ODI Direct Mount Stem, Flight Control Handlebars and Wingtips!

Dec 16, 2010
by Simon Paton  
You all know that ODI are the number one company for grips on your pride and joy. Their Ruffian and Mushroom grips should be inducted into the MTB Hall of Fame for sure. Now what about their Flight Control Bars and Direct Mount Stems, "What bars and stems?" I hear you cry. And as for Wingtips? Family show so we can't swear.

Hold tight, sit down and point your controls this way folks...
Made from 7075 T6 Aluminum which is the right choice for a pair of bars.  These bars look a million dollars in the colour options that are available; Black, Black Chrome, Blue, Red and Gold. This will give Race Face a run for their money in the style stakes. Currently only available in a 25mm rise, we would like to see that come down to at least 20mm, if not a 15mm option for the downhill race brigade please. Clamping size is 31.8mm, oversized. Is the 25.4mm bar dead for all mountain and downhill. Funn would argue that with their Full On bars or are they flogging a dead horse?
Made from 7075 T6 Aluminum which is the right choice for a pair of bars. These bars look a million dollars in the colour options that are available; Black, Black Chrome, Blue, Red and Gold. This will give Race Face a run for their money in the style stakes. Currently only available in a 25mm rise, we would like to see that come down to at least 20mm, if not a 15mm option for the downhill race brigade please. Clamping size is 31.8mm, oversized. Is the 25.4mm bar dead for all mountain and downhill. Funn would argue that with their Full On bars or are they flogging a dead horse?
<br> <span style='font-size:19px'>ODI Flight Control Handlebar details:</span> <br><br>- 25 mm rise<br>- 5 degree x 9 degree sweep<br>- 750 mm wide w/o Wing Tips<br>- 327 grams<br>- MSRP $79.95 USD<br><br><br>Now I've been running these ODI bars at their standard width of 750mm, at only 5ft 6ins, almost the wrong side of the big four zero, I still buy Calvin Kleins, have a wrist watch and have never been on Twitter. Therefore I'm not down with the 780mm wide brigade and the clowns pushing 800mm I'm afraid. Now personally I'm not sold on these Wing Tips, you see my Grand dad always had a few wise sayings. One of the most useful ones was,

ODI Flight Control Handlebar details:

- 25 mm rise
- 5 degree x 9 degree sweep
- 750 mm wide w/o Wing Tips
- 327 grams
- MSRP $79.95 USD


Now I've been running these ODI bars at their standard width of 750mm, at only 5ft 6ins, almost the wrong side of the big four zero, I still buy Calvin Kleins, have a wrist watch and have never been on Twitter. Therefore I'm not down with the 780mm wide brigade and the clowns pushing 800mm I'm afraid. Now personally I'm not sold on these Wing Tips, you see my Grand dad always had a few wise sayings. One of the most useful ones was, "Measure twice, cut once". I understand your regular rider that is moving up the style ladder and rankings that he wants to run wider bars. The chance he was already clued up enough to have a set of ODI bars in the first chance is a big fat zero. Therefore he's just going to go out and purchase a set of 800/780mm wide bars and cut them down. Hopefully remembering what my grand dad said,"Measure twice, cut once".
<span style='font-size:19px'>Wing Tips details:</span> <br><br>- 13mm or 18mm threaded extensions<br>- 14 g per pair (13 mm)<br>- MSRP $11.95 USD<br><br>Where these would be really useful if for the rider running 740mm bars or shorter that wants to go wider. Here is where the Wingtips jump in and help out in their unique way. The rider can run the ODI bars at 750mm as their first initial upgrade. Then in a few months time bump up to either 13mm/763mm wide bars or go 18mm/768mm bars. Thus saving valuable pennies and not having to splash the cash to go that bit wider. Plus it's a lot easier to set up and get used to as the bar foundations themselves will be the same angles, sweep, rise etc.. The Wingtips also have a thread in there for a plastic end cap with an allen key head. Just the job to stop you corking yourself and to keep the race commissaires happy. Could you buy two sets of Wingtips and screw them into each other to build a jumbo extension? Yes, but definitely not advised. You might say there are those of you out there that crash a lot. Skills on my side and luckily I haven't smashed by bars into the ground. If I had would the end of the bar been damaged, i.e squashed, dented? Thus meaning the internal threads damaged? Personally that would of had to of been one hell of a big stack and then have my bike run over by a steam roller. If that was the case then these bars would be rendered useless for any future extension plans. Hold on though, if you had such a big stack that your bars were damaged, wouldn't it be time to replace them anyway? Food for thought guys...<br><br><br>
Wing Tips details:

- 13mm or 18mm threaded extensions
- 14 g per pair (13 mm)
- MSRP $11.95 USD

Where these would be really useful if for the rider running 740mm bars or shorter that wants to go wider. Here is where the Wingtips jump in and help out in their unique way. The rider can run the ODI bars at 750mm as their first initial upgrade. Then in a few months time bump up to either 13mm/763mm wide bars or go 18mm/768mm bars. Thus saving valuable pennies and not having to splash the cash to go that bit wider. Plus it's a lot easier to set up and get used to as the bar foundations themselves will be the same angles, sweep, rise etc.. The Wingtips also have a thread in there for a plastic end cap with an allen key head. Just the job to stop you corking yourself and to keep the race commissaires happy. Could you buy two sets of Wingtips and screw them into each other to build a jumbo extension? Yes, but definitely not advised. You might say there are those of you out there that crash a lot. Skills on my side and luckily I haven't smashed by bars into the ground. If I had would the end of the bar been damaged, i.e squashed, dented? Thus meaning the internal threads damaged? Personally that would of had to of been one hell of a big stack and then have my bike run over by a steam roller. If that was the case then these bars would be rendered useless for any future extension plans. Hold on though, if you had such a big stack that your bars were damaged, wouldn't it be time to replace them anyway? Food for thought guys...


At first look you may see the resemblance between this and the E-13 stems that were two separate sides. Close, but no cigar, the ODI Flight Control Stem is two separate sides agreed, the difference here is that they join courtesy of the top clamp that bridges the two sides. Originally I wasn't too impressed that the stem came without the four stem mounting bolts. A quick call to Ison Distribution the UK distributors for ODI and they soon rectified this with the boys on the other side of the pond and now they all ship with bolts. Now that was the bad news, the good news is that there are plenty of nice things to say about this stem. First off - How many times have you squinted to no avail trying to line up your bars bang on in the middle? The ODI Flight Control Stem ticks that job off in a second by having a small centering arrow that protrudes from the clamp at both the top and the bottom. Winner! This allows you to line your bars up quickly and perfectly every time without the aid of a geometry set and a laser. Then depending on what bars you are running, you can now match up the angle you want your bars tilting back at. On the ODI bars, the lines are marked meaning that compass and protractor Aunt Blanche gave you for Christmas is now going in the bin. The stem is pretty light even though it looks quite big and bulky from a distance, close inspection reveals any unwanted material has been nicely and carefully machined out. That includes the floor of the two side clamps between the fixing bolts, another nice touch. Then add on the laser etched ODI logo and you have one killer stem that hasn't creaked, slipped or underperformed at any point in the last three months. Where I do need some help to finish this article off is with the clamping up process. The manual says to clamp the two top bolts first so they close shut, no gap. Then tighten the bottom bolts. Now I know Straitline also say this and apparently it ensures a stronger and more even clamp. Please can those of you cleverer than me tell me why that is in your posts below?
At first look you may see the resemblance between this and the E-13 stems that were two separate sides. Close, but no cigar, the ODI Flight Control Stem is two separate sides agreed, the difference here is that they join courtesy of the top clamp that bridges the two sides. Originally I wasn't too impressed that the stem came without the four stem mounting bolts. A quick call to Ison Distribution the UK distributors for ODI and they soon rectified this with the boys on the other side of the pond and now they all ship with bolts. Now that was the bad news, the good news is that there are plenty of nice things to say about this stem. First off - How many times have you squinted to no avail trying to line up your bars bang on in the middle? The ODI Flight Control Stem ticks that job off in a second by having a small centering arrow that protrudes from the clamp at both the top and the bottom. Winner! This allows you to line your bars up quickly and perfectly every time without the aid of a geometry set and a laser. Then depending on what bars you are running, you can now match up the angle you want your bars tilting back at. On the ODI bars, the lines are marked meaning that compass and protractor Aunt Blanche gave you for Christmas is now going in the bin. The stem is pretty light even though it looks quite big and bulky from a distance, close inspection reveals any unwanted material has been nicely and carefully machined out. That includes the floor of the two side clamps between the fixing bolts, another nice touch. Then add on the laser etched ODI logo and you have one killer stem that hasn't creaked, slipped or underperformed at any point in the last three months. Where I do need some help to finish this article off is with the clamping up process. The manual says to clamp the two top bolts first so they close shut, no gap. Then tighten the bottom bolts. Now I know Straitline also say this and apparently it ensures a stronger and more even clamp. Please can those of you cleverer than me tell me why that is in your posts below?
<br> <span style='font-size:19px'>ODI Flight Control Stem details:</span> <br><br>- Constructed of 6061 aluminum<br>- 50 mm reach<br>- Available in black<br>- Weight 123 grams<br>- MSRP $89.95 USD

ODI Flight Control Stem details:

- Constructed of 6061 aluminum
- 50 mm reach
- Available in black
- Weight 123 grams
- MSRP $89.95 USD


ODI is exclusively distributed in the U.K by Ison Distribution.
For more info on ODI check their website here.


