Pinkbike Product Picks

Nov 1, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
Sombrio Shazam Mid-Top Shoe

The Shazam is Sombrio's mid-top, flat pedal shoe, featuring the company's FlyerSol rubber compound. Designed with durability in mind, the Shazam has a triple needle stitched leather toe box, with waxed canvas and suede uppers. A textured cover helps keep unruly laces from tangling in cranks and chainrings, as well as providing a bit of protection from the elements. Although fairly minimal, there are laser cut vent holes in the toe box to help with airflow. Colors: Electrocuted Lemon, White. Sizes: 6-12. MSRP: $119 USD. www.sombriocartel.com

Sombrio Shazam
The Shazam proved to be a comfortable, durable, flat pedal shoe.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe often take for granted the abuse mountain bike shoes are expected to endure. They get dragged through mud, submerged in streams, bashed against logs and rocks, all the while keeping our feet comfortable and protected from the elements. The Shazam proved up to the task, without any blown seems or frayed stitching, even after being subjected to all of the previously mentioned abuse. We appreciated the mid-top design, which added a layer of protection between our ankles and crankarms or chainstays. The sole was stiff enough for longer days of pedalling or doing laps in the bike park, but still remained flexible enough to walk in. As far as traction goes, Sombrio's FlyerSol compound isn't as sticky as Five Ten's ultra-tacky Stealth rubber, but at the same time made it easy to reposition our feet on the pedals. Riders who prefer super-sticky soles may end up needing to run longer or additional pedal pins to get the level of grip that they are used to. For wet weather riding, the vent holes in the toe box does mean that water can make its way in, but we found that the lace cover helped keep a good amount of rain from reaching the inside of the shoe. The smooth lining around the upper cuff of the shoe made it easy to get the shoes on an off, and proved to shed mud well - a quick wipe down was all it took to remove dirt build up. The Shazam's might not be as bright as when we first received them, but they've proven to be a reliable pair of kicks. - Mike Kazimer



Scorpion Bike Stand

The Scorpion Stand is designed to simplify bike storage, and is similar to the type of stand used to hold dirt bikes. Handmade in California, the stand is constructed from steel tubing that is bent and welded into a shape slightly reminiscent of a scorpion's tail (hence the name), and then powercoated. The stands are designed to work with crankarms that have a hollow spindle and an external opening. The “stinger” portion of the stand is inserted into the crankarm, usually from the driveside, and the stand holds the bike stationary with the rear wheel a few inches off the ground. All wheel sizes will work with the stand, and different adaptors are available to allow the stand to fit crank arm holes from 10mm to 19mm. Weight: 4.14lb. Multiple color options. MSRP: $55 USD. www.scorpionbikestands.com

Scorpion bike stand review
The Scorpion bike stand is strong enough to hold a DH bike, but could use some refinements to make it more versatile.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesAs far as bike stands go, the Scorpion Stand is about as simple as it gets. Its sturdy construction meant there was enough support from the legs to securely hold a downhill bike, and the stand worked with wheel sizes from 26" to 29". While it might seem like the stand could be use as an impromptu work station for drivetrain adjustments, this isn't the case, since the arm that holds the bike doesn't provide enough clearance to make a full revolution with the cranks on bikes with flat pedals. Even on bikes whose pedals do clear the stand, after a few turns of the crank the bike will start to migrate off the 'stinger' due to the friction between the stand and the inside of the spindle. The stand did come in handy for washing bikes, since it makes it easy to access all sides of the bike. The Scorpion Stand is certainly a niche item, but for riders looking for a bare bones way to hold a bike upright in a garage or at a race it could be worth a look, and with no moving parts it will probably last longer than the bikes that it holds. - Mike Kazimer



Race Face Mud Crutch

Race Face's Mud Crutch is one of those 'Why didn't I think of that' products, a simple solution intended to keep the mud and water tossed up by the front wheel from flying into your eyes. The Mud Crutch is made from a piece of Mylar laced woven elastic and Lycra that wraps around the arch of a suspension fork and fastens with hook and loop closures on each side of the fork's crown. Three different sizes are available to fit forks with between 80 to 203mm of travel. MSRP: $14 USD. www.raceface.com

