Morpheus Loki - Review

Feb 10, 2014
by Jordan Carr  
REVIEWED
Morpheus Loki

WORDS Jordan Carr
PHOTOS Colin Meagher

Morpheus may be a smaller company compared to some of the more well known names out there, but they're betting that their philosophy of assembling durable aluminum frames and offering them at competitive prices will have them standing out in the crowd. And while they might have more of a following in the dirt jump and slope worlds, their new 27.5" wheeled, 116 - 126mm travel Loki could be the bike that introduces trail riders to the New York company. They aren't about to forget those roots by offering a mega-light trail bike frame that won't last long under an aggressive rider, though, saying that they "have not and will not release any model unless a single frame lasts at least an entire season on the world tour in the hands of our factory riders." Complete builds are available at either $4,125 o $5,688 USD, and a frame and FOX RP23 shock can be had for $1,795 USD. Color options include orange, blue, black and red, and all are anodized with laser etched graphics and carbon fiber rocker arms.


Morpheus Loki Details

• Purpose: trail / all-mountain
• Rear wheel travel: 116 - 126mm
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Hydroformed 7005 aluminum tubing
• Carbon fiber rocker arms
• ISCG 05 chain guide tabs
• Weight: 30.3lb (large, w/o pedals)
• Sizes: medium, large (tested)
• MSRP: $1,795 USD (frame w/ FOX RP23)


Frame Details

The Loki's construction consists of a hand welded frame that uses boxy 7005 aluminum tubing, and additional gussets have been added to high stress areas despite the tubing already being extensively hydroformed. In contrast to the frame's otherwise completely aluminum make-up, Morpheus has gone with carbon fiber for the rocker arms. Morpheus says that their manufacturing process not only results in an ultra-durable frame, but they also claim to have a historical failure rate of only .02%, which is significantly lower than their cited industry standard of between 3-5%. No, we can't confirm those numbers as failure rates are not only a closely guarded secret within most companies, but
they can also be interpreted a number of ways. Regardless, it is interesting that Morpheus would reference them, and it makes it clear that they have a lot of confidence in their design. The bike's cable routing isn't as invisible as with some of the competition, but it's also easily accessible while being out of the way underneath the top tube. A traditional thread-in style 68mm bottom bracket shell allows for endless crank options, while ISCG 05 tabs give riders the ability to easily install a chain guide or bash guard if they should require one. A perch for a direct mount front derailleur can be found on the seat tube, although our single ring setup left it looking a tad out of place on an otherwise clean looking bike.

   (clockwise) Often a flexy point on rocker link frames, Morpheus opted for a carbon rocker arm with foam core infusion to transfer the leverage from the rear wheel's motion into the custom tuned Fox RP23. At the junctions, the main pivot uses a twin needle bearing while custom IGUS self-lubricating bushings provide movement at the other pivots.


The bike's main pivot sits just above the bottom bracket shell, and it uses a sturdy looking captive design that sees the chain stay pivot sandwiched in the one-piece bottom bracket and pivot unit. The whole thing looks burly enough to be used on a motorbike, and it's finished off with flush pivot hardware for a clean appearance. Hidden out of sight within the main pivot is a twin needle bearing system, and a grease port has been added to keep it turning smoothly over time. Custom IGUS self-lubricating bushings are employed at the other pivot locations, which also see grease fittings used. Up front, a straight 1.5" head tube has been used to allow for maximum angle options via an angle adjusting headset, and you'll find a 12 x 135mm thru axle at the other end that requires a hex key to remove.


  A clean and uncluttered midsection is something we really liked about the Loki. Its sleek lines and stout tubing mates well with its anodized frame coloring and laser etched logos. Three shock position options allow for a small amount of travel adjustability, 116mm, 120mm, and 126mm.

Suspension Design

The Loki employs a relatively simple single pivot and rocker arm layout, with the rider able to choose between 116, 120, and 125mm of travel via three different lower shock mounting positions. Those numbers may seem awfully close to one another, but that fact does mean that you aren't making drastic changes to the bike's leverage ratio when moving between the different travel settings, and only minor air pressure alterations should be required. While the Loki's front and rear triangles are made out of aluminum, Morpheus has used carbon fiber to construct the rocker arms, a move that they say saves more than 150 grams compared to the older CNC'd version of the arms.




Aboard
the Loki


bigquotesThe Loki's compact feeling cockpit makes for a playful attitude, but Morpheus has also managed to create a bike that feels surprisingly stable at high speeds.



Climbing / Fit

An all-out climbing machine the Loki is not. There are a few reasons for this, but the bike's tight feeling front center length stands out to us due to the relatively cramped position that it put us in, despite our test bike being a size large. The answer is obviously to run a longer stem than the 50mm unit our Loki came fitted with, although this compromises that bike's excellent descending abilities and fun loving nature that we'll talk more about below. The end result was a more upright riding position than isn't ideal for seriously long climbs, although it took rides lasting over the two hour mark before we found ourselves voicing any complaints.

