Pinkbike Product Picks

Dec 19, 2013
by Mike Levy  
DMR Vault Brendog pedals

DMR has long been known for their V8 and V12 platform pedals that use a traditional BMX-esque design, but the debut of the much more contemporary Vault pedals a few seasons ago might just shift the spotlight. The Vaults are assembled around a decent sized 105 x 115mm platform that measures in at 17mm thick - not the thinnest out there, but certainly nothing to shrug at either. The footbed features a slight concave shape that works to keep your kicks in place, and eleven pins per side also help in that cause. Seven of those pins thread in from the opposite side and feature a wide, supportive shoulder that should go a long ways to keeping them in place, while the remaining four are shorter studs that thread into the face but use the same wide shoulder design. The Brendog version shown here also includes a set of much more aggressive 'moto' pins that can be swapped into place in order to further improve grip. The pedal bodies rotate on a DU bushing and sealed bearing combination, with a 4140 steel axle at the center of it all. Fairclough's signature pedals are only available in the stealthy black finish pictured here, and they weigh in at a reasonable 400 grams for the set. MSRP $150 USD www.dmrbikes.com

DMR pedals
  With some of the best reliability we've ever come across, and with decent traction to boot, the Vaults are a solid platform option for anyone considering a new set of pedals.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThere are loads of different platform pedal options on the market, and anyone who has spent years riding a few different models can attest to how contrasting they can be when compared to each other. These days, many manufacturers seems to be putting a lot of effort towards building the thinnest possible pedal, and we have to admit that it's something that we've put quite a bit of emphasis on here at Pinkbike as well. After all, a properly designed thin pedal can cut down on the frequency and severity of those dreaded pedal strikes, which has to be a good thing given that it has to be one of the worst ways to get taken to the ground. Trouble is, reliability often suffers as the pedal body height shrinks due to the bearings and bushings also having to shrink in size. It's for this reason that we've become such big fans of DMR's Vault pedal, and especially Fairclough's signature model that's pictured here, with their middle of the road 17mm height, burly axles, and reliable bushing and bearing combo proving to stand the test of time with nary a hint of trouble. Their height and internal specs aren't anything special, mind you, with many other pedals out there using very similar setups, but the Vaults have outlasted them all regardless of the similarities. And given that our timeframe begins at the start of last summer and runs until these words have gone live, with terrain including everything from time in the Whistler Bike Park to thousands of wet cross-country miles (they look well used in the photo above, don't they?), we feel justified in being impressed with the lack of bearing play and straight axles. The sturdy pin interface, with most of them threading in from the opposite side and featuring larger diameter shoulders for support, has also stood the test of time. In total, we've managed to knock two pins on the same corner out, both during the same incident, and they were easily replaced, as the threads in the pedal body weren't damaged, as well as a single pin that worked itself out on the trailing edge.

It's all well and good that they didn't fall apart on us - that's always a great thing - but what about the traction? That's also pretty darn good, with a solid amount of grip that never left us asking for more, even in wet and muddy conditions. This was also with the standard pins installed in the stock layout, with the four stubbier pins at the center of the body and the longer pins on the leading and trailing edges. The decent sized 105 x 115mm body size certainly plays a part in this, with a good amount of support spread over more real estate than some others making for a confidence inspiring feel. They aren't the outright kings of traction, though, especially when compared to a pedal design that combines more surface area with thinner pins that can penetrate deeper into the soles of your riding shoes, but they have become some of our favourite pedals regardless. And while $150 USD isn't inexpensive by any stretch of the imagination, there are all sorts of pedal options on the market that cost more, sport less traction, and offer less reliability in the long run. - Mike Levy





Lizard Skin DSP grips

Given that lock-on grips are so convenient and obviously rule the roost right now, Lizard Skins' brand new DSP non-locking grips is a product that certainly mystified some riders when we first showed them a few months ago. After all, why would anyone ever run non-locking grips? Lizard Skins claims that comfort and durability set the DSP grips apart, and they make the point that many of the current ultra-thin locking grips out there are nothing more than a wispy coating of rubber over a rock hard plastic barrel, a fusion that can sometimes feel a bit unforgiving. Their DSP grips are made from two different components, with a foam base layer that works to absorb vibrations, and their grippy DuraSoft Polymer as an outer contact layer. In order to prevent the dreaded throttle grip from occurring, a sticky "feather-lite lock tape" is used, although that does mean that you'll have to cut the grips off when the time comes to swap them out. Is that such a big deal now that the large majority of our controls attach via split or hinged clamps? That's for you to decide, but Lizard Skins believes that some riders are ready to put comfort and durability ahead of convenience now that grips don't have to be removed when changing brakes or shifters. They offer the DSP grips in two different diameters - 30.3mm (tested here) and 32.3mm - and both measure in at 130mm long. Attention all weight weenies: the thinner diameter shown here weighs just 27 grams per set, and the thicker only 30 grams, and those weights include the plugs and double sided mounting tape as well. You can choose from eight different colours options, and the MSRP is $30.00 USD www.lizardskins.com

