Pinkbike Product Picks

Feb 10, 2012
by Mike Levy  
Sombrio Nimble knee warmers

Sombrio is well known for their lineup of jerseys, shorts, jackets, and gloves, but if you scroll to the very bottom of the product page on their website you'll find an often overlooked article of clothing: the Nimble knee warmers. The Nimble knee warmers are manufactured from a combination of 4-way stretch polyester and spandex, and feature a form fitting cut that is right and left leg specific. While knee warmers are certainly not the most exciting piece of kit to have in your closet, there are still a few details that can make all the difference in the world. One of those details is the Nimble's flatlock seams, a type of stitching that creates a flat seam that is much less obtrusive than a standard joint. Sombrio has also employed an elastic gripper strip on the thigh to keep them from migrating down the leg during pedalling, a key ingredient if you've ever had to constantly pull up a pair of knee warmers during a long ride. The Nimble knee warmers come in small, medium, and large sizes, and only the black color shown below. They retail for $35.00 USD. www.sombriocartel.com


Product Picks
Cold out? Sombrio's Nimble knee warmers are a great way to keep the heat in on those cold days.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThink knee warmers are just for roadies and die hard XC riders? Think again. One key to staying warm and feeling comfortable during a ride in cold conditions is keeping your knees warm, a fact that is especially true for any riders who have knee issues and tend to stiffen up when the thermometer reading drops. Knee warmers, even thin versions like the Sombrio's tested here, add that extra bit of insulation that can make the difference between feeling chilly and feeling just right. The other benefit is added protection that, while not approaching what a proper pad set can offer, still provides defense against light abrasions. Are they going to save your knee cap in a worst case scenario? Not a chance in hell, but they might keep you from having to pick gravel out of it. My obvious love of knee warmers aside, the Nimble's are among the most comfortable that I've ever warn. The inside surface has a next-to-skin softness that even the most sensitive of riders won't be able to complain about, and the cut feels to be spot on for my legs - no extra material behind the knee, and a length that allows you to wear them high or low depending on the conditions. More importantly, the upper and lower openings seemed to be sized just right for the average leg, a major detail that many other offerings get oh so wrong. I also can't remember having to pull them up once, even on the longest of rides, a sign of a great fitting cut, but also that the elastic thigh gripper is working as advertised. There are many riders who pooh-pooh knee warmers and their roadie-esque appearance, but the added warmth and light duty protection make them ideal for many conditions. If I've managed to convince you of the benefits of wearing knee warmers, I would also wholeheartedly recommend giving the Sombrio Nimbles a try. - Mike Levy




Funkier Hawk short

Israeli apparel company Funkier may not yet be that well known in North America, but they offer a massive range that includes nearly anything and everything related to cycling clothing. New to that lineup is their Hawk short, a long option that will likely appeal to those riders who prefer more coverage than what an XC oriented short offers. The common drawback to such a long cut, though, is the extra heat retained that often make 3/4 shorts too hot for warm days. To remedy this, Funkier has constructed these shorts out of very thin and light 100% Nylon material, as well as designing in zippered vents on the front and large mesh panels behind the knees. The elastic waist features a drawstring if you need to snug them up (as well as belt loops, although we can't see many riders using these), and a zipper and button enclosure. While the Hawk short is quite baggy, they also employ Velcro straps at the bottom of each leg that allow you to reign them in a bit. There are pockets galore as well, including two in the back, two on the side, and two cargo pockets, all of them being zippered. The Hawk short can be had in both the grey color shown here or a black version, and they retail for $95 USD. www.funkierbikeusa.com


Product Picks
Funkier's Hawk short features a long cut, but are light and airy enough to be comfortable during a long day in the saddle.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesRight off the bat we were surprised at just how light the Hawk short actually is, feeling relatively invisible when compared to most shorts of the same length. Much of this is down to the very pliable nature of the Nylon fabric, nothing like the thicker (and also more protective) material that is used by most of the competition. The over-the-knee length, while certainly noticeable when compared to a more XC friendly option, wasn't bothersome. Again, much of this is down to the light Nylon fabric, but the cut is also done in a way that keeps the material from feeling tight over the knee when the pedal is at the 12 o'clock position. They also play nice with slim knee pads, being baggy enough to fit over them nicely without catching on the top of the pad, or even allowing you to tighten the Velcro down slightly to keep them from riding up. We came away impressed with how well they dealt with warm temps, feeling more like a slim XC short than a long, 3/4 length alternative. The behind the knee vents, something that we admittedly first took as a gimmick, actually seem to make quite a difference in keep the temps down, especially during slow climbs. The light fabric is also holding up quite well, with very little wear showing and all of the stitching still holding strong. What's not to like? There is just a bit too much material at the bum for our liking, and while we'll admit that it never once snagged on the seat, it still concerned us. The only other gripe comes down to the cargo pockets that, while nice when you are off the bike, are completely useless when in action. Even putting a single energy gel in one of them quickly makes for the annoying sensation of it flapping about wildly as you pedal. We'd recommend leaving them empty while in the saddle. There are less expensive shorts out there, but the Funkier Hawk short incorporates a light fabric and clever vents that make them a great choice for Summer shredding, no matter how long the ride. - Mike Levy




