Pinkbike Poll: Electronic Components

Apr 26, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
While electronics are pervasive in our day to day lives, until recently bicycles had remained relatively free of them, except for cycling computers and lights. That's rapidly changing, and over the next few years it's likely more and more electronically controlled components will be entering the cycling world. Shifting and suspension are the two places where the changes have already begun to happen, but other components, such as dropper posts, may see electronic controls as well.

Electronic shifting appeared as early as 1990, but wasn't commercially available until the introduction of Shimano's Di2 system for road bikes in 2009. While still not available for mountain bikes, prototypes have been spotted, and there's no reason not to think Shimano isn't at least considering an off-road version. An electronic shift system on a mountain bike would mean no more dealing with cables and housing that can be contaminated by the elements, and would make cable routing less of an issue. Wires take up less space and can navigate sharper angles on a frame than what is possible with traditional cables and housing.


Fox Racing Shox iCD shock

Fox's iCD system allows the rider to control the front fork and rear shock's suspension settings simultaneously. Further advances in the integration of electronics and suspension are just over the horizon.



The suspension world has seen a new wave of electronics enter the field, ones that work infinitely better than the ill-fated K2/Noleen electronic shock that arrived circa 1999. In 2012, Fox introduced their iCD system, which allows riders to control both their fork and shock settings at the same time. The system uses a Shimano Di2 battery for power, with a claimed run time of 2.5 months before needing to be recharged. Even more sophisticated systems are on the way, including Rock Shox's e.i. (electronic intelligence) system, which uses accelerometers to measure the force of an impact on the front fork, and then relays this information to the rear shock within .1 second. Marzocchi currently has a motocross fork that electronically controls the fork's compression and rebound settings, with plans in the works to introduce a mountain bike fork using this same technology.

Dropper posts are another area with the potential to see the introduction of electronics. As far back as 2009 Shimano filed a patent for a dropper post controlled by an electronic motor. At this year's Sea Otter Classic, Giant Bicycles had a prototype dropper post that uses a servomotor to raise and lower the seat. Giant's prototype had wires running from the handlebars to the post, but the concept of an dropper post that can be controlled via a wireless remote on the handlebar is even more appealing – no more cables to contaminate or hydraulic lines to kink.


Detail from Shimano s electronic dropper post patent.

Although Shimano's patent for an electronically controlled dropper post was filed in 2009, they haven't announced plans to produce one any time soon.


Of course, the addition of electronics to bicycles isn't without potential downsides. While advances in battery technology have allowed for increasingly long run times, the possibility of getting stuck in the woods without a working derailleur or suspension system does exist. Plus, the inherent simplicity of the bicycle has always been part of the appeal, and adding intricate electronics certainly adds a level of complication not everyone will approve of. Riders exploring remote locales could also have difficulty finding replacement parts, and servicing electronics isn't something that can easily be done in the field. Whatever your views, it's going to be interesting to see where this influx of new technology takes us over the next few years.






246 Comments

  • 360 14
 Without wanting to sound like a hippy, all this electronic garbage detracts from the purity of the bike and the ride. the bike is powered by me and I want to make the changes manually, not remotely via a wireless link. I want to feel the click and resistance of my shifters and the movement of my chain. it takes a split second and its in there that I find a moments peace to contemplate and plan my next pedal stroke or weight shift, and in that moment Im calm and focussed, everything slows down and i can feel and hear my bike telling me if anything is wrong. adding all this gadgetry takes you too far away from the experience and you become a passenger, a mere spectator.
  • 37 4
 Very Well said!
  • 26 17
 I'd really encourage even the purists to try the E:I system from Lapierre (it is totally developed and owned by Lapierre by the way Mike, Rockshox just produce it) I wasn't a believer either, but after riding it in France on an unfamiliar trail if anything it allows you to be more in tune with the terrain and experience of the ride. For example when rapidly transitioning from hard pack to a steep section of loose rocks round a blind corner or having to quickly climb up a short roller before launching off a drop, instead of finicking around groping for CTD levers and lockout switches, you just ride naturally and the bike changes from locked out to complaint to fully open exactly as you'd want it to. No slowing down, no taking your eyes off the line you want, no flailing for switches, just riding the way you want with your bike in the ideal setting freeing your mind and senses to focus on the real tactile elements of a great ride.
  • 17 2
 I agree, I just love the fact its me, the great outdoors, and my mechanically adjustable by hand bike with no electronic gizmo's. Its nice to get back to basics, and lets face it basics are not so basic when we consider the progress that has been made in last few years.
  • 33 10
 Purist change over time. Previous purist scoff at gears when it was first introduced, then 8/9/10/11 speed gears, after that suspension, after the full suspension bikes, after that dropper seat post, and the list go on. If you say you're a purist in that you like to keep it simple, the fork is not simple since its not field serviceable. I've had it failed on me in the wilderness before, had to push the bike out.

A true purist would ride a single speed rigid bike with cantilever brakes.

To me, if they can get it to be reliable and simple I'd say why not. If I can't service it myself at home or it will jack up the price like crazy then I'll stay clear of it.
  • 13 4
 I feel like i'm in the extreme minority here but i have to disagree. The bike is still 100% powered by you in these cases. I think electronic suspension is a great idea! There are so many people out there that don't know how and what to do with all their suspension dials and even when you do know the suspension will never be 100% perfect for every section of the track. For example, electronic suspension would slow rebound down on jumps and increase rebound speed when smashing a big gnarly rock garden - giving you a much more enjoyable decent before firming the system up for an easier climb back to the top. The technology is still young however but in the not so distant future where batteries will be much smaller and last significantly longer i recon we will be seeing a lot more of electronic kit on the market, you just cannot beat the precision of it.
  • 14 2
 Electronics are great as it gives people more options. The problems with options in MTB is many of it eventually becomes proprietary. Quality rims being disc only, CTD shocks limiting ability for fine tuning, whatever the case may be many people have been shunned away from mountain biking because unlike surfing and other sports, most of MTBs marketing is about having the absolute newest and greatest thing with the promise of it making you better. There is no real soul. for every article on PB about being a decent rider, there are 20 articles about bling. Electronic shifting will not make you better. But that does not mean it can't be an option. I reiterate....OPTION.
  • 9 4
 Hippy.... Wink
  • 7 1
 Well I'm not against the electronic components, it gives versatility to riding. But what i don't like is that the trends push you towards buying those new things...for example if you are 150cm tall, you don't need a 29er, it will make more damage to your riding than benefits,or maybe you just don't like them...but can you buy a new 26er specialized epic? No you don't...now that is stupid in my opinion. And maybe it's specialized's loss, but the whole industry is pushing the new stuf and makes the whole riding sometimes to consumerism oriented. So my 2 cents is that ok, bring the electronics but don't kill the older ones...
  • 1 0
 @davemit: Exactly! Ride whatever you like, but don't do what the magazines etc. tell you.. 29ers may be good, but not for a 150cm tall person. By the way: I'd love to ride a 29er stumpjumper Big Grin
  • 8 3
 Electronics need power... If bikes had electronics they would now be impactive to the environment. Bikes are supposed to be 100% people power...
  • 8 5
 MikeMarkov - I agree 100 000%. What gets on my nerves is that the development of electric-engine powered bikes are fueled by one thing: lazy-f*cking-ness. People ride bicycles for three reasons:
1.To commute
2.To exercise (bikes are synonymous with fitness)
3.To have fun

Exercising, training, whatever is the right word, is enduring a hardship in order to develop a healthier body and mind. That requires forcing the body to effort. But in the process people want it to get kind of easy. So they look for ways to make it so. And they go to such extents in order to get that paradox of "easy hardship" that they f*cking forget what was the point. They want it to be enjoyable. If I commit myself to it, it's gotta be fun. Too bad if it is too easy it gets boring quite fast, and we end up with a piece of toxic junk you don't want and never needed.