Lizard Skins DSP grips
  Ultra-thin and ultra-light, but not nearly as forgiving as we were hoping for, the DSPs are only for those who demand the slimmest feeling grips available.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesOne point to keep in mind is that the design of the these grips, which puts thinness above installation convenience, means that the DSPs are never going to be as straight forward to install or remove as a pair of lock-on grips, although it is far from being a challenging operation. Take a few minutes to clean the bar properly, then apply the double-sided tape with a bit of overhang as per the instructions, and finally give it a spray of Windex before sliding the grip in place, with it taking a bit of muscle to rotate each onto the bar. The grip will mostly dry into place within ten minutes or so, giving you more than enough time to get it in the right spot before that happens. The DSP grips feel incredibly thin once you've wrapped your hands around them, and although there are lock-on options that are very similar in thickness (ODI's TLD Signature grips measure 29.7mm, for example), the DSP grips simply feel thinner. We're putting this down to the lack of a plastic barrel underneath the grip material that lock-on options must use, thereby allowing the DuraSoft Polymer material to compress more than the rubber used by the competition. While they feel noticeably thinner, they are also noticeably harsher on the hands after a long day in the saddle, and we even had a few extra calluses after the first week of using them. Were we just not used to DSPs? Maybe, but we're often using different grips on test bikes and almost never get off them with sore hands. It's also worth noting that the ends of the DSP grips will become chewed up pretty quickly if you lose a bar plug like we did, since they are not protected by a metal collar as with many lock-on options. Removing them is quite easy, only requiring a sharp knife and some common sense to not cut too deeply and damage your carbon handlebar, but you'll obviously not be slipping them off to use on another bike - peeling them off means purchasing new grips. Foibles aside, the DSP grips are extremely light, weighing in at just 27 grams for the set, including tape and bar plugs. Compare that to 116 grams for ODI's TLD Signature grips of similar thickness and you'll begin to see that the DSP grips will likely become popular among the gram counters out there. And although their 30.3mm advertised thickness is in the same ballpark as the thinnest lock-on grips on the market, they really do feel noticeably thinner when you actually use them. Due to them not being the comfiest things out there, the DSPs might not the best option for those who spend weeks on end shredding their local lift accessed bike park, but they are certainly worth checking out if you prefer the thinnest feeling grips on the market. - Mike Levy





KS LEV Integra dropper seat post

KS' dropper seat post lineup includes the LEV and Supernatural series, with the both aftermarket LEV models utilizing a stationary cable placement that counts for so many points in many riders' minds. But while the standard LEV routes its actuation cable into a small extension located at the outer tube's threaded collar, the Integra makes use of internal frame routing that sees its cable feed right up into the bottom of the post. This means that you'll need a frame that works with such a setup - it's not a super familiar design yet but something that is certainly becoming more common in recent times. There are three versions of the Integra, with riders able to choose from 100, 125, and 150mm travel options, and each variation can be had in both 30.9 and 31.6mm diameters. Sorry, no 27.2mm version due to size constraints and oil displacement requirements. Internally, the Integra, as well as KS' other dropper posts, uses a hydraulic design that allows it to be adjusted infinitely within its travel - you can position it anywhere between fully dropped and full height, and an adjustable air spring (the valve is located at the top of the posts' head) acts to raise the post. Inside, you'll find a clever, one-way self adjusting bearing system that lets the post cycle up and down freely, but keeps it from rotating sideways, and the design eliminates the need for a keyway layout that is found within most other dropper posts. Not to be overlooked, KS' pint sized remote is a thumb operated unit that is mounted up against your grip, on either the left or right side, and takes up very little space on the bar. Somewhat strangely, it's not hinged or split like the very large majority of seat post remotes out there. The Integra weighs between 500 - 570 grams depending on the model, and the MSRP is $429 USD. www.kindshock.com

