looks like it will perform better in the wet stuff than the HR. www.kendausa.com/en/home/bicycle/mountain/nexcavator.aspx

Due out soon...
  • + 2
 LOL. That tire looks nothing similar, only the variation in center knobs tie the two together.

And you act like every maxxis rider will be using 3c... meaning you think every person who buys maxxis pays $80+ for each tire. You know the hard compounds are like 45 bucks right? You are bitching about their nicest option because it price is high... well no shit captain obvious. Do you complain about ferraris because theirprice is too high?? Maybe its because the product isn't for you.
And who are you to say that just because somebody isn't a WC racer, they can't use nice equipment? What if somebody wants the best handling version of their tire?? Is there now skill requirements? Get outta here with that bullshit
  • - 1
 Ah... but I also said no one is forcing anyone to buy them so people need not bitch about the pricing being "fair." Gotta read AAAAAALL the words!
And i'm not bitching about ANY of their tire options. I'm not a fan of the company, PERIOD. If Ferrari acts like total f*ckwads to me when I'm ready to buy I will go with a Bugatti instead. Always other options. And cheaper ones that offer just as much fun!

And once again you're trying to flip people's words around to suit your own view. Not the way to win an argument or even make a worthy point. I said 98% of the people on here are not at WC level. And need to stop buying into the hype of some of these companies. I've talked to people who haven't even TRIED other products, they just look at who's winning what and buy what they use. Which IS the goal these companies are trying to reach and are succeeding. THOSE are the people I'm talking to. The ones sitting around waiting for the next new PRODUCT that will supposedly make them faster when they SHOULD be out riding.

Tires are the first component to connect the rider to the terrain, and SHOULD be taken seriously. But there are soooo many options out there that anyone NOT looking to, or are not able to, spend $100 on a tire that lasts less than a month, does have other options. Chances are, the guy looking to improve his skill level is the one looking at this tire(because maxxis is always the dog to bark the loudest), but is also the last one it will help due to the simple lack of skill and experience. He may as well be on a set of $12 discount tires until he starts to figure out WHY and WHEN he's needing better tires.
  • + 1
 And if you ever get to see the Nexcavator you'll notice it lacks the "dead zone" between center lugs and shoulders when entering a corner that the HR, and nearly all of Maxxis' other tires, has.
You're also too young to remember when Maxxis was at the bottom of the food chain and was THE shit tire to run. Some paid rider from back in the day deserves a cookie. Or the marketing manager that turned it around does...
  • + 1
 Did you try a product or you just went to buy a tire and they were a dick? Either way you sound like a grouch and probably would have said the same shit about another company, had they been seeling you those tires.
  • + 1
 " I've talked to people who haven't even TRIED other products, they just look at who's winning what and buy what they use."

That's sad but doesn't mean you got a magic look into the entire biking market. That just means you met some "sheeple". There are real people out there who care about how their bike rides, not just fakes who bought some shit just to say they have it.

"Does this mean I'm slow? Who friggin cares if I am!? I'm having fun, and I'm having more fun than most of you because I always have new tires(like 3 new Kendas to you Maxxis riders' 1), and I don't have to run them down to the wires to get every cent out of them, and I'm not scrounging to buy a new set of tires because I think I have to(or can even come close) perform at a WC level on my random Tuesday ride."

Who are you to say you are having more fun? Or how fast OUR tires wear? I dont ride 3c. I ride 60a which has lasted me 4 months. What how many kendas did you go through? Oh probably like 20 since you say 3 kendas = 1 maxxis on 9 days of solid riding. Nice.
  • + 0
 "And yes, PB went downhill years ago. A site filled with trolls, little kids, and now, gangbanging Mexicans. What a sad, sad ordeal."


HAHAHA gangbanging Mexicans???????? Didn't see that one coming....