Stay Unclipped,

-Si Paton
Descent-Gear.com


65 Comments

  • + 10
 The more even clamping comes from the top two bolts acting as a hinge. This minimises the potential for the face plate to be twisted across the surface of the bar which is likely to happen when each bolt is done up to a different torque and with a different amount of insertion into the threads. It simply helps to alleviate the effect of the clamp being done up incorrectly with the potential for premature failure of the bar to then occur.
  • + 1
 definitely want this
  • + 3
 I think its brilliant! I want a wider bar for all mtn and dh riding, but a narrower bar for dirt jumping and park riding. I can either buy two bars, or a set of these babys and they're not that much more than the atlas bars i run now.
  • - 1
 The wingtips are a good idea, but surely it's just extra weight over making a slightly wider bar?
  • + 4
 so the wingtips can only be used on a the ODI handlebar? They should make one that could go on any bar. great idea though, looks sick!
  • + 3
 Important point on the clamp gap issue: It DOES make tons of sense for evening out the force over as close to 360 degrees as possible, and three cheers for the manufacturers that do it, but the face plate has to be machined so that the curves match. In other words, do it if the instructions say to, but don't go doing it on any old random stem. It's to be done on specific stems, not stems in general.
  • + 12
 I need those wing tips for my 800mm flat bar Geek
  • + 6
 hahaha, you gotta be kidding...
  • - 5
flag chrisbee (Dec 16, 2010 at 3:58) (Below Threshold)
 flat bars suck. 25mm is alright. who the hell needs them ugly flat ones?
  • + 5
 chrisbee - small people
  • - 8
flag jordxgreen (Dec 16, 2010 at 8:28) (Below Threshold)
 Don't really understand the whole "flat bars, toilet deat on neck, seat too high" fashion at the moment in all honesty.
  • + 21
 Yea, people wanting to avoid debilitating neck injuries or paralysis are real idiots, eh? :/
  • - 3
 I'm with you konakid1993. Plus I've yet to see any test reports etc of whether or not a bog seat round your kneck actually works in saving it?

Also if it does work they'll still be f*cked because they usually ain't wearing any armour or even gloves...