KS Lev Integra review test
  The LEV Integra is so close to being awesome but ends up being thwarted by its dependency on housing tension to function well.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThere is a hell of a lot to like about the LEV Integra, with it ticking pretty much every box that most consumers deem as requirements of a dropper post except one (more on that later). Its internal routing, while requiring a bike that accepts an internal cable path (or enough confidence to adapt your own bike to do the same), means that there shouldn't ever be any fussing with zip-ties to keep its housing's slack from flailing about when the seat is lowered. And the internal routing also surely helps to keep dirt and grime from contaminating the cable and preventing it from moving smoothly in the long run. It isn't just the post's protected cable that moves with little effort, though, as the post itself is impossibly smooth throughout its travel, enough so that it makes other designs feel like they've been stored in your local swimming hole for a few months. Rebound speed is decently quick as well but not nearly as fast as the return action of a D.O.S.S. or Command Post BlackLite, although we admit to probably being in the minority for preferring the ultra-fast rebound and loud top-out clunk (it's clear when the seat is all the way up) of those two aforementioned options. One point where the Integra wins hands down is when talking about its 150mm of travel, 25mm more than most, but not all, of the dropper post options. That extra 25mm might not sound like much, but it was greatly appreciated once we got used to it and had to go back to a 125mm or, heaven forbid, a 100mm travel post. Our view is that you're taking a weight penalty compared to a traditional seat post, so why not make the most of it? The Integra's 150mm of drop was enough that we never once found ourselves wishing for a lower seat height, regardless of how steep the trail or how big the gap. Isn't that exactly what a dropper post should do for you? A good dropper post should also be easy to put into action so that you use it a lot and take full advantage of its benefits, and the Integra's remote allows for exactly that. Its grip-side thumb button remote is, along with the similar remote employed by the BlackLite, the absolute best out there right now - get the angle correct relative to your hand position and you'll find it very intuitive, allowing you to hit it at a moment's notice if something surprises you when riding a new trail blind. The remote isn't perfect, though, as we'd like to see it use a hinged or split clamp for convenience sake. KS might have a good reason for not doing so, but we'd far prefer to see a bit of extra material where required to make that happen.

It's not all praise with the Integra, though, as our test post proved to be quite unreliable, costing us a handful of good rides when it decided that it didn't want to play nice. The issue boils down to a design that depends on housing tension as opposed to cable tension to operate, a finicky setup that proved to be worthy of a few angry trail-side moments on our part. Removing the Integra from the frame reveals that the housing terminates an a small spring loaded arm, with the cable passing through and being anchored in a stationary position on the post itself. When you push on the remote, you're actually compressing the housing towards the seat post due to the cable being held in place at both ends, which is the opposite of how other dropper posts, shifters, and cable operated brakes function. The problem arises when the post's housing changes in tension, which can happen pretty easily due to it being zip-tied to the frame after it exits the bike's housing port, which is often found low on the seat tube. A tug on the housing, maybe from something as small as a crash rotating your bars around, and the Integra is suddenly out of commission, with the seat either stuck in place or free to move up and down through its travel even though you're not pushing on the remote. And god forbid you need to change your seat hight slightly, a move that sends your properly tensioned setup out the window. Yes, we ended up sorting the issue out a few times by tinkering with the barrel adjuster at the remote and by either feeding more housing into or out of the entry port on the seat tube, and some of the blame should also fall on the frame's routing, but there were multiple times that the Integra simply refused to work after such an incident, which is unacceptable for a $429 USD seat post, as well as being a real shame given that it has a lot going for it besides this issue. Now that we've harped on about this it, there is word that KS is likely working on a revamped actuation system for the Integra that might take care of our single, albeit major, complaint. If true, the updated Integra could have the same game changing impact as their original i950r did when it was first released. - Mike Levy





123 Comments

  • 40 7
 Lizard Skins are the solution to the problem nobody has. This is an example of a product that is aimed at helping the company sell more grips, while doing absolutely NOTHING for the rider. If you want slim and lightweight, just grab a set of ESI silicone Racers Edge grips (48gms and ultra low profile). They go on (and off, and on again, I've done it) with rubbing alcohol, and provide a nice secure and nicely damped connection with the bar. Sometimes I just shake my head at the junk people try to sell me.
  • 2 0
 Yeah i was gonna say this exact same thing. My Spank Tugg-jobs go on easy enough with rubbing alcohol, wire em on and even spray a bit of Axe i got layin around on there as added security. Never had throttle grip, way less of a chattery feeling compared to lock ons (imo) and fit my hand much better (this is on my dh bike dunno how they'd work for dj/street). They cost me like 16$ and i dont have to sand the damn things off the bars when i need new ones
  • 3 0
 but spraying the axe takes away from their fruity scent! I had the tugg jobs for a while but couldn't get them to stop slipping even with spray on adhesive, I guess wiring them on is the way to go.
  • 2 0
 I've got the black unscented ones and yeah i had the same problem till i busted out the axe (or hairspray, old Lacrosse trick) and safety wire. on another note the end caps f***kin suck had to replace them with steel washers
  • 1 0
 sensus grips are super tacky underneath. no slip at all which is amazing considering there just slide ones. but if you want a super slip grip you lose it there...
  • 3 0
 I have a set of lizardskins lock ons, and they're very good. Very long life and quite confortable as well, as well as being decently thin. Would recommend.
  • 3 0
 I wouldn't mind trying the slightly thicker lizard skin grip... as pinkbike is bitching they arnt comfy.... you got the tinyy ones if your looking for comfort you got the wrong model boys... just saying try both before saying they suck
  • 5 3
 I strongly disagree. I got to play around with the grips at InterBike and I was quite impressed. At first the thought of a foam grip raised some red flags, after messing around with some, I would definitely consider using for my next grips. Maybe you ought to actually see them before mouthing off about shit you don't know...
  • 2 0
 isopropyl alcohol