Then the commuters, who also want to have things easier and faster, understood! But there is an issue... Why do most people who can afford an el-bike (important: those who can afford an el-bike!), decide to ride a bike to work instead of taking a bus or a car? Because they: 1.Believe it is an exercise! 2.Because they think it is more eco-friendly. Both things go to shit as soon as they buy an el-bike, and to compensate they come up with the lamest, stupidest excuse: I don't want to come sweaty to work or to a meeting. Oh you bloody hipocrite.

Specialized Turbo looks f*cking sweet though, at least it is honest! Pure fun, pure power.
  • 5 0
 When I see all these electronics... You know what I really like on a bike? ME.
  • 28 0
 Bring on the electronic gizmos: just means cheaper non-electronic gear for me.
  • 5 0
 A bike is (should be) nothing more than circles turning circles, its the human motor that makes it elegant.
  • 6 0
 When you start to add in all of these electronic components and systems. Biking seems to become less rider controlled and more electronically controlled. This could mean that soon all bikes will behave the same way in terms of fast shifting, or how your fork compresses, anything to give you an edge. But then we go away from the exiting aspect of the sport where there were consequences if your bike wasn't tuned properly. I mean half the fun of biking is tuning your bike to suit what you are riding. If this becomes electronic then the fun is gone, and there might not be much space for customization.
  • 3 0
 When you sync up strava to your computer and your shifting os you can then ride xc, dh and enduros no-hands!
  • 4 0
 WHAT IF, engineers actually took advantage of electric systems and put all the controls (sus. lock out, dropper, shifting(future?)) into one/two cables and one/two controls making the bars looking like bars not like this weknowmemes.com/generator/uploads/generated/g1362388941230064102.jpg
that might be useful feature

except brakes Big Grin never ever electric brakes!
  • 1 0
 querhoch, nice said, i agree 100% with you.
I want to feel the reactions of my bike, not feel the reactions of some electronics
  • 2 0
 Bring on evolution!! However I won't buy anything if it means I'm stuck out there with a dead battery and my shock locked out.
  • 4 6
 Battery problem on the trail, a trouble indeed! I assume that suddenly getting a flat tyre without a spare tube in the back pack or snapping the mech hanger is far further on the "ruin the ride problems" list. I'm not buying a front wheel because spokes can break buahaha...

trollolololo
  • 3 0
 Once again so many people get upset about electronics on mountain bikes. I personally won't ever use them, but why can't people stop hating on new things.
  • 8 1
 You guys are hilarious. It took the pinkbike community less than one year to change your mind about dropper posts. Suspension forks were met with even more resistance in the 90s. Hell, even friction shifters were fought by the nay sayers. All you "purists"... There's no such thing!
  • 2 0
 I agree 100% my dude
  • 3 1
 If they put a small generator on the bike that was powered by pedaling you would never have to worry about running out of power!
  • 1 0
 That is a good "other side" of the argument. If that is true I think people would just have to try it out for themselves. I personally just dont believe it is that precise and/or reliable. Lets face it, electronics can fail at any time. It happens every day.
  • 1 0
 Life cycles!!!
  • 1 1
 Electronic shock control is a means of increasing cost of product and decrease life expectancy. It is planned obsolesence. It is not going to improve your ride because an airshock is already not really working well and e-control is not going to change that. Money better spent on a decent coilsprung fork and coilsprung rearshock. Now that will improve your riding experience and carries about the same weightpenalty as the e-box and battery. E-control is a solution looking for a problem.
  • 1 0
 by all means, bring on the electronics, i wont use them but hey, if the guy (or gal) next to me wants to throw 5 extra lbs to do the same job as my mechanical and hydraulic switches, go right ahead.
  • 1 0
 Shimano sources have told me there is no interest in Di2 for mountain biking simply because the market is tiny compared to the Di2 market for road cycling

Shimano have poor margins on Di2 compared to their mechanical systems, its really seen as a flagship product than a profit generator

Di2 XTR sales would be so small, its probably not worth the time to do the R&D and tooling

I have seen several MTB's using Ultegra Di2 in a 1 x 10 format with the climbers buttons mounted to a custom made rapidfire "pod" to give the correct finger ergonomics on a flat MTB handlebar, but is custom work, not Shimano's...
  • 4 0
 i'll wait for telepathy tech. it should save me a few more grams.
  • 1 0
 electronic intelligence system, which uses accelerometers to measure the force of an impact on the front fork, and then relays this information to the rear shock within .1 second sounds interesting and worth the money, but this Fox hideously overpriced electronic lever crap, which looks like diy for 20$ must die
  • 1 0
 I disagreeable with the simplicity point, but nothing pleases me more than a well designed mechanical solution.
  • 3 0
 i do think wireless brakes would be cool...
  • 2 1
 why? it is the most pointless idea, + you wouldn't get feedback
  • 1 0
 I don't believe for a second that Shimano is not investing R&D into Di2 for MTB. And while margins may be small *at the moment* for roadies, I am quite certain the technology will trickle down very soon and become very affordable.
  • 3 2
 I all about adding more wires to my rig. Now I have dropper cable, two deraileurs, ya I run a front deraileur like a queerbait, then I have electromagnetic weather station collecting fecal gasses from asses, then I have ten pounds of lighting, then I decided to be like a indecisive teenager and get the fox icd ccd addhd system to change my setup as my mood dictates, then I have the wires leading to my pene to relieve urine while lubricating my chain. I know what your thinking,,,this guy needs more wires. Well I getting ideas about wiring my notbook and printer so I can work, shred, pee, tweet, fart, steeze, and scan my ass at the same time. Can you say multitasking? Seriously can you?
  • 1 0
 Gears for slopestyle sounds great. More whips and bars. Active suspension through magnetically controlled non newtonian fluids sounds awesome too. No junk on bars or cables everywhere sounds like it will look great. More money and more weight sounds horrible. I love ebikes cause I hate cars killing the earth and I don't want to hear a combustion engine when I'm experiencing nature. E bikes are not mountain biking any more than they are motor bikes, they are their own thing. I want all the gizmo's but I want to be able to take it off too. None of the current e suspensions seem worth it and if we are going to have a high tech gear selector system it should control a high tech gear system not derailleurs.
  • 1 2
 Cars are killing the planet? RLY? You do like the bikes the way they are don't you? Or the health care? Probably every single thing you touch at the moment, the way it looks and works or exists at all, is greatly a result of oil. Which by the way is an organic based material. You know vegetarians say that we should not eat meat, well it is agriculture that has created all this overpopulation mess. Hunters& gatherers existed in Americas and Australia as undeveloped civilisations when people growing shit came to slaughter them. So basicaly you ride a toxic contraption carrying hundred of gallons of virtual oil, that you use only for your own pleasure, not a necessity. Mind your own business, live a healthy and balanced life and the planet will be fine.
  • 1 0
 There is currently a kickstarter for a small bike generator called the Atom. This thing could power/charge electronic systems that are being developed.