The Loki is not going to be a Strava assassin on the ascents, but it should be noted that clearly isn't Morpheus' intentions with the bike. If you have no idea what Strava is, or if you don't have the slightest interest in timing yourself on the climbs, then that fact shouldn't matter to you. We found ourselves being happiest when pedalling up moderately technical sections and singletrack that kept us on our toes, and the bike compared favourably to the competition in these type of settings. It's when things got slower and more technical that we had the distinct feeling that the blue machine was a bit unwieldy, and it seemed to make us square up a bit more than expected on tighter switchbacks in order to clean any sort of clutch corner. It wasn't as if we didn't clean anything that we made on other test bikes, but just that the Loki seemed to ask us to take a different approach. The bike's active suspension was best tamed by reaching down for the RP23's CTD lever, and we spent most of our time on smoother climbs with it flipped to the firmest 'Climb' setting.

Jordan Carr testing the Morpheus Loki in Sedona AZ
  Though not the bike's strong suit, the Loki will get you to the top of anything, all while you're dreaming about the ripping descent that inevitably follows.


If it sounds like we're painting a negative picture of the Loki's ascending abilities, take a second to remember that Morpheus didn't set out to design an all-out climbing machine. No, this is a bike for the rider who simply wants to get to the top of the mountain in order to make the most of the descent. Ride it with that in mind and you won't be disappointed in the slightest, not to mention that you'll have a hell of a good time when you drop the saddle and let it rip on the way back down.



Descending / Technical Terrain

Any of the complaints about the Loki's climbing were forgotten a few seconds after we pointed the bike down the trail, and Morpheus' desire to create a nimble and fun loving machine were clear as day. The compact cockpit gives the bike a very BMX-esque personality, and it didn't take long before we found ourselves playing around with a huge grin on our face as if it was our first day on a bike in ages. Somewhat contradictorily, the Loki also displayed some impressive stability on ledgy, rough ground that upsets bikes of similar travel, something that is surely helped by rear suspension that feels more forgiving than its advertised travel would have you believe. The Loki's all around abilities on the descents means that it's a bike that can be fun on pretty much any trail that finishes lower than started, and that is especially true when the speeds pick up - there aren't many bikes of the same travel that can hold a candle to the Loki in big-boy terrain.

Jordan Carr testing the Morpheus Loki in Sedona AZ
  The Loki loved popping off and jumping man-made features on flow trails, and we were happy to oblige.


The Loki loses some of its luster when the speeds drop, and we sometimes found ourselves feeling like our weight was a touch too far forward on steep sections, something that can likely be put down to the compact cockpit. It also doesn't pretend to be the most maneuverable of bikes when you're at a near standstill and need to change direction or put some air between the ground and your tires, although the tradeoff of high-speed stability was a welcome compromise. The bike's head angle felt spot on so long as you kept moving at a decent click, and the 150mm travel FOX 34 Float did a great job of levelling anything we pointed it at.

While we've certainly talked up the Loki's surprising performance on fast, rough terrain, it is on the smoother, man-made lines that the bike makes you feel like a competitive slopestyle rider. Okay, that might be a bit of a stretch, but it is a bike that can be pumped like mad, take flight off of the smallest of lips, and boost like you never thought you could. Get after it on your local jump line to see what this bike is all about.

Jordan Carr testing the Morpheus Loki in Sedona AZ
  Steep, technical lines were feasible on the Loki, although we often times found our weight a little further forward than we would have preferred due to the bike's tight cockpit.


Component Check

• Spank Subrosa rims/ True Precision hubs: A nice wheel build featuring the 30mm wide (outer) Subrosa rims and quick engaging True Precision hubs, and we didn't have a single issue with the combo. The rims' inner width of 24.5mm offered a great platform for the 2.3" Maxxis Ardent tires as well. Overall, a great wheelset for the Loki's intended purpose as a thrasher's trail bike.

• Formula RX brakes: We had some initial issues bedding in the pads on the Formulas, but they eventually came to life for us. And although we find them to offer substantial power and modulation, their lever shape is something we still have a hard time getting used to. Riders who have come to appreciate the Formula's stoppers will, however, find this a non-issue.

• SRAM X9 Type 2 derailleur: The Type 2's clutch system kept our drivetrain quiet and the chain engaged on the roughest of trails, while the Race Face narrow-wide ring made for a seamless 1 x 10 drivetrain without the need for a chain guide.

• Fox D.O.S.S. seat post: Mating the D.O.S.S. with a one-by drivetrain allows for perfect remote lever placement where you'd otherwise expect to see a shifter, and just like with the other D.O.S.S. posts that we have on our test fleet, it performed flawlessly. No, it's not the lightest, not does it offer infinite adjustment throughout its travel, but it is becoming the most dependable option on the market when talking dropper posts.