spray that on the bars and slide - whatever grips - on the bars with no effort at all.
not sure about carbon bars and isopropyl alcohol but never had any isues with alloy ones. also works for getting them off and the isopropyl alcohol does not harm the surface/paint etc.
  • 2 1
 I've bought a million grips in the last 25+ years and have just spent a pair of $5.00 MEC Basic Slip On grips. Granted I've got access to an air compressor (but yeah, Iso works too) so the grips go off and on 5 seconds, don't slip and have plenty of grip. Makes me wonder how much money I've wasted on gimmicky grips over the years.
  • 4 4
 mec is soo hurt ^ support local shops
  • 2 0
 +1 on ESI foam grips. Very nice light commfy and non locking. I like big fat grips. They are eaiser to grip after spraining a thumb on the trail.
  • 1 0
 After years of lock-ons i returned to normail grips with a pair of 10$ odi longnecks .. used hairspray to put on for slip and stick ... the best deal i did in years ...
Lightweight ?? Grips ?? Really ??
  • 3 0
 ODI Rogue lock-ons. Period.
  • 1 0
 ESI are utter garbage. drop your bike or wipe out and the foam is destroyed. meaning, trashed. replacement volume is about 10x per season if you ride hard and push yourself. if you're a slow poke or just ride around at 2km/hour cool beans have at it
  • 25 1
 Light grips? Really? What is this world coming to? If you think your grips are too heavy just wear thinner socks.
  • 4 5
 I don't much care about weight but this is a stupid argument. 100 grams isn't much, but it all adds up and if I was trying to build up a light xc bike I would rather save weight somewhere that compromises neither performance or strenght. Doesn't sound like these are very comfy, but I just put a new pair of regular old grips on the commuter bike and they're noticeably cushier than the lock ons I've used on the mtbs so I'd be down to try them-light weight is just a bonus. The grips reviewed seem a bit ritch compared to other options but I'd be stoked on a cheaper option that stayed put as well as lock ons.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, mostly for XC racers. Saving 100 grams 4 times is almost 1 pound, though. If you weight weenie all the parts in your bike, you can save a lot a weight which makes a big difference for XC racing. Also, it is the psychological factor. If you think that it will make your bike faster then it will. For example, if riding a brutal up hill ride and you are thinking "how heavy my bike feels" rather than "how light my bike feels" makes the world of difference in how positively you pedal and how much more you are willing to push yourself. Mind over matter makes a difference.
  • 1 0
 Bontrager Rhythm Plus grips. I love these grips, wide and comfy. But the rubber isn't so soft that it has play in it. Even pretty comfy bare handed.

bontrager.com/model/11260
  • 9 0
 Please review (or perhaps you have and I'm just clueless - in which case suggest?) some chunky grips. It seems all I stumble on here on PB are skinny grips. I used to run a pair of raceface strafe grips, and they were awesome. Does anyone else make chunky-ass grips like that?