(The cars are killing the planet? Oil is in everything you own. Where do you think the energy came from to manufacture your bike and all its components, It wasn't a hamster in a wheel. What other abundant and cheap source of energy do we have other than fossil fuels? We have to find another source before we run out. Until then oil wont be going away).
  • 1 0
 Tek and waki, cars are killing the planet in terms of emissions. That isn't to say that current manufacturing processes aren't. To say a car emits less greenhouse gasses over its lifetime than a bike is blatantly incorrect. Overpopulation is unrelated, it's due to the evolutionary instinct to produce as many offspring as possible, which is greatly accelerated by the advances in medicine and agriculture.
  • 1 0
 Honestly, it kinda reminds me of when electrics were being incorporated into suspension components in F1 cars. They sound really cool and all but you get to a point where everyone can be the best. Mountain biking is about feeling the trail, experiencing nature, not making things that make nature smoother or easier to deal with. Whats next, traction control?
  • 1 2
 Bobochobo. NRA will sort you out with this one: cars and emissions don't kill the planet: stupid people and mdrfkrs do. I know that coal and oil help, but at the end of the day it is a over/misconsuming idiot, and the mdrfkr providing him with shit he doesn't need, who ruin the place. They also tend to feed on brown or black people who can't defend themselves. They have all sorts of means to do it.
Get smart, give people an enhanced environmental and social education, instead of numbers and dates, and the planet will be fine. Show them all religions, show them atheism, let them contemplate and choose, find the deeper meaning in life and nobody will buy an SUV or four mountain bikes
  • 3 1
 I want to change my vote now....
  • 3 5
 First change your skidded out undies. Buuyaa, blowout backdraft. Check my emissions sir,,,,,, farrrrrrt,,, dam son that was a 10.8 on the fecal emissions scale. You need to wear filtration underwares.
  • 5 4
 GODDAMNIT!!!! I'm sick and tired of you (@ Questrails) and your class A douchbaggery! What is it with you and constantly putting other people down for no reason?

Does anyone know a way to get this guy blocked?
  • 3 3
 @ bigwheels29er i totaly agree with you
  • 5 1
 Dam ladies you must have your seat jacked soo far up your tight ass you cant even take a joke. I love how easily offended you sensative types get, then I get the other half loving these humorous comments and getting the comedy aspect. Try unclenching your butthole sometime and relax a bit. Uhhh cant we sign a petition to ban this guy for making a fart joke. Get a grip, you sound like frilly little fancy lads at boarding school. He said fart thats a paddlin. You cant ban somebody for making true statements and occational fart jokes. I just keep it realer than most. The comedy comes out when you sensative types start squealing like babies. Ohh dont worry I coming to change your diaper little baba.
  • 2 2
 Sorry mate but that was a mediocre fart joke... It's obvious that you are trying to have a laugh, but you must understand us - that you are quite bad at it and you try too hard. Hence lack of sympathy. You need to do your homework, go to youtube and watch Billy Connolly, Robin Williams, George Carlin, Eddie Murphy, Richard Pryor, Eddie Izzard. You know, learn the classics...
  • 2 1
 You like all these other pink flamingoes take this forum of nothing too serious. You tread on every word fragment like some bitchass english teacher I about to fart on. If you like my jokes or not who gives a shit. If you dont like it kiss the back of my scrotee bags you fruit salad. I dont give flying meatball turd sandwhich what you think about anything much less my jokes about farting in your face. If it makes you feel better dont read my shit dumb ass. If you have no sense of humor and no balls who gives a shit, your crying to the choir with this shit. Go ride you bike and play less with your devices, ohhga my devices are all sync to pinkbich.
  • 1 0
 Oh man, give it to Waki. He needs it the most
  • 1 0
 I would buy electronic derailleurs if they were more accurate, faster and not much bigger/heavier. If the battery wasn't built in, I wouldn't mind carrying a spare one in my backpack.
When it comes to other parts, I don't see any significant benefit and I'm not fan of doing things differently just to show that it's possible (when talking about commercial products, not prototypes).
  • 1 0
 ok, but how slow and innacurate is your current derailluer? is it so bad that you would spend hundreds of pounds to replace it? I very much doubt it.
  • 1 0
 @Extremmist

the new 11 speed Dura-Ace Di2 is actually a lighter groupset than the new 11 speed Dura-Ace mechanical groupset (this is a first for Di2 as the older 10 speed Di2 systems have always been slightly heavier, the weight difference was actually only the battery in a true comparison)

you can take a spare battery with you when using the older 10 speed Di2 systems, it just mounts into a battery holder either on the bottle cage or under the down tube, or other locations on some bikes (not hard to engineer a suitable location for MTB)

typically a road rider will get 2,800-3,500 km on a single charge, which gives a huge range. Current road Di2 is designed so that you get low battery warning, then after 100km the front derailleur stops shifting (this consumes the most power) allowing you to get home using the rear derailleur gear range.

if you have worked on Di2 or ridden it, its actually a brilliant system

I have a diagnostics suite in my workshop and can setup the gears from the workshop computer! Its also ideal for internal cable routing frames which can often have "difficult" problems with gear indexing reliability which is usually related to internal carbon texture or convoluted routing pathways playing havoc with gear shifting

once those Di2 cables are installed, unless you smash the derailleur or tear a cable by accident, there is nothing to adjust or maintain apart from cleaning the drivetrain as normal (lubing chain)