Park Tool threadless saw guide

Park Tool's threadless saw guide is designed to ensure that you always make a straight cut by sandwiching the blade between two steel plates encircling the steerer tube. Those plates are bolted into a composite body and clamp that holds the guide in place as you make the cut, with the inner plate extending down below the guide to allow you to clamp it into a vice (instead of having to clamp the steerer - not a good idea). It can be used on 1", 1-1/8", and 1-1/4" threadless forks, but you'll have to use the larger oversized saw guide if you are looking to shorten 1.5" steerer tubes. Different plates are available that allow you to precisely cut threaded steerers, or forks with carbon steerer tubes that should be trimmed with a carbon specific blade, if required. The Park Tool Threadless Saw Guide retails for $40 USD. www.parktool.com


Product Picks
Park Tool's threadless saw guide won't see as much use as many other tools, but it could prove to be invaluable when the time comes to trim a steerer.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe go through a lot of different forks here at Pinkbike, which means that Park Tool's saw guide sees quite a bit of action. Through all that use the guide has proven to be a very valuable item in our workshop, consistently allowing us to make perfectly straight cuts, even when rushing and giving the job less attention than it deserves. The two steel plates that guide the saw blade ensure that the job is nearly fool proof, as long as you've measured correctly (measure twice, cut once!), and the Nylon steerer tube clamp holds the fork's steerer tight enough that we have never had one shift during sawing. The guides vice clamping extension means that you don't have to clamp the fork's steerer in the vice, a move that is never recommended. As great as Park's saw guide is, it isn't perfect. While the Nylon steerer tube clamp is sturdy enough to keep the steerer from shifting as you cut, it needs to be tightened down extremely tight to provide enough support to properly hold a long dual crown fork without having a friend hold the opposite end. This probably won't be an issue for the average home mechanic that isn't cutting steerers that often, but bike shops might want to opt for the larger oversized saw guide from Park tool if it will be seeing that kind of action. A clever home mechanic could easily rig up a homemade saw guide of some sorts, but the threadless saw guide's $40 USD asking price is quite reasonable when you consider the job at hand. - Mike Levy






119 Comments

  • + 60
 Knee warmers? Just borrow some leggings off your little sister Wink
  • + 23
 Nylons don't really have the insulating effect of even the thinnest knee warmers. Not that I would know that from trying them...
  • + 26
 Don't lie Mike! We all know you dabble in the drag when nobody's looking ;D
  • + 6
 why not just wear pants?
  • + 9
 Just wear your Kyle Straits...
  • + 9
 I've used the saw guide on many occasions. Works great, but I only use it on steer tubes. I never cut my bars... Wink
  • + 4
 My mate could have done with one of those. I now have a wonkey steerer tube thanks to his shoddy sawing.
  • + 6
 Why not simply use a pipe cutter. a lot quicker than sawing through and gives a nice straight cut.
  • + 2
 ....can't use a pipe cutter on carbon fiber. Wink You just need to make sure you duct tape the part of the carbon bars or seat post you're keeping or you get splinters.