Also, just got a pair of DMR Vaults on my new ride - sooo great.
  • 10 0
 ODI Rogues are pretty big. They seem to last forever, too.
  • 3 0
 I run Rogues on every one of my bikes and I love them. But I recently grabbed a set of Oury grips for my fiance's bike and I might be making the switch... They're just as chunky, a little softer, they come in more colors, and they have the little groove out towards the end that gives you a little bit of a better feel of where you are on your bar.
  • 1 0
 The problem with Ourys is that they are not wide, enough. Your ability to "throttle" comes mainly from the thumb and index finger, and on Ourys that part is the smaller diameter portion and not the nice, thick, block pad area. If they were 10mm wider I'd love them.
  • 2 0
 I run those North Shore grips. Nice chunky big blocks. Rubber is soft. Wears nicely but I've ripped a couple chunks out of them from bad spills (bike falling off of bike rack type spills). I don't notice any loss of grip or feel with the chunks ripped out. 5 outa 5 product IMO, if you have big hands.
  • 1 0
 I have small hands and I dig the big grips such as odi rogues or the oury. They're meaty so more cosy in the rough stuff and the pressure on your palms is distributed more evenly so less uncomfortable pressure points. Bigger grips are also harder to hold so you build up more endurance and it makes arm pump a thing of the past.
  • 1 0
 Check out the odi sdg hansolo grips. They're pretty thick, have really good grip, and are pretty comfy. I've ridden mine a decent amount and they seem to wear pretty well.
www.jensonusa.com/!qRd2FqSEIGh7EiIXDwv!nA!/SDG-Lock-On-Grips-By-Odi?utm_source=FRGL&utm_medium=organic&gclid=CJqV9cnhwrsCFUZqfgodNAIAKA
  • 1 0
 Raceface still makes chunky grips! Check out to Good N Evils.
  • 1 0
 The Oury grips are superb, They use ODI clamps, Made in the USA too!
  • 1 0
 Thanks all!
  • 6 0
 Glad to know about the KS Lev flaw, good thing the non-integra version doesn't have this same problem. So for now if you are buying one, just get the regular version and consider yourself a champ for buying the best dropper out there. That being said I love the three positions that my command post has, if it had a fixed cable and two bolts for the seat instead of one, I would be in heaven.
  • 1 0
 had a regular version for a year now, no issues what so ever...
  • 2 1
 No problems with my LEV either, but it does need perfect cable installation which takes some patience, never had the issues mentioned in this review. And the remote is hinged by the way. Just loosen the gold anodized parts and it will hinge, I'm afraid Mike Levy missed that.
  • 3 1
 @Nobility - Our remote most definitely isn't hinged and can't be installed without removing the grip.
  • 1 0
 My KS LEV has been good, although still fresh. The only tricky installation issue for me was ensuring that the little round cylindrical grommet at the end was installed and encouraged to sit exactly perpendicular to the post itself. Initially it was rotated after install about as little as 20 degrees, and then this adds a wee amount of actuation to the hydraulic assembly, making it impossible to get the cable tension right, or for the post to operate properly. I used a pick and it took less than a second during re-install to do this. Now it runs flawless. You do have to find the sweet spot on cable tension with the barrel adjuster still. About an 1/8th of slack.
  • 1 0
 Thanks as well for the review of the LEV Integra and mentioning the flaw with cable tension/catching in frame. Although, not as bad from the sounds of it when mounted externally, but this is why I ditched the cable actuation altogether and just run my KS Supernatural with lever actuation instead. The lever is far less finicky and get more consistent performance with the post. The only time I miss the remote is riding at places with lots of short steep, techy up/downs like at Sedona. In the NW, it works great and not a big deal to briefly take the hand off the bar to actuate and not having the cable up front on the bars is bonus as well! Down to three cables up front and love it for jumping and overall cockpit bike control with less drag with turning radius'.
  • 3 0
 I have a Lev Integra and have run into the EXACT same problems as Levy.

To say i am disappointed is a MASSIVE understatement. I have tweaked my setup to force it to work, but the design of the cable actuation is 100% wrong. KS has the housing move rather than the cable. It is a simple fix for KS, and if you were to ask 99.9% of LEV Integra owners we would all agree KS should stop shipping the current LEV Integra and fix their actuator.

I admit that my comments are rather negative, but who ever gave the thumbs up to producing this incarnation of the post with this actuator probably wasn't given all the correct info.

I've been silent since I bought my LEV Intergra but tried contacting KS to see if there was a fix. Email sent and no reply back. Phone call made and nobody answered.

I had hoped my LEV Integra would be a good purchase based on the raving reviews I've seen of all their products, but in this case I have been let down in almost every way. KS needs to man up, take ownership of this design failure and PUBLICLY let people know what they are doing for future LEV Integra owners a what they can offer to current owners of the LEV Integra.
  • 1 0
 Same issue here, loved post but it far from perfect. The housing tensions seems to be very temperamental, just did a re-route yesterday using different housing which seems to have improved things. Another fairly common issue with these which hasn't been mentioned yet is that a lot of people seem to lose the first 10-20mm of travel just by sitting on the saddle. This issue is not related to the housing or cable tension, and seems to be a seal issue. I've had mine for 2 months and it was great from the start but now compresses around 20mm when I sit and pedal. I got mine from eBay so I just have to live with it, if you're thinking of buying one (or any other dropper post for that matter) I think this is an occasion when you need to buy direct from the dealer. Seems any brand you get WILL have problems and you are going to need the support of your LBS to solve the issue when they arise.

Re: Remote, pretty sure that if you get an OEM version the remote is not hinged. The aftermarket version is both hinged and can also be used to replace one of the bar grip clamps (ODI compatible) which is pretty hand and not mentioned in the review here.
  • 1 0
 1) Glad to see this review of the LEV Integra. I purchased and installed it, found this issue, removed the post & returned it to Competitive Cyclist without riding it. It's really just a boneheaded design. which is quite frustrating. Did they never actually install & test this before putting it into production??

2) @rollingrevolution, I had the same issue with my standard LEV, and I know of many folks who have as well. The post basically turns into a suspension post, i.e. it drops 10-20mm when you sit on it, then springs back up when unweighted. FWIW, I've seen several complaints of this issue arising when using the post in sub-freezing temps, though not sure when this is the case.