Bar wise - don't any of them ride any singletrack with trees at the side? I can think of many a place where it's bloody tight with my 710mm bars.....
  • + 0
 innerleithen has some of the tightest downhill trails around and you can get away with over 750mm there its just all about knowing where the end of your bars are. if you find 710 is tight sometimes then ride trails with less tight tree's, takes away from the fun if you are constantly worrying about hitting tree's
  • + 0
 personally I think flat bars look badass
  • + 5
 Don't get me wrong, I think neck braces are a bloody good idea, the point I was trying to make is that the DH scene is too much about fashion right now
  • + 0
 you say that, but if it fashion makes you protect your neck then whats the problem? sponsors want riders to look good. also a lot of people think neck braces are ugly and same with flat bars, but yet people run both...explain that
  • + 1
 People run things they think look cool, i.e. flat bars, but are they really necessary? How low does a front end need to be?
  • + 0
 the lower your front, the more efficient your pedalling position, and your steering.becomes more accurate. there is a point thats comfortable though. my am bike's front is probably higher than these slammed-boxxer, 0 rise stem, flat bar dhers and i like it
  • + 4
 Yeah some people are taking it too far, like a "my bars are lower and wider than yours" kinda thing, bit stupid
  • + 2
 flat bar.. for short people like me ,, or i'll fix stem upside down
  • + 6
 Reading these posts just reinforces how old school I am. I love the tight trees where I have to wiggle my bike through places. I also love the epic, super steep bumpy trails that are only made possible by shifting the center of gravity as far back as possible, to hell with pedaling efficiency. A lot of the new trails though I can see being perfect for low and wide bars. The days of tiny skinnies 20ft in the air are coming to an end I suspect.
  • + 2
 Mad-Pierre, I totally disagree with you, My 'Bog seat round my neck' has saved my neck on many occasions, I will never ride Downhill without it, I didnt just jump on the band wagon, I bought it for safety, and it definatley works, without mine i'd of been on 4 wheels a long time ago, I've been riding for a few years, and have had the neck brace for over a year, and it boosts your confidence on the hill, I myself definatley have felt the benefit of it, as landing straight to the top of the head, still holding onto my poor little hardtail, From 10foot, should of broken my neck, but ,my 'Bog Seat round my neck' Saved me, I'll admit to wearing full MX kit to look good, but my Neck brace was purely for Protection, not fashion. Just my 10pence worth.
  • + 1
 A guy I know learned it the other way around. He broke his neck in May, but started riding downhill again already in September. He now never rides without his neckbrace. When they get so cheap that the average downhill joe look at it as "worth the price", if you see what I mean, I will definitely buy one.
  • + 3
 Function>fashion any day tbh, I jut think downhill is starting to go the other way in some areas.
Brendan Fairclough made a good point about this in an interview, about how stupid flat bars are!
  • + 1
 what interview is that? can you find me it?
  • + 2
 staikeinthahood, Just buy an Adventure brace, Thats all i have, £175 and i will never regret it, In my opinion riding without a neckbrace is nuts, When i go dirtjumping, i've always got my DH lid on, but because i dont wear the brace for it, i don't feel as confident as do at DH, Maybe worth a try at my local Razz But anyway, You won't regret buying a neckbrace.
  • + 1
 I can get them dirt cheap since I can get them for near half price the place I work. But I'm fairly new to downhill right now, but I will certainly look into it next season if I ride as much as I have planned. Smile
  • + 1
 Sorry Magnus, was a while ago so can't find it, but he was saying there's basically no point having a stupidly low front end haha
  • + 1
 Here you go: www.pinkbike.com/news/2011-specialized-demo-8-brendan-fairclough.html Listen to the audio under the pic of his headtube (8 from top).
  • + 1
 Brendog is also 6'2" and doesn't need his front end to be very low. Konakid, I like how you're upset that DH is too focused on fashion, yet you use a brief interview where a paid professional claims a certain park "looks stupid" to support your argument. Personally, I don't give a rat's a$s what Brendan Fairclough is using on his bike, or what, in his opinion, "looks stupid." A bit ironic?
  • + 1
 No, not really. I will definitely get flat or very low rise bars when I get a proper dh bike, because it makes me feel more like sitting "in" the bike and not on it. I'm only 5'7" though.
  • + 1
 kona-owna-4-life : I didn't say a bog seat doesn't save you froma broken kneck - I've just yet to see any proper reports that these things actually work? You seem to think yours does which is fair enough - but that's only word of mouth.

I'm all for protection - which is why I was having a dig at all the people that wear a bog seat but not any other protection - armour, gloves etc. They might not break their kneck but it's hard to ride with no skin on your hands!

you also say a kneck brace boosts your confidence. I don't want a confidence boost from thinking I can survive a crash better - that would just make me more likely to crash!
  • + 1
 experiences + skills + techniques => confidence
  • + 1
 I wasn't saying that Brendo is someone we all HAVE to agree with, merely showing someone that agrees with my opinion
  • + 6
 I'm afraid your maths is a bit suspect Si!

"13mm/763mm wide bars or go 18mm/768mm bars"

Remember you have one ODI Wingtip in EACH side therefore:

- 750mm + pair of 12.5mm (1/2 inch) Wingtips = 775mm

- 750mm + pair of 18.5mm (3/4 inch) Wingtips = 787mm (it is written on the bar as the max width I think).
  • + 2
 Really.... more hype on handle bars. They are handle bars, seriously i haven't had any issues breaking handle bars in the past 10 years, why do they need keep coming out with new bars in new colors. The direct mount stem i really like, very simple, and light as hell
  • + 1
 Every time I see an article like this I get more and more worried about the fact that mountain biking is becoming a lot like fashion, people don't have the brains to design and make anything which is a good, clever and usable product so instead they come up with these stupid accessories that create no advantage or development whatsoever, so the only people who will buy these products are the people who don't have the brains to realise their just following another pointless trend, (eg: people who just want to have the widest bars possible).