On aluminum, you are better off just using a pipe cutter still however.
  • + 1
 ^and cut really slowly

that guide has to be up there as one of the best park makes.
  • + 2
 Never thought of using a pipe cutter, thanks Smile
  • + 0
 too thick for a pipe cutter isn't it? I'm thinking of the small copper pipes mind..? and by thick I mean thickness of metal, not diameter.
  • + 1
 I wondered that to , gonna buy one (it was pay day yesterday Big Grin ) and try it Wink
  • + 2
 I have pipe cutter and have used it to cut steer tubes off of my Boxxer, and multiple 32's. Worked great and works extremely quickly. And by the nature of how it cuts always gives a great cut.
  • + 1
 I too use a pipe cutter, but be sure to take it REALLY slowly, otherwise you can damage whatever you're cutting.
  • + 0
 wow, fair enough. are we talking about this pipe cutter? really not sure on that! i40.tinypic.com/2111dnd.jpg
  • + 1
 exactly
  • + 1
 ah I see, got one of those as well. Nice one.
  • + 2
 +1 for pipe cutter, works great!
  • + 10
 None... Next!
  • + 2
 right!
  • + 5
 Dear Mr. Mike Levy, I really appreciate your articles, this one included. On a humoristic tone, I did find one part especially troubling or just damn funny. Will the leg warmers stop us from picking gravel out of Hell or ours knees? O'l Beelzebub is gonna be proper hot if he finds out that we're move his turf around. Or is it maybe some sort of additional work duty in hell? lol I cannot help my musing with written word. Thanks again for all your work. Ride loose! By the way the Pink bike website seems to be lacking a humoristic sense as every time I type the word "humoristic" it doesn't get it.
  • + 1
 Haters!
  • + 1
 Come out, come out, wherever you are!
  • + 5
 Is this an invitation? Challenge accepted.
  • + 1
 Speak your piece! We're not just playing peek-a-boo!
  • + 2
 I believe the word you're looking for is "Humorous".
  • + 1
 Humoristic is the adj. I mean to use.
  • + 4
 I personally have bad exp with PT saw guide. Using it in our workshop for over two years the plastic/rubber part of a clamp is folded apart moons ago made it impossible to have precise cut ( its end up with some angle whichever way yo clamp it ). I bought some other clamp from Cyclus and it does the job much better. It may cost a bit more but it is a hell of a tool. Park may do some good tools but not all of them are world class - mechanic's dream set.
  • + 2
 Word. I have had bad experiences with the PT saw guide as well. Only weak point in Parks line up.
  • + 4
 Big fan of the sombrio knee warmers. I own two pairs my only issue with them is that they tend to stretch out over time. I would also recommend ordering in a smaller size. Eg if your a med normally get a small. And for all the haters out there for knee warmers.. Don't knock them till u try them. Grab a pair. Your ligaments will thank u on a cold day.
  • + 2
 ever try throwing them in a dryer? It might destroy the fabric a bit but it usually makes spandex tighter.
  • + 3
 You clearly haven't used the saw guide if you think what you posted in your review. It does not cut straight every time especially when rushing.

Why would you cut the steerer of a dual crown with the stanchions still in the crown? Protip remove the crown and then cut the steerer...

It's starting to seem like "product picks" means these guys gave me free shit so you should buy their stuff....
  • + 1
 Good tip on removing the lower crown from a dual crown fork to make it easier, even though it would be nice if you didn't have to. And I have used the saw guide, this particular one for roughly two years and another of the same make and model for 10+ years. No issues with it cutting crooked, no matter how little attention I give it.
  • + 1
 Those Park Tool guides cut straight the first time you use them, and then every single cut afterwards is a bit off. It's just how it is. Mike if you say that you have no issues with it cutting crooked then you're just not as demanding of perfection as a mechanic is.
  • + 2
 If your PT saw guide is making angled cuts, it's because the metal saw guide part is slightly loose from the nylon clamp part. Just make sure the two bolts on the front of the tool are tight, each time before you use it, and you will have a nice clean straight cut.
  • + 1
 That's really not why it's crooked. Those bolts are always tight on all of the guides I have at the shop. Not a single straight cut.
  • + 1
 Then why is it crooked? All I know is the last time I used my guide, I had a slightly angled cut. I noticed those bolts were loose, I tightened them up, and the next cut was perfectly straight again. The tool didn't feel loose, like moving around, but sure enough when I checked, the bolts they were loose. Just letting people know what has worked for me YMMV...etc...
  • + 1
 I don't know why it's crooked. I don't work for Park Tool. I just use the tools, and I expect them to work.
  • + 4
 The guide guides you to a crooked cut because of the small clamping area and a long heavy (relatively) weight hanging off the end...

Its just the nature of the tool. If someone holds the fork then sure you can get a straight cut but without holding or supporting the fork a straight cut not guaranteed.

