Pinkbike Product Picks

Jan 2, 2014 at 23:00
Jan 2, 2014
by Matt Wragg  
 
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Effetto Mariposa Caffelatex tire sealant

Not all tire sealants are created equal. Where most are based on latex, Effetto Mairposa's Caffelatex tire sealant is formulated around a more complex and innovative chemistry. It uses a technology they call Actifoam to protect against punctures. Where latex based sealants remain fluid as you ride, the centrifugal force of the wheel spinning causes Caffelatex to foam and expand to fill the inside of your tire. Those centrifugal forces push other fluid sealants to the edge of the tire, leaving the sidewall less protected than the centre. By filling the entire tire, Effetto Mairposa claim their blend is more effective at repairing sidewall punctures. It uses a much smaller level of particle too, to help keep your valves clear. Normal sealants uses particles between 150 and 300 microns in size, but those in Caffelatex are just 2 microns across, allowing them to flow freely. The final element is silicate particles that help slow the flow of fluid through a tear and help it seal faster. It is rated for tears up to 5mm long. However, this performance comes as a cost in terms of lifespan - they recommend you check your sealant every two months and advise that even in the best conditions it will last no more than six months. One other important feature is that it is claimed to be 100% non-corrosive to rims and tires, unlike some of the alternatives. In the compostion of Caffelatex sealant is ethylene glycol - which has been used in antifreeze for years - which Wikipedia describes as "moderately toxic." Working out concentrations and volumes, this means a 20kg child would need to drink more than 200ml of the Caffelatex fluid, which is 10-12.5% ethylene glycol, to be at serious risk. In the US, the CDC is clear that "Your health is not likely to be seriously affected by the very small amounts of ethylene glycol that could be tasted or otherwise accidentally eaten." In the environment it lasts for several days to a few weeks, causing no long term damage, however it is toxic for that period. Not to get too bogged down in science, but the message is simple: If you choose this sealant, you will need to think about how you use it, dispose of it, what to do if you spill any, and keep it well out of reach of both children and idiots. MSRP $16.71 (1 litre) www.effettomariposa.eu

While the Caffelatex may be doing exciting things on a molecular level on the outside it looks a lot like any other bottle of tyre sealant.
While the Caffelatex may be doing exciting things on a molecular level, on the outside it looks a lot like any other bottle of tire sealant.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIf you talk to any pro rider or mechanic who uses a tubeless setup, you will sooner or later hear stories of pro-tweaks. One of the most common is putting baby powder in the fluid in order to thicken it to make it seal faster. Caffelatex does this right out of the bottle. There is a reason why Nico Vouilloz uses it as his sealant of choice these days. Having spent six months using several different sealants back-to-back, we can confidently say this is the highest performing one we have tried so far. It seals more punctures, quicker than anything else we have tried - nothing else off-the-shelf works better to keep you rolling. However, that performance comes at a price, with it's lifespan being shorter than some of the other options, and you need to think carefully about storage and disposal of the fluid. - Matt Wragg





Shimano MW81 winter riding shoes

The MW81 is Shimano's winter riding shoe that has been designed to keep you warm and dry, no matter how bad the conditions get. At their heart is an insulated Gore-Tex liner that is not only waterproof, but breathable too, and the insole is polar fleece for extra warmth. On the outside they are constructed from polyurethane-coated leather that should be tough enough to survive for several years. Reinforcements at both ends protect your toes and heel, and it's all held in place with three big velcro straps and a water-resistant neoprene ankle closure. Underneath, the tread pattern is big and deep to offer grip and mud-clearance, and there are two fixtures for spikes to the toe if conditions get really bad. They weigh 815g (claimed) for a pair in size 40. MSRP $250.86 www.shimano.com

The MW81s put function well before fashion every part of their make-up is there for a purpose While the insulation and rugged materials on the outer are all pretty useful it s the Gore-Tex liner that makes these boots stand out - if you re not sure how good it is just ask anybody who has invested in a Gore-Tex waterproof jacket it s the kind of thing that once you ve used you can t go back from The sole is big an open to both grip and provide excellent mud clearance.
The MW81s put function well before fashion, and every part of their make-up is there for a purpose; While the insulation and rugged materials on the outer are all pretty useful, it's the Gore-Tex liner that makes these shoes stand out - if you're not sure how good it is, just ask anybody who has invested in a Gore-Tex waterproof jacket, it's the kind of thing that once you've used, you can't go back from.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe're sure that the first thing many of you will say is "$250 for a pair of riding shoes?" And we'd say yes, and yes again. Sure, you can keep your feet sort of dry and warm with plastic bags and multiple pairs of socks, and if you'd prefer to do that, stop reading now. However, anybody who spends a lot of time out in the cold and wet will most likely appreciate the value of high-quality outerwear and appreciate that quality inevitably comes at a price. Knowing your feet are going to come back warm and dry no matter what the weather is a great feeling, one that makes getting the bike out onto the trail that little bit easier. On the trail we couldn't get them to falter, so we stuck these under the hose at the bike wash for a good spell, just to see how well they did. Our feet stayed dry. Aside from their all-weather performance, the sole is a nice balance between stiffness and flexibility, and the grip off the bike is very impressive, even in the mud. Our only small gripe is that the three strap and ankle closure system makes them a bit difficult to get on and off. Right now, in the middle of winter when the weather is at its coldest and wettest, the MW81s are simply fantastic and we have no hesitation in saying that they are worth every single one of those $250 dollars. - Matt Wragg