   (clockwise) A simple 1 x 10 drivetrain is made possible by combining a Race Face narrow-wide chain ring with a SRAM X9 Type-2 rear derailleur. Though a direct mount front derailleur is easily installed on the Loki, we found the simplicity of the single ring setup worked best for the bike's intentions, as well as allowing for proper FOX D.O.S.S. remote placement.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotes The Loki is a rather unique bike that offers up some very specific strengths that not many machines with similar travel numbers can brag about. Does it qualify as one of those elusive quiver killers that we often talk about? As always, that depends on what you're looking for, but if that includes putting more of an emphasis on fun than crushing climbs, it could be the bike for you. On the other hand, it wouldn't be the first bike that we'd reach for if we were heading out for any ride of serious distance or massive elevation gains, so keep that in mind if you're considering the Loki. - Jordan Carr


www.morpheusbikes.com


160 Comments

  • 76 10
 Did they make this frame 15 years ago and forget about it ?
  • 33 4
 For a minute I thought it was a 26"... and then I was disappointed!
  • 20 4
 2005 called...
  • 10 0
 Looks very similar to my Kona Coiler
  • 6 48
flag Satanslittlehelper (Feb 10, 2014 at 9:38) (Below Threshold)
 Seriously! They make the some of the fugliest damn bikes I ever seen. You couldn't pay me to ride that thing. I wouldn't care if were the best bike ever, same goes for a Lefty fork, could be the best thing ever, I'll never know because its so stupid looking I'd almost rather ride a unicycle.
  • 4 4
 Satanslittlehelper: They are ugly but ride like a dream, specially the vimana
  • 12 7
 It just looks unfinished, as if its a quick mock-up to test geometry. The square edges on the end of the seat stays (where it meets the rocker) are horrible. No internal cable routing either. Just looks cheap and nasty.
  • 14 1
 not diggin that lower shock mount. carbon rocker arm looks like the first one ever made in the 80s
  • 4 0
 They do offer the bike in 26". Wish the company would have sent one to do a side by side comparison.

I do like the bike for what it is: a trail bike for people that tend to break bikes.
  • 6 2
 Looks like a high school shop project compared to what other manufacturers are rolling out with now
  • 4 1
 @poozank: How about minimalistic and purposeful instead of overdesigned stylism? Rockerarm could be more elegant and the upper pushrod with transversal bracket could be 5mm lower and edges ground off - otherwise quite a sucessful engineered look. Enduro,now approaches what used to be called Freeride.
  • 2 0
 @Cuban-b - That's exactly what I thought about the rocker link. Usually carbon fiber links add a high-tech/expensive look, but this made it look as you had described. I'm not knocking the function.. that's just what the initial visual impression was.
  • 1 1
 Chirps!
  • 6 3
 You guys need to stop jerking off to bikes and go ride.
  • 5 3
 You guys sound like a bunch of dodos complaining about the aesthetics of this bike. Guess I missed the shop class in school where they engineered and created hydroformed tube sets and created foam cored high modules carbon components. I see is a 27.5 trail bike with 17" chain stays and 66.5 head angle, sounds like the makings of a great trail bike.
  • 2 2
 This is what they thought the future would look like back in 1989.
  • 2 0
 Good geo and looks are possible ya know KVBRIAN
  • 26 1
 Summary: Climbs as well as a 6" travel bike, descends as well as a decent 5" travel bike.
  • 26 4
 Loki was a rogue Asgard scientist, who planned on finding a way to cure his species from the decay of their genome caused by their constant cloning.
  • 3 1
 lol, just watched that episode last week.
  • 3 1
 haha..im currently rewatching the whole series
  • 19 0
 " who planned on finding a way to cure his species from the decay of their genome caused by their constant cloning."

Quite an apt name given the current AM bike market.
  • 4 1
 I spent 30 mins on the wiki page after posting that lol
  • 2 1
 maybe i should of waited to buy a new bike till i saw this Smile
  • 1 7
flag MintsauceSouth (Feb 10, 2014 at 6:21) (Below Threshold)
 I own many bikes.
  • 2 3
 Is this bike organic?
  • 2 0
 That rocker! I cant stop looking at it. Frown
  • 1 0
 Tjet: its bacon cut with blood diamond on the screen of I pad, from a pig that has never seen the daylight fed with GMO soy.
  • 2 0
 you say that as if GMO soy is a bad thing
  • 20 4
 looks a bit high school project to me
  • 7 1
 Odd that it lacks a replaceable hanger, seeing that my skyla has one. They're deas on about it riding like it has more travel than it does. My skyla, 100mm, descends like a 7 inch bike, could only imagine how this feels. And at 6'1", I don't feel cramped with the short top tube. Still hate the brakes though.
  • 8 1
 i would never buy a bike without a replaceable hanger. why would a frame company even make a frame like that. you can only straighten it so many times.
  • 6 11
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 9:31) (Below Threshold)
 Because its stronger and stiffer ? In the thickness of dropout/hanger they're using, you can bend it straight hundreds if not thousands of times. People seem to operate in the bicycle consumer world under this belief that aluminium is more fragile than it actually is. If you're crashing onto the derailleur often enough to fatigue the hanger from re-bending, you sir... lack riding skills.
  • 1 0
 To be fair, I"m glad my Skyla had a replaceable hanger, since it was broken when the bike was shipped to me, would have sucked to wait on another frame instead of grabbing a hanger from a local shop.
  • 4 1
 ok deeeight I'm afraid your gonna have to brush up on your armchair engineering regards bending alu back after you've knocked it out of shape and the thicker the alu the more trouble your in. anyone can knock they're mech on a rock, tree, gnome, or anything in the world depending on where you ride! not including a replaceable mech hangar i have not seen since i sold my 45lb apollo when i was 12! and while were knocking things, bushes on each pivot... i wonder what brand recently tried that and look what happened there.
  • 3 8
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 11:59) (Below Threshold)
 Uh huh...and your engineering and aluminiun background is what exactly? Armchair engineer indeed. I've run high end aluminium frames without replaceable hangers for years without problem. You did actually read the article didn't you?