I'm currently running a Thomson, fingers crossed!
  • 10 1
 So maaaachhh moneyyyy
  • 4 0
 I had the same issue with my lev integra. I ended up rotating the post from the factory position and it solved it. Haven't had the problem since. A few crashes and one super gnarly one and I haven't had any problems with it.
  • 1 0
 What's the "factory position", if you don't mind my asking?
  • 1 0
 I believe they ship with the height/cable measuring gauge writing on the back of the post. I rotated the head of my post 180 degrees. Depending on where your cable routing goes it might be better to run it somewhere in the middle but it's def worth a shot if your having problems.
  • 1 0
 tpersons- You're the man!
  • 1 0
 Did that work out for you?
  • 1 0
 I haven't been able to try it out yet sadly, but I'm going to test it out and let you know. You're being very helpful!
  • 1 0
 Ahh got it. Well good luck. Hopefully it does
  • 9 2
 I'll buy anything Brendog uses!
  • 30 2
 Except for his underwear, I hope.
  • 4 3
 Those pedals do look quite nifty ehh
  • 6 0
 i have been riding the vaults for about a year now, consistently every ride. thru the snow, rain, dust, mud, and everything in between. they have held up and feel the exact same after no mantinece and 2500 miles. i bought these petals for dirt jumping and they were on my trail bike one day and i was to lazy to change them. from that day forth they have been on that and i never switched back to clip less. these are the petals that made me ride flats for the rest of my life.now when i say this i have never had any other flat petal of similar quality but there is no way it can get much better than this. the only issue i have is they go thru shoes and in to your foot in about 2500 miles. the shoes were toast anyway tho.
  • 5 2
 Apart from the quality of the pedals, a pro rider can go pro using anything almost, and buying a product that is used by some pro rider for some reason, won't make anybody a professional or even any tiniest bit closer. It will only make a wallet lighter, producer richer and the pro rider more sponsored and more pro. But my point won't change anything anyway.
  • 2 1
 most of us are well aware of that. point is vaults seem to be great pedals, and if you want to spend a bit more for the signature model either coz it's Brendog or coz it's stealthy blk, then so be it.
  • 4 0
 I've had the Vault for a year now and they have been great so far. Reliable, grippy, with a nice and wide platform. I find a lot off pedals feel too tiny under my size 13 5-10 impacts!
  • 2 0
 Same here, Size 13 5-10 shoes and Vaults have been my favorite combination ever.
  • 1 0
 Only size 9.5 fivetens with vaults if I had the money, I'd get another pair for my dirt jump bike.
  • 1 0
 big fan of DMR and sold 100s of pairs of V-8 and V-12 pedals, and many of their wheels, tires, DJ frames, stems, seats, bars, etc.

but sold a good number of Vaults and saw them quickly come back with pedal body failure after moderate impact that other pedals would shrug off?

perhaps too little material for the large size of the pedal platform? (they are huge but not very heavy!)

they look awesome and are super grippy, but from my customers experiences I don't know if I could pay that much money for pedals prone to early failure

I'm using Nuke Proof pedals which were 1/2 the price of the vaults, similar shape but heavier and no issues after 2 years of abuse
  • 1 0
 Reading the comments, body failure does seem to be a problem for some people. I had several good hit that left some scars on them, including a nasty one at high speed that broke a few pins and sent me flying down the trail, resulting in a separated shoulder. They look like the ones in the review now, but they still work like when they came out of the box. Pedals are your main contact point on the bike and a good set makes a big difference when thing get rowdy on the trail. That said, I haven't tried all the pedals on the market and I'm sure there are some very good ones for less money. I bought these for the platform size (I think they used to be slightly larger at 115x115mm) and because they were half price online.
  • 2 0
 Vaults are the most amazing pedal that has ever existed, they are ridiculously comfortable and so much grip. It's almost impossible to find a position on them that isn't awesome feeling.
  • 3 1
 too bad i bent both of mine after 3 weeks of getting them. in one crash
  • 1 0
 Both in one crash? How did you manage to do both sides at once?
  • 2 0
 Overshoot or case?
  • 2 6
flag Dorinfarley (Dec 19, 2013 at 20:08) (Below Threshold)
 Neither, I clipped a rock in a race and all I know is I went otb and my bike went end over end into a rock garden off the side of the track. I went to try to get return them to dmr since they were so new but they wouldn't answer and emails or phone calls. They essentially said F off it's your problem. Terrible customer service.
  • 4 1
 It's only metal, bro. What do you expect?