Madison Zenith short

Madison, the well known UK distributor, launched their own range of clothing in 2013 with the idea to produce good quality kit at sensible prices. The Zenith is their take on a lightweight, versatile short for a rider who wants to spend long periods of time in the saddle, and the material strikes a balance between light weight and durability. The lay-up of fabrics is complex, with a seamless, stretch crotch, tougher fabric on the exterior of the leg and vent on the thigh. There are five pockets, two on the hip, a phone pouch, and two on the leg, all with zippers to close them. Both sides of the waist employ elastic adjusters, and the fly is a nice, chunky zipper coupled with a pair of buttons at the top. They also come with a limited lifetime warranty. MSRP £49.99 (only available in the UK right now). www.madison.cc

The Zenith are a fairly simple pair of shorts with decent length and a good number of pockets There are the two hip pockets two leg pockets and an iphone pouch in the righthand side.
The Zenith short features a decent length and a good number of pockets; there are the two hip pockets, two leg pockets and an phone pouch in the righthand side.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe like the approach Madison have taken with their clothing line, focusing squarely on function over fashion. One of the most important things is always the feel of the material, and the Zeniths score well there, although it took a couple of washes to soften the inner enough to be properly comfortable. Length is good, coming just past the knee and leaving no awkward gap between kneepads and the short. Many lightweight shorts opt for equally lightweight zippers, which is a common area for failures, especially on the fly. The Zeniths avoid that pitfall, with a sizeable, solid zipper. We aren't so keen on the zippers used to close the hip pockets, though, and we'd prefer a simple, deep pocket with no zips. We are big fans of the phone pouch that is lined with an extra-soft material to protect your screen. Aesthetically, the logo on the leg is a touch big for out taste - simpler would be better. The other, bigger problem is that they don't come with a liner included, which means you will need to buy one later, counting against them on the value stakes. - Matt Wragg




Must Read This Week






130 Comments

  • + 64
 I am less likely to buy the sealant knowing I can use baby powder to get the same effect, especially since I have more babies than I know what to do with. Still, it seams most likely to be something I'd use.
  • + 4
 how much baby powder do you add anyone know? if it has a short life i wont be using it i have to replace my stans every 2 months or so here in mallorca due to the tempretures drying it out(or maybe i'm getting lots of punctures without realising it!)
  • + 9
 Well I run tubes, run flats and don't live in the UK... Oh well maybe next week Wink all jokes, these product reviews are great, even though I have no use for a good portion it's still an interesting read. Defiantly a fav for me!
  • - 46
flag treyxman (Jan 3, 2014 at 4:04) (Below Threshold)
 take your shit somewhere else gomez
  • + 18
 Will the sealant work to shut up a brother?
  • + 67
 taletotell - you should have used latex in the past, then you wouldn't have so much baby powder at home to seal the tyres... too late for me as well...
  • + 4
 @Waki - that's classic! I love it!
  • + 7
 I know waki, but as you know, after you have them you'd give up anything for them. And I have another on the way, but this one is the last I swear! It is the sickness that costs me all my pedal time. In a couple years will get back to my old dedicated biking schedule. I plan to have a very good decade in my thirties. After all, the 4 year-olds are already riding trail with me some times.
  • + 10
 The Caffelatex tire sealant looks delicious. Does it come in de-caff?
  • + 2
 @jlhenterprises haha. I was just thinking it looked dangerously edible.
  • + 5
 tried the Caffelatex for a number of tubeless conversions

did not find it worked well...at all, poor at sealing initial setup, poor at retaining pressure, thankfully did not get as far as getting any punctures.