"have not and will not release any model unless a single frame lasts at least an entire season on the world tour in the hands of our factory riders"

That includes the derailleur hanger on the frame. If the piece couldn't survive a season on the world tour... they'd have not used a fixed hanger setup.
  • 5 1
 ive bent hangars, my friends have all snapped hangars! it happens! and this a pink bike 'article' / advert and i wouldn't mind my bike lasting longer than one season! no need to get all angry its a simple fact, steel or ti and i would agree with you but I'm just saying i wouldn't want to lay down my hard earned on it thats all!
  • 1 1
 Well, it's 7005. Most hangers are not made of that, because then the frame would break first. It'll take a good bit of force to bend a hanger made of 7005, probably enough to break a derailure first. A replaceable hanger is designed to break, where as this is, I'd hope, not designed to, much like the replaceable drop out on my Bullit, it'll just total derailures. Time will tell.
  • 2 2
 and every single BRAND NEW bike I've putt together has never had a 100% straight hanger. whether this happens in shipping or not i don't know. and usually its not so bad that it hugely effects shifting. But if you are anal about shifting as i am you will want a perfecto straight hanger. why spend a hundred bucks on a rear der only to not get the full advantage because of a shit hanger. yes you can bed alu bit it always seems bend to back to the way it came from the factory after a few rides. even more important with the new 11 speed set ups like Di2 and XX1. Or maybe i am just a shifting connoisseur.
  • 3 0
 I've bent my hangers back dozens of times. Last vacation, on my last day, one started to get too easy to bend, so I knew it was curtains. Finished the ride, but it spontaneously lunched itself while on a bike rack driving home. Rear mechs may be more expensive to replace than hangers, but they're a helluva lot easier to find in stock than a specific hanger.
  • 5 0
 Great to see deeeight back at it. Quick, everyone hide your opinions! You lack the riding/engineering skills to have them!
  • 3 0
 Ok armchair engineers, check this out on material plasticity:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasticity_%28physics%29

Basically, if you bent a mech hanger beyond its yield point it would become weaker. Repeated bending will further weaken it - this is more prevalent for aluminum because it often requires heat treating after forming to realign molecules.

Having an alloy bike without a replaceable mech hanger seems like a bad idea.
  • 1 2
 And of course you fail to take into consideration how much force it actually takes to bend a thick dropout hanger plate past its yeild strength point and that it doesn't magically lose half its strength when that happens. And actually aluminium, in the six thousand series families requires heat treating after forming processes where significant heat was involved (like welding or casting) but not when its simple mechanical bending. Seven thousand series alloys however, as this frame is made from, do not. That's one of the advantages to doing frames in 7005 specifically, and any home framebuilder with a Tig welder, a jig set and ordering tubing/sheet 7005 can build their own frame and not need a big fancy oven and quenching rigs after.
  • 1 0
 Hanger is replaceable, just gotta replace that one side of the chain stay. Prob after a few chain slapping, gouging and a off tilt hanger be nice for a fresh drive side chain stay replacement. just pricy i guess.
  • 8 0
 Also provides you with super powers to oppose Thor.
  • 6 1
 They should come out with a Hulk dh bike to 'smash' the opposition
  • 3 0
 The possibilities are endless!
  • 1 0
 An Iron-man bike would need lots and lots of gadgets XD
  • 14 6
 Ellsworth Called, they want their linkage back.
  • 14 0
 ya right ellsworth's linkage looks disgusting and is about 6 inches longer
  • 3 0
 Don't you mean Kona called? Pretty sure the big K did it before Ellsworthless.
  • 8 2
 Competitive prices at 1800$ ?? You can pick any alu frame from the major brands for that money (OK for 100$ more) and have a choice of 4 different sizes for a better fit.
  • 3 1
 ...and many of those aren't Faux-bar.
  • 5 0
 Competitively overpriced.
  • 8 0
 The self lubricating thing sound like p.......
  • 9 2
 not alot of Morpheus fans in here I take it? the bike doesn't look too bad, not my first choice but still not bad
  • 3 2
 Not sure why people are hatin so much, the linkage design is reliable and it looks good
  • 4 0
 At least it's better than that DH thing they had at Rampage....
  • 1 1
 still better than Redalp
  • 6 1
 It looks weird but...kind of nice. Raw and simple. I like! BUT- aluminium frame and no hanger? Risky or silly?!