I don't usually agree with Seraph but this time I will. There are better ways to cut a steerer nice and straight. Although I don't mind using the park guide with a nice vertical belt sander to even things out.
  • + 2
 If you're getting crooked cuts then you aren't using the proper technique. Obviously with a nylon insert it will deform when the fork is hanging out from it. Just lie the whole thing on the bench or ground, protect the sliders with a rag so they don't get scratched and cut away. This takes about 20 seconds with a good hacksaw blade. Hit the burred edges with a deburring tool and away you go.
  • + 3
 The tool was designed to be clamped in a vice. If you don't secure it it will slip and slide around. You're not supposed to "...lie the whole thing on the bench or ground".
  • + 2
 That's not how the tool was designed to be used. It is designed to be clamped in a vice
  • - 1
 It is designed so that it can be used on a vise but doesn't have to be used on a vise. No, if you put some downward pressure on the fork it will not slide around. Only a hack would try to put so much pressure on a hacksaw that they couldn't hold the fork still. I'd prefer to get straight cuts by doing it this way instead of in a vise. I've also trued my wheels on the bike instead of putting them in my truing stand. How crazy is that!!!!!
  • + 0
 You have a very backwards way of doing things. The tool is designed to be clamped in a vice. Just because you can also use it on the ground doesn't mean you should. A headset is designed to be pressed in a frame with a headset cup press, but you could also use a block of wood and a hammer. Doesn't mean you should. You can do a minor true while the wheel is still in the bike, but for a precise true you have to use a truing stand. I even bust out the gauges every so often to fine-tune the wheels I true, primarily if they are very high-end wheels.
  • + 0
 You are very narrow minded to think that not putting it in a vise will not work. It works very well, if not better than putting it in a vise. As others have noted, putting the fork in a vise causes an uneven cut an there is no way around this unless you support the fork sliders. Having a crooked cut may not be an issue when installing the fork but I prefer to get a cut that is perpendicular to the steerer tube. I actually own the Park cutting guide and have a good shop bench with a vise but prefer to get good cuts by putting the fork and guide on my bench.

Just to be clear, what are the issues when not clamping the guide in a vise? None, that's what I thought.

Your comparison to installing a headset with a hammer is terrible. That would only be equivalent to cutting the steerer tube without a guide. Nice try but there is a big difference between using the wrong tools for the job and using the tools slightly differently.
  • + 0
 "...what are the issues when not clamping the guide in a vise?" Where do I begin? Well first of all the fork can incur quite a few scratches and nicks if you have it laying on your bench while you're applying enough pressure with a hacksaw to cut through aluminum. Also I don't know about you but I use two hands when I use a hacksaw, so which of my already-being-used hands is supposed to hold the fork steady? That's where the vice comes in.

Why can't you just admit that Park doesn't make a very good cutting guide? You are the only person who is not using the guide how it is supposed to be used.
  • + 1
 So you can't figure out how to protect the fork by putting a rag down. Yikes!
If you're finding that you have to use 2 hands and apply too much pressure you're clearly you're using a blade with the wrong tpi or you're using an old dull blade. A sharp blade with the correct tpi along with cutting fluid will cut any steerer tube quite easily with very little pressure. That's how hacksaws are designed to cut if you know anything about cutting theory.

It is a good guide, they sell tons of them and most shops use them. I can clean, straight cuts with mine and that's what is important.

I'm glad that you've polled everyone that has a Park guide to know that I'm the only one doing it this way ;-} The good mechanics in the shop that I used to work in (a bunch of years ago now) used to cut it on a bench also. This is one way to get a good end result. The other is to support the fork sliders when the guide is in the vise.
  • - 1
 Well I don't know about your crazy Canadian hacksaws, but here in America our hacksaws are designed to be used with two hands. The one here at the shop has a second handhold so that you can provide strong downward/forward pressure as you cut. We use a 24TPI 12" blade and it cuts quick and easy every time. Just never straight with the Park Tool guide. Maybe the first few times.

Everyone uses the Park Guide because it's the industry standard. Until someone takes the time to design something better we'll just keep making slightly crooked cuts.
  • + 1
 A double handled hacksaw hey?! Very odd when every hacksaw in any hardware store is single handed.

Like I said, there's no need for strong downward pressure unless you have the wrong blade and/or a dull blade and aren't using cutting oil. BTW, if you're using a 24tpi blade for a steerer tube you're not using the optimal blade for the job.