went back to using Stan's sealant on the same tire/rim setups (had used Stans for many years) no problems to report?
  • + 7
 I'm just wondering…who the f*ck drinks tire sealant?
  • + 6
 Recently the bell on my bike broke, i wondered if anyone had any advice? Been hunting for an enduro specific bell but theyre hard to find
Thanks
  • + 14
 Yeah, you can pick up a carbon fiber one for about $8032.07 (about 3 british pounds) at your local enduro store.
  • + 2
 Had some gortex shimano shoes for 6 years now. They have been to the cobbler two times now but are still kicking. Retail was 220 but I got them on sale for 169. Thought it was expensive but I commute 365 and hate having wet feet from rain or sweat. They keep your feet dry from rain and allow them to breathe. The only problem is if you ride through streams that come over your pedals for any length of time the water that gets in can't get out.
  • - 27
flag saint4life (Jan 3, 2014 at 20:12) (Below Threshold)
 Tubeless doesn't work well in general - tube's are the way to go and countless mechanics agree with this statement.
  • + 7
 Uhhh....dude this isn't 2005, technology has advanced a LOT in the past few years
  • + 5
 I'm confused. I've ran tubeless for years with next to no issues...
  • + 1
 @hampsteadbandit, totally agree, and it doesn't do anything if you puncture but foam out the hole...
  • + 9
 @saint4life WTF? I'm a mechanic and I hardly ever sell anyone on tubes besides the cheap bikes from Walmart, they are by far the most obsolete thing in mountain biking history…
  • + 1
 @mnorris122

Wait until you have kids, also dogs.

They glycol makes it taste sweet, so there is a good chance they will.
  • + 1
 @mnorris122

I don't know who would drink tire sealant, but the antidote for ethylene glycol poisoning is alcohol. So if you use this sealant, make sure to keep several bottles of whiskey handy in the garage, just in case.
  • + 0
 @LiveWire199 Go ask Monk the same question - He's a top level pro mechanic - Tubes are his choice - why because if there is an issue you replace a tubeless with a tube - interesting. Tubeless is nice don't get me wrong but I've been using Protek's on my rig for two years - same tubes - drops, jumps rock gardens you name it - same tubes as the day I put them on 2 years ago. No issues, no flats, new tires same tubes. I guess it's luck of the draw but a lot of people have issues with tubeless and the moment it goes dry it's always a mess on the tire. That's just me and I guess I'm old school in that respect - don't hate though!
  • + 0
 Saint4life, there is a difference between DH, Enduro, trail or XC when choosing tubes or tubeless... I would never ride without tubes on a DH bike, and I would never use tubes on my rear tyre on a trail or Enduro bike (I run 100g butyl tube on front for xc/trail) You might want to broaden your horizons...
  • + 1
 Trust me I know where the application is needed that's not my point. My point is if you go tubeless you still go out and ride with an extra tube just in case. So it still seems odd that a pro level application that's a lot more money than a tube is the way to go. If you're not a pro level rider or someone whose going to maintain your tubeless well have fun with it and seating your set up along with all the costs associated with having someone else do it. Durability and ease of use is the pinnacle. I see all horizons - I just don't buy into them so easily.
  • + 3
 saint4life Tubeless may be more expensive initially, but trust me if you ride in a rocky area like I do it soon pays for itself.
I was getting 2 pinchflats every ride before going tubless 2 years ago, since then I've had 1 puncture. As far as maintenance is concerned Topping up your sealent every couple of months is far easier than replacing a tube(or 2) by the side of the trail or the walk home when youve run out of spares. So i agree "Durability and ease of use is the pinnacle". We just have different pinnacles! Smile
  • + 2
 2 pinch flats every ride, idk what you were doing but thats not normal. I have gone hundreds of whistler bike park laps without getting a flat thats no joke (no pun intended). I really think its personal preference, although tubeless is lighter i doubt i will ever make the switch. I would just hate to be out on a ride and do something to a tubeless tire and then be screwed because it wont hold air, and if im riding with an extra tube anyways, well then whats the point. not to mention i buy a $5 patch kit and now i can re use them.
  • + 3
 cretin82, first off there are no bike parks here it's all natural trails that are littered with loose rocks. Secondly I'm riding a hard tail which probably doesnt help. Putting more air in the tyres helps but at the cost of grip(id need to run about 40 psi to prevent flats where i can run 25 psi with tubless).Yes I know I could run downhill tyres and tubes but that is extra weight(and rotational weight at that) that I have to lug to the top! Thirdly you can't put a patch on 2, inch long slits that are an inch apart so in the bin it has to go.
  • - 1
 Well it seems to me that you are using the wrong bike for the wrong discipline, and maybe it's not the tires fault because its not designed for that kind of riding.
  • + 2
 cretin82 I'm not blaming the tyres just explaining why I use tubeless! As for wrong bike for the wrong discipline its a Ragley Mmmbop not a xc hardtail it's as tough as old boots. The wheel set up is sun ringle inferno 27s shod with Maxxis high roller 2.35s single plys so not a light weight xc set up at all.This is the kind of riding I'm doing www.pinkbike.com/photo/10476449 www.youtube.com/watch?v=ALI40nmSnvo
  • + 2
 Dumb slack gravity anti Xc prejudice in anti tubeless attitude I sense... very few riders in the world shred so hard in a very aggro style that they need to run tubes for stability and to avoid burping. We are affraif of that we don't understand. Stop it...
  • + 20
 For me the most important quality in a short is the liner and the back being higher than the front so that when I squat my crack doesn't show.
  • + 3
 LOL I second that
  • + 18
 A true story about the "old" Caffelatex... I was in my garage with my bike after a ride and couldn't resist the urge to pull out an embedded goathead. As expected, air started to forcefully come out. Like a genius, I decided to pick up the bike and spin the wheel... f***ing buk***e on the walls, the ceiling, the floor, everything... it was terrible, I tell ya! Oh, the horror!
  • + 7
 That shit sticks to everything, jerseys, rims, tyres, valves.... except the hole in the tyre!! Like you say, it's a horror... don't know about the "new" one, but i won't bother with Caffelatex any more...
  • + 9
 I agree. Watched the tire piss coffee every where and walked bike out. Stans simply works for me.
  • + 6
 Had similar trying to seal tyres with it - not sure if it was an "old" version, it was the one that was supposed to "foam", but it was terrible - jetting out of the tyre all over the shop.