That rocker is hucking fuge!
  • 1 10
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 7:20) (Below Threshold)
 Its silly to think you need a replaceable hanger still on frames (most just introduced a flex/failure point that screws up the precise shifting you want with 11 speed cassettes) when the derailleurs for the most part have all gone to hollowed out steel or alloy hanger bolts which will break away instead.
  • 2 0
 My argument relies on the fact that they (mech hangers) do not brake that easy BUT they simply bend. Bent aluminium which is bent back into place? That cannot happen forever, right?
  • 2 2
 Hence my original question- risky or silly?
  • 1 11
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 8:30) (Below Threshold)
 If it was aluminium foil, no. But in the thickness of the hanger / dropout... Thousands of times.
  • 5 1
 More like 5 times at best.
  • 1 10
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 10:02) (Below Threshold)
 I've rebent fixed aluminium hangers multiple times and a lot more than 5. Hell I own a frame which is an aluminium softtail and its stays are constantly bending every time I ride over a bump. Over its lifetime it will probably flex thousands of times enough in each direction that it would be throwing off the shifting constantly if you bent a hanger that much and putting derailleurs into spokes. I much prefer fixed hangers over replaceable ones. Give me a break away bolt over a replaceable hanger any day.
  • 7 1
 That softtail example is pointless. Elastic deformation......
  • 2 8
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 11:06) (Below Threshold)
 Yes...and elastic deformation is exactly the same process at work when you bend a derailleur hanger. Invest in the proper hanger alignment tool folks. Don't just ham fist it with an adjustable spanner.
  • 7 1
 elastic deformation is the materials inherent flexibility, what you are talking about is plastic deformation and alu doesnt like that!
  • 2 7
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 11:56) (Below Threshold)
 And you're experience with aluminium is what? ok fine you armchair engineers want to say its replaceble hangers only go nuts... meanwhile the rest of us who know better will be happy without them.
  • 7 1
 im an aircraft engineer. I'm not trying to wind you up but its just a terrible oversight to think that the hangar isn't gonna get damaged and the reason i say the thicker the hangar the more trouble you'll be in re bending it is that the thicker the metal the larger the radius you have to bend it around without cracking due to the outside of the bend having to stretch so much more. it will break and it will cost 1800 not 10. its like having wheels with tyres permanently fitted and saying ah just put stans in of course your not gonna get a puncture!
  • 1 5
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 10, 2014 at 12:18) (Below Threshold)
 But the thicker it is, the stiffer and harder it is to actually bend (enough to affect the shifting). That's why the tool used to straighten it is made from steel and about 1 1/2 feet long. You need a lot of force to straighten an even slightly bent hanger, or to slightly bend a straight one. As to the $1800 part... a set of chainstays don't cost that much. Well maybe if you're in a country where they slap all manner of import duties onto US made things but in general, the chainstay assembly of a $1795 TOTAL cost frame, isn't going to be more than a couple hundred dollars. Also if you've used enough force to completely tear the hanger off, chances are you've destroyed other things too, like the derailleur, the wheel, and probably miss-aligned the rest of the rear end of the frame as well so you should probably replace it.

I've had to fix a number of hangers (professionally speaking) for customers and pretty much every time it involves a frame with a replaceable hanger, its not just that piece that's screwed up, but the thinner recessed part of the dropout it fits into that's also bent out of shape.
  • 5 1
 sacrificial parts like a replaceable hangar don't cost hardly anything to make and fit and they make complete sense! yes if you smash the entire swing arm up then yeah but if a branch, fence, bra or bit or rock catches the mech the hangar at speed will break well before anything is overlytressed. i just sold an ellsworth earlier this year and had to replace a broken hangar first for 12 quid, with the money i made from that i stuck some pikes on my mojo. if it had no replaceable hangar i would have to source a swing arm from a frame no longer made that costs more like 700 dollars and where would that have left me! i would made next to bugger all selling just the rear shock!
  • 1 1
 Where are you riding your bike that you're catching bra's ?!

As I said earlier... most every higher end derailleur made now has gone to hollowed out steel or alloy hanger bolts... which make far more sense as a point of planned failure than relying on a hanger bending precisely away.
  • 3 1
 Propermuntered, I fully agree with you. I am very pleased at all of your posts because now I don't have to try to write them. Sacrificial parts an enormously useful tool on our bikes. I have had to change one or two out on every bike I have ridden hard. I see little point in trying to save a piece of bent aluminum. deeight, I guess you could call me an armchair engineer because I am sitting in one right now. I also am a mechanical engineer who loves the material sciences aspect. Some people work in this engineering field for a job. Listen to propermuntered. He knows much more on the subject at hand than you do.
  • 3 3
 i agree with D8... its nice to have a solid hanger cuz they dont bend easliy and they shift real good...
  • 2 2
 People keep going on how cheap replaceable hangers are... except... do they realize HOW many models of hangers there are now? For brands even just making in the same factories in taiwan and china, there could be a half dozen different hangers. Look at the wheels manufacturing catalog (as they make aftermarket hangers)...

Take Bianchi as a brand for example, there are twelve different hanger models. Norco has eleven models, GT has fourteen, etc. Good luck on your local dealer having the one you want in stock (many dealers don't stock them for this very reason) when you actually break yours. And there have been brands which used replaceable hangers which no one ever made aftermarket replacements for. Wheels Mfrg doesn't make hangers for Morpheus brand frames for an example of that (or Banshee, or Chromag) so better be close to the LBS you got your bike from when you break your fragile replaceable hanger, or you could be riding a frame with a fixed hanger than can be just bent back.