Start making products which are worth buying! Stop making products which are obviously just there to satisfy the fashion followers!
  • + 1
 Wide bars are not a fashion fad. I got wide bars because I looked for lower bars (I had a high head tube and fork) and I tested them without cutting at 760mm. Never looked back. After a day 710s felt strange on friends dh bikes. I'm pretty thin framed so I understand why people would need really wide bars.
  • + 1
 think about this, when you're riding without those plugs in the end of the bars and you take a spill and bend the end of the bar just slightly out of round or screw up the threads in any manner you won't be able to put the plug back in (or take it out) and it will just be another useless accesory you wish you never bought. this is the second time this article has bene posted about this crap and its the second time ive had to try and point it out! pick a bar size and stick to it! sissys
  • + 1
 I got to test a set of these early last race season and i was told they come with extensions, so i thought they would be flimsy and would loosen. I was completely wrong, these bars so sooo well done and fit n finish is top, i had them running at 780mm with extensions and the joint between the spacers and the bar is so well machined. the bars are seriously sick and i recommend them to anyone. i didnt get to use the stem though, so no insight on that.
  • + 0
 I just like the fact that these colors are available in my RaceFace Diabolus ratings at 25 mm rise & 5 degree x 9 degree sweep. Only reason I havent picked up the Altas bars, besides being so damn wide, now these are perfect!! Props to ODIFCB
  • + 0
 Well get down to your local bike shop and pick one up then.
  • + 1
 Still think I'd prefer the 6pack or Reverse bars, and the reverse ones win the looks stakes.

www.reversecomponents.com/eng/parts_lenker.html
  • + 1
 I got this Race Face Dues bar on sale last season. Come to find out it was on sale because it was only 680mm wide. Those ODI Wingtips seem to be for just such an occasion.
  • + 1
 Wont work bud, got to have threaded ends.
  • + 1
 This is just as useful as straitlines quick release stem :http://www.pinkbike.com/video/129847/
  • + 1
 I had the bars on my last bike. They worked great. Im gonna get them for my next bike.
  • + 1
 I am going to machine 30mm extensions and thread the inside of my 800mm Gravity LiteSmile
  • + 1
 Lolwut

These came out ages ago. Wasn't there a write up in the inter-bike thingies?
  • + 1
 123g 6061 alu stem? Can anyone explain me why not 7075?
  • - 3
 7075 aluminum is more brittle and when experiencing shock, such as hitting a drop, the aluminum is more likely to crack
  • + 10
 sorry its got nothing to do with material properties - in fact 7XXX series alloys are considerably stronger and tougher than 6XXX series alloys, 7005 (that many frames are manufactured from) is certainly not "brittle" Wink

its all to do with saving money - 7XXX alloy billet costs more, and are harder to forge and machine = more cost to manufacture
  • + 1
 That brittle thing is BS. Many DM steems are made from 7075. For the last season I was riding on 7075 prototypes of Dartmoor rage. I'm also pretty sure it's cheaper as in Poland it is to be around 70$ if not less.

Also I was curious because If I was to do a lightweight stem (150g) I'd never go 6 series. That's why I'm curious.
  • + 1
 Im a welder i know the chemical properties of aluminum, its not bs, and sue it has to do with money aswell because everyone wants to make the most, but 7005 aluminum ismore brittle than 6061, just because it doesnt crack right away doesnt mean shit, you should see x ray's of aluminum
  • + 1
 Welding is not material eng. man. 7xxx are more brittle than 6xxx series but not by enough to make them to brittle to use. What 7 alloys really are is STIFFER. Which also makes them THEORETICALY more brittle but mostly STRONGER at the same weight.

In bike components 6061 is used only because of price. There are no stresses that would cause the added stiffness of 7075 (almost no components are made from 7005 so why are we talking about it? Stems are either 6061 or 7050/7075 !!!) to be a negative fact. Especialy that if a stem is bent it's also done and it's much easier to bend a 6061 part than to crack a 7075 part.
  • + 1
 7005 is more brittle, because it is stiffer, because the stiffer something is, the harder it is, which means it is more brittle, as softer is more maluable , you can weld 7005 , i didnt say anything about being to brittle to use, and its 7005 not 7075 im not saying that 7005 wont bend because it will, there is a higher chance that 7005 will crack compared to 6061, and everything is moleculer bud, no point arguing cause everything im saying is right, and if you read right above, because u responded to it, you can read, that i wrote because it has to do with money, your making yourself look like a fool, basically restating my comment
  • + 1
 You have serious ego problems man.

Also it's not 7005. There are no components made from 7005 that I know off. Bars are 7050 and 7075 if made from 7xxx series alu, Stems mostly from 7075 (haven't seen a 7050). So why the hell you are talking about 7005? Because you weld it? That's not the point of discussion.

Also you also restated my opinion so stop calling me a fool if you fit your own definition kid. (btw. even if 7xxx will crack before, 6xxx will bend earlier - bend stem = trash)
  • - 2
 $80 for handlebars? sorry, ill go spend $50 on wider bars elsewhere
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