My buddy has vaults. No issues. The platform seems pretty big compared to my VP pedals.
  • 1 0
 They're good pedals and I was bummed they broke but what can you do. What made me upset was the terrible customer service from dmr
  • 1 0
 Not doubting the awesomeness of those pedals, but at half the price, you can get a set of Wah Wahs...?
  • 2 0
 I'm sriously supprised at that customer service from them. I dealt with martin gibbs when looking for some 20mm cups for a front hub. He sent me some and asked if i would send some sweets for the warehouse guys as a gesture of good will. I did that and they then sent me a dmr beanie hat. I could never have asked for a better service and that was with no currency exchanged.
  • 1 0
 Got three sets of Vaults now, on different bikes, including the Brendogs - love them, the concave shape is brilliant, they grip brilliantly, and they spin for pedalling - ditched Straitlines and Point Ones 'cos I prefer these. As for customer service, only problem I had was rounding off one of the end caps when I forgot it was reverse threaded. DMR answered my email same day, and sent me two replacement caps free of charge. They're good people.
  • 1 0
 I guess they just don't like Americans because I never got a return email or anything
  • 1 0
 I have a KS-Lev, it's just over 2 months old, it's currently back with KS for a warranty repair, they have already had it for 3 weeks and I've been told that I won't be getting it back before the end of the year.

My issue is that the seat post kept dropping around an inch when it was sat on, not so good for a £350 seat post!
  • 1 0
 Same exact issue here, mines about 8 months old and has been in warranty for about a month with no answers as to when I might get it back. Frustrating.
  • 1 0
 Just as a counter experience, I've had my i950r for two years, no problems.
  • 1 0
 What is it with Skinny grips? I hate the way they feel, the Race Face Strafe's are the dogs cogs nice and chunky and tacky as hell to boot. The chatter you get & achy hands with the small grips is crap. Although $170 for a pair of pedals is on the steep side Specialized Lo Pro's do the trick for me and are still true after plenty of pedal strikes & missing pins.
  • 1 0
 The pedals, now that I've gone back to flats seem like the perfect pedal. The post. I've had the second generation Giant dropper post since August and besides needing a little extra clamping force, has worked flawlessly and at a price point that few seem to be able to match. Makes me wonder why I would drop double the money for something that is of the same or worse quality and reliability. The LEVs are awesome on paper but they need to be better in the real world. The good thing is, most parts manufacturers need to keep improving products to keep their business going so things will most likely only get better. At least thats my hope.
  • 1 0
 Same here on the Giant dropper I wrote off the first one but the replacent is brilliant
  • 1 0
 Just spoke with someone at KS yesterday, he said there were no issues with the Integra and they have no changes or updates in the works for 2014. Also disappointing to find out you can't change the remote to their anodized options shown on the website, which seemed like a really cool option. Overall, I wasn't impressed with the phone call and am on the fence about investing in one of their dropper posts.
  • 1 0
 Same issues with KS Lev post dropping about 10-20 mm every time i put wait on it, increased to max pressure and it still drops down. Valve is also a pain in the ass to access as you have to remove the seat, and a seat install in one of my least favorite tasks. The post has about 200 miles on it, wasn't expecting to have issues right away. Thinking about switching back to the Reverb, KS Lev came with my Carbon Patrol.
  • 3 0
 DMR pedals were made so that you do not have to worry about taking care of your pedals to be nice and look new
  • 1 1
 Unless I missed it in the text somewhere., reading "This means that you'll need a frame that works with such a setup" in the first part and "...and some of the blame should also fall on the frame's routing..." makes me wonder what frame you did test the KS Lev Integra on?
  • 1 0
 i think the point is, frames that were designed for and will work with other stealth posts, like the Reverb, might have trouble with a KS post. Trek bikes come to mind...
  • 3 0
 Just bought that Integra. Now I'm a little worried...
  • 1 0
 contact the guys in the USA, Rick and Ron are great guys. and look at "tpersons" comment
  • 2 0
 Pedals $150 .. seatpost 430$ .. grips 30$ ... are we goin crazy ... ???????
  • 8 7
 $150 for some pedals? WTF? is spending that much really gonna improve my experience: NO
  • 4 2
 ..it actually does. And you can find these pedals for $110 at bike shops ALL DAY LONG (or the internet) get em in red! haha
  • 5 2
 I hear ya but in the bike world, $150 for some quality pedals that will last a good long time isn't that big a deal. good pedals can outlast almost everything else on a bike. $30 for some grips is more of a travesty.
  • 1 2
 you =can get a suuuper nice and thin profile grippy as hell HT pedal for $100 and they are the pimpest pedals ever made IMO

www.hti-pedals.com/ht_portal/front/homepage

check em out...

if they made food, I would eat it.
  • 3 0
 sorry dude..DMR's are wayyy better. They feel for solid on gnar rocks and hard/fast corners. It's subtle, but DMR vaults are better
  • 1 1
 crc : nice set of Nukeproof for 44$ ou saint for 55$!
  • 2 0
 Pedals are one of those things that just need to figure out what you want in term of shape and pin placement and then buy whatever is on sale and fits those criteria. I don't give a sh*t about weight and how pimp they look, it's all about function. I tried several cheap models thinking it was all the same, but since I got the Vaults, I have to admit a good set of pedals makes a difference.
  • 1 0
 Can't fault my 70$ DMR V12 and they're been through hell and back with huge stress loads, crashes and hundreds of strikes. My nearly pristine 200$ straitline AMP already have some play, some squeaking and a slightly bent cromo axle from god knows where after very light use (haven't rode them much, no significant strike or crash either and I'm a featherweight)... Can't say I'm impressed. I don't think I'll ever spend over 100$ again for pedals when the performance/feel difference is mostly insignificant.