Wheels Mfrg is up to 217 seperate models now btw.
  • 5 1
 You are losing this argument deeeight, just give it up. The pointless amount of replaceable hangers is a separate issue. It doesn't mean that a replaceable hanger itself is a bad idea. We are all aware that industry standard items make alot of sense in mountain biking. No one is going to disagree with that. BUT it has nothing to do with a replaceable hanger being a good idea or not.

You keep whittling on about hollows bolts, which are inevitably going to be stuck in your non-replaceable hanger and aren't guaranteed to snap before the hanger bends at the right angle.

"I've had to fix a number of hangers (professionally speaking) for customers and pretty much every time it involves a frame with a replaceable hanger, its not just that piece that's screwed up, but the thinner recessed part of the dropout it fits into that's also bent out of shape."

Usually on very cheap, poorly designed drop outs. Not on expensive frames we are discussing here. Again using a pointless example of something thats been poorly designed but isn't actually an inherent problem with the design idea.

"ok fine you armchair engineers"

Because being a bikeshop mechanic means you know it all? Congratulations you've reached the top level of cycling, the bike shop mechanic. No matter what the topic, you are the expert. Please let me buy you biscuits so can show me how to index my gears you demi-god you.
  • 1 5
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 11, 2014 at 4:47) (Below Threshold)
 Those that know, do. Those that don't, teach.

Replaceable hangers were, a crutch fix to get around designing a proper dropout in the first place on frames that were REALLY expensive to fix (titanium, carbon....twenty years ago). They never should have kept going on frames which are now ridiculously cheap (in comparison). Morpheus has taken the time to design a proper fixed hanger dropout and folks refuse to accept that.
  • 1 5
flag deeeight Plus (Feb 11, 2014 at 5:04) (Below Threshold)
 In other others, those of you who'd rather try and teach folks that replaceble hangers are the be all / end all solution, go nuts. I'm out here in the real world on the other hand knowing different. And I'm done with this thread now.
  • 1 0
 Ooo man- nothing better than a productive banter, huh? Chill out guys...
  • 5 1
 deeeight gets owned by actual engineers and he still thinks he's right... no wander they fired him as an admin.
  • 1 3
 Yes because saying you're an engineer on the internet is actual proof you're one.
  • 2 0
 just admit your wrong.
  • 1 3
 Except I'm not wrong. You can argue blind however you want that you're right that replaceable hangers are best but you'll never convince me of that, or many others, case in point the frame designers at Morpheus left it off this frame. If it was an entire replaceable dropout system as some brands use, like Intense does with the carbine, that'd be one thing, but simply having a replaceable hanger is a bad idea to me, always has been and always will be. Now negative prop away for my unpopular thinking I really do not care.
  • 4 1
 deeight- you should chill out and learn the skill of an educated conversation. Stop throwing toys out of your pram just because someone dares to think otherwise to you mate. Chill out. We are adults... Stop using irrelevant arguments and produce a factual conversation instead of getting assy just as noone likes your comments- grow up Sir.
  • 1 4
 Except on this site, even when people throw out REAL facts, they get ignored and/or negative propped out of visibilty, which is ironic for a place full of people who believe there are industry conspiracies in place to force them to change to new wheel sizes, new this, new that. So i'm done wasting time trying to educate on this topic. People will believe what they believe even if its not grounded in logic. There's more to being an adult than being over 18 years old.
  • 3 0
 "Real" facts. Which is actually your own opinion.

"Yes...and elastic deformation is exactly the same process at work when you bend a derailleur hanger. Invest in the proper hanger alignment tool folks. Don't just ham fist it with an adjustable spanner."

If you have bent it within plastic deformation then you could also bend back a replaceable derailleur hanger so this argument is complete bollocks.

I've re-read your argument and couldn't really find any other REAL facts to quote. You just go on about how important your own opinion is because a.) You have professionally fixed other peoples bikes and b.) You own an aluminium soft tail.

If you are going to explain your side of the argument well then your profession or background should make no difference as you should be arguing with facts and figures not opinions and personal experiences.

Everyone agrees that there should be less 'models' of derailleur hanger and we could easily standardise this part (obviously this would not profit bike companies so probably won't happen.) This is non-argument.

What we are saying is that in the case of complete failure then replaceable hanger is obviously advantageous. Saying you can replace the chain-stay instead seems a bit of a no-brainer, why would anyone want to do that?


This sums you up for me:
"I'm out here in the real world on the other hand knowing different. "

I'm here in the made up world knowing nothing.
  • 4 0
 deeeight --> burned
  • 2 2
 I admit i reversed elastic and plastic when typing, but I'm not changing my opinion on the matter. I will continue to prefer bikes with fixed hangers over replaceable given the choice between the two. If you can't accept that, I don't care. You do what you want, I'll do what I want, and that's the end of it. People want to keep typing to "burn" me, go nuts, I have better things to spend my time on.
  • 1 1
 I shall never ask another fricking question on PB- that has turned promptly into a hatred game. Deserved IMO but nevertheless unnecessary.