Race Face Mud Crutch Review
Effective and easy to install, the Mud Crutch is a recommended accessory for wet weather riding.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesHere in the Pacific Northwest, the Mud Crutch is the type of item that goes on at the beginning of fall and doesn't come off until the rains stop six months later. While it's very possible that you've been rigging something similar out of inner tubes and zip ties, ease of installation is what makes the Mud Crutch appealing. It's literally a 30 second affair - just wrap the fabric around, fasten the hook and loop fasteners and go play in the mud. The fabric is a touch over three inches wide, giving it enough width to block the spray even from fat DH tires. Riders that haven't tried this style of mud guard might be skeptical as to how effective it will be, but the Mud Crutch makes a noticeable difference on the trail, blocking a good percentage of the water and muck spinning off the front wheel. It's not a 100% solution - you'll still want to have some eye protection against those errant chucks of flying mud, but it does help keep goggles and glasses clean for a much longer time than if it wasn't in place. Plus, with a retail price of less than $20, it's an affordable item that will make those messy fall and winter rides much more enjoyable. - Mike Kazimer






112 Comments

  • 163 3
 Scorpion Bike Stand thanks for the idea I will now make one out of PVC piping.
  • 18 3
 Exactly, a brilliant idea, just spend £5 in materials instead of $55!
  • 4 1
 Kirt Voreis Vorskin FTW!!! i hope hes getting monies on the back end
  • 2 1
 Haha exactly what I was thinking when I saw this
  • 2 0
 You can even make yours long enough to turn your cranks for chain cleaning !
  • 16 1
 Don't mean to be pesimistic but I have a hard time seeing 1" pvc holding up to even a 30lb bike for an extended period of time...
  • 3 0
 Well it doesn't necessarily have to be entirely PVC...the arm that actually holds the bike could be easily made from aluminum or steel tubing with some pluming fixtures...PVC would be plenty strong for the base tho.
  • 3 6
 It doesn't have to actually hold the bike up off thre ground though. this thing doesn't. It just has to help it balance.
  • 3 3
 Still, have you ever actually used PVC? I just don't see it holding up to this whether it is fully supporting the bike or not. Either its going to be as flexy as a wet noodle or if you do over build it enough, PVC is inherently brittle and sooner or later it is going to break. Don't get me wrong, give it a try because true, PVC is cheap. Based on my experience with the material (I work for an excavating company and we lay pvc sewer lines all the time) I wouldn't trust it. I would much rather weld something out of some scrap metal that I know is going to last. Depends on the tools and skills you have though...
  • 6 0
 I don't respect PVC for plumbing. But for crafts yay!!! But for under ten bucks it do the same as that stand.
  • 7 0
 honestly if you build it right I think pvc is plenty strong. its not holding it up its just balancing it... try to break a 1" + piece of pvc in half...it takes a lot of strength. its definitely strong enough
  • 3 0
 I have an Andy Stand - cheap, strong, orange, and it has a bottle opener!

andystand.co.uk

that is all......
  • 2 0
 the bottle opener makes that stand!
  • 7 0
 Funny... I built mine about 5 years ago... didn't think to sell em... www.pinkbike.com/photo/9573592
  • 1 0
 And just in case anyone was wondering he now increased his prices to $70-73 a stand, shipping not included....
  • 51 0
 You know what the say about guys with size 13+ feet....