Bakc to Stan's/Doc Blue, no problems since
  • + 3
 I've been using cafe for about two years now and never had a puncture smaller than 15mm stay open. However, It still sticks to your shins like a waxstrip...
  • + 5
 I tried it once because my shop was out of stans. That might be the single worst bike related purchase I've ever made. The stuff would not seal up at all, it just bubbled and made a giant mess. It definitely sticks to everything, everything you don't want it to. I also don't know if this was "old" or "new" but I sure as hell won't be trying it again.
  • + 9
 Yes the MW81's are expensive but worth every penny if you spend winter riding in the freezing cold mud and slop you get in the UK. Mine are two years old now and still going strong, consider it an investment.
  • + 5
 You can walk through a freezing river and they keep your feet warm and dry. Best winter shoes I've ever had.
  • + 8
 some how I don't think they will keep my feet warm in the -50 degree temperatures I have been experiencing lately.
  • + 23
 Anyone else notice the winter riding shoe tester is wearing shorts or knickers? Isn't that like testing mittens in a t-shirt?
  • + 1
 Totally worth buying a pair. My old school Shimano D100 boots are still going strong after 10+ years.
  • + 8
 Mbrett, They are just that good. I use mine naked. Well i would if i had some.
  • + 1
 I have the MW81's and like the fit and warmth. the key is to go one size up and wear thick socks. i use neoprene socks under them on the coldest days. I have an old set of Lake boots that these replaced. They have a much stiffer sole that the old Lakes.
  • + 2
 Probably will be too narrow. Will anyone ever make a wide winter shoes?
  • + 1
 I have these,they have issues,the top strap is made of neoprene and not waterproof,you splash through enough puddles they fill with water like any other shoe/boot Every properly wet ride I've been on I've come back with wet feet,if they made the ankle portion of the boot water proof I'm sure they'd be much improved. Wouldn't recommend.
  • + 1
 That's f'n awful. Brutal cold.
  • + 1
 Am41/45's and a pair of sealskins as good if not better,buy a size up to fit extra socks and save large.
  • + 10
 went tubeless a year a go never checked or changed fluid no problems .
  • + 11
 Sorry, pinkbike, can you change to positive props, positive and negative too close together for my fingers in the morning!
  • + 9
 Once the sealant dries out, your setup will remain sealed, but you won't have puncture protection any more.
  • + 1
 I took my tyre off after around a year, I guess it never gets warm enough in Northern Scotland to dry out. Stans.
I find that either the 5g rim strip fails at a spoke entry point, possibly due to a spoke becoming loose and a not realising, then a big impact poking the spoke through tbe tape, where the fluid does not work, or with schwalbe tyres the bead area fails when hitting a square edge rock or something (3 fails now!), where the sealant does not work, it is there, but those fails just dont stay sealed.
  • + 2
 @Betsie - I have the same issue with schwalbes, but I tried only really light ones, dunno about HDampf for instance. In my experience the lightweight Schwalbe TR tyres setup tubeless are excellent until you get a slightly bigger hole in them. Then they become extremely unreliable as they can go fine for a month and then I come to the attic to get the bike for a ride and the tyre is flat and the basterd just won't seal up due to a 1mm hole in it. The only way to fix that is to get a large patch from the inside, but then it's only a matter of getting a hole somewhere else. I tried both Stans and Joes, haven't really found any difference between them. The thing I found is that being weightweenish on sealant is plain stupid, 100ml is the absolute minimum or forget it.