Sweet looking tires though.. But I like Ardents and Minions.
  • + 2
 A very sad commentary indeed... no further comment on this.
  • + 3
 first rule of knightrider - don't hassle the Hoff! a wise man once said "cheap, light, or reliable...pick two" and stfu
  • + 2
 I test these tyre.. Are for real amazing... In mud has a real good traction. Also drivability improve a lot.. Totally rcomended
  • + 1
 mmm this tyre have the same middle knob of the kenda nevegal...... just slightly depurated and good tested changes,i like it!!! foldable tyres are good of course other people will like more a casing tyres
  • + 2
 Sounds like what I'm looking for.
When can we buy these bad boys?
I'm due for a new set of rubber right now.
  • + 1
 they're available from "next day tyres"
  • + 1
 Check out the Dunbar Online store. They are now available.
  • + 2
 i wish i had the time to wear my tyres out. i've had the same set of hard compound high rollers for a year!
  • + 1
 Good review. Here's another in-depth piece to check out before you buy. blistergearreview.com/gear-reviews/maxxis-high-roller-2
  • + 4
 Conti der kaiser's ftw
  • + 2
 I have heard tha der barons are better. Even in dry.
  • + 2
 I've seen the future and it is called "Continental Ramstein". Athertons and a few other test riders are running prototypes at the moment ;o)
  • + 2
 Run the same tyres as Gee? Not a very appealing prostect lately.
  • + 1
 lol true, they havent exactly been good to him this season...
  • + 1
 Yeah I am getting 2 der kaisers for next season and 2 der baron's so I can put a der baron in the front and a kaiser in the back, I the the kaiser's are AWESOME in the tacky dirt and mud
  • + 2
 At $93/tire, doesn't that seem like a lot of wear for 9 days (in the last pic)..? I dunno, just asking for more opinions...
  • + 1
 Yes it does. Read what the rides entails, he did a lot. This is a sacrifice you make running soft compound tires. It literally leaves rubber behind. However any soft compound tire offer higher performance. They are more for hardcore enthusiast who want the best grip possible. Not really for weekend warrior, hit the mountain everyweek kinda guy.
  • + 2
 same gose with off road tires. they are soft compound and leave rubber behind, but offer better sticky grip. just dont run um down the freeway in the summer heat. spendy yes worth it... well not for me, i dont get out enough. but they do loook sweet
  • + 1
 Looks like a significant improvement over the old high rollers. I'm not going to be ditching my Minion DHFs anytime soon though, that's for sure.
  • + 1
 $93 I'm guessing they'll be about 60 pound each over here in which case they can f*ckrightoff mountain biking is getting way overpiced!
  • + 2
 There's still cheap, decent tires out there, no reason to drop that much coin on a tire if you don't feel the need, right?

Also, scroll up and check my link I posted right above you...
  • + 1
 There are alot of good cheap tyres, but it seems at the moment alot of manufacturers are just charging a ridiculouse amount for there top of the range product so as to hike the price up of the lower priced stuff. Don't know if that's the case in the US but it certainly is over here.
  • + 1
 im not sure about the whole semi replaceable tires idea. 20 days isnt exactly long for a tire even iff it is a super grippy compound.
  • + 1
 If they made them in 2.35 and hard compound, they would be perfect for AM riding in my local park but then again they might be Advantage. They seem great to me.
  • + 1
 Is the new high roller II any better than the swampthing in muddy conditions
  • + 1
 Hey Jake, I am not a huge fan of the swampthings unless your on super loamy trail. I Find them very un-predictable on anything fast and hard pack. The new High Roller II was awesome on on both. However when it gets really mucky the High roller II still cant stand with a clipped Wet Scream. -Adam
  • + 2
 wtb dissents, $19.99 on department of goods. done and done. great tire
  • + 0
 dissents are even close to great when it comes to downhill. just look at what the world cup guys ride. i dont think its dissents.
  • + 2
 Agreed... Dissents don't absorb impacts as well as High Rollers. The grip isn't quite good..
  • + 1
 what the world cup riders use? buddy dissents were designed, and raced by fabien and have multiple world cup wins.. and im not a world cup rider anyways, just want a good tire for cheap.
  • + 1
 i dgaf if its grippy enough to ride on my celing, what kind of sucker wants o pay $80 for one tire?!
  • + 1
 They need to make more tire versions for am use. For example Minion DHF Lust UST 2.35 42a ! This is what I want ! Smile
  • + 1
 I guess they figured this tire should live up to its name hence the price, only high rollers can afford them.
  • + 0
 I designed this tire to give it better braking and keep the original HR's good characteristics. If you liked the old version, you'll like the new one much more.
  • + 0
 I'll never buy a Maxxis product for a few reasons. A: They are douchebags on a general level, mostly that f*cktard that runs his mouth on here claiming to be the designer and that "all other companies need to get in touch with him and he'll do them all a favor and design them a single winning tire as well." How nice.

i though this was funny....sorry
  • + 1
 hahaha that was awesome!
  • + 1
 maxxis minion 60a front, high roller 2 in back with the ust, is that smart?
  • + 2
 way too expensive.
  • + 1
 Anyway, WTB much better grips,rolls and lighter then this rubber!
  • + 1
 2.4 Kev 60A weigh in at 868g