Keep on doing your crooked cuts while I get straight cuts. Good thing you won't be working on my bikes.
  • + 1
 Yeah they're really not one-handed. Sure you could use one hand, but almost every model is designed to be used with two hands.

Now I'm glad you're not working on my bikes.
  • + 1
 Yes, they most certainly are one handed if you take the time to know about your tools. If they were meant to be used with two hands maybe they would have put a handle at the opposite end. The extra beefiness of a hacksaw is only to provided support to the thin, flexible blade. Remember this: just because you can doesn't mean you should.

Do yourself a favor and get a blade with the correct tpi, use cutting fluid and support the fork properly. This way you won't need to use tow hands, the blade will last longer, you'll get cleaner cuts and they'll be straight.
  • + 0
 Like I said, our hacksaw does have a handle at the end. It is designed to be used with two hands. Talk about knowing your tools.
  • + 1
 Like I said, keep on doing it wrong and getting bad results. Your work will speak for you.
  • + 0
 Hey buddy, I'm using the tool how it was intended to be used and I'm getting shitty results. What do you say about that?
  • + 1
 Says that your attention to detail is terrible. That's what you get when you use the wrong blade, don't use cutting fluid, put too much pressure on the saw with two hands and let the fork sag and twist in the guide. Not much more to say.
  • + 0
 None of that is true and if you think that I'm using the tool wrong then you're the tool.
  • + 2
 after riding in israel 3 summer's in funkier's other model of shorts i can say they are very good . with temp over 30c and humidity around 60 what you need is a lightweight short from thin fabric. and as good as new after summer shredding. a real top value for your money !!
  • + 1
 Good to know for us Australians. Ta.
  • + 4
 Theirs a device plumbers use which is for cutting copper pipes and its like the park tool one but costs less and give the same result.
  • + 1
 Your talking about a tube cutter. It is nothing like the Park tool. The Park tool is a guide for a hack saw. A tube cutter is an entirely different tool. Will it work for a steerer? You bet it will. Will the Park Tool saw guide be better? Could go either way. The only way I see an advantage over a tube cutter is a cleaner cut. The tube cutter will leave a big sharp edge on the inner diameter of the steerer tube which will need to be filed down. For what its worth, I use the tube cutter.
  • + 1
 I usually use the pipe cutter, simply because I use one a lot for my profession already and I'm familiar with it. I also use the Park Tool thing when I'm working at the bike shop, and I've found that the plumbers pipe cutter works better for me. Just don't use a cheap one, I've had one snap in half on me halfway through cutting a steerer lol
  • + 0
 Can't use a pipe cutter on carbon fiber, boys.
  • + 6
 Knee warmers are surprisingly excellent....
  • + 1
 Oh, yeah, almost forgot.... if you get the park guide, make sure you have the Park hacksaw as well. Sure, any saw will work with the Park guide, but protip; the Park hacksaw is small enough to fit in your hydration pack so that your "buddy's" downtube can be cut right at the head tube when he goes off to take a leak. Never finish 2nd on a downhill again. Wink
  • + 2
 "Park Tool's threadless saw guide won't see as much as you many other tools, but it could prove to be invaluable when the time comes to trim a steerer."

>won't see as much as you many other tools?
  • + 1
 Try reading it again.
  • + 1
 "Park Tool's threadless saw guide won't see as much use as many other tools, but it could prove to be invaluable when the time comes to trim a steerer."

Ahhh, I see it now. Thanks
  • + 4
 the park tool saw guide is so handy when it comes time to build up new bikes at the shop
  • + 1
 in that first line, Pinkbike writes "Park Tool's threadless saw guide won't see as much use as many other tools, but it could prove to be invaluable when the time comes to trim a steerer." ------- huh? we have used ours sooooooooooooo many times. paid for itself many many many times over and these are a gajillion times better than any pipe cutter.... not sure why they said it needed to be clamped down extremely tight --- simple hand tight and a steady hand.. it stays put for us.

the only thing l have noticed --- there's a small allen bolt that holds the plastic C shaped clamp in place --- that often works its way loose over time. just need to tighten it down every so often. great tool
  • + 1
 The Park saw guides are no good. Over time the front (guide section) separates from the back(steerer clamping section). This makes for a nice angled cut. Our shop asked Park about this and they told us they weren't meant to be used in a bench vice and to clamp the fork in a bike stand instead. Strange since the guide has a tab for a bench vice.
  • + 5
 Knee warmers ? Doesn't Elton John have those ?
  • + 3
 exactly, who needs those with knee pads on, anyway
  • + 4
 Canadians with knee warmers is like riding DJ's on a XC bike, u just don't see it anywhere
  • + 1
 Park makes a better cutting guide that's suited to more than just round tubes not to mention its the one you need to cut 1.5 steerers (the guide you reviewed is only for 1", 1 1/8" and 1 1/4" steerer tubes).