From what I've tried Maxxis offers best reliability at resaonable weight, but they are not as easy to seal up as Schwalbes. I don't know about Contis as I haven't managed to seal them on Mavic rims. This season I will roll on HR2 1ply front and Ardent 1ply on the rear.
  • + 1
 I have manged to cut 2 hds and a nn, so no solution there. Never puncture the top of them that did not seal, but the bead interface is horrible and just cuts.
  • + 2
 I don't want to get into too much detail here in the comments, but personally I find the Schwalbe Supergravity tyres to out perform Maxxis ExoProtect in terms of puncture resistance.
  • + 1
 Unfortunately Schwalbies with Sypergravity sidewalls don't work well on my trails in the gloop. Hans Dampf is ok on the rear but for the front I need something like HR2, Minion or Roubaix Butcher, eventually Conti MKII. HD is fine on front only in the softer compound but then it rolls like shit. I get better grip from harder Butchers. Substantial Side knobbies and "ze channel" rocks my boat. Then Supergravity is heavish, I have too many ups and downs... and having tyres from two companies on one bike is disgusting! There is no pleasing me...
  • + 1
 Lol! One year, NO sealant, and my bike has been sitting in a 20 degree garage for about a month. Didn't lose a single burp of air! Thank you Mavic and Hutchinson
  • + 1
 Which Schwalbes have you been using? In terms of a channel between side and centre, and side profile, the Magic Mary and Rock Razor are two if the best out there. I personally don't get on well with the Hans Dampf for the reasons you descrive.
  • + 1
 I might give Magic Mary a go, but Rock Razor won't work here, too much climbing on wet roots, I need a good hooking support and those middle knobbs are placed too densely behind each other. If I could get Nobby Nic pattern with Supergravity casing for the rear, I would be a very happy man...

Matt, now for somethign different - from your experience, what do you think plays bigger role for tyre stability: rim width or tyre casing? I am about to change my CMax STs with 19mm internal to carbon rims with 26mm internal, to still be able to run light casings and get a bit more support, but will that solve the problem? I can pump them up more to 30psi (I am 76kg) but then climbing and overall grip gets compromised
  • + 1
 I am waiting to get a magic mary for tubeless, I have a non tubeless version, but it refuses to seal properly.
  • + 1
 I've been surprised how much grip you get from the centre of the Rock Razor - so long as you stay consistent and smooth putting power down it grips far better than it has any right to. There are a lot of rocks and roots where I live and I'm impressed with it.
  • + 2
 I think you need both. I wouldn't choose to run anything below 21mm ID, 25mm preferably. I never use weaker tyres though, I would never compromise carcass for weight reasonsz
  • + 1
 I run HD's and have had two holes in the rear that Stans sealant wouldn't fix, I've switched to an Ardent now to see if it works any better. I can't remember what size hole Stans claim their sealant can fix but I don't remotely believe it.
  • + 1
 Gotta second Matt on going with a substantial tire + wider rim, and going from 19mm to 25mm, you might even be able to go down a tire width without losing any real world performance, while gaining a lighter overall wheel. Food for thought. Also, On-One makes a tubeless ready set of tires that were "designed for pacific northwest riding" with the Smorgassbord and Chunky Monkey, which are made by Maxxis, and are tubeless ready. I've been really happy with them so far, but I don't live someplace muddy. At the price they're asking though, pretty easy to buy a set just to give them a shot...
  • + 1
 groghunter - thanks for posting! I might try them! Smorgasbord, ahahah - who's Swedish? If they fit Pacifc North West, then they will suit my trails, from what I've seen in many videos.