whether its worth the large price premium is another matter altogether?
  • 65 3
 Batteries belong in my tv remote not in my shifter.
  • 3 1
 lol,
  • 3 0
 Yea right-on "mycool"
I too was internalizing that complicated battery situation in my head. :-)
  • 1 0
 I was thinking my power tools I use for trail building. but yea i couldn't agree more! Smile
  • 2 2
 let's keep it all mechanical human power - this ain't dirt biking after all
  • 1 0
 Human machine
  • 10 0
 "Hey man wanna go ride?"
"I cant, I forgot to charge my bike"
  • 1 0
 so we buy a bicycle seo we can power it by ourselves, and we want it to be powered by $3k electric motors and shocks and shit, why dontcha go buy a dirtbike and stop riding trails backwards, the way they werent designed to be ridden? (under powered drive of course)
  • 2 0
 Hey when i'm build building a trail angrynipples I jus wana finish it asap so i can shred it so hence the power tools. major props to ya if you build all your stuff by hand Wink you must have some major patience if ya do also.
  • 2 0
 You probably don't remember it but old TVs didn't have a remote Wink
  • 42 0
 Seems like a step away from self servicing. Can u imagine how much a park tools soldering kit would cost?? Sweet jeebus.
  • 5 8
 go to electronics store by solder gun, solder. maybe 40 bucks?...But if you're buying electronic shifting, suspension, etc. for your bike, then you're probably not servicing your own bike.
  • 2 0
 Ha ha no doubt.
Had a good laugh at this one. Smile
  • 4 0
 why do electronics need servicing? Mechanical things need servicing not electronics. How many times have you opened up your tv to service it?
  • 5 1
 none
but i have derailleurs that are ten plus years old and still work, cant say that for any of my electronics :?
  • 2 0
 mechanical things ware out... and besides 10 years is ample amount of time for anything to warrant replacing. Saying that if you dont abuse electronics theres no reason for them to break.
  • 2 1
 Georgy291, how many people do you know that have had electronic devices fail? Tv's and computers for example? Electronics are unreliable and not usually cost effective to repair. I wont take that chance on my ride.
  • 3 0
 Yes but the electronics must operate a servo of some kind and it is integrated into the shock/ fork so how are we going to service this stuff at home. It's like cars these days, you plug a computer into them when something is wrong and then it's a case of replacing parts rather than servicing them, this isn't the way I want biking to go. Also why bother with electronic derailleurs when creating a lighter weight gearbox/hub is what we really need.
  • 1 0
 @ georgy, your right, you just throw it out Razz
  • 1 0
 Who services their own suspension? Who even knows a shop who will do it here in Western Australia?
  • 2 0
 I have speakers that are from 1960, powered by an amplifier from 1980. Its a beautiful sound system and it still works.
  • 3 0
 Yes made when things were made to last.
Nowadays electronics have an "engineered lifespan".
  • 24 1
 I have a massive banana on my table...
  • 25 3
 A bicycle should be purely mechanical in my view
  • 2 3
 no headlights then?
  • 2 1
 The bicycle is still mechanical, in that human power turns a mechanical crank which in turn, turns the wheels. All those other actuations - shifters, brakes, suspension - what does it matter if they are actuated by cables, hydraulics or electronics?
  • 1 0
 Bowden1911: I'm not saying that. Electronic accessories on a bike I am fine with (such as lights, gopros, mobile with strava.etc) because these do not enhance the bikes performance. They make things such as navigation a little easier but that is all. In my opinion electronics such as that Bluetooth tear-off device Justin Leov was testing last year should not be allowed in competitive races. Electronic suspension and things like that are an amazing innovation but I don't believe they have a place on a mountain bike
  • 21 3
 Soon it will be all Wifi gears and suspension, but then at WC races they'll be like people who hack into them and lock out the oppositions forks just before the rockgarden etc. The UCI will get pissed off about this and ban every such cycling event apart from XC.
  • 25 0
 Lol the idear of hacking someone's bike could fast become a sport in its own right
  • 2 0
 this is an excellent point though: what the UCI doesn't allow, doesn't really get any attention in the road bike world. If they were to ban Di2, it would die on the vine.

maybe MTB will be different, as we have a far less friendly relationship with the UCI. In fact, i would kind of welcome the UCI trying to ban something like this: anything to drive that wedge deeper.
  • 1 0
 "Soon it will be all Wifi gears and suspension" sounds like a Drunk Uncle quote.
  • 2 1
 hahaha, most funny will be the part, where aron gwin is sitting in a tent and shifting gears, braking and stuff, and some random dude is just sitting on the bike roosting down some gnarly dh track. all thanks to WiFi gears, brakes and shait. Big Grin
  • 16 2
 Can't fox work out a way to give us an air shock that really is as plush and sensitive as a coil before trying all this techno shiz?

You have to walk before you can run geeze....
  • 3 0
 Fox 40 RAD?
  • 1 0
 the RAD is a prototype, but the 2014 model is the production version of the air fork. superlight too
  • 4 0
 of course, neither of these is a SHOCK...
  • 5 0
 "of course, neither of these is a SHOCK..." ... this explains why I couldn't get them to fit then Razz
  • 2 0
 gotta cut off the chainstays, replace 'em with the fork.
  • 2 0
 CLOSE ENOUGH!
  • 2 0
 I can tell its late because I am honestly thinking about that as a possibility
  • 9 1
 A rider rounds a turn on the trail only to see another rider flipped over the bars and asks if he's alright.
The other rider gets up and says "Ahh yea I'm ok, it's just that when I went to shift my system crashed and my rear shock exploded which sent me flying over..
.
"Ohh" the first guy says, "you must be running the Vista version of Di and iCD".
  • 9 2
 I'm all in for electronics, but the current implementation is horrendous. They've just slapped the current purely mechanical products with some electronics. If they would reengineer each component from the ground up with the new options that electronics would offer, the product would look much cleaner and work better in the end. As an engineer the offerings I see right now belong to the proof of concept stage.
  • 8 2
 Everyone will whinge about the concept saying that it isn't pure enough, then Shimano will release an XTR Di2 which all the reviews will love and say it's amazing but all of us will whinge because it is sooooo expensive, then it will start filtering down to cheaper groups and everyone will start using it and say how amazing it is and how they always thought it was a great idea - just like when the idea of suspension was back in the 90's.
  • 1 0
 E shift on walmart bikes in 3013?
  • 2 0
 Nah, more like 2020 when the don't work right and get stuck at Walmart as a marketing gimick
  • 9 1
 Maybe for race, but for fun? Why, should we wear a solar panel on our backs?
  • 2 0
 They make solar panels for your back?
I want full body solar and a solar bike with a solar trailer.
  • 7 3
 No, no, no and no! A bicycle is a mechanical thing, it's beauty is in it's simplicity. Why don't we just stick an engine on and be done with it?! Imagine if all of these R&D hours went into something we actually need, the rear mech would be long dead!
  • 6 2
 Electronically assisted suspension can improve performance, it has been done on cars and motorbikes.
I see no reason why it should not be done on bikes. (If done right, obviously)
And for all the people saying they do not want to sound purist, well you just do.
20 years ago you would be politely expressing your opinion about hydraulics having no place in bikes... ?
  • 4 0
 When the majority of pro road riders are still reluctant to ride Di2 for the cobbled classics, I struggle to believe it would be consistently reliable for mountain usage... and I REALLY struggle to believe that any advantage brought by it will be remotely worth the astronomical cost. It's bad enough to think about blowing apart a $250 rear derailleur on a rock... do we really need $700 rear derailleurs..?
  • 6 5
 Interesting observation with roadies! The thing is: we might not need all that, but it is utterly irrelevant. They will push it, and there will be people buying it for first few years, no matter if it works or not. Companies will make their money, because if theoretically it makes at least a bit of sense, they will find clients for that. Toss in a tiny particle of confusion and trolls and geeks will blow it to a size of Manhattan. Wheelsize debate is settled, (fat bike might cause some stir), carbon is settled, geometry is settled for 26" and 650B, Enduro 29 shows that 29ers will settle on geo side very soon. Pike and Fox 34 are here to cater long travel 29, not much development left to do there. XX1 is here, it will just drip down to lower groups. Dropper posts got dialled. Let's face it - their only current line of attack, the only "completely new big thing" to push is electronics.

People think industry should react to demand. There is no demand because this is what designers do, they create what does not exist yet or improve current designs step by step. then marketers create demand for it by packaging it. And they all do it with the use of what's called "Imagination", a thing that with all due respect, an average bread eater lacks. So he has very little needs and demands ,especially that he cannot "need" shit he hasn't seen. Top racers can do it, because on the edge they are able to imagine what sort of equipment can take them further.