2.4 Wire 3c & 60A weigh in1,260g

Wink
  • + 1
 Yeah, that was a terrible analogy!
  • + 1
 Weird, I thought that was the best part of the article
  • + 1
 Is it good for a front tire or a rear tire then?
  • + 1
 When may I be able to buy the Highroller 2 in Germany?
  • + 1
 when do these tires come out to purchase
  • + 1
 There's a NEW Knight Rider?!?! Whaaaaat?!!!
  • + 1
 93 dollars, OMFG.They better be good for that amount!!!.
  • + 1
 That would be for the sticky compound, which like shown above would need replacing more often. This means it offers superior performance over harder compound tires(which last longer). So basically its performance > longevity. The harder compound would likely be in the 60-75$ range.
  • + 1
 not always true, a stickier tyre would roll slower...
  • + 1
 That is a drawback to sticky rubber. Everybody knows that.
  • + 1
 You were saying the better the tyre performs, the faster it will wear. However in some circumstances you'd want a harder compound over a softer one for less rolling resistance, making the tyre out perform the softer compound while still lasting longer. For example riding on hard packed dirt, concrete or tarmac. I know what you're saying though and it is usually true, especially for DH.
  • + 1
 Yes but we are talking about DH here not XC. And I said the stickier the compound, the faster the wear. I know rolling resistance is an issue but it's more likey a Dh rider would be concerned on how their tire cornered rather than rode in a straight line.
  • + 2
 93$ ? f*ck the maxxisBig Grin
  • + 1
 The top Maxxis WC racers tested it and like it. I'm happy.
  • + 2
 freedom of speech
  • + 1
 beauty looking tire but way to expensive haha
  • + 1
 are these avaliable in UST Tubeless?
  • + 1
 Thats $93 for the 3C, the 60a's are only $45 or something like that.
  • + 1
 I wouldn't mind a 2.1" version to throw on my dirt jumper.
  • + 1
 $93???? REALLY guys? Jesus Christ.
  • + 1
 That's like the top of the line one though. I'm sure there will be a basic model for about $60 or less. Probably more like $45.
  • + 1
 True. It just gets frustrating how expensive bike parts are these days. haha
  • + 1
 haha. Knob flex!!
  • + 1
 EXO?
  • + 0
 25psi front and 29 rear? I run 65...
  • + 1
 Wow !! You must be really fast
  • + 1
 I don't see why you would run such low pressure. If I was needing some more grip I would run 40, but 25 would be far too soft go get anywhere. Useful in rock gardens and on wet roots I suppose...
  • - 1
 well i know what tires i'm getting...
  • + 0
 Holy f*ck heavy enough?
  • + 8
 Dude, all DH casing tires are in that weight range, 1200-1400g. Always >1 kilo a wheel.
  • + 1
 For example. Big Betty, 2,4", 3C, Snake-Skin 900 grams.
  • + 2
 Ill take a rubber queen 2.4 @820g
  • + 2
 @c-bernier, your 800+g 2.4 Rubber Queen is foldable Blank Stare , and I've looked at Schwalbe's site, NO wire bead Big Betty is less than 980g, that's still almost a kilo.
Let's stop b*tching about weight; it's either you get a foldable for lesser weight, or get a DH cased tire that gives you peace of mind while doing tons of laps in a park.
  • + 1
 selfcontained - that Big Betty is the freeride version not the DH version - still a good burly tyre but not as robust as the full DH model

c-bernier - that model is not a DH tyre! Der Kaiser and Der Baron DH modela are 1000 - 1150 grams depending on the tyre & model.
  • + 2
 Thats what I said...
  • + 2
 Folding bead only saves around 30 grammes,so to loose that much heft the other tyres must use less rubber.
  • + 1
 Lol... I have an Intense DH Part 2.35 2-ply foldable and has 1250g :O. But it`s awsome, much better grip and rolling resistance than High Roller.
  • + 1
 @Boylagz nothing wrong with a foldable tire.
  • + 1
 ^Youre right, theres nothing wrong with a folding one. But you making weight comparisons between a DH casing tire and a foldable one, of course the foldable tire will weigh less, even if it has dual ply, reinforced sidewalls.
Im just saying comparing this new DH cased HR2 with a folding Rubber Queen weight-wise, arent exactly in the same playing field.
  • + 1
 Fair enough,but the folding bead doesn't make near 400 grams difference. When your talking rotational weight that's HUGE.
  • + 2
 Like marquis said, its the rubber material reinforcing the walls, and more biased plies as well. Hell Im using a Spesh Butcher SX 2.3 in the rear, which is folding; dual ply, FR specific and weighs 950ish. Its real beefy for a foldable, and its taken a beating in the park on really rocky trails. Held up pretty well, zero flats and it sets up tubeless really good too.
  • - 2
 Weight: 1290 grams - Oh, this isn't for me. Maybe next time Maxxis.
  • - 2
 exactly!
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