You know the problem I have with those wide rims is... the instructional video of Fabien Barel shredding on 19mm CMax SLRs... it´s been imprinted in my brain and flashes back whenever I want to buy wider rims... I don't know though if he isn't running DH tyres which would change a lot... and then I have this other image in my brain, it's from DirtTV on EWS where Jerome Clementz rides 19mm rim on the back of his CMax enduro and winning EWS on it. Rationality says "go wider, buy them asap! it is reasonable to do so, all the research made in that subject by Germans proves it". But the reality says "please tell me more of your life problems son, what was that - you did not like Crossmax ST wheels, was it? They felt wrong, hum? - how about a ginger IPA and a shotgun suicide afterwards you spoiled Fokker Fuk?
  • + 4
 All depends on what you're building the bike for, man. Racing at a pro level? then the extra weight savings of a narrower rim can make sense, since you'll run everything as light as possible anyway, and you're not paying for your own parts, or your sponsor doesn't give you the option of a wider rim. There's also the aspect of having the skill to make up for the performance decrease that the narrower rim causes. For the rest of us? Screw that, tires are our main interface with the world, and I'll take every little improvement I can get, because the better my bike performs, the more fun I have. Every time I've gone to a wider rim, my bike has felt more enjoyable and fun to ride, and that's what matters to me.
  • + 2
 I've chewed through a couple of Hans Dampf trailstars set up as rear tires... I think the Pacestar compound would be more durable as a rear. I have a Rock Razor as a rear right now. I was hesitant to have it as a rear tire in the winter in North Van but it's actually gripped surprisingly well. Just need to be a bit more aware on wet roots.
  • + 1
 DC1988 If you get a puncture that stans wont seal just stick a patch on inside the tyre and you are good to go! it happend to me when a sharp rock made a 6mm hole in the tread, thats the only puncture ive ever had whilst using stans.I ran out of sealent this week so stuck a tube in, big mistake I had 2 pinch flats on yesterdays ride and only 1 spare tube! walking home was a pain in the arse! so been and got me some more stans.
  • + 1
 Waki, have you though of getting some cheap wide rimes to test traction? Halo makes a super wide assortment for €100 that you could test.
A used option could be good too If you just need to test width.
Also remember when Levy rode a pro's DH rig and had trouble making it feel good for him? Pros don't ride like us. A pro might like like the squirrley feel of a folding tire on the back. If you don't like it then make a change.
  • + 3
 Mnah... I'd buy those carbon ones. I'd buy them anyway. I remember switching from 17mm to 24mm. Mavic should bring back that 3.1D rim I used to have. It was lighter and wider than EX823. It is just the guilt holding me back, and the fact that I ride little due to pissing rain, my blog, my bike project, my family and my mental treatment program.

I just wonder if I will have to buy the tyres as well because if I am about to spend 180$ for a carbon rim to get 26mm inner at 400g, and then I will by 850g tyres which will add 400g to my rotating mass in total, it doesn't make sense any longer. I might as well go for ZTR Flow EX or Pacenti DL31 at 500g each and save 200$. On the positive side I am very proud of myself that I've found the limit of those rims and tyres Big Grin
  • + 1
 I have always found Schwalbe trail tyres to be a little too fragile for tubeless use. I have found Maxxis tyres to be solid when used as tubeless and Continentals you need to keep the pressure up.
  • + 6
 I love reading these"Product Picks" articles strictly for the poll at the bottom of the article asking the reader to vote which product they're most likely to try. I swear the majority of the time, "None of the Above" gets the most votes.
  • + 3
 I pretend it doesn't have a "none of the above option." Makes it more interesting. I never can afford any of them anyway.
  • + 6
 The MW81's are the best money you can spend on winter kit, use em almost every ride in the PNW winters.
  • + 2
 Okay I'm intrigued. I had a tack in my tyre last week and pulled it out. The stans fluid in the tyre was fresh replacement out of a new bottle only 2 weeks earlier ( i shake the bottle for about 2 mins) but it wouldn't seal up. Fluid spraying out everywhere and looked really thin. Air temperature was I guess around 2 degrees at time or less which made me wonder if that was a possible factor. It sealed temporarily but as soon as I began to inflate tyre it opened up again and sprayed through what was quite a tiny hole where tack punctured. Been looking out for alternate product since, I get the concept of the baby powder because of this experience. Are they talking just like Johnsons talc powder here?
  • + 24
 I actually use nail glitter in mine. It doesn't thicken the sealant so it still manages to distribute evenly inside the tyre. I've had great success in the past and haven't had a flat since. The other bonus is that if you do get a flat you'll look fabulous so be sure to pick a good colour!
  • + 3
 Angus was telling me about this its a fabulous plan
  • + 2
 Been using the Café L for most of 2013. Works a treat and even though it dried out in my rear tyre still had no sealing problems with about 30 thorns while away on vac last month. It had formed a latex layer on the inside of the tyre and side wall as claimed and was slightly moist which seems to have kept the air in.
  • + 2
 The shoes are awesome! I used them in -12 dC with Sugoi Carbon Winter socks for a 2+ hour ride and my feet were comfortable and dry Smile Best actual Winter riding shoes I ever got Smile I also ride on technical rocky trails where I use platforms and found the 5-10's with the Marino Wool Medium Weight hiking socks a perfect combination on my 5+ hour ride in - 15 dC Smile
  • + 2
 Tried Caffelatex and for me it had no better performance in comparison to Stans. The downside is that it left brownish stains on my shiny silver colored rear hub after a puncture which are very hard to get rid off between spokes and hub flange.
  • + 1
 My MW81 Shimano winter riding boots fell apart after 2 days of summer riding in Torridon Scotland. All the stitching came out and the outer layer peeled back, not what I expect from Shimano shoes as I have a pair of 5 year old DX (stormtrooper) shoes that are still in one piece.
  • + 1
 I'm glad to see Shimano supporting the "off weather" rider!! Those shoes look impressive but how about a lacing system?
Velcro is fine but nothing blows harder than a Velcro strap that wont fasten after 3 seasons of use ( I winter ride and go out at -15 sometimes ). Lake uses a boah system, much like that used on ski boots. Still, I'm happy that there's a well priced winter boots for the hardcore cold weather rider!!
  • + 3
 Any chance Nico Vouillez gets paid to use Caffelatex?