Let's just take it in a buddhist way... enjoy it passing by
  • 4 0
 Electronics dont belong in mountain biking. I ride to be in nature and have fun with my friends. I love the mechanics of mountain biking, the old grease on your hands and getting a part put together just right. I dont want to fix a damn circuit board, thats just boring. We have been able to ride perfectly fine before electronics in Mountain biking
  • 4 0
 I am old enough to remember people throwing similar fits about hydraulic brakes, full suspension, and travel over 3in. Try finding more than a handful of people on Pinkbike or at your local trail head that now claim these have ruined the sport or that don't have any or all of the above named heresies. If it works and improves riding it will thrive, if it turns out to be a terrible idea, it'll get thrown on the pile with Softride. The market will sort it out, no reason to kill innovation in the cradle.
  • 4 0
 As a singlespeed trail rider, i say... meh. Shit hanging all over the handlebars and frame is annoying.

On second thought. Give me radio controlled brakes and eliminate those annoying hydro lines between levers and calipers. Battery power calipers might even be able to recharge themselves with a bit of clever engineering.

Buaaah haaa haaaaa haaaa.

(but maybe, like in the year 2063)
  • 6 1
 Id rather have a single speed than have this stuff. I consider my mtb to be my transport in any post apocalyptic worlds that I may find myself surviving in.
  • 1 0
 Yeah for my mad max bike I'm thinking single speed solid rubber tyres on mag wheels and no brakes.
  • 2 0
 I think the environment you ride in on a regular basis will need to factor in heavily. For instance, the environment in Hawaii is much to wet and corrosive for electronics to last more than a few months of hard riding. I think in drier, more arrid climates, such components might work better. On a separate note, the simplicity of a bike is nice - free of electronic gimics which aren't necessary.
  • 4 0
 See you bite a piece out of your stem on flat drop lander with locked suspension cause the battery is empty or the crap resets for no reason.
  • 2 0
 Is anybody taking all this unnecessary electronic blah blah blah seriously?
The system must weight 2-3lbs anyway, even if there are performance advantages--no thanks.
Is that why everybody needs $3,000 frames--so they can negate the weight savings by putting on this techno garbage?

I'll keep my shifting mechanical...at least I don't need to be an electrical engineer to wrench on my shifting.
  • 2 0
 I could see benefits of integrating the settings of different components with electronics. But I certainly don't want to have to remember to charge a battery to ride my bike. I already forget to charge my lights for night rides. My phone, mp3 player and camera are always running out of juice when I need them, so electronics on bikes is not for me.
  • 1 0
 This also drives me nuts, in that there are at least half a dozen places on a bike where a generator could be used that would get rid of the need for a battery, and the weight of a battery. and None of them would require introducing drag like the old ones that rubbed against the tire.
  • 1 0
 I'd love to hear your idea for a generator that doesn't create drag. It takes power to make power and that's what causes drag. You may be able to make something that only generates power through the brakes, but that may not be too practical on courses where braking is at a minimum.
  • 1 0
 I'm using "doesn't cause drag" as shorthand for "doesn't use friction" as even a magneto hub does introduce a small amount of drag, but not enough for most people to care. but my thought is to combine that with a linear electrical generator (think one of those flashlights that you shake) in one of the fork stantions, or possibly in the frame itself. you'd have power on anything but the smoothest trails, and if you didn't get enough from that, the magneto hub picks up the slack.
  • 1 0
 Ahh I see. Maybe they could do something like that inside the crank arms. Durability would probably be an issue there, though.
  • 1 0
 Kickstarter: Atom
  • 1 0
 that looks like it would be a bit of a challenge on anything with disc brakes.
  • 2 0
 From MBA 1989 review of the Rockshox RS1: "Bicycle suspension? A pipe dream! Rube Goldberg devices! Not practical! Too Heavy! Too flexible! Unnecessary! Those are the responses that the MBA wrecking crew got every time it mentioned mountain bike suspension systems. Shop mechanics would groan at us. Marin County granola-eaters would chastise us. Even our buddies would look at us askew."

Hmm... sounds a lot like the complaints people have about electronic controls! Sure, it might take some time, but I bet you like anything, if it provides any advantage that people will start to use it. And come on, fork companies have been trying to mechanically adjust suspension settings on the fly forever! Watch, one World Cup XC or DH racer will win a race - or the season - with electronic controls. Everyone else will grumble about it for the off-season (not pure! cheating!) then quietly ask their sponsors if there's a way to get in on that electronics action before the next season. Or maybe they'll start using cantilever brakes, brick-sized cell phones, and steel frames to protest.
  • 2 0
 I think there is benefits in this medium. As far as what querhoch said, its not going to take away from the sprot, you still will shift and adjust your weight and decide what gear to be in, it just makes it easier to adjust that gear. I think some of these people are just scared of change for the better.
  • 2 0
 Sod it, it's coming if we like it or not. I'm sure those who are nay at the moment, once they try it will join the yay squad. It wont be for everybody. All i care about is getting out and riding and if a little electronics makes the little time i get out even more enjoyable i will be up for it. And lets face it, if you really cared you probably wouldn't be riding a bike that had it's frame, suspension, brakes etc designed by electronics, you would go for a proper hand crafted bike, so your reading the wrong article to care.
  • 4 0
 cables take up waaay less space than that brick strapped to the shock, batteries not included.
  • 1 0
 I'm afraid we can't really stop that. We'll see in racing how much advantage it brings but I can imagine the gain on pedaling sections... The question is whether those suspension would be just as sensitive in the rough. If it's equivalent to a standard one then the gain is clear. Otherwise good hydraulics could still have a future.
  • 3 1
 If it can all be done 'without' wires or cables then its worth it. Bluetooth for example. Super clean lines, no additional weight, no gunked cables every again. Technology is beyond wires now. With wires its an epic fail.
  • 4 1
 I want a dropper post that lowers without needing to be pushed down. Whatever it takes for that to happen, if it's electronic, then, so be it.
  • 5 0
 bikes cost enough! putting this shit on it is NOT a good idea
  • 1 0
 yea it will cost a fortune trust me, it's gonna be like this ios android shit, everykind of update too much confusion
  • 2 0
 In theory, electronic shifting *might* be nice, but not if the price is a huge clunky battery pac. Id rather have cables until the power pack can be made small enough to be discreet.
  • 1 0
 Have you seen the Di2 battery? Pretty small. Next gen will be hidden in the seat tube too I heard.
  • 3 0
 Well I don't want ass cancer so keep that thing as far away from me as possible. Preferably off the bike.
  • 4 1
 Hippys rock! KISS. Keep it simple stupid, we can't get proper damped and spring curve suspension yet they want to five us electronics give me a break!
  • 1 0
 Imagine one button presets changing the dropper post, suspension travel and compression. Awesome for all-mountain. I doubt it will take over the active damping though... nothing beats mechanical near zero reaction times. It should just be used for changing settings rather than damping.
  • 1 0
 Check out this MR fluid you might change your mind on reaction times.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=SBXQ-6uI8GY
  • 1 0
 I forgot about ferrofluid, it is definitely cool stuff for suspension.
  • 2 1
 Let the shitstorm begin! Personally, I think electronics on bikes will always be for pros looking to squeeze every second out of their lap times and toys for the enthusiast. For the average biker like me without personal mechanics and 10 backup bikes for every occasion it's totally unnecessary and complicated, like having a bike that needs life support to work properly.
  • 2 1
 If your excuse to love the eletronics is something like "you don't have to look for the CTD lever all the time, the bike does it for you and it's nice", just remember - you don't need the CTD in the first place. Riders who think their performance on different types of terrains depends on a slightly hard or slightly soft shocks just need to learn how to ride. Adapting to the terrain is part of it, not a thing the bike should do for you.
  • 1 0
 equally you dont need suspension, disk brakes etc
  • 2 0
 Oh my gosh.. now Fox comes with that electronic stuff..
What do I do when something doesn't work with this thing? You can't repair it by yourself.. You'll need someone to repair it..
  • 1 0
 The shock/fork with this technology is largely autonomous, it's deciding how to set itself up based on the accelerometer, Crank spin sensor + whatever internal fork accelerometers it uses.