They can't wear Sombrio shoes.
  • 3 28
flag Lilshredman (Nov 1, 2013 at 6:21) (Below Threshold)
 You know what they say about people with big feet...
  • 20 1
 big socks?
  • 13 1
 a bitch of a time finding shoes in stores?
  • 5 0
 I get by in Vans
  • 3 0
 Same here...I love my Vans!
  • 1 0
 Ive had success with Nike Dunk Low, I wish new balance made riding shoes.
  • 32 1
 Isn't the mud crutch just a slightly different RRP that we've all been using for years?
  • 12 0
 Or simply an old inner tube stretched between the arch and the crown... Simple. Cheap. You have got dozens of them in the back... I have been doing that for years n ow...
  • 2 1
 Mmmmm. Pin Stripes. Back to the seventies then?
  • 13 0
 Nice to have a pin stripe option, I always like to coordinate my riding suit with my bike if I can.
  • 10 0
 would have mucky nutz anyday.
  • 2 0
 RRP/ Mud Crutch style mud guards just bounce 80% of the crap straight onto your fork seals.. Mucky Nutz FTW..
  • 13 3
 The Sombrio shoe has a far bett3r feel on the pedal than any 5.10, I have Sam Hills, Freeriders and Basics.
Once I bought 1 pair of Sombrios when crc were selling them for £33, I soon found myself with 3 pairs at that price.
Expecting them to last 12 months max, like 5.10's I am surprised a year on that they are still not far off new looking after lots of abuse.
A few riders up here converted to them due to the price, comfort, feel on the pedal, better feed back from the trail, far better durability, how quickly they dry out and the fact that you can wear them all the time without fear of the sole coming off, the inside falling to bits the outer cracking and the sole not lasting very long like 5.10's.
  • 4 3
 The only thing I can complain on with 5.10s is their spongyness sucking in water, and weight. Then Maltese Falcons are a failure big time and Hellcats are like a pound too heavy but that's another story. As to the sole durability - such grip is possible only due to soft compound that must wear out quicker than anything else. My Impacts lasted me 3 years, and thanks to that super grip I can run shorter pins so my shins and calves are extremely thankful. Even after 3 years they grip better than Teva and Vans I tried.
  • 12 0
 sombrio's dont come in a 13 or larger... so 5.10's are my boots of choice i guess
  • 1 0
 Ive had my 5.10 red barrens for 2 years now and they are holding up well from weekly xc and dh use. Not knocking sombrios since ive never tried them but i havent had the same experience with 5.10 durability.
  • 2 1
 best shoes i've ever owned, plus you can use them for enduro
  • 20 1
 Are you sure? I was anticipating them releasing an enduro version that is $150 USD.
  • 3 2
 I am out most days in the summer, XC to work (14 to 20 miles a day), but XC is disco slippers.
Digging and riding in the same shoes is ideal and the 5.10's just don't last.
I live were I have trails on my door step, so do tend to ride for up to 25 hours a week on top of my XC to work (gotta love riding).
Can easily do 2 hours, 4 nights a week, all day Saturday and all day Sunday, in the summer it is only dark for a couple of hours so no restrictions with light (shame it is now dark at 1630 though!)
  • 5 0
 @sidermang - they didn't realized yet that more and more people will have 650b feet...or something like that...
  • 1 2
 @betsie 25h a week +XC? Thar gives 30h+a week over a bike I guess - Gee Atherton you too serious basterd! Is that you?

I can only say I envy you, the husband of my sister in law who raced in Giro, Vuelta and will do TDF next year, does 30h per week and that is his full time job.
  • 2 0
 it's not the weight of hellcats(minnaars) it's the flex, they feel terrible in rough terrain compared to am45s, maybe a good upper but the sole shank is a fail on fivetens part
  • 2 1
 @waki.
I love to ride and build.
Often a winter week is, ride to and from work, well the last 7 miles, I work 27 miles away by road.
A night time build, monday late gym, thursday badminton, saturday and sunday ride.
Leaving at 0800 tomorrow as I have a family dinner and fireworks to get back for, sk should manage 0900 to 1500 riding.
Big summer day in the mountains is up to 10 hours riding. Perfect weekend is Friday night, 1700 to 2100 play ride, all day saturday big day, then 0900 to 1500 or later sunday ride, sleeping in the van.
Tough life, but that is why we work hard during the week.
  • 2 1
 @Betsie - sorry for sounding suspicious, I just wanted to express my honest admiration for you spending as much time on bike related activities as full on pro riders, despite having a job and family.

Cheers!
  • 5 0
 The stands come with the adapters for the three different hollow spindle sizes. BB heights are all within 1/2 inch so it dose not effect the stand height. The new design clears flat pedals, and the adapters rotate on the stinger so the bike stays on the stand. These are hand made, tig welded, and powder coated. Well worth the money. Any other issues I can address? I make these one at a time by hand so it takes more then 5 mins. Thanks for the positive reviews!
  • 2 0
 sounds perfect. make one that can hold two bikes 69ing in my garage?
  • 1 0
 Haha, sure I could do that!
  • 14 5
 Ugly shoes..
  • 5 4
 Ugly yellow. And white? Really?
  • 1 0
 Reminds me of Back to the Future
  • 3 0
 Oh I dunno, I always wanted some special needs moon boots.
  • 2 1
 I bought a set of the sombrios when they were on sale from CRC and man do I regret it - they are some of the most godawful looking things in this universe. I went back to riding clipless just so I didn't have to wear those shoes...
  • 2 0
 Right, because 5.10 impacts are things of beauty.
  • 2 0
 Sombrios do have ugly color schemes (I own the ugly blue and orange loams) never wore em till my old shoes got wrecked but they work awesome no pedal slips comfy and still not wrecked.