Most likely going to give a go to HT or superstar next time. The saints are also priced ridiculously low these days, I'd try those too.
  • 1 0
 good set of DMR vault pedals makes a difference.
  • 2 4
 I really don't follow why you need more than 100mm of drop in the real world. Before dropper posts were about, you'd only lower your saddle a couple of inches for anything downhill, it's not hard to get off the back. But 150mm???? Your knees end up around your ears FFS!!!
  • 3 0
 I think you are missing the point , when you run your seat lowered you will be standing as you should be riding rough , aggressive terrain where you need the ball clearance.
  • 1 5
flag Zziplex (Dec 20, 2013 at 1:57) (Below Threshold)
 Sorry mate, but my bawbag isn't 150mm. If you can't move about your bike with a 100mm drop, then you need to see a Dr. How do you think they've coped for the past 20 years?? XC riders seem to manage with zero drop, how many DH riders are running dropper posts?
  • 2 0
 "how many DH riders are running dropper posts?" Dropper posts are mainly aimed at AM and Enduro riding!
  • 4 0
 I still only have a rigid seatpost, but when I change my seat height It's either right at the top or as far down as it would go. I haven't measured it but I'd have said it was about 150mm, I ride all mountain so the saddle needs to be high for the climbs, but then the descents are the fun bit and I don't want a saddle getting in the way when I'm trying to get low on the bike for a corner, or trying to squash jumps or getting off the back of the bike for a sharp descent. I could make do with a higher saddle, but it wouldn't be as fun, and that's what biking is all about (for me at least).
  • 2 0
 "XC riders seem to manage with zero drop, how many DH riders are running dropper posts?"

That's like saying "Roadies seem to manage with no front or rear shocks, how many beach cruisers are running front and rear shocks?"

Once again - dropdowns are mainly for AM/Enduro, where you need the seat low on the down and high on the long pedals up. XC riders usually stay in the saddle for most of the ride, and they don't normally hit the bigger obstacles/drops that AM/Trail/Enduro does. Likewise, DH riders don't have to worry about pedaling uphill at all so they wouldn't need to raise their seatpost up.

And yours may not be, but what if my "bawbag" is 150mm?

=D
  • 2 2
 You can get some solid Wellgo pedals with a very similar profile for a whole lot less and they will function just as well.
  • 1 0
 ...I wish the dropper came in 30.0...
  • 1 1
 I tried DMR pedals years ago and the axles bent so quick I swore them off forever. So I don't see the durability high lite
  • 1 0
 these seem more like product placement ads more than reviews of products.
  • 3 0
 How so? The DMR pedal review was obviously quite positive, but they are very good pedals. The words on the grips and the seat post are rather critical, especially on the LEV: ''...Integra simply refused to work after such an incident, which is unacceptable for a $429 USD seat post...''
  • 1 0
 150 for pedals? ha
  • 1 1
 My comment got deleted, it obviously touched a nerve LMAO
  • 1 0
 It didn't get deleted (we almost never delete anything), but it was automatically moved to the 'below threshold' section that is at the bottom of all of these comments. This is because other users negative propped it past a certain point, which moves it automatically =)
  • 2 5
 Can't you pick something different? Ie not a flat pedal that everyone knows is good, or a dropper and some useless skinny grips?

Wheres the innovation PB?
  • 5 0
 Maybe give me a call and let me know the exact products that YOU would like to see tested, because it's obvious that everyone is only looking for feedback on components that you're considering. That'd be a huge help, thanks.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the reply, look it wasn't meant to sound that way and I apologise if you or the site took offence by it. I enjoy this site and have fond for many years, saying that though personally I would like to see something like a product pick on forks, suspension, or wheels that may of evolved and used more new technologies than these already long in the tooth products. As stated no offence meant and apologies if you took it that way but this site has been so focused on pushing the next big thing all the while ie 27.5 / 650b and enduro it seems a cop out to pedal this at us.

Thanks and have a nice break
  • 1 0
 Mike Levy seems like a real cool dude. A work horse. He writes so many articles/reviews and still has time to answer everyone's comments.
  • 1 1
 Sorry sewer rat too many of those products are manufactured by their sponsors. They can't review those, they can only tell you how great those products are, it's how the site makes $$$.
  • 2 3
 Seems a bit late ehh?
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