So with that in mind, If all the relevant sensors could communicate via wireless, have no visible differences from a regular shock - apart from a properly engineered bump somewhere to house a battery and a servo; I'd be okay with that.

But what we have right now is a plastic box stuck to the side, and wires everywhere - like a student prototype. I can't actually believe they've released a product that looks the way it does. It wont take off until they let Fox engineer a solution from the ground up. Until then we will have tacked on boxes.
  • 1 0
 I hear ya! Multi-axis accelerometers are tiny. If having a very clear picture of the bikes state at any one point is important, multiple accelerometers and a small micro-controller, in some small and sensical chassis, shouldn't be a big deal. The logic for it will be tougher, but this is an area that's not unexplored.

Anyway, packaging is probably secondary to them at this time. I'll also bet that the engineers prolly don't like it, but are forced to make it ready for release by corporate cats for marketing reasons.

Another question too me is what exactly does mean for the internal design of dampers on mountain bikes. In the short term, these controllers will most likely effect change by actuation of external switches on existing shocks and forks no? But this means actuators, linear or rotary, that will increase weight and complexity. But what about the the long term where the dampers have internal electronics and can effect change internally? Yes! Magneto-rheological fluids inside mountain bike shocks that are controlled by varying magnetic fields to adjust damping 100's (understated for sure) of times a second, which takes power.

A suspension that can adapt to conditions as it see's them is the holy grail of all wheeled sports.

That said, I'm not sure if I really care for it here on mountain bikes.
  • 1 0
 Actually the holy grail of suspension is to provide maximum suspension travel for any given situation that the suspension is built for. Bikes can lean, cars cannot. With leaning comes perpendicular suspension action. The sus is alway at its theoretical max. efficiency although you cannot get as much grip from 2 than from 4 tirepatches.
  • 2 1
 Why wouldn't electronics be a good thing? Its just progression surely?
I have a little collection of my past downhill bikes dating back to about 1995 (when I started downhilling). If I look at my bikes the developement is clear to see and the newer the bikes the quicker they are downhill. (don't give me any comments about a good rider being just as quick on any bike), I'm just an average rider and my Tomac is quicker than my Sintessi which is why I bought it (and they were both world cup standard bikes once).
Point is I bought newer bikes as they allowed me to go down a hill faster, Electronically controlled suspension has the potential to react to terrain faster than mechanical, with that comes the potential to go faster.
So just as suspension has progressed from an elastomer block electronics is just further developement, so long as its reliable it will sell.
  • 1 0
 Please post pics of your bike collection it sounds rad.
  • 1 0
 I said 'maybe'. Mostly because I have experience with electronic suspension in motorcycles. Electronics allow you to select between several settings and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Without electronics, you'd need to make suspension adjustments manually and if you arrived at a section of road that were different than your setup, you'd either gut it out or have to pull over and try to remember what would work for the new terrain and make the manual selection-electronics do that for you and allow you to set the optimum setting for the conditions-that also means you will likely enjoy your ride more. That said, it's another point of failure and like the dropper post that's fully down if it fails, I'm guessing electronic suspension would be the same-left in an undesirable position but you could limp home. I find that for the most part, today's adjustment offer enough flexibility for my needs.
  • 1 0
 No electronics for me period. I hate this electronic age, everyone got a smart phone glued to their ear, my stupid car reminds me when my seat belt isn't on. Sure I like some technology and high end bikes but at the end of the day I ride to get away from this electronic age and all the stupid people obsessed with it.
  • 2 0
 TOTALLY AGREE! Wait... how did you find this page?
  • 1 0
 Yes, I used a computer because I have to in this day and age. I always get all kinds of neg. freeback on this issue. but seriously what's next, do I need an iphone to dial in my suspension? Save the electro-high tech stuff for Formula 1 racing. Can you imagine, your at the trailhead miles from civilization and your forgot to change the batteries in electronic suspension and it doesn't work properly, I would go ballistic. I swear my next car is going to be a restored muscle car/truck from the 60's or early 70's just for this reason, no air bags, no electronic service/seat belt reminders etc... but hey to each their own. I do embrace some new technology but overall the benefits don't always outweigh the negatives IMO...
  • 1 0
 I don't get why everyone is so against electronics on bikes. I can understand it's not the "old pure way" of riding and maybe even "detracts" from the biking experience, but what if we said that about stuff like disk brakes, or maybe even front and rear shocks? Don't those "belong" on a motorcycle, and not a bicycle? The thing is, once those electronics become cheaper and more available, people will be looking back and wondering why we were so against them.
  • 2 1
 I have to say I lean a against the electronic components in general but to me the real deciding factor is what exactly the electronic component achieves. As long as these components aren't making things happen automatically then I guess I can live with them. Like in the case of say electronic shifting. As long as the rider still has to do the shifting, then I'm ok with it. But if it evolves into some kind of automatic transmission with a computer that controls the shifting etc then thats a no go in my book. Same with suspension. If your talking about a system where the electronics simply let the rider adjust his fork and shock then ok. As long as its still a manual adjustment. Where I think it gets sketchy is that Rockshox system described above where the shock is adjusted automatically based on sensors and such. That to me crosses the line since the bike is doing things on its own basically. Biking is about the rider and the skill necessary to ride the bike. To much automation crosses the line.
  • 1 0
 The idea of having to change batteries seems dumb to me when you have two wheels that are turning as well as energy imparted to the system through the cranks via your legs. Can we not figure out some way to harness all that energy so that all we need are small internal batteries like what's on motherboards and in watches?
  • 1 0
 What’s next, antilock brakes?
It seems like something that only the endless budget of sponsored racers looking for that next competitive edge, might see any real need for all of this. With all of the cool new technology out there, we've obviously seen a lot of recreational/fitness riders on dirt riding single speed rigid bikes. Do I even really need 1x10 or 2x10 gearing, or 29 or 27.5 tires, to have fun out there, let alone more computational power than it took to land Armstrong on the moon? I’m with the “Keep It Simple Stupid” school on this one, and don’t log nearly enough miles to justify a lot of extra money for little extra whizbangs that I wouldn’t have much faith in.
I have had or seen faliures on simple cable and hydraulic systems, but they seem few and far between, and can often be overcome w/ a little enginuity if needed. I'm not sure I'd trust fine electronics, little LiPo batteries or even the softwear to be as reliable, especially considering the abuse I subject this stuff to out on the trail.
  • 1 0
 Half the time I never even remember to lock out my fork or drop my seat when I'm riding. What would I do with all this stuff?