My argument for hangers is quite simple: if your rig gets struck by an on trail feature around the area of the rear derailluer I prefer to have to replace a hanger; even when overpriced and to be chosen from hundreds of different designs; than to buy another frame/another derailluer. yes, indeed, it is yet another part but its function is quite simple- it is to brake when struck to avoid any damage to frame/dropout/mech. Why would you complain about the fact that it brakes and you have to buy another one? It is its function. As to above frame- I personally do not like the idea of no hanger on AM frames- that is it. Prove me wrong and I shall change/reconsider my opinion. You Sir (deeight) have failed to do so.

Saying all that I do own a frame with no hanger- but it is steel- different matter, different story. Even on steel I do question the lifespan of the irreplaceable mech hanger when adjusted on numerous occasions...
  • 3 0
 The bike has 2 flaws:
1 - no replaceable hanger
2 - Igus bushings

They need to differentiate themselves from others. The carbon rocker is cool, but what about stealth/internal seatpost routing? Water-bottle bosses? There is nothing special about this bike.
  • 6 0
 Take the red pill and I'll show you how far the rabbit hole goes!
  • 7 1
 Looks like a Kona Coiler
  • 1 0
 more like a Dawg Smile
  • 3 1
 Looks like a Session.
  • 2 0
 Yeah it looks a lot like a modern Coiler. Which isn't a bad thing, I have the Coiler and I think it looks awesome.
  • 2 4
 Matjtom90 - You are wrong, it looks crap.
  • 3 0
 More like Raleigh ram xt2500
  • 1 0
 My size small Coilair Supreme frame came in at 9.3lbs so at least it's lighter. Hell it's lighter than my Abra Cadabra frame by 0.6 lbs.
  • 2 1
 Bushings? over 7 lbs? No replaceable hanger? And STILL just as much money as any other aluminum 5-6" frame?? This must be a joke, I'm sorry but you'd have to be clueless to pay that much for this bike. Oh and straight HT wtf? Also, travel range 116-126mm wtf? If anyone at Morpheus is reading this... CHANGE UP YOUR GAME. And before attempting this change, pay some damn attention to what people ride nowadays.
  • 1 1
 Ive had the frame for coming up to 2years now and no issues with the bushings at all. Also ive destoryed a mech but the hanger is still intact (i see the argument there though).

If you've read the article, youll see that although they are small increments in travel, they make a large difference

Mine isnt the 27.5 frame, but it works more or less the same. They handle dirt jumps along side hardtails, and can rip the park alongside 8" freeride frames.
  • 1 1
 I like the fact that can ajust the travel a bit which is great but most of the time would not bother better than no adjustment with most up to date builds but over 30lbs for short travel bike you can get fat bikes much lighter but looks nice but could do with longer top tube so make a short and long version
  • 2 0
 Aesthetics from the past meet the pricing of the future...Who buys one of these when the choices out there offer so much more?
  • 4 2
 www.pinkbike.com/photo/10044099
Going on 2 years strong. Amazing do it all frame. Its taken some real abuse.
  • 1 0
 Yer man, they're so fun.
Mine was the first in the UK, along with a freinds. www.pinkbike.com/photo/7835576
  • 3 0
 Needle bearings seem to have a short lifespan
  • 3 0
 Ugly cheap ass looking bike looks like an Ellsworth
  • 1 1
 They had this great opportunity to make a sexy carbon fiber rocker arm. And they made it look like a crude toy. I hope the next version looks better or you wont be selling many bikes.
  • 2 0
 is this a joke? 22.3 inch top tube? non replaceable mech hanger? not impressed.
  • 2 0
 Plain Jane! ...why would someone pay $$ for this over a Norco, Specialized, Santa Cruz...?
  • 2 0
 " their philosophy of assembling durable aluminum frames and offering them at competitive prices". $750.00 for a DJ frame.
  • 2 0
 Still looks better than their DH bike. www.morpheusbikes.com/carbon.html
  • 2 0
 hey guys lets go back to 2000, take an ellworth link arm and call it progressive geo
  • 2 0
 $1800 for the frame is too much considering where it's made, the suspension design, and the materials used.
  • 2 2
 one of the better bikes i've ridden so far! tons of fun on jumps and downhills! kind of a mini freeride bike! can't wait to give it a try in the bikeparks
  • 2 0
 135x12 ? Really? Not the more common and popular 142x12 ?
  • 2 0
 Again...FAIL