I personally don't care for fashion on my bike I just wanna ride.
  • 7 0
 make it collapsable so you can put it away.
  • 5 5
 Pretty shitty and simple looking stand for 55 bucks. For 5-10 bucks I'd say okay, but for this much money.. And it only fits cranks that have a hollow spindle, not even all bikes. Big fail there in my opinion.
  • 1 0
 They sell one that breaks down and the strength and quality is awesome. You also have to remember the owner is hand making them in his garage!
  • 4 0
 I would rather use a Mucky Nutz or Marsh Guard than a Mud Crutch or the like. I have a Marsh Guard and it keeps 90% of the crap off of my fork seals as well the mud out my eyes.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I was debating over whether I should go with a MuckyNutz bender fender or the Mud Crutch, and the fender won out. Only drawback I can see so far during my rides is that it moves around a bit and makes some noise. This could be down to a multitude of things, not least of which is that I may not have mounted it as securely as I could have done.

Oh, and my legs seem to get a bit wetter, but only if I'm not wearing my hard shell RF knee/leg pads
  • 1 0
 Mine is zipped on securely. The only time I notice it is after a ride when my fork seals are still clean.
  • 3 1
 that race face thing is stupid i had a similar product and if its really muddy it pushes the excess mud onto the fork seals meaning a full fork rebuild i completely f*cked my fork, the bender fender is a much better design for a cheap spray and mud guard
  • 3 2
 How does it push mud anywhere? Mud flying off the tire is free to hit the stanchions, but while does not prevent it, neither should it encourage it.
Care to explain?
  • 3 1
 the mud got clogged because it couldn't pass through the gap above the crown, im talking about a mentally muddy ride i had here, the product i had the rrp neoguard one, said that it is designed to shed the mud under fork compression but it just dumped it onto the fork. i know there designed to stop spray not as a mud guard but still this is just my experience with a similar product
  • 4 0
 okay, I see what you mean. I guess these are only good in certain conditions.
  • 1 0
 yeah man just my 2 cents
  • 3 3
 I got mine last week and it work flawlessly
  • 2 1
 i never said it doesn't work, keeps spray down fine, i said it caused MY forks to break it worked until it got really muddy
  • 2 1
 You could just make your own from a cut up inner tube ?
  • 2 0
 So I get the choice of bright yellow or white for shoes intended for getting dirty? No, thank you.

That stand is interesting though. Be interesting see one in a clear resin version for photography purposes; I'll bet they'd sell quite a few more.
  • 8 3
 time to get me one of those stands. From Home Depot of course
  • 10 3
 A lot of technology went into the developed of that stand.
  • 6 0
 and I cant afford a lot of that technology
  • 4 14
flag MendelMu (Nov 1, 2013 at 1:26) (Below Threshold)
 I encourage people, who can afford, to buy "the real one" instead of knock-offs at places who f*cks over there employees. I don not know what the wage is at this company but they at least invested in the product..

At home depot the wage starts at 9 dollars/hour, f*cking despicable, people with families trying to survive...
  • 7 1
 What technology??

You can't even use it for all bikes, only the ones with a hollow spindle.

After spending 55 bucks on such an easy design (2 C-shaped pieces of metal welded together), you will probably also need to spend even more money to get the right adapter to fit the cranks on your bike.

And if your other bike has a different type of hollow spindle it won't fit, so you'd need to spend even more money on another adapter.

Also it takes time to screw the adapters on and off, and no one wants to spend time on that when you just want to quickly put your bike away.
Also most people will lose those small pieces eventually. It doesn't even have a place where you can put them in so you don't loose them? Not very bright in my opinion.

And it's not foldable so you're always stuck with that big piece of shit in your garage.


Long story short, for 5 bucks I might consider it, but 55 bucks is ridiculous for such a poor design. Especially when you probably end up spending more than 70 bucks if you also need to buy new adapters.
This could have easily been made much more user-friendly, by making it foldable, and loosing the extra adapters you'd need to buy and just get something that fits every single bike, just like your 5-10 buck bicycle stand does.
  • 4 3
 Well, for the money, they hopefully can give there employees a decent wage. Agree with you that it is not much of technology to talk about, but kind of nice product anyways.
  • 2 0
 I will have to agree that it looks nice tho Smile
  • 3 0
 A tree or rock is free.
  • 3 0
 Still, a fuckin' good idea.
  • 8 0
 Total rip off of this:

andystand.co.uk
  • 3 0
 Or your car tire...or the ground...
  • 1 1
 The stand comes with 5 different adapters for bikes! Go check the site before you bag on an all US made bike accessory made in the company owners house!
  • 1 0
 Did I get bashed for saying buy the real one? I did not know Andystand were in the business.