It's bad enough that I can barely find a stick shift car any more. I want to drive, not steer. Same thing with my biking ...
  • 1 0
 I'd run electronic shifting if it was wireless on my jump bikes, bar spins and tail whips for days. Other than that I'd rather keep it simple. If I'm 30 miles out of town on an xc ride I don't want to have some crazy gadgetry fail on me because my battery ran low. But soon I bet we'll probably be running a small alternator like on the old school cruiser lights.
  • 1 0
 The only electronic device acceptable on a mountain bike is the speedometer, seriously, who would want one of those clunky mechanical analog speedometers from yesteryear. Now an electric seat and handle grip warmer for thos cold winter mornings might not be a bad idea lol
  • 1 0
 As mentioned before, proprietary BS is the main problem here, imho, apart from the environmental impact. Just take a look under the hood of a 70s or 80s car, in theory, the owners could fix everything by themselves back then, provided they had the tools and the knowledge. Nowadays it's just sealed blocks under the hood which require a class A hacker to even run the diagnostic w/o bringing it to the shop. Proprietary hell is even worse with software and DRM online. Now, do we really wanna go down that same path with MTB? After all, bike and motor(vehicle) industries are tightly locked together already, so are some of those lobbies.... I'm concerned about a future where f*t f*cks ruin trails with a combination of E-Bikes and Google Glass and nothing can be serviced at home anymore.... just sayin'.
  • 1 0
 for racing when every milisecond counts its an obvious advantage but for just getting out and riding it may be overkill, it will make non electric parts cheaper and will allow people to push their limits a bit more, your bike is your own, if you think you need electric suspension go for it.
  • 1 0
 This issue is related to the automobile world. Electronics could give racers an extra advantage or make it easier for beginners to get into the sport. Electronics will probably make bikes a little faster and easier to ride. However, most riders are just looking to have a good time. It is possible to have a fast bike where you still feel connected and in control of the bike. A Bugatti is the fastest car, but it has excessive technology. The McLarren F1 is almost as fast, but it can do without all of the computers and electronics and therefore the driver is much more connected to his driving.
  • 1 0
 No thx on electronics for lots of reasons all well said above.
I get the argument that goes, if you dont like/want it, don't but it, but...
Prob is, you might not be able to get other good stuff without buying it.
For example, if I want kashima and some damper adjustments, I also get a lock out on my fork and a propedal on my shock (both of which I never use and would rather not have because of added cost/weight and complexity).
Electonics would certainly amplify that problem.
  • 1 0
 if its battery operated... it's not for me. Maybe the next step would be to power the unit by kinetic energy so that there's no chance of it running low. I cant think of many scenarios where you'd need the electronics at a standstill. Carbon footprint could become an issue with old batteries being chucked in landfills too. its a great start though
  • 1 0
 I don't understand why people are so worked up about this. Aren't we all here to have fun and ride bikes? Are you gonna say someone is completely ruining the spirit of our sport because their road bike has Di2? I am never personally gonna have it, but I say more power to you if you want to have it. I don't understand why people say how it is so horribly wrong to have this kind of stuff on our bikes, but no one complains about having Kashima coated stanchions on our suspension and carbon levers on our hydraulic brakes. When "Mountain Biking" first started, none of that stuff existed, but you don't see the purists pushing for rigid Cro-Mo bikes with V brakes do you? And you certainly can't have brake boosters, they came out later...

Basically I just want to see everyone, regardless of what kind of bike they ride, to hold hands in a circle and sing about our love of bikes. Be it road, CCX, XC, 4x, BMX, DH... whatever. We are all cyclists. And we all love new tech.
  • 1 0
 Comparing hydraulics to electronics is a completely off basis analysis. As it stands hydraulics have allowed us to push the limit of what is possible on our electricity free hobby. As a firm believer in riders before gear, I believe that bike parts are specialized and expensive enough. Adding electronics will only add to the expense and in turn make your bike less and less reliable. Leave electronics to the roadies out there who spend tens of thousands of dollars on their bikes just as conversational pieces.
  • 1 0
 I think it depends, the only reason i could see to move to electronic components is if we reached a maximum of mechanical ability and the only way to improve things is to go electric. electronics should not be a means to make crappy components work better.
  • 2 0
 I'm not interested in electronic shifting I'd rather they concentrated there efforts on getting every dh bike a gearbox so I don't smash my derailleur on rocks than piss around with electronic shifting !
  • 1 0
 I don't really see the point. Electronic shocks seem pointless, yeah they can automatically adjust to the terrain, but that most likely wont be the right setup for everyone, as everyone has there own preference for rebound, plushness etc etc. Having another 5 cables coming off the front end, and yet more shit you probably can't tweak and setup yourself and costs a fortune to fix is not something I'd be interested in. Give me electronic uphill power and an electronic boost feature to fire all your shocks and launch you over logs and I just might consider it... Or the Audi e bike as that's sick. For me the whole point of biking is its simple to keep running and doesn't need anything to power it. I'd much rather see these companies putting the time and money into developing better hub gears like a proper alfine system that is long lasting, belt driven, lighter and affordable. As that's pretty much the last thing on bikes that's crappy old tech in need of modernisation. I used my alfine roady offload a few times and to be able to drop 3 gears when coasting on a corner then cranking up hill with no delay for shifting is bliss, we NEED that on MTBS way more than we need electronic shifters for deraileurs.
  • 1 0
 The poll asks whether you want to 'keep it simple', there is nothing simple about a modern am bike. it has been outlined by other comments and I will echo it too, those people who refuse to embrace tech and the future of engineering due to riding ethics and keeping it pure, probably have no right to be riding the latest air sprung fork or the latest linkage design on their frame, or gears, or tubeless tyres or a dropper, well the list goes on..... If a device can be improved with the addition of a power cell then it would be ignorant not to try.
  • 1 0
 The obvious thing to do is connect to some accelerometers and and a GPS. Once you've done a run down the course to gather data, on the next run you let the GPS and software change the suspension on the go to match the terrain. It's not hard to do. I reckon you'll see this in downhill racing in the next 12 months or so.
  • 1 0
 These are cool gizmos which some peeps will enjoy. but for me The trails is where I go to get away from the clutter and hang out with nature. The only gizmo that gets packed is the cell but that gets turned off. Only there for safety. Keep the machine simple, keep it mechanical with cables cogs chains and Cranks and pulleys. keep it Powered by our long stroke low rpm bio engines.
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't want electronic stuff on my bike too - BUT I wouldn't mind seeing some racers use the E. I. system that lapierre and rock shox made. It's like formula 1 and road cars. I love seeing how the latest tech can make an F1 car go faster but I wouldn't want to have those complicated things on my car. I hope that made sense. Hahaha
  • 1 0
 Put the pitch forks and torches down naysayers!
How about you try a demo of it first and make an educated decision.
Then if you don't like it... don't buy it... simple!
I'm willing to try it out before making a judgement... I'm not scared of possible future developments...
Its called progress Wink
  • 4 0
 Di2 XTR, You're going to love it.
  • 1 1
 To be fair, we knew the concept would hit the markets one day soon, and although people will hate the idea of it for now, once one or two people buy it, which from the look of things is a definite, people who arent sure on it will have a go on a demo bike or a friends with it on and see the advantages/disadvantages. I agree that the electronic shifters are an unusual idea, Personally electronic gearbox hubs may be a better idea.

If you are sat there thinking that electricals will ruin your riding experience, Ill tell you that it doesnt, I own a recon instruments goggles HUD kit, (shop.reconinstruments.com/product/mod-live-uk) designed for snowboarding but by god it is a fantastic thing to have while riding a track, just for the convenience of everything from your music to speed and whether that jump really is bigger than it looks.