I have had better luck - initial sealing and long-lasting - from the Conti Revo sealant.
  • + 1
 I tried that Conti stuff and was impressed, but it goes bad in hot weather really quick. Average life was about 1-2 months. Went to Orange Seal and been impressed. I think Stan is still king though.
  • + 1
 MW81's are good down to about -15C for me. If you ride down to -25C or so, you need to buy one size up, then wear them loosely done up with extra wool socks. In that set up, I was good for about 1hr. 2hr rides, feet went numb. At some point you have to look at flat pedals and sorel boots.
  • + 1
 Yes, essential to avoid tight fitting or else GoreTex lets water in and thick socks will not insulate against cold properly. Just one big negative about all 4 pairs of Shimano shoes (size 10.5/11 UK) I have had is that they appear to be fitted for folk with flat arches. I have slightly higher arches than average, I believe, and the Velcro straps only contact over a half/third of the full Velcro area. Duh!
  • + 1
 Check out the reviews at Jenson USA

1.0
Stay with Stans
By Tiger Box
from Virginia

Comments about Effetto Mariposa Caffelatex 1000ML Foaming Tire Sealant:
Lets admit it, none of us really love working with Stans Sealant even when you have the set-up mastered as it creates a mess. But it works once it's in and as we all know is far superior to tubes.

I decided to try this Caffelatex to see if there was something better out there. There isn't, at least this brand isn't. It's a super thin fluid so makes even more of a mess during set-up.

But the big problem is that it simply doesn't seal as well as Stans. And this is during both set up and riding. After many attempts of getting my tires on the rim I finally stopped the air from leaking out, but with the messy stuff all over the place as it hissed out and sprayed all over the place. The fluid would simply peculate out and not close up the small holes Stans seals instantly.

But even worse...the ride. It leaked out of three separate, small areas, and never sealed, the bubbles they advertised? Well it just bubbled and bubbled and didn't stop. In fact it created these big globs on the tires after it dried. I ended up putting a tube in and when I got home threw the big bottle of CaffeLatex in the trash can....Back to Stans.
Bottom Line No, I would not recommend this to a friend

5/26/2011
(2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

1.0
This stuff is terrible
By Jeff
from Oz
Comments about Effetto Mariposa Caffelatex 1000ML Foaming Tire Sealant:
This stuff is terrible. It doesn't seal punctures, even small pinholes, at all. All it does is spray out in a fine mist, regardless of whether the wheel is kept spinning or stationary.I went back to Stans, which works much better.

What is PB up to?
  • + 1
 Wool socks are ok in the west coast winters. I have Lake winter shoes, too, but they're too warm if it's above 5 celsius. I've used Gore-Tex socks for riding and golfing. They've lasted over 10 years. They're great if you really ride in the wet. These shoes should be perfect for Pacific Northwest winters.
  • + 1
 I wish they made it more obvious if their sealant was hypoallergenic or not. As someone with a latex allergy, its presence in sealant is what's been putting me off going tubeless, and it doesn't help that few companies advertise their sealant as latex free, or protein free.
  • + 3
 The madison zenith looks like a good option if it ever becomes world-wide, the stretch crotch is a plus
  • + 4
 i like that the shorts DONT come with a liner
  • + 1
 Shimano make great shoes, these winter boots offer great protection as well as almost completely water tight and cozy warm, worth every penny and I am on the second season
  • + 2
 Where did pinkbike get roughly $16 for the Cafelatex? Our distributors price it at $30
  • + 1
 Compared to that, I used from several seasons Stans milk, the Caffelatex it simply doest work and it is a mistake, I bought once and never again!!!
  • + 3
 I always get a stretchy crotch when I ride.
  • + 1
 I've owned the Shimano shoes (MW80 prior year) and they rule! I've done trail riding and I commute to work in them. A pair of winter socks and you're dialed!
  • + 1
 Some riders sniff their liners after a long and hard ride. It's like a right of passage or some *hit.
  • + 2
 wth no news since 2nd January!
  • + 1
 bike serviced new sealant in tires bike is like new sorted for the rest of the year .
  • - 2
 I'm a bit hesitant to try those shoes as I have two pairs of hiking and mountaineering shoes with Goretex and it must be really cold so I don't sweat my feet to get them as wet as they would get by getting water splashed in my 5.10 MFalcons or Lowimpacts. It's super wet where I live and some trails can turn into streams but still, as long as you don't normally ride in XC racing ballerinas, a 400grade wool socks and 5.10/Am45/Teva/Vans shoes will do the job. You shouldn't ride in XC ballerinas anyways...
  • + 1
 Waki - I ride just what you're saying - 5/10 Karver and a merino wool sock. I add toe wares only when the temp dips below -12, which it seldom does here SW Ontario. Feet are always toasty warm. And no cleTs clogged with snow.
  • + 2
 *warmers
*cleats