OR

Did I get bashed for complaining about the wages at certain companies?
  • 1 0
 You didn't get bashed. They're just neg props, not the end of ze world here man...
  • 8 3
 a mud crutch? isnt that what an intertube is for!?
  • 6 0
 Yeah that's the cool ghetto version. But some people get intimidated by the cool ghetto look so they pussy out and spend money on things like this.
  • 6 0
 Innrr tubes aren't enduro specific, you can fit this in your waist pack too...
  • 4 0
 they are, they are!! 650b tubes...
  • 1 2
 Inner tube looks like shit on a high end bike Had my crutch 1 month and looks and works great
  • 2 1
 The stands come with the adapters for all three crank hole diameters. The stands are hand made one at a time, tig welded, and powder coated. Well worth the $. New style stands will clear flat pedals. I make a two piece version. BB height are all so close that the stands work for most bikes. Any other questions? Thanks for the positive thoughts!
  • 1 0
 I love the Scorpion stand, but when i upgraded to the RaceFace Next SL, it was no longer compatible. I ended up making my own adapter that will allow me to use my Scorpion stand with the Next SL crank. If anyone is interested shoot me a PM.
  • 4 2
 Has the rrp mud guards not made it to the states? Raceface face one is a pretty similar concept! Wonder if raceface will make the muckynutz/marsh guard copy next.
  • 1 0
 It's a similar concept but the Raceface is a much better design. The RRP can come undone when it's really muddy because the mud clogs the velcro straps on the bottom and undos them, the Raceface only has straps at the top so this can't happen. No straps also means slightly more clearance.

The RRP/Raceface design is also better than the Muckynutz/Marsh Gaurd IMO as I broke a Muckynutz very easily when some small sticks got caught and ripped it apart. That doesn't happen with the RRP/Raceface design. Also with big tyres I found the tyre buzzed the Muckynutz/Marsh Gaurd when the fork flexes. Again, no such issues with the RRP/Raceface design. I do have to admit the Muckynutz/Marsh Gaurd stops the spray a little better though.
  • 1 1
 I have those shoes. The shoes were very compfy but durable???? HA! After my first day at the jump park of which I didnt even fall or do and extra damage to them, the stitching was coming undone on the lace protector and after another ride had completely come apart. I'm going for giro next time
  • 3 0
 So the Scorpion bike stand is just a poor copy of the Andystand?
andystand.co.uk
  • 1 1
 Yeah, and they're both pieces of shit.
  • 1 0
 Why not a stand that gos under the BB or fits onto chain stays just to lift the wheel off the ground . This would be very usefull for me as I live in a flat
  • 2 0
 Give the stands a like over on Facebook/scorpionbikestands or follow on instagram @scorpionbikestands.
  • 1 0
 Scorpion should turn the arm into a spindle with bearings inside so it spins with the crank to reduce marring the inside of the crank
  • 1 0
 The new stands adapters spin on the "stinger". Check the web site for updated pics or the instagram.
  • 1 0
 Wow.. three products that don't cost an arm an leg to buy
+1 for the Sombrio shoes, I love mine
  • 2 0
 I would buy any flat pedal shoe that came in my size- 15 EE/52 extra wide
  • 1 0
 If only... I'm in the same boat. No fancy 5.10's or sombrios for me. Stuck to using vans...
  • 1 0
 I used the mud crutch this season.. It's cheap and goes on quick.. Alot easier than messing with tubes zip ties.
  • 1 0
 cool a sweet product like the mud crutch. will I actually be able to find it at the bike shop?
  • 2 0
 I also make a two piece version.
  • 1 0
 Concerning the shoes...Shimano's price and quality still very hard to beat!!
  • 1 0
 I have and Andy Stand - cheap, strong, orange, and it has a bottle opener!

andystand.co.uk

that is all......
  • 1 0
 How does the stand deal with different BB heights?
  • 5 0
 you can put a book under the stand or remove air from the tires =)
  • 1 0
 I thought it said mud crotch.
  • 2 0
 it prevents the mud crotch.
  • 1 0
 The mud crutch looks like your fork is wearing suspenders...
  • 1 0
 most durable and the best shoes....Five Ten approach shoes for climbing.
  • 1 0
 Marshguard is easier to fit...and look sexier!!
  • 2 2
 For the stand: You can only turn the crank while you're at non-drive side.

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