www.parktool.com/product/oversized-saw-guide-sg-7-2

There is also an SG-8 version of the SG-6 which has a wider spacing of the plates to enable the cutting of carbon fork steerer tubes with wider hacksaw blades.
  • + 1
 I'm not a big fan of the park guide. The blade slot has a bit too much room. The Cyclus one is precise and bomber. It has different inserts for 1" and 1 1/8". Still have to brake out the park for 1.5 though.
  • + 4
 I use a pipe cutter! Zip, Zip without a vice.
  • - 1
 Useless on a carbon steerer.
  • + 3
 I don't have a carbon steerer.
  • - 2
 Cool story bro. A lot of people do.
  • + 1
 I own the Park cutter. It's great for carbon fiber stuff. You're still better off using a pipe cutter for aluminum however. None of the other stuff interests me.
  • + 1
 PT's Steerer cutter is glorofied saw guide...
I'd rather by something like this:
www.cheapbikeparts360.com/images/b/12275.jpg
  • + 1
 The "oversized" saw guide is a better investment than the one reviewed. Though really if you want a straight cut you should use a miter saw or a proper jig of some kind.
  • - 1
 Hello!! Fashion,low price,Reliable quality,the good shopping places,
Cheap wholesale and retail Nike Air jordan shoes $40,
Nike shox shoes $40, Nike Air max shoes $41,
Nike Air Force one $40, Nike Dunk Shoes $42,
Gucci shoes $45, D&G shoes $46,
Timberland Shoes, LV shoes $46,
Griff Shoes, Women Boots,
belt $18, Hat $12,
sunglasses $16,
handbags,Jeans $39,
Watch,T-Shirt $20,
(NFL MLB NBA NHL) jerseys $25,
free shipping and quantity discount,
Welcome interested friends to order,
Maybe you will find suitable for your lover and friend's gift,
welcome to:====== www.china8trade.com ======
  • + 3
 My G form pads keep my kness warm fine
  • + 1
 what gives, i actually use body armour to in winter as part of thermals to rather than protection. How ever you do remember you have armour on when you crash and it doesnt hurt Big Grin
  • + 2
 The knee warmers are not a good look regardless of whether it is cold or not.
  • + 2
 There's an old military maxim - if it looks stupid and it works, its not stupid. For me, knee warmers are the difference between coming out of Winter fit and coming out of Winter fat.
  • + 1
 A saw guide is really what i need, you know because i am always getting new forks...I wish!
  • + 1
 The saw guide makes me think of a DAG everyone should have one and know how to operate a DAG!
  • - 2
 Knee warmers are important, I screwed up me knees twice riding without them in the cold. Right now I use Tomcat knee pads for that purpose but on XC rides I take whatever if it's under +15C. I can't look at people riding in the cold with bare knees: "I'm a tough mdrfkr" stupidity
  • + 11
 er under 15C you say? so well er most of Britain will be constantly riding in knee warmers because i dont think it ever gets above that here much.

Im one of the "I'm a tough mdrfkr" people you describe and its actualy quite simple (neglecting the wind) you keep moving and dont stay still for very long. As long as you keep pedaling / walking doing anything with you feet it doesnt actually get cold.

What i do run issues with is my toes freezing up as they dont tend to move much on rides Frown and i dont think knee warmers are going to help much there..
  • + 0
 I didn't mean that everyone should ride in knee warmers under 15C but under 10 wearing anything (at least knee pads) should be really considered. I met 3 people who had the same knee issue due to "cold" knees. And well you don't see many pro /half pro roadies not dressed from toes up to neck without warmers - knee injury is something they cannot afford. (Please don't bring up an argument like: in the woods you are sheltered from wind) So yea it is usualy "I'm a tough mdfkr" amateurs riding without them when days get cold as no good rider I know rides without them.
  • + 4
 WAKI:

Have you ever thought maybe it's not "I'm a tough mdfkr" attitude, and maybe more that they ''just haven't thought about it''. Your point of presuming it's a 'bad boy' attitude to things makes you come across slightly narrow minded.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Feb 10, 2012 at 4:12) (Below Threshold)
 mhm... you are actualy right, thanks for sorting me out Wink - can't I expect that everyone should be as smart as me? Cheers!
  • + 1
 Lol. True dat Wink
  • + 1
 haha never even thought about using them? Im pretty used the the cold temps so riding in -0'C to -20'C doesn't really bother me. i think if your not used to cold temps then yes it would be seen as crazy but for someone who does it all the time normal
  • + 2
 at georgy291: Even if you keep your body feeling warm through exercise, even in cold weather you'll still be doing damage to your knees(or joints all together). The problem here lies in the fact that your muscles warm themselves and your body up through the exertion, but your joints don't because they're not burning calories. I'm not 100% on the medical stuff but the way it was explained to me was gum. It's nice and flexible, but if you freeze it becomes brittle. So every time you work out in the cold without covering up you're actually destroying the stuff that keeps your joints together.

I made the same mistake when I moved from Idaho (-15C to -5C) in the winters to Portland Oregon (most people don't know what to do if it gets down to 5C). Obviously being acclimated to the cold whenever I rode my bike into work I didn't think I needed anything more than shorts and a t, and a windbreaker if it was raining. Luckily the mechanic back in the shop took me aside and pointed out that my bright red knees and ankles were a sign that I'd be regretting things really quick if I didn't cover my knees.

This is the whole reasoning behind removable knee and arm warmers. It doesn't take much really. A pair of socks that cover the ankle, and long sleeve shirt, and knee warmers, or even in a pinch, take an old pair of knee high socks and cut off the foot. Not as nice as the store bought stuff, but in a jiff they work great. Been commuting winters in Germany, Idaho, and Oregon that way ever since and even after acl surgery my knees are going strong.
  • + 3
 One of my riding buddies explained it best: the big muscle groups in your legs get lots of circulation and tend to stay warmer longer. Your knees however, don't have much in the way of active circulation and since there is little to no muscle there, they don't generate any heat on their own.

I ride year round and I like them, though I'll often just use thermals [eg. mec roubaix or mercury tights] under a pair of shorts. I'm tempted to try these ones out though - I had tried the defeet wool kneekers and couldn't get them to stay in place for the life of me since they were completely shapeless [cant even tell which end is up] so a more fitted one sounds like the ticket.
  • + 2
 The older I get, the warmer my knees like to be.
  • + 1
 Never wore knee warmers (either on the road or trail) Its either shorts or knickers
  • + 1
 how are the Sombiro knee warmers in terms of wicking sweat away?
  • + 0
 how come pink bike has reviewed a product and never said its rubbish? Im getting suspicious at all this marketing ploy
  • + 5
 Looking for more reading material? While I don't often say that a product is complete rubbish, I've certainly had my fair share of issues. Have a read of some recent reviews posted below to see some of them. Also, just as an FYI, none of the companies featured in this week's Product Picks test advertise on PB =)

www.pinkbike.com/news/Pinkbike-Product-Picks-january-27-2012.html
www.pinkbike.com/news/Pinkbike-Product-Picks-december-16-2011.html
www.pinkbike.com/news/twenty6-Predator-Pedal-Tested-2011.html
www.pinkbike.com/news/Pinkbike-Product-Picks-October-7-2011.html
www.pinkbike.com/news/Straitline-AMP-Pedal-Tested-2011.html
  • + 4
 It's just like being in customer service. 1 bad interaction is not equal to 1 good one, unfortunately, and it usually takes 10 or more to balance things out. Its just switched in this case... to appease everyones paranoia they would have to write 10 negative reviews for every 1 glowing. Then we would all bitch and complain about how picky and snobbish and holier than thou these great dudes are at PB. (who are doing all of this at no cost to us to read).
  • + 4
 feel free to start your own review instead of whispering conspiracy theories into the wind.
  • + 1
 Those Shorts look horrible!
  • + 1
 stupid peschman
  • - 3
 stupid shorts
  • + 12
 You think? Lets hear your feedback since you've clearly tried them... Why are you not a fan?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy- always good to read your reviews. have any plans to review BrakeForceOne brakes anytime soon?
  • + 1
 Those are some interesting brakes... externally it almost looks like a combo between Formula and Magura, although it would be interesting to see the internals. You might see them here in the future.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.041435
Mobile Version of Website