At the end of the day, try it before you hate the concept, dont get paranoid about running out of battery halfway up a mountain as every good biker brings spare tubes like you should always take a spare battery for it.
  • 4 0
 They will only sell it to the top 3%
  • 5 1
 More Fox garbage brainwashary.
  • 2 0
 The last thing mountain bikes need are more cables and more clutter. 2 brake cables, 2 shifter cables, fork lock out cable and seat post drop cable is well enough.
  • 1 0
 I'm up to the electronic shifting -it has to be enhanced yet- but the rest, should remain as it, and just as an option. Electronic components as a must in top-notch bikes could be a dumb thing.
  • 1 0
 I think it makes no sense, even the cars have too much electronics. I wanted to ask the manufacturers do not spoil the best cycling has and to keep the bikes simple and charming as ever.
  • 2 0
 Don't like it, don't buy it. I don't need the risk of a burned out motor to enjoy a ride, but I won't whine if other people want to tech up their rig.
  • 1 0
 Just look at electric car windows. They always break. I would much rather have windows that you can manually roll up and down. Just like I would much rather have the simplicity of cables on my bike over wires and batteries.
  • 1 0
 Bike electronics are garbage Their garbage for the sport All they do is make lazy people even more lazy If you want to be lazy go ride a dirt bike Plain and simple ....My Dudes
  • 1 1
 What a croc of crap!! Just another must have industry standard this is what you need to make you better etc etc etc. Just like the motor industry, more electrics, sensors and shit not required with more problems. Before we no it tandys and RadioShack will be in on the act.
  • 1 0
 As long as there is an option for high end "old school" equipment, I don't want to be forced to buy electronic stuff to get quality. Most stuff is overpriced as it is, and this will just push prices higher.
  • 2 0
 All this electronic crap is for the posers. For the same people that goes out, and buy a Porsche 911 with a automatic transmission.
  • 2 0
 I'm currently back on a brakeless BMX. The more you add, the more time you spend maintaining it and after a while you'll want to break free from it and sell it on.
  • 1 0
 Either we will need computer nerds to start fixing our bikes or we will have to ship everything back to the company when something goes wrong. I would prefer if they kept it simple.
  • 1 0
 Used an enduro rig for all last racing season with electronic shifting. Full story here: www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=140990&pagenum=1#commentid4724606
  • 1 0
 i would like to try it once but i don't see my self buying electronics i think it would be really expensive to run and not to mention if your batteries ever die you would be in serious trouble
  • 1 0
 I hoped for more clever solutions than this Fox's iCD system .. it seems like you can build your own at home, and maybe better looking one.
  • 2 1
 I quite like the idea, and I guess if you dislike the concept no-ones forcing this change in technology upon you however it is nice for those interested to have the option...
  • 2 0
 first electronic shifters next electric bike! good bye old fashioned pedal man muscle powered machine!
  • 1 0
 As said, keep it mechanical all the way. Electronics are just something to go wrong, that my not be fixable in your garage / Mid Trail.
  • 2 0
 Another case of we dont really need it but for racers if it shaves a few tenths of then we are gonna get it!!
  • 2 0
 Never on my Bikes that crap even my car is old staff never broke electronic always going wrong
  • 2 0
 I think this answers that question: www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cgbZqR2AGI
  • 3 0
 Someone's going around neg-propping everyone in favor of no electronics.
  • 3 0
 Want electronics? Buy a fancy car!
  • 2 0
 The sport is already expensive enough. My bikes will always be mechanical and man powered.
  • 2 1
 From experience, electronics are the number on thing I warranty at the shop I work at. Computers and lights are so unreliable. But I've never had to warranty a reflector.
  • 3 0
 I want autopilot so I can make a sandwich while "riding" downhill.
  • 1 0
 Shimano patented an electronic dropper post but hasn't announced anything. Are they actually developing one, or just registered the patent so nobody else can?
  • 1 0
 one of the erst things to happen to mountain biking was hydrolic brakes. way better than canti's or v brakes. so the way i see it is bring on evolution, bring on electric's.
  • 2 0
 Just seems like a lot of stuff that could go wrong, I'd be wary of that.
  • 4 0
 Yes I agree. I Allso think that their is a line you should not go over. To much tech can be painfull in the wrong hands. Just make us good standard shocks that simply work but please don't over do it with the tech.
  • 1 0
 seems like the logical path of bikes evolving to me. electronics can be built to be much more reliable than mechanical components in many ways. Looking at it from an automotive perspective, it would be interesting to compare failure rates of electrical vs mechanical components in cars/trucks.
  • 1 0
 But all autos (and motos) have on board power generation in the alternator. What does your bike have? I know guys who can barely keep track of the charge on a set of lights, more batteries to run out just equates to more problems. Or you can have a dyno hub and add a couple pounds of weight and drag to your rides.
  • 3 3
 How about no more polls and just do article in the subject itself?

I don't want to charge the batteries in my bike unless it gets me up the mountain.
  • 5 2
 Keep it simple stupid.
  • 1 0
 spot on!
  • 4 6
 Sorry PB crew, there should be a note at the bottom of the poll:

WARNING! Comments expressing sympathy towards development of electronics in MTB might lead to your comment being negpropped and sent to "below threshold" limbo. You might also get exposed to repetitive hate notes. That eventualy might affect your self-confidence.

Comment responsibly
  • 1 0
 If batteries today would last for 100 times longer, I'd go for it. Obviously they don't.
  • 1 0
 id have it if it didn't affect th weight of the bike, but I have heard this kit is quite heavy :/
  • 1 0
 Wait till you eat shit and brake that stuff. I say more things to go wrong with electrical mechanisms
  • 2 0
 Sweet! Now my bike can electrocute me!
  • 1 0
 All the electricity on bike I'll ever need is the front and rear light on my commuter bike.
  • 1 0
 Bikes cost enough money now, imagine electronics, No thanks, I like simple and Not having to repair expensive electronics,
  • 2 1
 I had a great idea for an electronic shifter , doesn't matter now Frown
  • 2 0
 Too far?
  • 2 0
 No.
  • 1 0
 I really don't want my bike to sound like an electric car.
  • 1 0
 XTR 986 -> XTR 99x -> XTR electronics?
  • 1 0
 Rock gardens and bike wash = fail!
  • 1 0
 Bring back Shimano Airlines
  • 1 0
 it's all good till the battery fades or it starts raining
  • 1 0
 I will never plug my fucking bicycle in.
  • 1 0
 I don't trust electronics! My laptop breaks down all of the time!
  • 2 0
 like to try it
  • 1 0
 electronics never last in MTB conditions.
  • 1 1
 A soldering gun 40 bucks! good grief
  • 1 1
 maybe another option is needed. YES, but within reason
  • 1 0
 APPLE iBike
  • 1 0
 No !!
  • 1 0
 Human machine
  • 1 1
 I want a carbon fiber bike with a built in smart phone.
  • 2 5
 Uci will band it so who cares about evolution of are sport anymore.
  • 3 1
 Its not banned in road, so i doubt it would be in mtb.
  • 3 6
 Norbs got electronic!!!
  • 3 0
 No, he got robbed!
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