There are so many really good bikes out now, you have to get the details downs. No replaceable derailleur hanger??? I am having trouble remembering a non-steel ot Ti frame w/o one. I need to check again to see if it has an 1 1/8" straight steerer tube.
  • 2 0
 can you buy 135 axle, 27.5 wheels?
  • 1 1
 Needs 12x142 and a VP suspension system. Otherwise it's just a 2002 frame design with bigger wheels. Looks super nice though, but that could be my early-2000s tastes.
  • 2 0
 Hahahah I missed the fact that it's a 135mm. It's like they literally have no idea what has happened in the past 4 years. They just noticed that 650b and slack head angles seemed popular and figured their work was done.
  • 1 1
 I think they were thinking that they were making an XC bike for DH riders, much like Banshee did with the Spitfire, or Kona did with the Process 111.
  • 1 0
 Except why use a 12mm axle then and a non-QR one at that.
  • 2 1
 Would be better with a Horst link.
  • 2 0
 Could be neat with some sort of VPP too. Maybe DW?
  • 2 2
 Does not look like a bike for pedaling a lot, so I would rather had one with more active suspension and a higher BB. Obviously, just an inter webs talk, but with the patent expired and with some VPP like designs available I wish for more choice. Short travel rear with 150mm front sounds like something I would like.
  • 1 1
 This one compresses shocks during pedaling AKA bob/squat. I wish they put that pivot higher of the chain line or at least centered on the chain line.
  • 1 1
 That would require knowing exactly what chainring someone is designing around (ie, everyone has to run a 29T ring and that's it for perfection). While the bike was presented for testing with a 1x drivetrain, they clearly built the frame with 2x/3x compatibility and optimized the main pivot placement to be in between where the granny ring would be and the middle ring. It'll compress/squat in the middle ring and extend/lockout in the granny.
  • 2 1
 Looks burly. Try it before judgement. Nice bike
  • 1 0
 Put a horst link on that thing
  • 2 1
 Look at the big ass zip ties they used and did not even cut them off right
  • 2 1
 Looks like a unfinished school metal work project from 1995
  • 1 1
 I like the simplicity but i dont like the way the shock is mounted at the bottom
  • 2 1
 Available at your local Wal-Mart
  • 2 1
 Wow so much hate haha I really like the look.. Smile
  • 1 0
 Because bikes and DH Enduro resisted 29er wheels?
  • 2 1
 that rocker is the fugliest I've ever seen in my whole life
  • 1 0
 I like going down...
  • 9 1
 That's what she said.
  • 5 5
 needle bearings and bushings? No thanks.
  • 3 2
 Had mine for coming on 2 years, never ahd to replace any bearing and theyre still running smooth. Its had some fair abuse aswell.
www.pinkbike.com/photo/10044099
  • 3 0
 Bushings are great for many applications, suspension picots are one of them. For pivots that rotate less than 180 degrees, they have an advantage because there is not sufficient movement to lubricate the bearings.
  • 2 2
 trouble is bushings only work properly if they have made and fitted to the right tolerances and aren't subjected to twisting loads and flex causing the bushes to bind and a frame flexes plenty. yes your right bearings prefer to rotate not oscillate but they are forgiving of misalignment and are easy and cheap to replace when they have had it unlike bushes. giving your frame a longer life than your likely to expect with bushes
  • 2 2
 Morpheus have been very Loki latly
  • 2 2
 Shit on the front wheel? Hidden commercial of bike
  • 1 1
 22.3" TT for a "large".

FAIL.
  • 1 2
 Unless that's "actual" toptube not effective horizontal.
  • 4 0
 Large tt should be at least 24". Modern geo is 24.5.
This alert was brought to by the unprofessional internet guy webcast network. Ty
  • 2 1
 I am starting to think a lot of this "cramped" feeling is largely symptomatic of looking at the top tube numbers. A Loki in size medium has the same reach as my cannondale SL2 frame, which is pretty darn long at 22.25 inches.

A Santa Cruz Bronson measures at like 404 reach in a size medium, and is thus almost a half inch shorter, but is instead not badly positioned for climbing but equally as "playful".

The numbers and the feedback do not correspond at all in these tests. For example I find 415+ reach necessary for my rides, no matter what type of bike this is almost always consistent- bmx included. And I am only 5'8". Further highlights how useless reviews are to the end user unless something completely fails during testing. And I thought MBA was inconsistent.
  • 3 3
 Nice bike but can it do enduro?
  • 2 1
 Can you say 2006 Kona?
  • 2 2
 I've owned this bike for almost a year and all I can say is it SHREDDS.
  • 2 0
 How many other $1700+ frames have you ridden to compare to?

edit: don't mean that to be a jerk, I'm seriously asking what other similar bikes you can compare this to because it's entirely possible that, despite their complete disregard for current standards, it does ride well.
  • 1 1
 many others thanks. I admit the bike has slightly different geometry than standard all-mtn bikes these days...but it also rides differnet. The low low, low bottom bracket and slack head angle give it an insanely stable feel. Kills it on the downhill, and pumps and pops like a animal on more flowly trails. The only situations it fails to excel in are technical climbs...a bit too low and slack. Bottome line, its a different, but super fun bike other recent bikes are RM SLAYER SS, banshee wildcard, TR250, Transition bandit
  • 1 1
 I agree, had mine for 2years now, 1st one imported to the UK. Its taken everything ive thrown at it, can keep up with freinds on their 8" DH bikes, and with all the lycra wearing XC boys at the local loop. I had a wildcard before it and it feels quite similar, just can play on the DJs too.
  • 1 1
 cough, Kona Process review, cough
  • 1 0
 nice groupo
  • 2 4
 Looks like a Remedy.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.050374
Mobile Version of Website