I don't like iPhone spell check
  • + 1
 -12? are you serious? my respects Smile
  • + 2
 -15 often!! I use Lake clip-less boots, they work great!!! The only cogging I get is the snow compacting and actually freezing to the cleat. I imagine that's not something that any shoe company can get around unless they have a cleat defrosting system.

Yes Narro2 , -15c and just so you know, I drove to work today ( happy my car started at - 40c with the wind ) and saw a guy riding his bike!! Fix gears are the only things that work in this weather since your freehub will most likely freeze and leave you in "neutral" and your cables freeze in the housings making gear shifts next to impossible. I was a courier for 5 years and still XC on snowshoe trails when the occasion arises.

I LOVE THIS COUNTRY!!!!!
  • + 1
 wow, -1 is the coldest i remember ridding at, no shredding, just going up and down our big old XC trail. something that I havent tried is riding on the snow, we've been getting lots of snow on the mountains this year but I just dont feel like trying it, I'll do it eventually
  • + 1
 Thick woolly socks from the army surplus store (or porelle drys) and some quality dubbin/wax on my leather DC court skate shoes with a sheepswool & foil insole to keep the sole warm... never had cold or wet feet for years in the uk, and its compatible with flat pedals too :-p
  • + 1
 @enduroelite: I work for Jimmy John's, and recently had to do deliveries in similar temperatures. Can confirm that fixed gears are the shit in winter weather. Got my cross tires and fender on for the snow. Tonight should be fun, we have like 8 inches.
  • + 1
 I hate winter regardless of how great my riding shoes are. Give me spring and summer any day.
  • + 1
 Those shorts look so perfect for riding. Not so perfect is the fact that its only available in the UK Frown
  • + 1
 think I will get new sealant tomorrow after all that info there AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAGH .
  • + 2
 why doesnt any one make a NON SPD winter/waterproof shoe :@
  • + 1
 take a look at the five ten elements range
  • + 1
 Not totally waterproof but the FiveTen Freerider Elements edition is winterized and has some water repellent tech. Haven't used the Elements edition but the normal Freeriders are the best.
  • + 1
 probably the most useless product picks yet...
  • + 1
 bontrager xr4 tubeless team issue workin for me
  • + 1
 How about a Stans Vs. Caffelatex sealant shootout?
  • + 1
 I thought everyone carried their phone on the left?
  • + 1
 Huh. Here in the US, I carry phone on the left, keys on the right, because the ignition lock on my car is on the right side of the steering wheel. wouldn't it be opposite on your side of the pond?
  • + 2
 No our ignition is on the right too! Strange though I think that's probably why I carry my phone on the left though I've never really thought about it! The left one just seems safest especially with these new fangled £500 things! Really don't want my keys scratching that up!!
  • + 1
 Interesting, I hadn't even thought of there being a normal side for pocketing keys or a phone. Off the top of my head it doesn't seem like there would be any consistency. Some people use their phone in their dominant hand because they have a better grip on it and it feels more natural. Other people use their non-dominant hand because it frees their dominant hand for doing other stuff.
  • + 1
 Yeah absolutely. That's what I thought so seems daft they put a phone specific pocket in the right leg. I'd be riding around in circles with the extra weight on the wrong side! Ok for the other 50% I guess
  • + 1
 Have to have phone in the right pocket or I feel all... wrong! Maybe I'm weird though!
  • + 1
 I know what I'm getting for Christmas.
  • + 1
 Best. Sealant. Ever.
  • + 1
 Orange seal!
  • - 2
 New Cafelatex works great. Even the first version was quite good.
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